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Intro to Physical Computing Syllabus

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A [[Parts/IntroParts | list of parts]] needed for the first few weeks follows. You will end up spending money on materials in this class. It can be done reasonably inexpensively, by scavenging parts, reusing parts, and so forth, but more ambitious projects inevitably make demands on your budget.
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A list of parts needed for the first few weeks follows. You will end up spending money on materials in this class. It can be done reasonably inexpensively, by scavenging parts, reusing parts, and so forth, but more ambitious projects inevitably make demands on your budget.
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!!Books

Below are recommended texts for the course in general. Individual instructors may have their own recommendations as well. All of them are good inspirational guides for physical computing and computing in general. They are not assigned, but pick up at least one of them and incorporate it in your midterm journal, if nothing else.

'''Physical Computing: Sensing and Controlling the Physical World with Computers,''' ''Dan O'Sullivan and Tom Igoe'' ©2004, Thomson Course Technology PTR; ISBN: 159200346X [[<<]] Includes all the stuff covered in class and lots of advanced examples as well. This book was developed from this course, so if you're looking for a textbook, this is it.

'''The Design of Everyday Things,''' ''Donald A. Norman'' ©1990 Doubleday Books; ISBN: 0385267746  [[<<]] If you design at all, or work with people who do, read this. A lucid approach to the psychology of everyday interaction and how the objects we deal with could be better designed to match the strengths and weaknesses of the way we think. His predictions about physical interaction design and information design, some accurate and some not, are interesting history lessons eleven years after the first edition.

'''The User Illusion: Cutting Consciousness Down to Size''', ''Tor Nørretranders'' ©1998 Viking Press; ISBN: 0670875791 [[<<]] Makes the case that much of our experience of the world does not come to us through our consciousness; in fact, the majority of it dealt with pre-consciously.

'''The Art of Interactive Design''', ''Chris Crawford'', ©2002 No Starch Press; ISBN: 1886411840 [[<<]] Written in a very casual style, this book nevertheless is an excellent and concise summary of what interaction design is, why it is important, and what problems it brings with it. Anyone seriously interested in interaction design, physical or not, should read this book.

The following are good references for electronics hobbyists. Take a look at both, and get one or the other as a general reference, or find an electronics reference of your own (a few more are listed in the [[http://www.tigoe.net/pcomp/blog/archives/books/index.shtml | books]] section of the site).

'''Getting Started in Electronics''', ''Forrest M. Mims III'', ©1983, Forrest M. Mims III [[<<]] A very basic introduction to electricity and electronics, written in notebook style. Includes descriptions of the basic components and what they do, and how they relate to each other.

'''Practical Electronics for Inventors''', 1st Edition. ''Paul Scherz'', ©2000, McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing; ISBN: 0070580782 [[<<]] A more in-depth treatment of electronics, with many practical examples and illustrations. An excellent reference for those comfortable with the basic topics. The use of plumbing systems as examples to demonstrate electric principles makes for some very clear illustrations of how different components work. Good chapters on sound electronics and motors as well.

A longer list of books for inspiration and reference is available online at the [[http://www.tigoe.net/pcomp/blog/archives/books/index.shtml | books]] link.

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!!Parts
A [[Parts/IntroParts | list of parts]] needed for the first few weeks follows. You will end up spending money on materials in this class. It can be done reasonably inexpensively, by scavenging parts, reusing parts, and so forth, but more ambitious projects inevitably make demands on your budget.

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!!Parts
A [[Parts/IntroParts | list of parts]] needed for the first few weeks follows. You will end up spending money on materials in this class. It can be done reasonably inexpensively, by scavenging parts, reusing parts, and so forth, but more ambitious projects inevitably make demands on your budget.

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A [[Parts/IntroParts | list of parts ]]needed for the first few weeks follows. You will end up spending money on materials in this class. It can be done reasonably inexpensively, by scavenging parts, reusing parts, and so forth, but more ambitious projects inevitably make demands on your budget.
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A [[Parts/IntroParts | list of parts]] needed for the first few weeks follows. You will end up spending money on materials in this class. It can be done reasonably inexpensively, by scavenging parts, reusing parts, and so forth, but more ambitious projects inevitably make demands on your budget.
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A [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/Parts/IntroParts | list of parts ]]needed for the first few weeks follows. You will end up spending money on materials in this class. It can be done reasonably inexpensively, by scavenging parts, reusing parts, and so forth, but more ambitious projects inevitably make demands on your budget.
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A [[Parts/IntroParts | list of parts ]]needed for the first few weeks follows. You will end up spending money on materials in this class. It can be done reasonably inexpensively, by scavenging parts, reusing parts, and so forth, but more ambitious projects inevitably make demands on your budget.
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A longer list of books for inspiration and reference is available online at the [[http://www.tigoe.net/pcomp/blog/archives/books/index.shtml | books]] link. ||||
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A longer list of books for inspiration and reference is available online at the [[http://www.tigoe.net/pcomp/blog/archives/books/index.shtml | books]] link.
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!!Parts
A [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/Parts/IntroParts | list of parts ]]needed for the first few weeks follows. You will end up spending money on materials in this class. It can be done reasonably inexpensively, by scavenging parts, reusing parts, and so forth, but more ambitious projects inevitably make demands on your budget.

!!Books

Below are recommended texts for the course in general. Individual instructors may have their own recommendations as well. All of them are good inspirational guides for physical computing and computing in general. They are not assigned, but pick up at least one of them and incorporate it in your midterm journal, if nothing else.

'''Physical Computing: Sensing and Controlling the Physical World with Computers,''' ''Dan O'Sullivan and Tom Igoe'' ©2004, Thomson Course Technology PTR; ISBN: 159200346X [[<<]] Includes all the stuff covered in class and lots of advanced examples as well. This book was developed from this course, so if you're looking for a textbook, this is it.

'''The Design of Everyday Things,''' ''Donald A. Norman'' ©1990 Doubleday Books; ISBN: 0385267746  [[<<]] If you design at all, or work with people who do, read this. A lucid approach to the psychology of everyday interaction and how the objects we deal with could be better designed to match the strengths and weaknesses of the way we think. His predictions about physical interaction design and information design, some accurate and some not, are interesting history lessons eleven years after the first edition.

'''The User Illusion: Cutting Consciousness Down to Size''', ''Tor Nørretranders'' ©1998 Viking Press; ISBN: 0670875791 [[<<]] Makes the case that much of our experience of the world does not come to us through our consciousness; in fact, the majority of it dealt with pre-consciously.

'''The Art of Interactive Design''', ''Chris Crawford'', ©2002 No Starch Press; ISBN: 1886411840 [[<<]] Written in a very casual style, this book nevertheless is an excellent and concise summary of what interaction design is, why it is important, and what problems it brings with it. Anyone seriously interested in interaction design, physical or not, should read this book.

The following are good references for electronics hobbyists. Take a look at both, and get one or the other as a general reference, or find an electronics reference of your own (a few more are listed in the [[http://www.tigoe.net/pcomp/blog/archives/books/index.shtml | books]] section of the site).

'''Getting Started in Electronics''', ''Forrest M. Mims III'', ©1983, Forrest M. Mims III [[<<]] A very basic introduction to electricity and electronics, written in notebook style. Includes descriptions of the basic components and what they do, and how they relate to each other.

'''Practical Electronics for Inventors''', 1st Edition. ''Paul Scherz'', ©2000, McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing; ISBN: 0070580782 [[<<]] A more in-depth treatment of electronics, with many practical examples and illustrations. An excellent reference for those comfortable with the basic topics. The use of plumbing systems as examples to demonstrate electric principles makes for some very clear illustrations of how different components work. Good chapters on sound electronics and motors as well.

A longer list of books for inspiration and reference is available online at the [[http://www.tigoe.net/pcomp/blog/archives/books/index.shtml | books]] link. ||||
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