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Dustyn Roberts Fall 12

Intro.DustynRobertsFall12 History

Hide minor edits - Show changes to output

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*[[http://itp-vitorf.tumblr.com/tagged/PhysComp | Vitor Freire ]]
to:
*[[http://itp-vitorf.tumblr.com/tagged/PhysComp | Vitor Freire ]] and [[http://itp.nyu.edu/~vf483/blog/?p=24 | Final project]]
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8:55 Alexandra\\
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8:55 Evaluations\\
9:00 Celebrate! Congratulations!\\
to:
9:05 Evaluations\\
9:10 Celebrate! Congratulations!\\
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\\
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\\
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\\
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6:30 Erin\\
6:40 Susan\\
6:50 Vitor\\
7:00 Erika/Donna\\
7:15 Asli\\
7:25 Jonas\\

7:35 BREAK\\

7:45 Su\\
7:55 Emily\\
8:05 Shilpan\\
8:15 Rose/Hanna\\
8:30 Adam/Surya\\
8:45 Omer\\

8:55 Evaluations\\
9:00 Celebrate! Congratulations!\\
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* Finish your final project documentation.
to:
* Finish your final project documentation/presentation.  This includes:
** Description of concept and goal/objective
** Steps of implementation (post code, schematics, etc.)
** Bill of Materials
** Play test reports
** Future work, if any
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to:
* Review Rory Hamilton's notes on [[http://everythingiknow.co.uk/gum.html|preparing presentations]] and [[http://everythingiknow.co.uk/preMat.html|giving presentations]]
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[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clarke%27s_three_laws | Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic]]
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'''PRESENT THIS WEEK:''' Final project playtest reports
to:
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* Wireless communication overview
** Bluetooth [[Labs/Bluetooth | example]]
** Shilpan - why wifi
Changed lines 99-104 from:
* Shilpan - why wifi
* Bluetooth [[Labs/Bluetooth | example]]
* configuration vs. communication (command move vs. data mode)
* addressing
* protocols discussion

to:

'''PRESENT THIS WEEK:''' Final project discussion: concepts, diagrams, BOM, play test reports
Changed lines 96-104 from:
* complex data communications
** configuration vs. communication (command move vs. data mode)
** addressing
**
Bluetooth serial as example
** protocols discussion

'''Assigment for next week:'''
->Revise your project plan and description based on what you
've learned from your playtest
to:
* Adam - getting started with Max
* Shilpan - why wifi
* Bluetooth [[Labs/
Bluetooth | example]]
* configuration vs. communication (command move vs. data mode)
* addressing
* protocols discussion

'''Assignment for next week:
'''
->Revise your project plan and description based on what you've learned from your play test

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[[http://blog.makezine.com/2012/11/12/permission-to-suck/|Permission to suck]]
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* [[http://blog.makezine.com/2010/06/28/make-your-own-gears/|making and using gears]]
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** [[Labs/Bluetooth | Optional Bluetooth Lab]] or TBA depending on class topics
to:
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* collect/discuss self assessment
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* collect/review self assessment
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'''Blog:''' 
to:
'''Blog/Assignment:''' 
Deleted lines 85-86:

'''Assignment for next week:'''
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* collect/discuss self assessment
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* working with AC: meet the [[https://www.adafruit.com/products/268|power switch tail]], and check out this [[http://techvalleyprojects.blogspot.com/2012/04/powerswitch-tail-ii-and-arduino.html|example]]
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* stuff I've done : [[http://www.dustynrobots.com|dustyn robots]]
to:
* stuff I've done: [[http://www.dustynrobots.com|dustynrobots]]
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- now, get up and move and sit in a new place and/or next to someone you haven't sat next to before
to:
''- now, get up and move and sit in a new place and/or next to someone you haven't sat next to before''
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to:
* stuff I've done : [[http://www.dustynrobots.com|dustyn robots]]
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to:
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8337/8185394586_c4ae7892d6_z.jpg
- now, get up and move and sit in a new place and/or next to someone you haven't sat next to before

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!!!Week 10

'''PRESENT THIS WEEK:
''' Final project concept presentations
to:
!!!Week 11 (Nov 14)


'''PRESENT THIS WEEK:''' Final project concept presentations/discussions. Have an idea to talk about or be ready to jump in with someone else.
Changed lines 78-85 from:
* collect/discuss self assessment
* complex data communications
** configuration vs. communication (command move vs. data mode)
** addressing
** Bluetooth serial as example
** protocols discussion
** [[Labs/Bluetooth | Optional Bluetooth Lab]] or TBA depending on class topics

to:
* collect/review self assessment
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->For next week, document your concept for your final project. Describe the technical system briefly (one paragraph with a diagram). Prepare a preliminary bill of materials and start budgeting the cost.
to:
->For next week, document the concept for your final project. Describe the technical system briefly (one paragraph with a diagram). Prepare a preliminary bill of materials and start budgeting the cost.
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!!!Week 11 (Nov 14)
to:
!!!Week 12 (Nov 21)
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'''In-class discussion/exercise:'''
* collect/discuss self assessment
* complex data communications
** configuration vs. communication (command move vs. data mode)
** addressing
** Bluetooth serial as example
** protocols discussion
** [[Labs/Bluetooth | Optional Bluetooth Lab]] or TBA depending on class topics

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!!!Week 12 (Nov 21)
 

----
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Final schedule:

    Concept
presentations week 10
    Playtest reports and questions week 11
 
   Final plan presentations week 12
    Project working demonstrations week 13 & 14

Blog:
For next week, come up with a concept for your final project. Describe the technical system briefly (one paragraph with a diagram). Prepare a preliminary bill of materials and start budgeting the cost.
Week 10

Midterm project process review: what would you have done differently? In
-class discussion

PRESENT THIS WEEK: Final
project concept presentations

Assigment for next week:
Develop a plan to playtest your project
. Perform a playtest before the next class and report on it.
Week 11

PRESENT THIS WEEK
: Final project playtest reports

In-class discussion/exercise:

    complex data communications
 
     configuration vs. communication (command move vs. data mode)
 
       addressing
       Bluetooth serial as example
        protocols discussion
        Optional Bluetooth Lab or TBA depending on class topics

Assigment for next week:
Revise your project plan and description based on what you've learned from your playtest
Week 12

PRESENT THIS WEEK: Final project system plan presentations

Blog:

    Finish your final project documentation.

Week 13

PRESENT THIS WEEK:

    Final Project Demonstrations

Week 14

PRESENT THIS WEEK:

    Final Project Demonstrations
to:
----
!!!Week 10

'''PRESENT THIS WEEK
:''' Final project concept presentations

'''In-class discussion/exercise:'''
* stepper demo
* collect/discuss self assessment
* complex data communications
** configuration vs. communication (command move vs. data mode)
** addressing
** Bluetooth serial as example
** protocols discussion
** [[Labs/Bluetooth | Optional Bluetooth Lab]] or TBA depending on class topics

'''Blog:''' 
->For next week, document your concept for your final project. Describe the technical system briefly (one paragraph with a diagram). Prepare a preliminary bill of materials and start budgeting the cost.

'''Assignment for next week:'''
->Develop a plan to playtest your project. Perform a playtest before the next class and report on it.

----
!!!Week 11 (Nov 14)
'''PRESENT THIS WEEK:''' Final project playtest reports

'''Assigment for next week
:'''
->Revise your
project plan and description based on what you've learned from your playtest

----
!!!Week 12 (Nov 21)


----
!!!Week 13 (Nov 28)
'''PRESENT THIS WEEK:''' Final project system plan presentations

'''Blog:'''

* Finish your final project documentation.

----
!!!Week 14 (Dec 5)
'''PRESENT THIS WEEK:'''
 
* Final Project Demonstrations
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'''2nd Half Semester topics'''\\
to:
Final schedule:

    Concept presentations week 10
    Playtest reports and questions week 11
    Final plan presentations week 12
    Project working demonstrations week 13 & 14

Blog:
For next week, come up with a concept for your final project. Describe the technical system briefly (one paragraph with a diagram). Prepare a preliminary bill of materials and start budgeting the cost.
Week 10

Midterm project process review: what would you have done differently? In-class discussion

PRESENT THIS WEEK: Final project concept presentations

Assigment for next week:
Develop a plan to playtest your project. Perform a playtest before the next class and report on it.
Week 11

PRESENT THIS WEEK: Final project playtest reports

In-class discussion/exercise:

    complex data communications
        configuration vs. communication (command move vs. data mode)
        addressing
        Bluetooth serial as example
        protocols discussion
        Optional Bluetooth Lab or TBA depending on class topics

Assigment for next week:
Revise your project plan and description based on what you've learned from your playtest
Week 12

PRESENT THIS WEEK: Final project system plan presentations

Blog:

    Finish your final project documentation.

Week 13

PRESENT THIS WEEK:

    Final Project Demonstrations

Week 14

PRESENT THIS WEEK:

    Final Project Demonstrations
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http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/Intro/DustynRobertsFall12
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Imagining the Future of Emergency Management Tech: [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5tfnmhl-A54&feature=player_embedded | Video]]
to:
Imagining the Future of Emergency Management Tech: [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5tfnmhl-A54&feature=player_embedded | Video]]

'''2nd Half Semester topics'''\\
http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/Intro/DustynRobertsFall12
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/blogs/eps293/physical-computing/ | Erin Smith ]]
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*[[http://eps293.weebly.com/physical-computing.html | Erin Smith ]]
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Student suggestions:
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!!Student suggestions:
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[[https://gist.github.com/3873494|Processing code - punctuation method]]
to:
[[https://gist.github.com/3873494|Processing code - punctuation method]]

Student suggestions:
Book Erika mentioned in class a few weeks ago: [[http://www.amazon.com/Most-Human-Artificial-Intelligence-Teaches/dp/0307476707 | The Most Human Human: What Artificial Intelligence Teaches Us About Being Alive]]
Imagining the Future of Emergency Management Tech: [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5tfnmhl-A54&feature=player_embedded | Video
]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~sam921/stuff/ | Surya Mattu]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~sam921/stuff/ | Surya Mattu]]


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to:
*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~ssb425/blog/  | Shilpan Bhagat ]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~ssb425/blog/  | Shilpan Bhagat ]]

to:


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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~shk479/su_itp_blog/ | Su Kim]]
*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~hm1109/blog/ | Hanna Moon]]
*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~sge222/blog/ | Susan Ettenheim ]]
*[[http://itp-vitorf.tumblr.com/tagged/PhysComp | Vitor Freire ]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~dm1346/blog/ | Donna Miller Watts]]
*[[http://cardsonstrings.wordpress.com | Emily Wagenknecht ]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~ssb425/blog/  | Shilpan Bhagat ]]
to:
*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~hm1109/blog/ | Hanna Moon]]
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*[[http://cardsonstrings.wordpress.com | Emily Wagenknecht ]]
*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~dm1346/blog/ | Donna Miller Watts]]
*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~sam921/stuff/ | Surya Mattu]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~shk479/su_itp_blog/ | Su Kim]]
*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~sge222/blog/ | Susan Ettenheim ]]
*[[http://itp-vitorf.tumblr.com/tagged/PhysComp | Vitor Freire ]]
*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~ssb425/blog/  | Shilpan Bhagat ]]


*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~sam921/stuff/ | Surya Mattu]]


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[[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/sensors/|sensor wiki]]
to:
[[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/sensors/|sensor wiki]]
[[https://gist.github.com/3873494|Processing code - punctuation method
]]
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IX-gTobCJHs
to:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IX-gTobCJHs

'''Week 6'''\\
[[http://notethesmile.org/|shadow monsters]]\\
[[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/sensors/|sensor wiki]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~sam921/stuff/?page_id=24 | Surya Mattu]]
to:
*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~sam921/stuff/ | Surya Mattu]]
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'''Office hours''':  Monday evenings 4-6pm in my office at NYU-Poly (please email me a head's up), and by appointment - email me to set something up.  \\
to:
'''Office hours''':  Off-site: Monday evenings 4-6pm in my office at NYU-Poly (please email me a head's up), and by appointment - email me to set something up.  \\
            On-site: Wednesday evenings from 5:30pm until class starts.  Look for me in the adjunct lounge until about 6:15pm.
\\
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*[[http://omershapira-itp-blob.tumblr.com/tagged/PComp | Omer Shapira ]]
to:
*[[http://omeritp.tumblr.com/tagged/PComp | Omer Shapira ]]
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Take the A/C/F/R train to Jay St Metrotech - Rogers Hall is the main NYU-Poly building that will be right in front of you with purple and green letters - entrance next to Starbucks.  Follow the hallway to the stairs or elevator, get to the 5th floor, turn right, then you'll see room 520 in front of you.  My office is in there so just knock.
to:
From ITP (20 mins) take the A/C/F/R train to Jay St Metrotech - Rogers Hall is the main NYU-Poly building that will be right in front of you with purple and green letters - entrance next to Starbucks.  Follow the hallway to the stairs or elevator, get to the 5th floor, turn right, then you'll see room 520 in front of you.  My office is in there so just knock.
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*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]

to:
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~rsm397/itp-blog/ | Rose Meacham ]]
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*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
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'''Office hours''':  Tuesday evenings 5-7pm in my office at NYU-Poly, and by appointment - email me to set something up.  \\
to:
'''Office hours''':  Monday evenings 4-6pm in my office at NYU-Poly (please email me a head's up), and by appointment - email me to set something up.  \\
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~os603/blob/PComp/ | Omer Shapira ]]
to:
*[[http://omershapira-itp-blob.tumblr.com/tagged/PComp | Omer Shapira ]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~os603/blob/PComp/ | Omer Shapira ]]
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*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~sam921/stuff/| Surya Mattu]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~sam921/stuff/?page_id=24 | Surya Mattu]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~sam921/stuff/| Surya Mattu]]
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*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
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*http://itp.nyu.edu/~dm1346/blog/ |Donna Miller Watts]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~dm1346/blog/ | Donna Miller Watts]]
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*http://itp.nyu.edu/~dm1346/blog/ |Donna Miller Watts]]
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*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
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'''Nokia Morph Concept'''
As mentioned today in class, this is a video of Nokia's Morph Concept (emphasis on the word "concept", ergo the illustrated nature of the video):
to:
'''Nokia Morph Concept'''\\
As mentioned today in class, this is a video of Nokia's Morph Concept (emphasis on the word "concept", ergo the illustrated nature of the video):\\
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Nokia Morph Concept
to:

'''
Nokia Morph Concept'''
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http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4125/5010132387_78f35c4b5e.jpg
to:
http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4125/5010132387_78f35c4b5e.jpg
Nokia Morph Concept
As mentioned today in class, this is a video of Nokia's Morph Concept (emphasis on the word "concept", ergo the illustrated nature of the video):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IX-gTobCJHs
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*[[http://cardsonstrings.wordpress.com | Emily Wagenknecht ]]
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*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
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'''Week 1'''\\
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dustynrobots/5010132387/
http://www
.flickr.com/photos/dustynrobots/5010132467/
to:
'''Week 2'''\\
http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4112/5010132467_61b24091e1.jpg
http:
//farm5.staticflickr.com/4125/5010132387_78f35c4b5e.jpg
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https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/537657_10151185076036258_375731193_n.jpg

'''Week 1'''\\
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dustynrobots/5010132387/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dustynrobots/5010132467/
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*[[http://jonassp.dk/blog/ Jonas ]]
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*[[http://jonassp.dk/blog/ | Jonas ]]
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*[[http://jonassp.dk/blog/ Jonas ]]
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*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~haa304/firstitpblog/ | Asli Aydin ]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~haa304/firstitpblog/?cat=5 | Asli Aydin ]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~haa304/firstitpblog/ | Asli Aydin ]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~shk479/su_itp_blog/ Su Kim]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~shk479/su_itp_blog/ | Su Kim]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~shk479/su_itp_blog/]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~shk479/su_itp_blog/ Su Kim]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~ssb425/blog/  | Shilpan Bhagat ]]
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*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/blogs/eps293/physical-computing/ Erin Smith ]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/blogs/eps293/physical-computing/  | Erin Smith ]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/blogs/eps293/physical-computing/ Erin Smith ]]
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*[[http://www.argonautplanet.com/itp/physical-computing | Erika Maher ]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~arc507/MINT/?cat=4 | Alexandra Coym]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~agq202/blog/?cat=7 Adam Quinn ]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~agq202/blog/?cat=7 | Adam Quinn ]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~agq202/blog/?cat=7 Adam Quinn ]]
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*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
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*[[http://itp-vitorf.tumblr.com/tagged/PhysComp | Vitor Freire ]]
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*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~hm1109/blog/]]
*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~sge222/blog/ Susan Ettenheim ]]
to:
*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~hm1109/blog/ | Hanna Moon]]
*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~sge222/blog/ | Susan Ettenheim ]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~sge222/blog/ Susan Ettenheim ]]
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~hm1109/blog/]]
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http://itp.nyu.edu/~shk479/su_itp_blog/
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*[[http://itp.nyu.edu/~shk479/su_itp_blog/]]
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** more than 2 absences or more than 5 late arrivals is an automatic failure
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A video of [[http://www.bareconductive.com/home.html|conductive ink]], by Royal College of Art students
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http://www.bareconductive.com/home.html (A video of conductive ink, invented by Royal College of Art students)
to:
A video of [[http://www.bareconductive.com/home.html|conductive ink]], by Royal College of Art students
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!!Class List:
to:
!!Class Blogs:
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Useful pages:
to:

!!Where/When
:
* Wed, 6:30 - 9, Rm 406 ([[http://itp.nyu.edu/help/Help/ClassDates | Class Dates]])

!!How
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!!Where/When:
* Wed, 6:30 - 9, Rm 406 ([[http://itp.nyu.edu/help/Help/ClassDates | Class Dates]])

 
to:
* [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/Intro/Supplies]] -- Supplies
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*Please press "Edit" at the bottom of this page, login and enter the url to your blog (if you are new to wiki formatting just follow the pattern)
to:
Please press "Edit" at the bottom of this page, login and enter the url to your blog (if you are new to wiki formatting just follow the pattern)
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!!!'''Notes from classes:'''
to:
!!Notes from classes
'''Week 1'''\\
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!!!Who
You can reach me by: email (preferred) dustyn(at)dustynrobots.com, phone at 201.452.1583, or Skype at dustyn.roberts\\
''Office hours'':  Tuesday evenings 5-7pm in my office at NYU-Poly, and by appointment - email me to set something up.  My office is located at 6 Metrotech Center, Rogers Hall 520A, Brooklyn, NY.  Take the A/C/F/R train to Jay St Metrotech - Rogers Hall is the main NYU-Poly building that will be right in front of you with purple and green letters - entrance next to Starbucks.  Follow the hallway to the stairs or elevator, get to the 5th floor, turn right, then you'll see room 520 in front of you.  My office is in there so just knock.

!!!What
to:
!!Who
'''Contact''': You can reach me by: email (preferred) dustyn(at)dustynrobots.com, phone at 201.452.1583, or Skype at dustyn.roberts\\
'''Office hours''':  Tuesday evenings 5-7pm in my office at NYU-Poly, and by appointment - email me to set something up.  \\
'''Location''': 6 Metrotech Center, Rogers Hall 520A
, Brooklyn, NY\\
Take the A/C/F/R train to Jay St Metrotech - Rogers Hall is the main NYU-Poly building that will be right in front of you with purple and green letters - entrance next to Starbucks.
  Follow the hallway to the stairs or elevator, get to the 5th floor, turn right, then you'll see room 520 in front of you.  My office is in there so just knock.

!!What
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!!!Where/When:
to:
!!Where/When:
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You can reach me by: email (preferred) dustyn(at)dustynrobots.com, phone at 201.452.1583, or Skype at dustyn.roberts
to:
You can reach me by: email (preferred) dustyn(at)dustynrobots.com, phone at 201.452.1583, or Skype at dustyn.roberts\\
Changed lines 2-3 from:
I'm one of 4 instructors teaching 6 sections for PComp this fall.  You can reach me by:\\
email (preferred) dustyn(at)dustynrobots.com, phone at 201.452.1583, or Skype at dustyn.roberts
to:
You can reach me by: email (preferred) dustyn(at)dustynrobots.com, phone at 201.452.1583, or Skype at dustyn.roberts
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to:
''Office hours'':  Tuesday evenings 5-7pm in my office at NYU-Poly, and by appointment - email me to set something up.  My office is located at 6 Metrotech Center, Rogers Hall 520A, Brooklyn, NY.  Take the A/C/F/R train to Jay St Metrotech - Rogers Hall is the main NYU-Poly building that will be right in front of you with purple and green letters - entrance next to Starbucks.  Follow the hallway to the stairs or elevator, get to the 5th floor, turn right, then you'll see room 520 in front of you.  My office is in there so just knock.
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**[[Fall12.BlogList|Class Journals]]
to:
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''Office hours'':  Sunday evenings 6:30-8:30pm in the adjunct lounge, and by appointment - email me to set something up.  Also, the latest version of Skype has a screen share feature that's great for remote help. My Skype name is dustyn.roberts.  By day my office is at the NYU-Poly campus in Brooklyn: 6 Metrotech Center, Rogers Hall 520B.  Stop by any time for help (take the A/F train to Jay St, exit at back of train).
to:
 
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!!Class List:
*Please press "Edit" at the bottom of this page, login and enter the url to your blog (if you are new to wiki formatting just follow the pattern)

*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]
*[[http://yourUrl.edu Your Name ]]

Changed lines 2-4 from:
I'm one of 5 instructors teaching 6 sections for PComp this fall.  You can reach me by:\\
email (preferred) dustyn.at.dustynrobots.com, phone at 201.452.1583, or Skype at dustyn.roberts
to:
I'm one of 4 instructors teaching 6 sections for PComp this fall.  You can reach me by:\\
email (preferred) dustyn(at)dustynrobots.com, phone at 201.452.1583, or Skype at dustyn.roberts
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**[[Fall10.BlogList|Class Journals]]
to:
**[[Fall12.BlogList|Class Journals]]
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* Tues, 9:30 - 12, Rm 406 ([[http://itp.nyu.edu/help/pmwiki.php/Help/MondayClassDates | Class Dates]])
to:
* Wed, 6:30 - 9, Rm 406 ([[http://itp.nyu.edu/help/Help/ClassDates | Class Dates]])
Deleted lines 26-29:
Q: Can you find out what code is already on an Arduino?\\
A: No, you can't get it back, because it's compiled.  The source code isn't stored on the chip.. There isn't an easy way to extract the assembly code either (though it can be done, but the explanation is beyond the scope of this class)\\

Deleted lines 28-109:
Why 1024?\\
This is the magic number for the full range of analog input we saw with the pot.  This is NOT necessary to remember, but since I'm an enginerd, I'll explain for those of you who are interested:
The analog-digital converter (ADC) pins on your Arduino are capable of sensing a varying voltage (from your potentiometer, fsr, etc) and outputting a 10 bit number.  A bit is a 1 or 0, a byte is 8 bits.  Each bit represents "2 to the power of (bit)", called the binary system.  So 1000000000 = 2^10 = 1024. Read more on counting in binary in this wikipedia article:\\
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_numeral_system\\
A byte is actually one of the [[http://arduino.cc/en/Reference/HomePage | data types]] we can use with Arduino (but very seldom do).  A byte is not big enough to hold the output of the ADC (Analog) pins, so we move up to an int (integer) when we declare things like int potValue = 0.  That way we can store the whole 1024 values in that variable.  An int can hold up to 2^15 = 32,767.  This is the default data type we use most often on the Arduino, but remember it also has its limits.  For super big numbers or fractions/decimals, you can use data types long or float, but these take more Arduino brain power so are slower than using int.

[[http://www.flickr.com/photos/dustynrobots/5010132387/ | Illustration of water analogy of electricity]]

[[http://www.flickr.com/photos/dustynrobots/5010132467/ | Illustration of series vs. parallel]]

''Alex's notes in response to reading - The User Illusion'':

->Perceptual Bottleneck:\\
[[http://ocw.mit.edu/ans7870/9/9.00/f04/lecturenotes/mp3/L5.mp3 | Intro Pysch / MIT ocw / Jeremy Wolfe - Lecture 5 (Limiting information)]]\\
[[http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/brain-and-cognitive-sciences/9-00-introduction-to-psychology-fall-2004/lecture-notes/h05.pdf | Lecture notes]]  / [[http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/brain-and-cognitive-sciences/9-00-introduction-to-psychology-fall-2004/lecture-notes/l05_attteachdemo.pdf | Lecture slides]]\\
Additional lectures [[http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/brain-and-cognitive-sciences/9-00-introduction-to-psychology-fall-2004/lecture-notes/ | here]]

->Multitasking:\\
http://itp.nyu.edu/~ad1790/filezzz/Multitasking.pdf

->Internet’s effects on cognition and the brain:\\
http://www.wired.com/magazine/2010/05/ff_nicholas_carr/all/1\\
http://www.livescience.com/health/091019-internet-brain.html\\
http://www.livescience.com/culture/090224-internet-brain.html

->Perception of time:\\
http://www.eaglemanlab.net/time\\
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=122322542\\
http://itp.nyu.edu/~ad1790/filezzz/emotion-time.pdf

''Notes from Alex and Ezer's EMG project'':
->Below is the link to the lab that we used for the EMG (although it was a ECG schematic).  This is the one that seemed to work.  Be warned, the background 'pictures' make the lesson almost unreadable.\\
http://www.cs.wright.edu/~phe/EGR199/Lab_4/

->And the schematic comes from this site that encourages diy EMGs using Arduinos.\\
http://www.biomed.engsoc.org/node/30

!!!'''Serial'''
1 bit: 0 or 1\\
1 byte = 8 bits: range from 0-255.  The value of the byte is determined by the binary interpretation of the 8 bits.\\
Every group of 8 bits (1 byte) is interpreted at one time in serial communication.  If all you're doing is sending a potentiometer value divided by 4 (for example), you're only ever sending a number from 0-255 so you don't have to do anything.  This is sometimes called the ''raw value''.  But if you want to send bigger numbers, or text a human can actually read, you have to format the byte that's being communicated from the speaker to the listener to know what the F you're talking about.

It turns out that there's a standard system called ASCII code that can takes any value from 0-255 and assigns it an alphanumeric character (letter, number, or punctuation mark).  Here's an example table:\\
http://www.asciitable.com/

The drawback is that when you send things at text, it takes as many bytes as there are digits.  For example:  a raw value of 12 only takes up one byte, but an ASCII encoded number 12 takes two bytes: one byte for 1 and one byte for 2.  Be careful here.  If you're speaking in ASCII-encoded text but listening for a raw value, you might interpret the 1 and 2 as their representative values in ASCII of 49 and 50.  And if you're speaking in ASCII and listening in raw, you can get all kinds of garbage characters like ~, +, *, etc. that correspond with the representative ASCII values. 

If you're thinking that ASCII encoding is an inefficient way to send numbers from 0-255, you're right.  After all, sending the number 12 as two ASCII encoded bytes instead of one raw byte takes twice as much information.  However, at the standard baud rate of 9600 that we work with, you're unlikely to feel this efficiency for just a few numbers.  And it also gives you the flexibility to agree on one method of encoding for anything you might want to communicate between the speaker and the listener.

One more note about ASCII: the first 32 raw values correspond with ''control characters'', that won't even show up as garbage but stand for things like "carriage return" (ASCII 13). 

This serial data is passed byte by byte from one device to another.  If you're constantly sending values between 0-255 like with a potentiometer, you don't particularly care how the message starts or stops because it's a constant flow of numbers.  But if you want to send a more specific message, or more than one message, the speaker has to give the listener clues as to when the messages start and stop and how to tell the difference between them. 

Ways to see/visualize serial data:\\
Mac & PC: Serial Monitor in Arduino, Processing graphing sketch, [[http://freeware.the-meiers.org/ | Coolterm]]\\
PC: Hyperterminal\\
Mac: Zterm, [[http://www.tigoe.net/pcomp/code/category/OSX/84 | Terminal]], [[http://tomgerhardt.com/Cornflake/ | Cornflake]]

On Arduino's [[http://arduino.cc/en/Serial/Println | serial monitor]], by default, it interprets bytes as ASCII-encoded decimals.  So the following lines will print out the same thing:\\
Serial.println(analogValue);      // print as an ASCII-encoded decimal\\
Serial.println(analogValue, DEC);  // print as an ASCII-encoded decimal\\

!!!'''Week 10'''

Final project matchup

[[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/readings/ch06_DRedit.pdf|Motors]] - review family tree, pg 6
Finish h-bridge lab

Steppers
*Wikipedia [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stepper_motor | animation]]
*Notes and wiring a stepper with an [[http://www.tigoe.net/pcomp/code/circuits/motors/stepper-motors | H-bridge]]
**Arduino [[http://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/Stepper | stepper library and schematics]]
*Wiring a stepper with [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=9402 | Sparkfun's EasyDriver]] (starts on pg 51 of motor chapter)

Wireless communication and [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/Labs/Bluetooth | Bluetooth]]

!!!'''Week 11'''

Myers-Briggs Personality test [[http://www.personalitypathways.com/type_inventory.html | link]]

<object width="512" height="400"><param name="movie" value="http://news.bbc.co.uk/player/emp/external/player.swf"></param><param name="allowFullScreen"
Added lines 1-114:
!!!Who
I'm one of 5 instructors teaching 6 sections for PComp this fall.  You can reach me by:\\
email (preferred) dustyn.at.dustynrobots.com, phone at 201.452.1583, or Skype at dustyn.roberts

!!!What
*[[Intro.HomePage|Intro to Physical Computing]] main page
**[[Fall10.BlogList|Class Journals]]

Useful pages:
* [[http://itp.nyu.edu/mechanisms/]] -- My other class on mechanisms
* [[http://www.makingthingsmove.com/]] -- My book on Making Things Move
* [[http://tigoe.net/pcomp]] -- Tom's physical computing site
* [[http://tigoe.net/pcomp/code]] -- code, circuits & construction. Tom's code & resources blog. Where he posts code and links for general use (not just this class)
* [[http://tigoe.net/blog]] -- Tom's blog
* [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/sensors]] -- sensor workshop class wiki.  A good place to learn about sensors, from another ITP class

!!!Where/When:
* Tues, 9:30 - 12, Rm 406 ([[http://itp.nyu.edu/help/pmwiki.php/Help/MondayClassDates | Class Dates]])

''Office hours'':  Sunday evenings 6:30-8:30pm in the adjunct lounge, and by appointment - email me to set something up.  Also, the latest version of Skype has a screen share feature that's great for remote help. My Skype name is dustyn.roberts.  By day my office is at the NYU-Poly campus in Brooklyn: 6 Metrotech Center, Rogers Hall 520B.  Stop by any time for help (take the A/F train to Jay St, exit at back of train).

!!!'''Notes from classes:'''

What is Physical Computing?
[[http://www.ted.com/talks/pranav_mistry_the_thrilling_potential_of_sixthsense_technology.html|SixthSense Technology]]

Q: Can you find out what code is already on an Arduino?\\
A: No, you can't get it back, because it's compiled.  The source code isn't stored on the chip.. There isn't an easy way to extract the assembly code either (though it can be done, but the explanation is beyond the scope of this class)\\


http://www.bareconductive.com/home.html (A video of conductive ink, invented by Royal College of Art students)

Why 1024?\\
This is the magic number for the full range of analog input we saw with the pot.  This is NOT necessary to remember, but since I'm an enginerd, I'll explain for those of you who are interested:
The analog-digital converter (ADC) pins on your Arduino are capable of sensing a varying voltage (from your potentiometer, fsr, etc) and outputting a 10 bit number.  A bit is a 1 or 0, a byte is 8 bits.  Each bit represents "2 to the power of (bit)", called the binary system.  So 1000000000 = 2^10 = 1024. Read more on counting in binary in this wikipedia article:\\
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_numeral_system\\
A byte is actually one of the [[http://arduino.cc/en/Reference/HomePage | data types]] we can use with Arduino (but very seldom do).  A byte is not big enough to hold the output of the ADC (Analog) pins, so we move up to an int (integer) when we declare things like int potValue = 0.  That way we can store the whole 1024 values in that variable.  An int can hold up to 2^15 = 32,767.  This is the default data type we use most often on the Arduino, but remember it also has its limits.  For super big numbers or fractions/decimals, you can use data types long or float, but these take more Arduino brain power so are slower than using int.

[[http://www.flickr.com/photos/dustynrobots/5010132387/ | Illustration of water analogy of electricity]]

[[http://www.flickr.com/photos/dustynrobots/5010132467/ | Illustration of series vs. parallel]]

''Alex's notes in response to reading - The User Illusion'':

->Perceptual Bottleneck:\\
[[http://ocw.mit.edu/ans7870/9/9.00/f04/lecturenotes/mp3/L5.mp3 | Intro Pysch / MIT ocw / Jeremy Wolfe - Lecture 5 (Limiting information)]]\\
[[http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/brain-and-cognitive-sciences/9-00-introduction-to-psychology-fall-2004/lecture-notes/h05.pdf | Lecture notes]]  / [[http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/brain-and-cognitive-sciences/9-00-introduction-to-psychology-fall-2004/lecture-notes/l05_attteachdemo.pdf | Lecture slides]]\\
Additional lectures [[http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/brain-and-cognitive-sciences/9-00-introduction-to-psychology-fall-2004/lecture-notes/ | here]]

->Multitasking:\\
http://itp.nyu.edu/~ad1790/filezzz/Multitasking.pdf

->Internet’s effects on cognition and the brain:\\
http://www.wired.com/magazine/2010/05/ff_nicholas_carr/all/1\\
http://www.livescience.com/health/091019-internet-brain.html\\
http://www.livescience.com/culture/090224-internet-brain.html

->Perception of time:\\
http://www.eaglemanlab.net/time\\
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=122322542\\
http://itp.nyu.edu/~ad1790/filezzz/emotion-time.pdf

''Notes from Alex and Ezer's EMG project'':
->Below is the link to the lab that we used for the EMG (although it was a ECG schematic).  This is the one that seemed to work.  Be warned, the background 'pictures' make the lesson almost unreadable.\\
http://www.cs.wright.edu/~phe/EGR199/Lab_4/

->And the schematic comes from this site that encourages diy EMGs using Arduinos.\\
http://www.biomed.engsoc.org/node/30

!!!'''Serial'''
1 bit: 0 or 1\\
1 byte = 8 bits: range from 0-255.  The value of the byte is determined by the binary interpretation of the 8 bits.\\
Every group of 8 bits (1 byte) is interpreted at one time in serial communication.  If all you're doing is sending a potentiometer value divided by 4 (for example), you're only ever sending a number from 0-255 so you don't have to do anything.  This is sometimes called the ''raw value''.  But if you want to send bigger numbers, or text a human can actually read, you have to format the byte that's being communicated from the speaker to the listener to know what the F you're talking about.

It turns out that there's a standard system called ASCII code that can takes any value from 0-255 and assigns it an alphanumeric character (letter, number, or punctuation mark).  Here's an example table:\\
http://www.asciitable.com/

The drawback is that when you send things at text, it takes as many bytes as there are digits.  For example:  a raw value of 12 only takes up one byte, but an ASCII encoded number 12 takes two bytes: one byte for 1 and one byte for 2.  Be careful here.  If you're speaking in ASCII-encoded text but listening for a raw value, you might interpret the 1 and 2 as their representative values in ASCII of 49 and 50.  And if you're speaking in ASCII and listening in raw, you can get all kinds of garbage characters like ~, +, *, etc. that correspond with the representative ASCII values. 

If you're thinking that ASCII encoding is an inefficient way to send numbers from 0-255, you're right.  After all, sending the number 12 as two ASCII encoded bytes instead of one raw byte takes twice as much information.  However, at the standard baud rate of 9600 that we work with, you're unlikely to feel this efficiency for just a few numbers.  And it also gives you the flexibility to agree on one method of encoding for anything you might want to communicate between the speaker and the listener.

One more note about ASCII: the first 32 raw values correspond with ''control characters'', that won't even show up as garbage but stand for things like "carriage return" (ASCII 13). 

This serial data is passed byte by byte from one device to another.  If you're constantly sending values between 0-255 like with a potentiometer, you don't particularly care how the message starts or stops because it's a constant flow of numbers.  But if you want to send a more specific message, or more than one message, the speaker has to give the listener clues as to when the messages start and stop and how to tell the difference between them. 

Ways to see/visualize serial data:\\
Mac & PC: Serial Monitor in Arduino, Processing graphing sketch, [[http://freeware.the-meiers.org/ | Coolterm]]\\
PC: Hyperterminal\\
Mac: Zterm, [[http://www.tigoe.net/pcomp/code/category/OSX/84 | Terminal]], [[http://tomgerhardt.com/Cornflake/ | Cornflake]]

On Arduino's [[http://arduino.cc/en/Serial/Println | serial monitor]], by default, it interprets bytes as ASCII-encoded decimals.  So the following lines will print out the same thing:\\
Serial.println(analogValue);      // print as an ASCII-encoded decimal\\
Serial.println(analogValue, DEC);  // print as an ASCII-encoded decimal\\

!!!'''Week 10'''

Final project matchup

[[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/readings/ch06_DRedit.pdf|Motors]] - review family tree, pg 6
Finish h-bridge lab

Steppers
*Wikipedia [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stepper_motor | animation]]
*Notes and wiring a stepper with an [[http://www.tigoe.net/pcomp/code/circuits/motors/stepper-motors | H-bridge]]
**Arduino [[http://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/Stepper | stepper library and schematics]]
*Wiring a stepper with [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=9402 | Sparkfun's EasyDriver]] (starts on pg 51 of motor chapter)

Wireless communication and [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/Labs/Bluetooth | Bluetooth]]

!!!'''Week 11'''

Myers-Briggs Personality test [[http://www.personalitypathways.com/type_inventory.html | link]]

<object width="512" height="400"><param name="movie" value="http://news.bbc.co.uk/player/emp/external/player.swf"></param><param name="allowFullScreen"
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