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April 09, 2014, at 11:46 AM by cybeanolley -
Changed line 1 from:
grew to be the decision mackintosh with regard to English police officers during the Trench World war with The european countries,hence the name Duster. This continues to be faithful to authentic typeポーター バッグ 新作 2014 <a href=http://www.jaredosmond.com/>ポーター アウトレット</a> ポーター アウトレット, in addition to a few shade add ons. In that case emerged cufflinks,ポーター アウトレット http://www.jaredosmond.com/ ポーター 財布 メンズ, in just about any sheet metal you enjoy, presently there amplebackground in these tiny jewels to write 12 publications.These people fallen out of fashion for approximately ten years and after that ポールスミス アウトレット <a href=http://www.cgbridal.com/>ポールスミス サングラス レディース</a> ポールスミス サングラス,delivered within the 80 now ever beforeポールスミス サングラス http://www.cgbridal.com/ ポールスミス メガネ 新作, better along with transferring to classical design.ポールスミス サングラス アウトレット http://os6.org/apk ポールスミス サングラス レディース, As if many people e going to be around at least another several years, hopefully.サマンサタバサ バッグ <a href=http://www.virginiachickenfestival.org/>サマンサタバサ バッグ 人気</a> サマンサタバサ 財布, Right now we come across adult males jewelry innovating,サマンサタバサ アウトレット http://www.virginiachickenfestival.org/ サマンサタバサ 財布 新作 2014, title to enjoy Vivienne Westwood. Did you actuallyサマンサタバサ バッグ 人気 http://mutiny.co/1qg サマンサタバサ バッグ, at any time look at the location where the darkish fit with came? Not necessarily France,Not Indonesia, Definitely not France. End result of an defiant kid who all simply decided to develop his own レイバン メガネ 新作 http://www.darsenius.se/1ov0 レイバン メガネ 新作,fashion and never end up being affected through their mates. Brummell rejected eighteenth one hundred yearfrills (dandy man). The require, a new dark pink coating, buff-coloured pantaloons as well as waistcoat,black shoes or boots and a thoroughly clean whitened side fabric, survives these days for the reason that darkish small business go well with, bright tee shirt along with egypt tie Bells bottomed trousers ended up a different 'icon' with the sq . device homogeneous.
to:
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Changed line 1 from:
became the choice mackintosh intended for Uk representatives over the Trench World war in The european union,hence the name Duster. The item stays faithful to unique typeポーター アウトレット <a href=http://www.jaredosmond.com/>ポーター バッグ 新作 2014</a> ポーター アウトレット, aside from a few colouring enhancements. After that came cufflinks,ポーター 財布 メンズ http://www.jaredosmond.com/ ポーター バッグ 新作 2014, in a steel you like, right now there adequatehistory in these minor jewels to create a number of publications.That they fell out of fashion approximately decade and ポールスミス サングラス レディース <a href=http://www.cgbridal.com/>ポールスミス サングラス レディース</a> ポールスミス サングラス,go back inside the 70 and after this at any timeポールスミス メガネ 新作 http://www.cgbridal.com/ ポールスミス サングラス アウトレット, stronger along with moving to time-honored fashion.ポールスミス アウトレット http://www.darsenius.se/1ouz ポールスミス アウトレット, Seems as though they will electronic usually close to at least the next several years, with luck ,.サマンサタバサ バッグ <a href=http://www.virginiachickenfestival.org/>サマンサタバサ 財布</a> サマンサキングズ, At this point we come across adult males diamond jewelry changing,サマンサキングズ http://www.virginiachickenfestival.org/ サマンサタバサ 財布, the name to view Vivienne Westwood. Performed anyoneサマンサタバサ バッグ 人気 http://likesh.it/iAa サマンサタバサ 財布 新作 2014, ever look at where the dim fit with started? Certainly not France,Not necessarily Australia, Not really England. The result of a defiant man who merely chosen to create his or her own レイバン アウトレット http://chopurl.zzl.org/bgb レイバン サングラス メンズ,model but not possibly be influenced by means of his / her friends. Brummell rejected 18th hundred yearsextras (dandy man). His or her requirement, any darkish glowing blue overcoat, buff-coloured pantaloons and also waistcoat,black color boots and also a thoroughly clean white throat towel, survives these days as being the darker business fit, light clothing and man made fiber tie up Bell bottomed trousers had been a different 'icon' on the sq . rig standard.
to:
grew to be the decision mackintosh with regard to English police officers during the Trench World war with The european countries,hence the name Duster. This continues to be faithful to authentic typeポーター バッグ 新作 2014 <a href=http://www.jaredosmond.com/>ポーター アウトレット</a> ポーター アウトレット, in addition to a few shade add ons. In that case emerged cufflinks,ポーター アウトレット http://www.jaredosmond.com/ ポーター 財布 メンズ, in just about any sheet metal you enjoy, presently there amplebackground in these tiny jewels to write 12 publications.These people fallen out of fashion for approximately ten years and after that ポールスミス アウトレット <a href=http://www.cgbridal.com/>ポールスミス サングラス レディース</a> ポールスミス サングラス,delivered within the 80 now ever beforeポールスミス サングラス http://www.cgbridal.com/ ポールスミス メガネ 新作, better along with transferring to classical design.ポールスミス サングラス アウトレット http://os6.org/apk ポールスミス サングラス レディース, As if many people e going to be around at least another several years, hopefully.サマンサタバサ バッグ <a href=http://www.virginiachickenfestival.org/>サマンサタバサ バッグ 人気</a> サマンサタバサ 財布, Right now we come across adult males jewelry innovating,サマンサタバサ アウトレット http://www.virginiachickenfestival.org/ サマンサタバサ 財布 新作 2014, title to enjoy Vivienne Westwood. Did you actuallyサマンサタバサ バッグ 人気 http://mutiny.co/1qg サマンサタバサ バッグ, at any time look at the location where the darkish fit with came? Not necessarily France,Not Indonesia, Definitely not France. End result of an defiant kid who all simply decided to develop his own レイバン メガネ 新作 http://www.darsenius.se/1ov0 レイバン メガネ 新作,fashion and never end up being affected through their mates. Brummell rejected eighteenth one hundred yearfrills (dandy man). The require, a new dark pink coating, buff-coloured pantaloons as well as waistcoat,black shoes or boots and a thoroughly clean whitened side fabric, survives these days for the reason that darkish small business go well with, bright tee shirt along with egypt tie Bells bottomed trousers ended up a different 'icon' with the sq . device homogeneous.
Changed line 1 from:
evolved into the option mackintosh regarding British isles police officers throughout the Trench World war in The european countries,hence the name Trench Coat. The item is still true to initial typeポーター 財布 メンズ <a href=http://www.jaredosmond.com/>ポーター アウトレット</a> ポーター バッグ 新作 2014, in addition to several shade upgrades. In that case followed cufflinks,ポーター バッグ 新作 2014 http://www.jaredosmond.com/ ポーター 財布 メンズ, in different metal you prefer, there adequaterecord during these little gemstones to post twelve books.That they slipped out of fashion approximately decade and after that ポールスミス メガネ 新作 <a href=http://www.cgbridal.com/>ポールスミス サングラス アウトレット</a> ポールスミス サングラス,delivered inside 70 and today actuallyポールスミス サングラス http://www.cgbridal.com/ ポールスミス アウトレット, more powerful as well as moving to be able to traditional style.ポールスミス サングラス アウトレット http://dburl.co/mdeu ポールスミス サングラス アウトレット, As if they will electronic those all around for at least the next decade, ideally.サマンサキングズ <a href=http://www.virginiachickenfestival.org/>サマンサタバサ バッグ 人気</a> サマンサタバサ バッグ 人気, Right now we see adult males diamond innovating,サマンサタバサ バッグ 人気 http://www.virginiachickenfestival.org/ サマンサタバサ バッグ, the name to watch Vivienne Westwood. Do you actuallyサマンサキングズ http://crisfield.co/1dic サマンサタバサ 財布, ever take into account where the dark fit with started? Not necessarily Croatia,Not necessarily Germany, Definitely not France. The outcome of your defiant son who else merely chosen to produce his personal レイバン サングラス http://vleap.it/1BPB レイバン サングラス メンズ,type instead of end up being inspired through their peers. Brummell rejected 18th one hundred yearfrills (dandy man). Their mandate, any black blue overcoat, buff-coloured pantaloons as well as waistcoat,dark-colored shoes along with a clean bright neck of the guitar textile, survives these days for the reason that dim organization go well with, whitened shirt and also egypt wrap Bell bottomed pants were being yet another 'icon' from the rectangular rig homogeneous.
to:
became the choice mackintosh intended for Uk representatives over the Trench World war in The european union,hence the name Duster. The item stays faithful to unique typeポーター アウトレット <a href=http://www.jaredosmond.com/>ポーター バッグ 新作 2014</a> ポーター アウトレット, aside from a few colouring enhancements. After that came cufflinks,ポーター 財布 メンズ http://www.jaredosmond.com/ ポーター バッグ 新作 2014, in a steel you like, right now there adequatehistory in these minor jewels to create a number of publications.That they fell out of fashion approximately decade and ポールスミス サングラス レディース <a href=http://www.cgbridal.com/>ポールスミス サングラス レディース</a> ポールスミス サングラス,go back inside the 70 and after this at any timeポールスミス メガネ 新作 http://www.cgbridal.com/ ポールスミス サングラス アウトレット, stronger along with moving to time-honored fashion.ポールスミス アウトレット http://www.darsenius.se/1ouz ポールスミス アウトレット, Seems as though they will electronic usually close to at least the next several years, with luck ,.サマンサタバサ バッグ <a href=http://www.virginiachickenfestival.org/>サマンサタバサ 財布</a> サマンサキングズ, At this point we come across adult males diamond jewelry changing,サマンサキングズ http://www.virginiachickenfestival.org/ サマンサタバサ 財布, the name to view Vivienne Westwood. Performed anyoneサマンサタバサ バッグ 人気 http://likesh.it/iAa サマンサタバサ 財布 新作 2014, ever look at where the dim fit with started? Certainly not France,Not necessarily Australia, Not really England. The result of a defiant man who merely chosen to create his or her own レイバン アウトレット http://chopurl.zzl.org/bgb レイバン サングラス メンズ,model but not possibly be influenced by means of his / her friends. Brummell rejected 18th hundred yearsextras (dandy man). His or her requirement, any darkish glowing blue overcoat, buff-coloured pantaloons and also waistcoat,black color boots and also a thoroughly clean white throat towel, survives these days as being the darker business fit, light clothing and man made fiber tie up Bell bottomed trousers had been a different 'icon' on the sq . rig standard.
Changed line 1 from:
kvfbbjuq, <a href="http://www.cuuvsqqwpv.com/">lmzcdittgv</a> , [url=http://www.mcbmvdvgqr.com/]tbdbejhooa[/url], http://www.sfgizgkogc.com/ lmzcdittgv
to:
evolved into the option mackintosh regarding British isles police officers throughout the Trench World war in The european countries,hence the name Trench Coat. The item is still true to initial typeポーター 財布 メンズ <a href=http://www.jaredosmond.com/>ポーター アウトレット</a> ポーター バッグ 新作 2014, in addition to several shade upgrades. In that case followed cufflinks,ポーター バッグ 新作 2014 http://www.jaredosmond.com/ ポーター 財布 メンズ, in different metal you prefer, there adequaterecord during these little gemstones to post twelve books.That they slipped out of fashion approximately decade and after that ポールスミス メガネ 新作 <a href=http://www.cgbridal.com/>ポールスミス サングラス アウトレット</a> ポールスミス サングラス,delivered inside 70 and today actuallyポールスミス サングラス http://www.cgbridal.com/ ポールスミス アウトレット, more powerful as well as moving to be able to traditional style.ポールスミス サングラス アウトレット http://dburl.co/mdeu ポールスミス サングラス アウトレット, As if they will electronic those all around for at least the next decade, ideally.サマンサキングズ <a href=http://www.virginiachickenfestival.org/>サマンサタバサ バッグ 人気</a> サマンサタバサ バッグ 人気, Right now we see adult males diamond innovating,サマンサタバサ バッグ 人気 http://www.virginiachickenfestival.org/ サマンサタバサ バッグ, the name to watch Vivienne Westwood. Do you actuallyサマンサキングズ http://crisfield.co/1dic サマンサタバサ 財布, ever take into account where the dark fit with started? Not necessarily Croatia,Not necessarily Germany, Definitely not France. The outcome of your defiant son who else merely chosen to produce his personal レイバン サングラス http://vleap.it/1BPB レイバン サングラス メンズ,type instead of end up being inspired through their peers. Brummell rejected 18th one hundred yearfrills (dandy man). Their mandate, any black blue overcoat, buff-coloured pantaloons as well as waistcoat,dark-colored shoes along with a clean bright neck of the guitar textile, survives these days for the reason that dim organization go well with, whitened shirt and also egypt wrap Bell bottomed pants were being yet another 'icon' from the rectangular rig homogeneous.
April 06, 2014, at 03:16 AM by dzomvmdeag - xzinmwux
Changed lines 1-282 from:
(:title Setting up an Arduino on a breadboard:)

!! Overview
This tutorial shows you how to build an Arduino compatible breadboard with an Atmel Atmega8/168 AVR microcontroller and FTDI FT232 breakout board from [[http://www.sparkfun.com/|SparkFun]].

Originally created by Carlyn Maw\\
Updated October 23, 2008 by Rory Nugent

(:toc Table of Contents:)

!!Parts

To do this, you'll need:

%lfloat width=400px margin-top=5px margin-right=25px margin-bottom=5px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_parts.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_parts.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]

!!!!Basic Parts for wiring up Arduino
* A breadboard
* 22 AWG wire
* 7805 Voltage regulator
* 2 LEDs
* 2 220 Ohm resistors
* 1 10k Ohm  resistor
* 2 10 uF capacitors
* 16 MHz clock crystal
* 2 22 pF capacitors
* small momentary normally open ("off") button, i.e. Omron type B3F

!!!!USB to Serial Communication Board

You will need a FT232 USB Breakout board from [[http://www.sparkfun.com/|SparkFun]].

There are two options available from them:
* FT232RL USB to Serial Breakout Board, SKU [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=718|BOB-0071]]
* Arduino Serial USB Board, SKU [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=8165|DEV-08165]]

If you plan to use the top option and have not yet soldered headers to the breakout board, now would be a good time.

!!!!Bootloading your Atmega Chips (Optional)

There are several options for bootloading your Atmega chips, a few of which are covered in this tutorial. If you wish to bootload your Atmega chips using your breadboard, an additional part will make your life much easier but is not necessary.

AVR Programming Adapter from Sparkfun, SKU [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=8508|BOB-08508]]

[[<<]]

!!Adding circuitry for a power supply

If you've already worked with microcontrollers, it is likely that you already have a preferred way to wire up a power supply to your board, so go ahead and do it that way. In case you need some reminders,  here are some pictures of one way to go about it. (We are going for a 5V regulated power supply)

[[<<]]
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_02.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_02.jpg"toppower"]] | [-Top Power lines-]
Add power and ground wires for where your voltage regulator will be.
[[<<]]
[[<<]]
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_03.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_03.jpg"bottompower"]] | [-Bottom Power lines-]
Add power and ground wires at the bottom of your board connecting each rail.
[[<<]]
[[<<]]
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_04.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_04.jpg"7805"]] | [-Add the 7805 and decoupling capacitors -]

Add the 7805 power regulator and the lines to power the board. The regulator is a TO-220 package where the IN-line from the external power supply goes IN on the left, ground is in the middle and the 5V OUT is on the right (when facing the front of the regulator). We're also adding power OUT and ground wires that connect to the right rail and power IN and ground wires off to the left where our power supply may go.

Also, add a 10uF capacitor between the IN of the regulator and the ground as well as a 10uF capacitor on the right rail between power and ground. The silver strip on the capacitor signifies the ground leg.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05.jpg"PowerLED"]] | [-LED-]
Add an LED on the left side of your board across from the voltage regulator. An LED attached to power like this is a great troubleshooting trick. You'll always know when your board is being powered as well as quickly know if your board is being shorted.
[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05_supply.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05_supply.jpg"Power Supply Input"]] | [-Power Supply Input-]
The red and black wires to the left of the voltage regulator is where your power supply will be plugged in. The red wire is for the POWER and the black wire is for the GROUND. Be sure to only attach a power supply that is between 7-16V. Any lower and you won't get 5V out of your regulator. Any higher and your regulator may get too hot. A 9V battery, 9V DC power supply, or 12V DC power supply is suitable.
[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_06.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_06.jpg"BlankCanvas"]] | [-Blank Canvas-]
Now that the power-basics are done we are ready to load on the chip!

[[<<]]

!!ATMEGA8/168 Basics
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduino_pinmap.png|http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduino_pinmap.png"Arduino Pinmap"]] | [-Arduino Pin Map-]

Before moving on, this image is a great resource for learning what each of the pins on your Atmega chip do in relation to the Arduino's functions. This will clarify a lot of confusion behind why we hook up certain pins the way we do. For even more detailed information, take a peek at the datasheet for the Atmega 168 ([[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/2545S.pdf|short version]]) ([[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc2545.pdf|long version]]).

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px margin-right=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_07.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_07.jpg"AddingChipCircuitry"]] | [-Add supporting circuitry-]

Start by adding a 10k ohm resistor "up" (to power) on the RESET pin in order to prevent the chip from resetting itself during normal operation. The RESET pin reboots the chip when pulled down to ground. In later steps we will show you how to add a reset switch that takes advantage of this.

* '''Pin 7''' - Vcc - ''Digital Supply Voltage''
* '''Pin 8''' - GND
* '''Pin 22''' - GND
* '''Pin 21''' - AREF - ''Analog reference pin for ADC''
* '''Pin 20''' - AVcc - ''Suppply voltage for the ADC converter. Needs to be connected to power if ADC isn't being used and to power via a low-pass filter if it is'' (a low pass filter is a circuit that cleans out noise from the power source, we aren't using one)

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_08.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_08.jpg"AddClock"]] | [-Add the Clock & Caps-]
Add a 16 MHz external clock between pin 9 and 10, and add two 22 pF capacitors running to ground on each of those pins.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_09.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_09.jpg"AddReset"]] | [-Add a reset switch-]
This is where we add the small tactile switch so that we can reset the Arduino whenever we'd like and prepare the chip for uploading a new program. A quick momentary press of this switch will reset the chip when needed. Add the switch just above the top of the Atmega chip crossing the gap in the breadboard. Then, add a wire from the bottom left leg of the switch to the RESET pin of the Atmega chip and a wire from the top left leg of the switch to ground.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_10.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_10.jpg"LEDWires"]] | [-LED leads on Arduino pin 13-]
The chip I'm using on this board is actually already programmed using the blink_led program that comes with the Arduino software.  If you already have an Arduino printed circuit board running it is a good idea to go ahead and check the breadboard version you are building with a chip you know works. The blink_led program blinks pin 13. Pin 13 on the Arduino is NOT the AVR ATMEGA8-16PU/ATMEGA168-16PU pin 13. It is actually pin 19 on the Atmega chip.

Refer to the [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduino_pinmap.png|pin mapping]] above to be sure you are plugging it in correctly.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_11.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_11.jpg"LED"]] | [-LED on Arduino Pin 13-]

Finally, add the LED. The long leg or the cathode connects to the red wire and the short leg or the anode connects to the 220 ohm resistor going to ground.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_12.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_12.jpg"Arduino-Ready!"]] | [-Arduino-Ready!-]

At this point if you had already programmed your chip somewhere else and didn't need this breadboard circuit to reprogram the chip, you could stop here. But part of the fun is in-circuit programming so keep going to really make a full USB-Arduino-circuit on a breadboard!

[[<<]]

!!Arduino-Ready

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_13.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_13.jpg"Add USB"]] | [-Add FT232 USB to Serial Board-]

Now we'll be adding the USB to Serial breakout board to our Arduino breadboard circuit. If you haven't added male headers to your breakout board, you will need to do it now.

Connect pin 6 of the breakout board to power and pin 9 to ground. With the USB port facing upward, I'm calling the top left pin 1, the bottom left 9, the top right 10, and the bottom right 18.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_usbback.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_usbback.jpg"USBBack"]] | [-The pinouts of the Sparkfun FT232 breakout-]

Curious what all the pin outs are for the SparkFun FT232 breakout board, just simply flip it over! In this situation we'll be using VCC (to supply 5V from the USB port to your board), GND, TXD, and RXD.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_14.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_14.jpg"TXRX"]] | [-Connecting the TX and RX-]
Now, let's get the USB to serial breakout board talking with your new Arduino setup. Connect the RX (pin 2) of your Atmega chip to pin 10 of the USB to serial board, and connect the TX (pin 3) of your Atmega chip to pin 14 of the USB to serial board.


[[<<]]

And there you have it... ready to be plugged in, powered up and programmed!

But wait, there's another step right? If you pulled your Atmega chip out of your Arduino, it has most likely been programed several times by yourself and so it definitely has been bootloaded, so you won't need to move any further in this tutorial.

However, if you purchased some extra Atmega8 or Atmega168 chips from an online store they will have NOT been bootloaded with the Arduino bootloader (with the exception of [[http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=17&products_id=56|Adafruit Industries]]). What does this mean? You won't be able to program your chips using the USB to serial breakout board and the Arduino software. So, in order to make your new chips useful for Arduino you MUST bootload them and MUST check out step 4.

[[<<]]

!!Other Breadboard Options

[[http://www.instructables.com/id/uDuino-Very-Low-Cost-Arduino-Compatible-Developme|The uDuino Setup by Tymn Twillman]]\\
This configuration is similar to the one above but the trick is that the Atmega chip is bootloaded with the Arduino Lilypad bootloader. The Lilypad runs using the internal clock instead of an external clock and so removes the need for much of the supporting circuitry.

[[http://www.ladyada.net/make/boarduino/|Boarduino by Ladyada]]\\
The Boarduino is a kit you purchase and assemble to create a nice, small breadboard compatible Arduino set up. All the common components are included on a small PCB so that the Boarduino can easily be added to a breadboard and even removed, in a snap.

[[<<]]

!!Bootloading your chips '''OPTIONAL'''

!!!!Bootloading Options

There are two options for bootloading your chips. The first being quite easy and the other being a little more tricky. We will cover both.

* Bootloading your Atmega chip using a Arduino board and an AVR programmer
* Bootloading your Atmega chip in your newly prepared breadboard with an AVR programmer

There are also many different kinds of AVR programmers but two are most commonly used here at ITP:

%lframe height=200px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_mk2.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_mk2.jpg"AVRISP mkII"]] | [-AVRISP mkII-]

%lframe height=200px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_tiny.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_tiny.jpg"USBtinyISp"]] | [-USBtinyISP-]

[[<<]]

The AVRISP mkII can be found in the ER or can be purchased from Digikey (Part # [[http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?Detail?name=ATAVRISP2-ND|ATAVRISP2-ND]]) while the USBtinyISP must be assembled and can be found at [[http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=16&products_id=46|Adafruit Industries]].

!!!!Using an Arduino board

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_bootload1.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_bootload1.jpg"ArduinoBootload"]] | [-Bootloading on an Arduino board-]

Place your Atmega chip into the Arduino board with the divot of the chip facing outward. Set the jumper to an external power supply and connect a 12V power brick (your board needs to be externally powered when using the AVR ISP mkII but is not needed with the AVRtinyISP) . Then, attach the 6-pin female plug of your AVR programmer to the 6 male header ICSP pins with the plastic nub of the ribbon cable head facing inward.

NOTE: The AVR ISP mkII turns its LED green when they've been hooked up correctly and are ready for programming. The LED turns red if it is hooked up wrong.

[[<<]]

!!!!Using your breadboard


%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_avradapter.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_avradapter.jpg"AVRAdapter"]] | [-AVR Programming Adapter-]

When bootloading an Atmega chip on a breadboard, I found the AVR programming adapter (SKU [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=8508|BOB-08508]]) from Sparkfun to be incredibly handy. This adapter breaks out the 6 pins from the programmer to 6 inline pins for easy attachment to the breadboard. All the pins are also labeled making it very easy to connect it up to your chip.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/6pinAVRprogcable.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/6pinAVRprogcable.jpg"6pinAVRprogcable"]] | [-6-pin AVR Programmer Cable-]

Don't worry, if you don't have an AVR programming adapter you can still bootload without it. It will however be more of a headache to set up. The two images to the left are great references when hooking up a programmer to an Atmega chip without an adapter board. The images will tell you what all the holes in the 6-pin AVR plug are and you will simply need to stick wires in the end and run them to your Atmega chip.

[[<<]]


%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/6pinAVRproghead.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/6pinAVRproghead.jpg"6pinAVRproghead"]] | [-6-pin AVR Programmer Cable Head-]

This image is a view from the bottom and labels each of the holes. Take note of the square as to what orientation your cable is in.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_pwrgnd.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_pwrgnd.jpg"AVRpwrgnd"]] | [-Add power and ground-]

'+Let's begin!+'

With the breadboard you prepared above, add two wires for power and ground for your AVR programmer.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_plugadapter.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_plugadapter.jpg"AVRplug"]] | [-Plug in the AVR adapter-]

Now plug the AVR programming adapter into the breadboard with the GND pin matching up with the ground wire you just ran and the 5V pin matching up with the power wire you just ran.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px margin-right=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_wires.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_wires.jpg"AVRwires"]] | [-Add the MISO, SCK, RESET, and MOSI wires-]

In this step you will need to add the last four wires needed by the AVR programmer for proper bootloading.

Be sure to refer to the [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduino_pinmap.png|Arduino pin mapping]] for help wiring this up.

* The MISO pin of your adapter will go to pin 12 or Arduino digital pin 18 of your Atmega chip.
* The SCK pin of your adapter will go to pin 13 or Arduino digital pin 19 of your Atmega chip.
* The RESET pin of your adapter will go to pin 1 of your Atmega chip.
* The MOSI pin of your adapter will go to pin 11 or Arduino digital pin 17 of your Atmega chip.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px margin-right=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_plugin.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_plugin.jpg"Plugin"]] | [-Plug in the USB cable and AVR programming cable-]

Almost there! Just plug in a USB cable to your USB breakout board and plug the 6-pin plug of your AVR programmer to your AVR programming adapter. The black nub of the 6-pin head must be facing upwards towards the Atmega chip.

In the next step, we'll show you have to use the Arduino software to burn your bootloader!

[[<<]]

!!!!Time to burn!

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_pickboard.png | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_pickboard.png"ArduinoPickBoard"]] | [-Pick your board type-]

Fire up Arduino and then go to 'Tools' and 'Board'. Choosing the type of board you'd like to use will effect which bootloader you will be put on your chip. Most commonly you will be using the Diecimilia or the most recent version of Arduino for an Atmega PDIP, however if you'd like to bootload an Arduino Lilypad, Arduino Mini, Arduino Nano, or any of the older Arduino versions, choose the appropriate board.

[[<<]]


%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burn.png | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burn.png"ArduinoBurn"]] | [-Choose your programmer. Burn!-]

Then, go to 'Tools' and 'Burn Bootloader' and choose the programmer you will be using.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burning.png | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burning.png"ArduinoBurning"]] | [-Burning-]

Once you chose your programmer, the AVR programmer will begin bootloading your Atmega chip and a message will appear in the status bar which reads "Burning bootloader to I/O Board (this may take a minute)..." Lights will flicker on your programmer.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burndone.png | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burndone.png"BurnDone"]] | [-Burn Complete!-]

When done bootloading, the status bar will be updated with the message  "Done burning bootloader." Your chip is now ready to be programmer using the Arduino software! Congrats! Power cycle your Arduino and your new Atmega chip will be running a simple LED blink program with pin 13 (if this is not the case, try programming it with one). If this is working, it was most definitely a success.

NOTE: On occasion, the process of bootloading an Atmega chip with the AVR ISP mkII will take an extraordinarily long period of time. Usually it should only take a couple minutes and in fact, the AVRtinyISP finishes much quicker. However, there are times where after 5-10 minutes it still appears to be bootloading. I found this to be an odd hiccup (perhaps it is triple checking the data flow) and after giving it ample time, 10 minutes or so, I usually unplug the programmer only to find the burning process to be a success and has ended long ago. I by no means endorse this method and you take all responsibility in whatever may happen to your chip, but in my experience it has been fairly harmless though you should proceed with caution. It is very possible that you may damage your chip in the process.

[[<<]]
to:
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Changed lines 240-241 from:
* The MISO pin of your adapter will go to pin 18 or Arduino digital pin 12 of your Atmega chip.
* The SCK pin of your adapter will go to pin 19 or Arduino digital pin 13 of your Atmega chip.
to:
* The MISO pin of your adapter will go to pin 12 or Arduino digital pin 18 of your Atmega chip.
* The SCK pin of your adapter will go to pin 13 or Arduino digital pin 19 of your Atmega chip.
Changed line 243 from:
* The MOSI pin of your adapter will go to pin 17 or Arduino digital pin 11 of your Atmega chip.
to:
* The MOSI pin of your adapter will go to pin 11 or Arduino digital pin 17 of your Atmega chip.
Changed lines 1-282 from:
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to:
(:title Setting up an Arduino on a breadboard:)

!! Overview
This tutorial shows you how to build an Arduino compatible breadboard with an Atmel Atmega8/168 AVR microcontroller and FTDI FT232 breakout board from [[http://www.sparkfun.com/|SparkFun]].

Originally created by Carlyn Maw\\
Updated October 23, 2008 by Rory Nugent

(:toc Table of Contents:)

!!Parts

To do this, you'll need:

%lfloat width=400px margin-top=5px margin-right=25px margin-bottom=5px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_parts.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_parts.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]

!!!!Basic Parts for wiring up Arduino
* A breadboard
* 22 AWG wire
* 7805 Voltage regulator
* 2 LEDs
* 2 220 Ohm resistors
* 1 10k Ohm  resistor
* 2 10 uF capacitors
* 16 MHz clock crystal
* 2 22 pF capacitors
* small momentary normally open ("off") button, i.e. Omron type B3F

!!!!USB to Serial Communication Board

You will need a FT232 USB Breakout board from [[http://www.sparkfun.com/|SparkFun]].

There are two options available from them:
* FT232RL USB to Serial Breakout Board, SKU [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=718|BOB-0071]]
* Arduino Serial USB Board, SKU [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=8165|DEV-08165]]

If you plan to use the top option and have not yet soldered headers to the breakout board, now would be a good time.

!!!!Bootloading your Atmega Chips (Optional)

There are several options for bootloading your Atmega chips, a few of which are covered in this tutorial. If you wish to bootload your Atmega chips using your breadboard, an additional part will make your life much easier but is not necessary.

AVR Programming Adapter from Sparkfun, SKU [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=8508|BOB-08508]]

[[<<]]

!!Adding circuitry for a power supply

If you've already worked with microcontrollers, it is likely that you already have a preferred way to wire up a power supply to your board, so go ahead and do it that way. In case you need some reminders,  here are some pictures of one way to go about it. (We are going for a 5V regulated power supply)

[[<<]]
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_02.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_02.jpg"toppower"]] | [-Top Power lines-]
Add power and ground wires for where your voltage regulator will be.
[[<<]]
[[<<]]
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_03.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_03.jpg"bottompower"]] | [-Bottom Power lines-]
Add power and ground wires at the bottom of your board connecting each rail.
[[<<]]
[[<<]]
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_04.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_04.jpg"7805"]] | [-Add the 7805 and decoupling capacitors -]

Add the 7805 power regulator and the lines to power the board. The regulator is a TO-220 package where the IN-line from the external power supply goes IN on the left, ground is in the middle and the 5V OUT is on the right (when facing the front of the regulator). We're also adding power OUT and ground wires that connect to the right rail and power IN and ground wires off to the left where our power supply may go.

Also, add a 10uF capacitor between the IN of the regulator and the ground as well as a 10uF capacitor on the right rail between power and ground. The silver strip on the capacitor signifies the ground leg.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05.jpg"PowerLED"]] | [-LED-]
Add an LED on the left side of your board across from the voltage regulator. An LED attached to power like this is a great troubleshooting trick. You'll always know when your board is being powered as well as quickly know if your board is being shorted.
[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05_supply.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05_supply.jpg"Power Supply Input"]] | [-Power Supply Input-]
The red and black wires to the left of the voltage regulator is where your power supply will be plugged in. The red wire is for the POWER and the black wire is for the GROUND. Be sure to only attach a power supply that is between 7-16V. Any lower and you won't get 5V out of your regulator. Any higher and your regulator may get too hot. A 9V battery, 9V DC power supply, or 12V DC power supply is suitable.
[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_06.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_06.jpg"BlankCanvas"]] | [-Blank Canvas-]
Now that the power-basics are done we are ready to load on the chip!

[[<<]]

!!ATMEGA8/168 Basics
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduino_pinmap.png|http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduino_pinmap.png"Arduino Pinmap"]] | [-Arduino Pin Map-]

Before moving on, this image is a great resource for learning what each of the pins on your Atmega chip do in relation to the Arduino's functions. This will clarify a lot of confusion behind why we hook up certain pins the way we do. For even more detailed information, take a peek at the datasheet for the Atmega 168 ([[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/2545S.pdf|short version]]) ([[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc2545.pdf|long version]]).

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px margin-right=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_07.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_07.jpg"AddingChipCircuitry"]] | [-Add supporting circuitry-]

Start by adding a 10k ohm resistor "up" (to power) on the RESET pin in order to prevent the chip from resetting itself during normal operation. The RESET pin reboots the chip when pulled down to ground. In later steps we will show you how to add a reset switch that takes advantage of this.

* '''Pin 7''' - Vcc - ''Digital Supply Voltage''
* '''Pin 8''' - GND
* '''Pin 22''' - GND
* '''Pin 21''' - AREF - ''Analog reference pin for ADC''
* '''Pin 20''' - AVcc - ''Suppply voltage for the ADC converter. Needs to be connected to power if ADC isn't being used and to power via a low-pass filter if it is'' (a low pass filter is a circuit that cleans out noise from the power source, we aren't using one)

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_08.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_08.jpg"AddClock"]] | [-Add the Clock & Caps-]
Add a 16 MHz external clock between pin 9 and 10, and add two 22 pF capacitors running to ground on each of those pins.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_09.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_09.jpg"AddReset"]] | [-Add a reset switch-]
This is where we add the small tactile switch so that we can reset the Arduino whenever we'd like and prepare the chip for uploading a new program. A quick momentary press of this switch will reset the chip when needed. Add the switch just above the top of the Atmega chip crossing the gap in the breadboard. Then, add a wire from the bottom left leg of the switch to the RESET pin of the Atmega chip and a wire from the top left leg of the switch to ground.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_10.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_10.jpg"LEDWires"]] | [-LED leads on Arduino pin 13-]
The chip I'm using on this board is actually already programmed using the blink_led program that comes with the Arduino software.  If you already have an Arduino printed circuit board running it is a good idea to go ahead and check the breadboard version you are building with a chip you know works. The blink_led program blinks pin 13. Pin 13 on the Arduino is NOT the AVR ATMEGA8-16PU/ATMEGA168-16PU pin 13. It is actually pin 19 on the Atmega chip.

Refer to the [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduino_pinmap.png|pin mapping]] above to be sure you are plugging it in correctly.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_11.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_11.jpg"LED"]] | [-LED on Arduino Pin 13-]

Finally, add the LED. The long leg or the cathode connects to the red wire and the short leg or the anode connects to the 220 ohm resistor going to ground.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_12.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_12.jpg"Arduino-Ready!"]] | [-Arduino-Ready!-]

At this point if you had already programmed your chip somewhere else and didn't need this breadboard circuit to reprogram the chip, you could stop here. But part of the fun is in-circuit programming so keep going to really make a full USB-Arduino-circuit on a breadboard!

[[<<]]

!!Arduino-Ready

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_13.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_13.jpg"Add USB"]] | [-Add FT232 USB to Serial Board-]

Now we'll be adding the USB to Serial breakout board to our Arduino breadboard circuit. If you haven't added male headers to your breakout board, you will need to do it now.

Connect pin 6 of the breakout board to power and pin 9 to ground. With the USB port facing upward, I'm calling the top left pin 1, the bottom left 9, the top right 10, and the bottom right 18.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_usbback.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_usbback.jpg"USBBack"]] | [-The pinouts of the Sparkfun FT232 breakout-]

Curious what all the pin outs are for the SparkFun FT232 breakout board, just simply flip it over! In this situation we'll be using VCC (to supply 5V from the USB port to your board), GND, TXD, and RXD.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_14.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_14.jpg"TXRX"]] | [-Connecting the TX and RX-]
Now, let's get the USB to serial breakout board talking with your new Arduino setup. Connect the RX (pin 2) of your Atmega chip to pin 10 of the USB to serial board, and connect the TX (pin 3) of your Atmega chip to pin 14 of the USB to serial board.


[[<<]]

And there you have it... ready to be plugged in, powered up and programmed!

But wait, there's another step right? If you pulled your Atmega chip out of your Arduino, it has most likely been programed several times by yourself and so it definitely has been bootloaded, so you won't need to move any further in this tutorial.

However, if you purchased some extra Atmega8 or Atmega168 chips from an online store they will have NOT been bootloaded with the Arduino bootloader (with the exception of [[http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=17&products_id=56|Adafruit Industries]]). What does this mean? You won't be able to program your chips using the USB to serial breakout board and the Arduino software. So, in order to make your new chips useful for Arduino you MUST bootload them and MUST check out step 4.

[[<<]]

!!Other Breadboard Options

[[http://www.instructables.com/id/uDuino-Very-Low-Cost-Arduino-Compatible-Developme|The uDuino Setup by Tymn Twillman]]\\
This configuration is similar to the one above but the trick is that the Atmega chip is bootloaded with the Arduino Lilypad bootloader. The Lilypad runs using the internal clock instead of an external clock and so removes the need for much of the supporting circuitry.

[[http://www.ladyada.net/make/boarduino/|Boarduino by Ladyada]]\\
The Boarduino is a kit you purchase and assemble to create a nice, small breadboard compatible Arduino set up. All the common components are included on a small PCB so that the Boarduino can easily be added to a breadboard and even removed, in a snap.

[[<<]]

!!Bootloading your chips '''OPTIONAL'''

!!!!Bootloading Options

There are two options for bootloading your chips. The first being quite easy and the other being a little more tricky. We will cover both.

* Bootloading your Atmega chip using a Arduino board and an AVR programmer
* Bootloading your Atmega chip in your newly prepared breadboard with an AVR programmer

There are also many different kinds of AVR programmers but two are most commonly used here at ITP:

%lframe height=200px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_mk2.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_mk2.jpg"AVRISP mkII"]] | [-AVRISP mkII-]

%lframe height=200px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_tiny.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_tiny.jpg"USBtinyISp"]] | [-USBtinyISP-]

[[<<]]

The AVRISP mkII can be found in the ER or can be purchased from Digikey (Part # [[http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?Detail?name=ATAVRISP2-ND|ATAVRISP2-ND]]) while the USBtinyISP must be assembled and can be found at [[http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=16&products_id=46|Adafruit Industries]].

!!!!Using an Arduino board

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_bootload1.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_bootload1.jpg"ArduinoBootload"]] | [-Bootloading on an Arduino board-]

Place your Atmega chip into the Arduino board with the divot of the chip facing outward. Set the jumper to an external power supply and connect a 12V power brick (your board needs to be externally powered when using the AVR ISP mkII but is not needed with the AVRtinyISP) . Then, attach the 6-pin female plug of your AVR programmer to the 6 male header ICSP pins with the plastic nub of the ribbon cable head facing inward.

NOTE: The AVR ISP mkII turns its LED green when they've been hooked up correctly and are ready for programming. The LED turns red if it is hooked up wrong.

[[<<]]

!!!!Using your breadboard


%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_avradapter.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_avradapter.jpg"AVRAdapter"]] | [-AVR Programming Adapter-]

When bootloading an Atmega chip on a breadboard, I found the AVR programming adapter (SKU [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=8508|BOB-08508]]) from Sparkfun to be incredibly handy. This adapter breaks out the 6 pins from the programmer to 6 inline pins for easy attachment to the breadboard. All the pins are also labeled making it very easy to connect it up to your chip.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/6pinAVRprogcable.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/6pinAVRprogcable.jpg"6pinAVRprogcable"]] | [-6-pin AVR Programmer Cable-]

Don't worry, if you don't have an AVR programming adapter you can still bootload without it. It will however be more of a headache to set up. The two images to the left are great references when hooking up a programmer to an Atmega chip without an adapter board. The images will tell you what all the holes in the 6-pin AVR plug are and you will simply need to stick wires in the end and run them to your Atmega chip.

[[<<]]


%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/6pinAVRproghead.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/6pinAVRproghead.jpg"6pinAVRproghead"]] | [-6-pin AVR Programmer Cable Head-]

This image is a view from the bottom and labels each of the holes. Take note of the square as to what orientation your cable is in.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_pwrgnd.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_pwrgnd.jpg"AVRpwrgnd"]] | [-Add power and ground-]

'+Let's begin!+'

With the breadboard you prepared above, add two wires for power and ground for your AVR programmer.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_plugadapter.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_plugadapter.jpg"AVRplug"]] | [-Plug in the AVR adapter-]

Now plug the AVR programming adapter into the breadboard with the GND pin matching up with the ground wire you just ran and the 5V pin matching up with the power wire you just ran.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px margin-right=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_wires.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_wires.jpg"AVRwires"]] | [-Add the MISO, SCK, RESET, and MOSI wires-]

In this step you will need to add the last four wires needed by the AVR programmer for proper bootloading.

Be sure to refer to the [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduino_pinmap.png|Arduino pin mapping]] for help wiring this up.

* The MISO pin of your adapter will go to pin 18 or Arduino digital pin 12 of your Atmega chip.
* The SCK pin of your adapter will go to pin 19 or Arduino digital pin 13 of your Atmega chip.
* The RESET pin of your adapter will go to pin 1 of your Atmega chip.
* The MOSI pin of your adapter will go to pin 17 or Arduino digital pin 11 of your Atmega chip.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px margin-right=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_plugin.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_plugin.jpg"Plugin"]] | [-Plug in the USB cable and AVR programming cable-]

Almost there! Just plug in a USB cable to your USB breakout board and plug the 6-pin plug of your AVR programmer to your AVR programming adapter. The black nub of the 6-pin head must be facing upwards towards the Atmega chip.

In the next step, we'll show you have to use the Arduino software to burn your bootloader!

[[<<]]

!!!!Time to burn!

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_pickboard.png | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_pickboard.png"ArduinoPickBoard"]] | [-Pick your board type-]

Fire up Arduino and then go to 'Tools' and 'Board'. Choosing the type of board you'd like to use will effect which bootloader you will be put on your chip. Most commonly you will be using the Diecimilia or the most recent version of Arduino for an Atmega PDIP, however if you'd like to bootload an Arduino Lilypad, Arduino Mini, Arduino Nano, or any of the older Arduino versions, choose the appropriate board.

[[<<]]


%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burn.png | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burn.png"ArduinoBurn"]] | [-Choose your programmer. Burn!-]

Then, go to 'Tools' and 'Burn Bootloader' and choose the programmer you will be using.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burning.png | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burning.png"ArduinoBurning"]] | [-Burning-]

Once you chose your programmer, the AVR programmer will begin bootloading your Atmega chip and a message will appear in the status bar which reads "Burning bootloader to I/O Board (this may take a minute)..." Lights will flicker on your programmer.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burndone.png | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burndone.png"BurnDone"]] | [-Burn Complete!-]

When done bootloading, the status bar will be updated with the message  "Done burning bootloader." Your chip is now ready to be programmer using the Arduino software! Congrats! Power cycle your Arduino and your new Atmega chip will be running a simple LED blink program with pin 13 (if this is not the case, try programming it with one). If this is working, it was most definitely a success.

NOTE: On occasion, the process of bootloading an Atmega chip with the AVR ISP mkII will take an extraordinarily long period of time. Usually it should only take a couple minutes and in fact, the AVRtinyISP finishes much quicker. However, there are times where after 5-10 minutes it still appears to be bootloading. I found this to be an odd hiccup (perhaps it is triple checking the data flow) and after giving it ample time, 10 minutes or so, I usually unplug the programmer only to find the burning process to be a success and has ended long ago. I by no means endorse this method and you take all responsibility in whatever may happen to your chip, but in my experience it has been fairly harmless though you should proceed with caution. It is very possible that you may damage your chip in the process.

[[<<]]
January 06, 2014, at 01:58 PM by Embarcepreamn -
Changed lines 1-282 from:
(:title Setting up an Arduino on a breadboard:)

!! Overview
This tutorial shows you how to build an Arduino compatible breadboard with an Atmel Atmega8/168 AVR microcontroller and FTDI FT232 breakout board from [[http://www.sparkfun.com/|SparkFun]].

Originally created by Carlyn Maw\\
Updated October 23, 2008 by Rory Nugent

(:toc Table of Contents:)

!!Parts

To do this, you'll need:

%lfloat width=400px margin-top=5px margin-right=25px margin-bottom=5px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_parts.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_parts.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]

!!!!Basic Parts for wiring up Arduino
* A breadboard
* 22 AWG wire
* 7805 Voltage regulator
* 2 LEDs
* 2 220 Ohm resistors
* 1 10k Ohm  resistor
* 2 10 uF capacitors
* 16 MHz clock crystal
* 2 22 pF capacitors
* small momentary normally open ("off") button, i.e. Omron type B3F

!!!!USB to Serial Communication Board

You will need a FT232 USB Breakout board from [[http://www.sparkfun.com/|SparkFun]].

There are two options available from them:
* FT232RL USB to Serial Breakout Board, SKU [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=718|BOB-0071]]
* Arduino Serial USB Board, SKU [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=8165|DEV-08165]]

If you plan to use the top option and have not yet soldered headers to the breakout board, now would be a good time.

!!!!Bootloading your Atmega Chips (Optional)

There are several options for bootloading your Atmega chips, a few of which are covered in this tutorial. If you wish to bootload your Atmega chips using your breadboard, an additional part will make your life much easier but is not necessary.

AVR Programming Adapter from Sparkfun, SKU [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=8508|BOB-08508]]

[[<<]]

!!Adding circuitry for a power supply

If you've already worked with microcontrollers, it is likely that you already have a preferred way to wire up a power supply to your board, so go ahead and do it that way. In case you need some reminders,  here are some pictures of one way to go about it. (We are going for a 5V regulated power supply)

[[<<]]
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_02.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_02.jpg"toppower"]] | [-Top Power lines-]
Add power and ground wires for where your voltage regulator will be.
[[<<]]
[[<<]]
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_03.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_03.jpg"bottompower"]] | [-Bottom Power lines-]
Add power and ground wires at the bottom of your board connecting each rail.
[[<<]]
[[<<]]
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_04.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_04.jpg"7805"]] | [-Add the 7805 and decoupling capacitors -]

Add the 7805 power regulator and the lines to power the board. The regulator is a TO-220 package where the IN-line from the external power supply goes IN on the left, ground is in the middle and the 5V OUT is on the right (when facing the front of the regulator). We're also adding power OUT and ground wires that connect to the right rail and power IN and ground wires off to the left where our power supply may go.

Also, add a 10uF capacitor between the IN of the regulator and the ground as well as a 10uF capacitor on the right rail between power and ground. The silver strip on the capacitor signifies the ground leg.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05.jpg"PowerLED"]] | [-LED-]
Add an LED on the left side of your board across from the voltage regulator. An LED attached to power like this is a great troubleshooting trick. You'll always know when your board is being powered as well as quickly know if your board is being shorted.
[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05_supply.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05_supply.jpg"Power Supply Input"]] | [-Power Supply Input-]
The red and black wires to the left of the voltage regulator is where your power supply will be plugged in. The red wire is for the POWER and the black wire is for the GROUND. Be sure to only attach a power supply that is between 7-16V. Any lower and you won't get 5V out of your regulator. Any higher and your regulator may get too hot. A 9V battery, 9V DC power supply, or 12V DC power supply is suitable.
[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_06.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_06.jpg"BlankCanvas"]] | [-Blank Canvas-]
Now that the power-basics are done we are ready to load on the chip!

[[<<]]

!!ATMEGA8/168 Basics
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduino_pinmap.png|http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduino_pinmap.png"Arduino Pinmap"]] | [-Arduino Pin Map-]

Before moving on, this image is a great resource for learning what each of the pins on your Atmega chip do in relation to the Arduino's functions. This will clarify a lot of confusion behind why we hook up certain pins the way we do. For even more detailed information, take a peek at the datasheet for the Atmega 168 ([[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/2545S.pdf|short version]]) ([[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc2545.pdf|long version]]).

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px margin-right=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_07.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_07.jpg"AddingChipCircuitry"]] | [-Add supporting circuitry-]

Start by adding a 10k ohm resistor "up" (to power) on the RESET pin in order to prevent the chip from resetting itself during normal operation. The RESET pin reboots the chip when pulled down to ground. In later steps we will show you how to add a reset switch that takes advantage of this.

* '''Pin 7''' - Vcc - ''Digital Supply Voltage''
* '''Pin 8''' - GND
* '''Pin 22''' - GND
* '''Pin 21''' - AREF - ''Analog reference pin for ADC''
* '''Pin 20''' - AVcc - ''Suppply voltage for the ADC converter. Needs to be connected to power if ADC isn't being used and to power via a low-pass filter if it is'' (a low pass filter is a circuit that cleans out noise from the power source, we aren't using one)

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_08.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_08.jpg"AddClock"]] | [-Add the Clock & Caps-]
Add a 16 MHz external clock between pin 9 and 10, and add two 22 pF capacitors running to ground on each of those pins.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_09.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_09.jpg"AddReset"]] | [-Add a reset switch-]
This is where we add the small tactile switch so that we can reset the Arduino whenever we'd like and prepare the chip for uploading a new program. A quick momentary press of this switch will reset the chip when needed. Add the switch just above the top of the Atmega chip crossing the gap in the breadboard. Then, add a wire from the bottom left leg of the switch to the RESET pin of the Atmega chip and a wire from the top left leg of the switch to ground.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_10.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_10.jpg"LEDWires"]] | [-LED leads on Arduino pin 13-]
The chip I'm using on this board is actually already programmed using the blink_led program that comes with the Arduino software.  If you already have an Arduino printed circuit board running it is a good idea to go ahead and check the breadboard version you are building with a chip you know works. The blink_led program blinks pin 13. Pin 13 on the Arduino is NOT the AVR ATMEGA8-16PU/ATMEGA168-16PU pin 13. It is actually pin 19 on the Atmega chip.

Refer to the [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduino_pinmap.png|pin mapping]] above to be sure you are plugging it in correctly.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_11.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_11.jpg"LED"]] | [-LED on Arduino Pin 13-]

Finally, add the LED. The long leg or the cathode connects to the red wire and the short leg or the anode connects to the 220 ohm resistor going to ground.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_12.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_12.jpg"Arduino-Ready!"]] | [-Arduino-Ready!-]

At this point if you had already programmed your chip somewhere else and didn't need this breadboard circuit to reprogram the chip, you could stop here. But part of the fun is in-circuit programming so keep going to really make a full USB-Arduino-circuit on a breadboard!

[[<<]]

!!Arduino-Ready

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_13.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_13.jpg"Add USB"]] | [-Add FT232 USB to Serial Board-]

Now we'll be adding the USB to Serial breakout board to our Arduino breadboard circuit. If you haven't added male headers to your breakout board, you will need to do it now.

Connect pin 6 of the breakout board to power and pin 9 to ground. With the USB port facing upward, I'm calling the top left pin 1, the bottom left 9, the top right 10, and the bottom right 18.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_usbback.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_usbback.jpg"USBBack"]] | [-The pinouts of the Sparkfun FT232 breakout-]

Curious what all the pin outs are for the SparkFun FT232 breakout board, just simply flip it over! In this situation we'll be using VCC (to supply 5V from the USB port to your board), GND, TXD, and RXD.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_14.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_14.jpg"TXRX"]] | [-Connecting the TX and RX-]
Now, let's get the USB to serial breakout board talking with your new Arduino setup. Connect the RX (pin 2) of your Atmega chip to pin 10 of the USB to serial board, and connect the TX (pin 3) of your Atmega chip to pin 14 of the USB to serial board.


[[<<]]

And there you have it... ready to be plugged in, powered up and programmed!

But wait, there's another step right? If you pulled your Atmega chip out of your Arduino, it has most likely been programed several times by yourself and so it definitely has been bootloaded, so you won't need to move any further in this tutorial.

However, if you purchased some extra Atmega8 or Atmega168 chips from an online store they will have NOT been bootloaded with the Arduino bootloader (with the exception of [[http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=17&products_id=56|Adafruit Industries]]). What does this mean? You won't be able to program your chips using the USB to serial breakout board and the Arduino software. So, in order to make your new chips useful for Arduino you MUST bootload them and MUST check out step 4.

[[<<]]

!!Other Breadboard Options

[[http://www.instructables.com/id/uDuino-Very-Low-Cost-Arduino-Compatible-Developme|The uDuino Setup by Tymn Twillman]]\\
This configuration is similar to the one above but the trick is that the Atmega chip is bootloaded with the Arduino Lilypad bootloader. The Lilypad runs using the internal clock instead of an external clock and so removes the need for much of the supporting circuitry.

[[http://www.ladyada.net/make/boarduino/|Boarduino by Ladyada]]\\
The Boarduino is a kit you purchase and assemble to create a nice, small breadboard compatible Arduino set up. All the common components are included on a small PCB so that the Boarduino can easily be added to a breadboard and even removed, in a snap.

[[<<]]

!!Bootloading your chips '''OPTIONAL'''

!!!!Bootloading Options

There are two options for bootloading your chips. The first being quite easy and the other being a little more tricky. We will cover both.

* Bootloading your Atmega chip using a Arduino board and an AVR programmer
* Bootloading your Atmega chip in your newly prepared breadboard with an AVR programmer

There are also many different kinds of AVR programmers but two are most commonly used here at ITP:

%lframe height=200px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_mk2.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_mk2.jpg"AVRISP mkII"]] | [-AVRISP mkII-]

%lframe height=200px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_tiny.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_tiny.jpg"USBtinyISp"]] | [-USBtinyISP-]

[[<<]]

The AVRISP mkII can be found in the ER or can be purchased from Digikey (Part # [[http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?Detail?name=ATAVRISP2-ND|ATAVRISP2-ND]]) while the USBtinyISP must be assembled and can be found at [[http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=16&products_id=46|Adafruit Industries]].

!!!!Using an Arduino board

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_bootload1.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_bootload1.jpg"ArduinoBootload"]] | [-Bootloading on an Arduino board-]

Place your Atmega chip into the Arduino board with the divot of the chip facing outward. Set the jumper to an external power supply and connect a 12V power brick (your board needs to be externally powered when using the AVR ISP mkII but is not needed with the AVRtinyISP) . Then, attach the 6-pin female plug of your AVR programmer to the 6 male header ICSP pins with the plastic nub of the ribbon cable head facing inward.

NOTE: The AVR ISP mkII turns its LED green when they've been hooked up correctly and are ready for programming. The LED turns red if it is hooked up wrong.

[[<<]]

!!!!Using your breadboard


%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_avradapter.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_avradapter.jpg"AVRAdapter"]] | [-AVR Programming Adapter-]

When bootloading an Atmega chip on a breadboard, I found the AVR programming adapter (SKU [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=8508|BOB-08508]]) from Sparkfun to be incredibly handy. This adapter breaks out the 6 pins from the programmer to 6 inline pins for easy attachment to the breadboard. All the pins are also labeled making it very easy to connect it up to your chip.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/6pinAVRprogcable.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/6pinAVRprogcable.jpg"6pinAVRprogcable"]] | [-6-pin AVR Programmer Cable-]

Don't worry, if you don't have an AVR programming adapter you can still bootload without it. It will however be more of a headache to set up. The two images to the left are great references when hooking up a programmer to an Atmega chip without an adapter board. The images will tell you what all the holes in the 6-pin AVR plug are and you will simply need to stick wires in the end and run them to your Atmega chip.

[[<<]]


%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/6pinAVRproghead.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/6pinAVRproghead.jpg"6pinAVRproghead"]] | [-6-pin AVR Programmer Cable Head-]

This image is a view from the bottom and labels each of the holes. Take note of the square as to what orientation your cable is in.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_pwrgnd.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_pwrgnd.jpg"AVRpwrgnd"]] | [-Add power and ground-]

'+Let's begin!+'

With the breadboard you prepared above, add two wires for power and ground for your AVR programmer.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_plugadapter.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_plugadapter.jpg"AVRplug"]] | [-Plug in the AVR adapter-]

Now plug the AVR programming adapter into the breadboard with the GND pin matching up with the ground wire you just ran and the 5V pin matching up with the power wire you just ran.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px margin-right=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_wires.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_wires.jpg"AVRwires"]] | [-Add the MISO, SCK, RESET, and MOSI wires-]

In this step you will need to add the last four wires needed by the AVR programmer for proper bootloading.

Be sure to refer to the [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduino_pinmap.png|Arduino pin mapping]] for help wiring this up.

* The MISO pin of your adapter will go to pin 18 or Arduino digital pin 12 of your Atmega chip.
* The SCK pin of your adapter will go to pin 19 or Arduino digital pin 13 of your Atmega chip.
* The RESET pin of your adapter will go to pin 1 of your Atmega chip.
* The MOSI pin of your adapter will go to pin 17 or Arduino digital pin 11 of your Atmega chip.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px margin-right=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_plugin.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_plugin.jpg"Plugin"]] | [-Plug in the USB cable and AVR programming cable-]

Almost there! Just plug in a USB cable to your USB breakout board and plug the 6-pin plug of your AVR programmer to your AVR programming adapter. The black nub of the 6-pin head must be facing upwards towards the Atmega chip.

In the next step, we'll show you have to use the Arduino software to burn your bootloader!

[[<<]]

!!!!Time to burn!

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_pickboard.png | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_pickboard.png"ArduinoPickBoard"]] | [-Pick your board type-]

Fire up Arduino and then go to 'Tools' and 'Board'. Choosing the type of board you'd like to use will effect which bootloader you will be put on your chip. Most commonly you will be using the Diecimilia or the most recent version of Arduino for an Atmega PDIP, however if you'd like to bootload an Arduino Lilypad, Arduino Mini, Arduino Nano, or any of the older Arduino versions, choose the appropriate board.

[[<<]]


%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burn.png | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burn.png"ArduinoBurn"]] | [-Choose your programmer. Burn!-]

Then, go to 'Tools' and 'Burn Bootloader' and choose the programmer you will be using.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burning.png | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burning.png"ArduinoBurning"]] | [-Burning-]

Once you chose your programmer, the AVR programmer will begin bootloading your Atmega chip and a message will appear in the status bar which reads "Burning bootloader to I/O Board (this may take a minute)..." Lights will flicker on your programmer.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burndone.png | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burndone.png"BurnDone"]] | [-Burn Complete!-]

When done bootloading, the status bar will be updated with the message  "Done burning bootloader." Your chip is now ready to be programmer using the Arduino software! Congrats! Power cycle your Arduino and your new Atmega chip will be running a simple LED blink program with pin 13 (if this is not the case, try programming it with one). If this is working, it was most definitely a success.

NOTE: On occasion, the process of bootloading an Atmega chip with the AVR ISP mkII will take an extraordinarily long period of time. Usually it should only take a couple minutes and in fact, the AVRtinyISP finishes much quicker. However, there are times where after 5-10 minutes it still appears to be bootloading. I found this to be an odd hiccup (perhaps it is triple checking the data flow) and after giving it ample time, 10 minutes or so, I usually unplug the programmer only to find the burning process to be a success and has ended long ago. I by no means endorse this method and you take all responsibility in whatever may happen to your chip, but in my experience it has been fairly harmless though you should proceed with caution. It is very possible that you may damage your chip in the process.

[[<<]]
to:
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Changed lines 280-281 from:
NOTE: On occasion, the process of bootloading an Atmega chip with the AVR ISP mkII will take an extraordinarily long period of time. Usually it should only take a couple minutes and in fact, the AVRtinyISP finishes much quicker. However, there are times where after 5-10 minutes it still appears to be bootloading. I found this to be an odd hiccup (perhaps it is triple checking the data flow) and after giving it ample time, 10 minutes or so, I usually unplug the programmer only to find the burning process to be a success and has ended long ago. I by no means endorse this method and you take all responsibility in whatever may happen to your chip, but in my experience it has been fairly harmless though you should process with caution. It is very possible that you may damage your chip in the process.
to:
NOTE: On occasion, the process of bootloading an Atmega chip with the AVR ISP mkII will take an extraordinarily long period of time. Usually it should only take a couple minutes and in fact, the AVRtinyISP finishes much quicker. However, there are times where after 5-10 minutes it still appears to be bootloading. I found this to be an odd hiccup (perhaps it is triple checking the data flow) and after giving it ample time, 10 minutes or so, I usually unplug the programmer only to find the burning process to be a success and has ended long ago. I by no means endorse this method and you take all responsibility in whatever may happen to your chip, but in my experience it has been fairly harmless though you should proceed with caution. It is very possible that you may damage your chip in the process.
Added line 223:
Changed line 222 from:
!!!! Let's begin!
to:
'+Let's begin!+'
Changed lines 188-189 from:
'+Using an Arduino board+'
to:
!!!!Using an Arduino board
Changed lines 198-200 from:
'+Using your breadboard+'

to:
!!!!Using your breadboard

Changed line 222 from:
'''Let's begin!'''\\
to:
!!!! Let's begin!
Changed lines 254-255 from:
'+Time to burn!+'
to:
!!!!Time to burn!
Changed lines 171-172 from:
'+Bootloading Options+'
to:
!!!!Bootloading Options
Changed lines 169-170 from:
!!! Step 4: Bootloading your chips '''OPTIONAL'''
to:
!!Bootloading your chips '''OPTIONAL'''
Changed lines 47-48 from:
!!!Step 1: Adding circuitry for a power supply
to:
!!Adding circuitry for a power supply
Changed line 81 from:
!!!Step 2: ATMEGA8/168 Basics
to:
!!ATMEGA8/168 Basics
Changed lines 129-130 from:
!!! Step 3: Arduino-Ready
to:
!!Arduino-Ready
Changed lines 159-160 from:
!!! Other Breadboard Options
to:
!!Other Breadboard Options
Changed lines 11-12 from:
!!!!Parts
to:
!!Parts
Added lines 1-2:
(:title Setting up an Arduino on a breadboard:)
Changed lines 9-10 from:
!!!! To do this, you'll need:
to:
(:toc Table of Contents:)

!!!!Parts

To do this, you'll need:
Changed lines 66-68 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05_supply.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_06.jpg"BlankCanvas"]] | [-Blank Canvas-]
Now that the power-basics are done we are ready to load on the chip!
to:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05_supply.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05_supply.jpg"Power Supply Input"]] | [-Power Supply Input-]
The red and black wires to the left of the voltage regulator is where your power supply will be plugged in. The red wire is for the POWER and the black wire is for the GROUND. Be sure to only attach a power supply that is between 7-16V. Any lower and you won't get 5V out of your regulator. Any higher and your regulator may get too hot. A 9V battery, 9V DC power supply, or 12V DC power supply is suitable.
Changed lines 66-67 from:

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_06.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_06.jpg"BlankCanvas"]] | [-Blank Canvas-]
to:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05_supply.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_06.jpg"BlankCanvas"]] | [-Blank Canvas-]
Added lines 71-75:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_06.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_06.jpg"BlankCanvas"]] | [-Blank Canvas-]
Now that the power-basics are done we are ready to load on the chip!

[[<<]]

Changed lines 50-51 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_03.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_03.jpg"bottompower"]] | [-Connect the sensors]
6 Push buttons
to:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_03.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_03.jpg"bottompower"]] | [-Bottom Power lines-]
Add power and ground wires at the bottom of your board connecting each rail.
Changed lines 54-55 from:

to:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_04.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_04.jpg"7805"]] | [-Add the 7805 and decoupling capacitors -]
Changed lines 81-82 from:
Start by adding a 10k ohm pull-up resistor to power on the RESET pin in order to prevent the chip from resetting itself during normal operation. The RESET pin reboots the chip when pulled down to ground. In later steps we will show you how to add a reset switch that takes advantage of this.
to:
Start by adding a 10k ohm resistor "up" (to power) on the RESET pin in order to prevent the chip from resetting itself during normal operation. The RESET pin reboots the chip when pulled down to ground. In later steps we will show you how to add a reset switch that takes advantage of this.
Changed lines 50-51 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_03.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_03.jpg"bottompower"]] | [-Bottom Power lines-]
Add power and ground wires at the bottom of your board connecting each rail.
to:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_03.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_03.jpg"bottompower"]] | [-Connect the sensors]
6 Push buttons
Changed lines 54-55 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_04.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_04.jpg"7805"]] | [-Add the 7805 and decoupling capacitors -]
to:

Changed lines 81-82 from:
Start by adding a 10k ohm resistor "up" (to power) on the RESET pin in order to prevent the chip from resetting itself during normal operation. The RESET pin reboots the chip when pulled down to ground. In later steps we will show you how to add a reset switch that takes advantage of this.
to:
Start by adding a 10k ohm pull-up resistor to power on the RESET pin in order to prevent the chip from resetting itself during normal operation. The RESET pin reboots the chip when pulled down to ground. In later steps we will show you how to add a reset switch that takes advantage of this.
Changed lines 268-271 from:
When done bootloading, the status bar will be updated with the message  "Done burning bootloader." Your chip is now ready to be programmer using the Arduino software! Congrats! Power cycle your Arduino and your new Atmega chip will be running a simple LED blink program with pin 13. If this is working, it was most definitely a success.

NOTE: On occasion, the process of bootloading an Atmega chip will take an extraordinary long period
of time. Usually it should only take a couple minutes. However, there are times where after 5-10 minutes it still appears to be bootloading. I found this to be an odd hiccup and after giving it ample time, 10 minutes or so, I usually unplug the programmer only to find  the burning process to be a success and has ended long ago. I found this remedy to be fairly safe but definitely proceed with caution. It is possible that you may damage your chip in the process.
to:
When done bootloading, the status bar will be updated with the message  "Done burning bootloader." Your chip is now ready to be programmer using the Arduino software! Congrats! Power cycle your Arduino and your new Atmega chip will be running a simple LED blink program with pin 13 (if this is not the case, try programming it with one). If this is working, it was most definitely a success.

NOTE: On occasion, the process
of bootloading an Atmega chip with the AVR ISP mkII will take an extraordinarily long period of time. Usually it should only take a couple minutes and in fact, the AVRtinyISP finishes much quicker. However, there are times where after 5-10 minutes it still appears to be bootloading. I found this to be an odd hiccup (perhaps it is triple checking the data flow) and after giving it ample time, 10 minutes or so, I usually unplug the programmer only to find the burning process to be a success and has ended long ago. I by no means endorse this method and you take all responsibility in whatever may happen to your chip, but in my experience it has been fairly harmless though you should process with caution. It is very possible that you may damage your chip in the process.
Changed lines 183-186 from:
Place your Atmega chip into the Arduino board with the divot of the chip facing outward. Set the jumper to an external power supply and connect a 12V power brick (this is very important. the board must be externally powered). Then, attach the 6-pin female plug of your AVR programmer to the 6 male header ICSP pins with the plastic nub of the ribbon cable head facing inward.

NOTE: The AVR ISP mkII and probably other programmers turn their
LED green when they've been hooked up correctly and are ready for programming. The LED turns red if it is hooked up wrong.
to:
Place your Atmega chip into the Arduino board with the divot of the chip facing outward. Set the jumper to an external power supply and connect a 12V power brick (your board needs to be externally powered when using the AVR ISP mkII but is not needed with the AVRtinyISP) . Then, attach the 6-pin female plug of your AVR programmer to the 6 male header ICSP pins with the plastic nub of the ribbon cable head facing inward.

NOTE: The AVR ISP mkII turns its
LED green when they've been hooked up correctly and are ready for programming. The LED turns red if it is hooked up wrong.
Changed lines 183-184 from:
Place your Atmega chip into the Arduino board with the missing nub facing outward. Set the jumper to an external power supply and connect a 12V power brick (this is very important. the board must be externally powered). Then, attach the 6-pin female plug of your AVR programmer to the 6 male header ICSP pins with the plastic nub of the ribbon cable head facing inward.
to:
Place your Atmega chip into the Arduino board with the divot of the chip facing outward. Set the jumper to an external power supply and connect a 12V power brick (this is very important. the board must be externally powered). Then, attach the 6-pin female plug of your AVR programmer to the 6 male header ICSP pins with the plastic nub of the ribbon cable head facing inward.
Changed lines 153-155 from:
This configuration is similar to the one above but the trick is that the Atmega chip is bootloaded with the Arduino Lilypad bootloader and so many of the supporting components are not needed. Very minimal and barebones, but also cheap.

to:
This configuration is similar to the one above but the trick is that the Atmega chip is bootloaded with the Arduino Lilypad bootloader. The Lilypad runs using the internal clock instead of an external clock and so removes the need for much of the supporting circuitry.
Changed lines 156-157 from:
to:
The Boarduino is a kit you purchase and assemble to create a nice, small breadboard compatible Arduino set up. All the common components are included on a small PCB so that the Boarduino can easily be added to a breadboard and even removed, in a snap.
Added lines 155-157:

[[http://www.ladyada.net/make/boarduino/|Boarduino by Ladyada]]\\

Changed lines 148-156 from:
to:
[[<<]]

!!! Other Breadboard Options

[[http://www.instructables.com/id/uDuino-Very-Low-Cost-Arduino-Compatible-Developme|The uDuino Setup by Tymn Twillman]]\\
This configuration is similar to the one above but the trick is that the Atmega chip is bootloaded with the Arduino Lilypad bootloader and so many of the supporting components are not needed. Very minimal and barebones, but also cheap.

[[<<]]

Changed lines 251-252 from:
Once you chose your programmer, the AVR programmer will begin bootloading your Atmega chip and a message will appear in the status bar which reads "Burning bootloader to I/O Board (this may take a minute)..." Lights will flicker your programmer.
to:
Once you chose your programmer, the AVR programmer will begin bootloading your Atmega chip and a message will appear in the status bar which reads "Burning bootloader to I/O Board (this may take a minute)..." Lights will flicker on your programmer.
Changed lines 238-239 from:
Fire up Arduino and then go to 'Tools' and 'Board'. Choosing the type of board you'd like to use will effect which bootloader you will be put on your chip. Most commonly you will be using the Diecimilia or the most recent version of Arduino for an Atmega PDIP, however if you'd like to bootload an Arduino Mini, Arduino Nano, or any of the older Arduino versions, choose the appropriate board.
to:
Fire up Arduino and then go to 'Tools' and 'Board'. Choosing the type of board you'd like to use will effect which bootloader you will be put on your chip. Most commonly you will be using the Diecimilia or the most recent version of Arduino for an Atmega PDIP, however if you'd like to bootload an Arduino Lilypad, Arduino Mini, Arduino Nano, or any of the older Arduino versions, choose the appropriate board.
Changed lines 149-150 from:
!!! Step 5: Bootloading your chips '''OPTIONAL'''
to:
!!! Step 4: Bootloading your chips '''OPTIONAL'''
Changed lines 56-59 from:
Add the 7805 power regulator and the lines to power the board. The regulator is a TO-220 package where the in-line from the external power supply goes in on the left, ground is in the middle and the 5V out is on the right (when facing the front of the regulator). We're also adding power out and ground wires that connect to the right rail and power in and ground wires off to the left where our power supply may go.

Also, add a 10uF capacitor between the in of the regulator and the ground as well as a 10uF capacitor on the right rail between power and ground. The silver strip on the capacitor signifies the ground leg.
to:
Add the 7805 power regulator and the lines to power the board. The regulator is a TO-220 package where the IN-line from the external power supply goes IN on the left, ground is in the middle and the 5V OUT is on the right (when facing the front of the regulator). We're also adding power OUT and ground wires that connect to the right rail and power IN and ground wires off to the left where our power supply may go.

Also, add a 10uF capacitor between the IN of the regulator and the ground as well as a 10uF capacitor on the right rail between power and ground. The silver strip on the capacitor signifies the ground leg.
Changed lines 35-36 from:
There are several options for bootloading your Atmega chips, a few of which are covered in this tutorial. If you wish to bootload your Atmega chips using your breadboard, an additional part will make your life much easier.
to:
There are several options for bootloading your Atmega chips, a few of which are covered in this tutorial. If you wish to bootload your Atmega chips using your breadboard, an additional part will make your life much easier but is not necessary.
Changed lines 202-203 from:
Let's begin! With the breadboard you prepared above, add two wires for power and ground for your AVR programmer.
to:
'''Let's begin!'''\\
With the breadboard you prepared above, add two wires for power and ground for your AVR programmer.
Changed lines 187-190 from:
%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_pwrgnd.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_pwrgnd.jpg"AVRpwrgnd"]] | [-Add power and ground-]

With the breadboard you prepared above, add two wires for power and ground for your AVR programmer.
to:
%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/6pinAVRprogcable.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/6pinAVRprogcable.jpg"6pinAVRprogcable"]] | [-6-pin AVR Programmer Cable-]

Don't worry, if you don't have an AVR programming adapter you can still bootload without it. It will however be more of a headache to set up. The two images to the left are great references when hooking up a programmer to an Atmega chip without an adapter board. The images will tell you what all the holes in the 6-pin AVR plug are and you will simply need to stick wires in the end and run them to your Atmega chip.
Changed lines 193-196 from:
%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_plugadapter.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_plugadapter.jpg"AVRplug"]] | [-Plug in the AVR adapter-]

Now plug the AVR programming adapter into the breadboard with the GND pin matching up with the ground wire you just ran and the 5V pin matching up with the power wire you just ran.
to:

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/6pinAVRproghead.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/6pinAVRproghead.jpg"6pinAVRproghead"]] | [-6-pin AVR Programmer Cable Head-]

This image is a view from the bottom and labels each of the holes. Take note of the square as to what orientation your cable is in.
Added lines 200-211:
%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_pwrgnd.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_pwrgnd.jpg"AVRpwrgnd"]] | [-Add power and ground-]

Let's begin! With the breadboard you prepared above, add two wires for power and ground for your AVR programmer.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_plugadapter.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_plugadapter.jpg"AVRplug"]] | [-Plug in the AVR adapter-]

Now plug the AVR programming adapter into the breadboard with the GND pin matching up with the ground wire you just ran and the 5V pin matching up with the power wire you just ran.

[[<<]]

Changed lines 212-213 from:
%lframe width=250px margin-right=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_wires.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_wires.jpg"AVRwires"]] | [-Add the MISO, SCK, RESET, and MOSI wires-]
to:
%lframe width=250px margin-right=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_plugin.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_plugin.jpg"Plugin"]] | [-Plug in the USB cable and AVR programming cable-]
Changed lines 199-200 from:
%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_wires.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_wires.jpg"AVRwires"]] | [-Add the MISO, SCK, RESET, and MOSI wires-]
to:
%lframe width=250px margin-right=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_wires.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_wires.jpg"AVRwires"]] | [-Add the MISO, SCK, RESET, and MOSI wires-]
Added lines 212-219:
%lframe width=250px margin-right=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_wires.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_wires.jpg"AVRwires"]] | [-Add the MISO, SCK, RESET, and MOSI wires-]

Almost there! Just plug in a USB cable to your USB breakout board and plug the 6-pin plug of your AVR programmer to your AVR programming adapter. The black nub of the 6-pin head must be facing upwards towards the Atmega chip.

In the next step, we'll show you have to use the Arduino software to burn your bootloader!

[[<<]]

Added lines 199-211:
%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_wires.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_wires.jpg"AVRwires"]] | [-Add the MISO, SCK, RESET, and MOSI wires-]

In this step you will need to add the last four wires needed by the AVR programmer for proper bootloading.

Be sure to refer to the [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduino_pinmap.png|Arduino pin mapping]] for help wiring this up.

* The MISO pin of your adapter will go to pin 18 or Arduino digital pin 12 of your Atmega chip.
* The SCK pin of your adapter will go to pin 19 or Arduino digital pin 13 of your Atmega chip.
* The RESET pin of your adapter will go to pin 1 of your Atmega chip.
* The MOSI pin of your adapter will go to pin 17 or Arduino digital pin 11 of your Atmega chip.

[[<<]]

Changed lines 195-196 from:
Now plug the AVR programming adapter into the breadboard with the ground pin matching up with the ground wire you just ran and the 5V pin matching up with the power wire you just ran.
to:
Now plug the AVR programming adapter into the breadboard with the GND pin matching up with the ground wire you just ran and the 5V pin matching up with the power wire you just ran.
Added line 207:
Deleted lines 213-218:
%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burn.png | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burn.png"ArduinoBurn"]] | [-Choose your programmer. Burn!-]

Then, go to 'Tools' and 'Burn Bootloader' and choose the programmer you will be using.

[[<<]]

Added lines 193-198:
%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_plugadapter.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_plugadapter.jpg"AVRplug"]] | [-Plug in the AVR adapter-]

Now plug the AVR programming adapter into the breadboard with the ground pin matching up with the ground wire you just ran and the 5V pin matching up with the power wire you just ran.

[[<<]]

Changed lines 172-173 from:
Place your Atmega chip into the Arduino board with the missing nub facing outward. Set the jumper to an external power supply and connect a 12V power brick. Then, attach the 6-pin female plug of your AVR programmer to the 6 male header ICSP pins with the plastic nub of the ribbon cable head facing inward.
to:
Place your Atmega chip into the Arduino board with the missing nub facing outward. Set the jumper to an external power supply and connect a 12V power brick (this is very important. the board must be externally powered). Then, attach the 6-pin female plug of your AVR programmer to the 6 male header ICSP pins with the plastic nub of the ribbon cable head facing inward.

NOTE: The AVR ISP mkII and probably other programmers turn their LED green when they've been hooked up correctly and are ready for programming. The LED turns red if it is hooked up wrong
.
Added lines 180-184:

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_avradapter.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_avradapter.jpg"AVRAdapter"]] | [-AVR Programming Adapter-]

When bootloading an Atmega chip on a breadboard, I found the AVR programming adapter (SKU [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=8508|BOB-08508]]) from Sparkfun to be incredibly handy. This adapter breaks out the 6 pins from the programmer to 6 inline pins for easy attachment to the breadboard. All the pins are also labeled making it very easy to connect it up to your chip.

Added lines 187-192:
%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_pwrgnd.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_pwrgnd.jpg"AVRpwrgnd"]] | [-Add power and ground-]

With the breadboard you prepared above, add two wires for power and ground for your AVR programmer.

[[<<]]

Added lines 186-211:
[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burn.png | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burn.png"ArduinoBurn"]] | [-Choose your programmer. Burn!-]

Then, go to 'Tools' and 'Burn Bootloader' and choose the programmer you will be using.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burn.png | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burn.png"ArduinoBurn"]] | [-Choose your programmer. Burn!-]

Then, go to 'Tools' and 'Burn Bootloader' and choose the programmer you will be using.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burning.png | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burning.png"ArduinoBurning"]] | [-Burning-]

Once you chose your programmer, the AVR programmer will begin bootloading your Atmega chip and a message will appear in the status bar which reads "Burning bootloader to I/O Board (this may take a minute)..." Lights will flicker your programmer.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burndone.png | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_burndone.png"BurnDone"]] | [-Burn Complete!-]

When done bootloading, the status bar will be updated with the message  "Done burning bootloader." Your chip is now ready to be programmer using the Arduino software! Congrats! Power cycle your Arduino and your new Atmega chip will be running a simple LED blink program with pin 13. If this is working, it was most definitely a success.

NOTE: On occasion, the process of bootloading an Atmega chip will take an extraordinary long period of time. Usually it should only take a couple minutes. However, there are times where after 5-10 minutes it still appears to be bootloading. I found this to be an odd hiccup and after giving it ample time, 10 minutes or so, I usually unplug the programmer only to find  the burning process to be a success and has ended long ago. I found this remedy to be fairly safe but definitely proceed with caution. It is possible that you may damage your chip in the process.

Changed lines 184-185 from:
Fire up Arduino and then go to 'Tools' and 'Board'. Choosing the type of board you'd like to use will effect which bootloader you will be put on your chip. Most commonly you will be using the Diecimilia or the most recent version of Arduino for an Atmega PDIP, however
to:
Fire up Arduino and then go to 'Tools' and 'Board'. Choosing the type of board you'd like to use will effect which bootloader you will be put on your chip. Most commonly you will be using the Diecimilia or the most recent version of Arduino for an Atmega PDIP, however if you'd like to bootload an Arduino Mini, Arduino Nano, or any of the older Arduino versions, choose the appropriate board.
Added lines 177-186:

[[<<]]

'+Time to burn!+'

%lframe width=250px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_pickboard.png | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobload_pickboard.png"ArduinoPickBoard"]] | [-Pick your board type-]

Fire up Arduino and then go to 'Tools' and 'Board'. Choosing the type of board you'd like to use will effect which bootloader you will be put on your chip. Most commonly you will be using the Diecimilia or the most recent version of Arduino for an Atmega PDIP, however

[[<<]]
Changed lines 144-147 from:
But wait, there's another step right? If you pulled your Atmega chip out of your Arduino, it is most likely bootloaded at the factory and you won't need to move any further in this tutorial. However, if you purchased some Atmega8 or Atmega168 chips from a store they will NOT be bootloaded with the Arduino bootloader (with the exception of [[http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=17&products_id=56|Adafruit Industries]]). What does this mean? You won't be able to program your chips using the USB to serial breakout board and the Arduino software. So, in order to make your new chips useful for Arduino you MUST bootload them and MUST check out step 4.


to:
But wait, there's another step right? If you pulled your Atmega chip out of your Arduino, it has most likely been programed several times by yourself and so it definitely has been bootloaded, so you won't need to move any further in this tutorial.

However, if you purchased some extra Atmega8 or Atmega168 chips from an online store they will have NOT been bootloaded with the Arduino bootloader (with the exception of
[[http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=17&products_id=56|Adafruit Industries]]). What does this mean? You won't be able to program your chips using the USB to serial breakout board and the Arduino software. So, in order to make your new chips useful for Arduino you MUST bootload them and MUST check out step 4.

Added lines 174-175:
[[<<]]
Changed lines 146-149 from:
[[<<]]

Bootloading
Options
to:


!!! Step 5: Bootloading your chips '''OPTIONAL'''

'+Bootloading
Options+'
Deleted lines 166-169:
[[<<]]

!!! Step 5: Bootloading your chips '''OPTIONAL'''

Changed line 173 from:
[[<<]]
to:
'+Using your breadboard+'
Changed lines 144-145 from:
But wait, there's another step right? If you pulled your Atmega chip out of your Arduino, it is most likely bootloaded at the factory and you won't need to move any further in this tutorial. However, if you purchased some Atmega8 or Atmega168 chips from a store they will NOT be bootloaded with the Arduino bootloader (with the exception of [[http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=17&products_id=56|Adafruit Industries]]). What does this mean? You won't be able to program your chips using the USB to serial breakout board and the Arduino software. So, in order to make your new chips useful for Arduino you MUST bootload them and MUST check out step 4 and step 5.
to:
But wait, there's another step right? If you pulled your Atmega chip out of your Arduino, it is most likely bootloaded at the factory and you won't need to move any further in this tutorial. However, if you purchased some Atmega8 or Atmega168 chips from a store they will NOT be bootloaded with the Arduino bootloader (with the exception of [[http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=17&products_id=56|Adafruit Industries]]). What does this mean? You won't be able to program your chips using the USB to serial breakout board and the Arduino software. So, in order to make your new chips useful for Arduino you MUST bootload them and MUST check out step 4.
Changed lines 148-149 from:
!!! Step 4: Bootloading Options '''OPTIONAL'''
to:
Bootloading Options
Changed lines 155-156 from:
%lframe height=200px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_bootload1.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_bootload1.jpg"ArduinoBootload"]] | [-Bootloading on an Arduino board-]
to:
There are also many different kinds of AVR programmers but two are most commonly used here at ITP:

%lframe height=200px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_mk2.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_mk2.jpg"AVRISP mkII"]] | [-AVRISP mkII-]

%lframe height=200px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_tiny.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_tiny.jpg"USBtinyISp"]] | [-USBtinyISP-]

[[<<]]

The AVRISP mkII can be found in the ER or can be purchased from Digikey (Part # [[http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?Detail?name=ATAVRISP2-ND|ATAVRISP2-ND]]) while the USBtinyISP must be assembled and can be found at [[http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=16&products_id=46|Adafruit Industries]].

[[<<]]

!!! Step 5: Bootloading your chips '''OPTIONAL'''

'+Using an Arduino board+'

%lframe width=250px
% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_bootload1.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_bootload1.jpg"ArduinoBootload"]] | [-Bootloading on an Arduino board-]
Changed line 175 from:
!!! Step 5: Bootloading your chips '''OPTIONAL'''
to:
[[<<]]
Changed lines 144-145 from:
But wait, there's another step right? If you pulled your Atmega chip out of your Arduino, it is most likely bootloaded at the factory and you won't need to move any further in this tutorial. However, if you purchased some Atmega8 or Atmega168 chips from a store they will NOT be bootloaded with the Arduino bootloader (with the exception of [[http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=17&products_id=56|Adafruit Industries]]). What does this mean? You won't be able to program your chips using the USB to serial breakout board and the Arduino software. So, in order to make your new chips useful for Arduino you MUST bootload them and MUST check out step 4.
to:
But wait, there's another step right? If you pulled your Atmega chip out of your Arduino, it is most likely bootloaded at the factory and you won't need to move any further in this tutorial. However, if you purchased some Atmega8 or Atmega168 chips from a store they will NOT be bootloaded with the Arduino bootloader (with the exception of [[http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=17&products_id=56|Adafruit Industries]]). What does this mean? You won't be able to program your chips using the USB to serial breakout board and the Arduino software. So, in order to make your new chips useful for Arduino you MUST bootload them and MUST check out step 4 and step 5.
Changed lines 148-149 from:
!!! Step 4: Bootloading your chips '''OPTIONAL'''
to:
!!! Step 4: Bootloading Options '''OPTIONAL'''
Changed lines 155-159 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_bootload1.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_bootload1.jpg"ArduinoBootload"]] | [-Bootloading on an Arduino board-]
to:
%lframe height=200px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_bootload1.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_bootload1.jpg"ArduinoBootload"]] | [-Bootloading on an Arduino board-]

Place your Atmega chip into the Arduino board with the missing nub facing outward. Set the jumper to an external power supply and connect a 12V power brick. Then, attach the 6-pin female plug of your AVR programmer to the 6 male header ICSP pins with the plastic nub of the ribbon cable head facing inward.

!!! Step 5: Bootloading your chips '''OPTIONAL'''
Changed lines 122-123 from:
%lframe width=180px margin-right=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_13.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_13.jpg"Add USB"]] | [-Add FT232 USB to Serial Board-]
to:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_13.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_13.jpg"Add USB"]] | [-Add FT232 USB to Serial Board-]
Changed lines 130-131 from:
%lframe width=180px margin-right=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_usbback.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_usbback.jpg"USBBack"]] | [-The pinouts of the Sparkfun FT232 breakout-]
to:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_usbback.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_usbback.jpg"USBBack"]] | [-The pinouts of the Sparkfun FT232 breakout-]
Changed line 136 from:
%lframe width=180px margin-right=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_14.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_14.jpg"TXRX"]] | [-Connecting the TX and RX-]
to:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_14.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_14.jpg"TXRX"]] | [-Connecting the TX and RX-]
Changed lines 148-151 from:
!!! Step 4: Bootloading your chips

There
are two options for bootloading your chips. One being quite easy and the other being a little more tricky.
to:
!!! Step 4: Bootloading your chips '''OPTIONAL'''

There
are two options for bootloading your chips. The first being quite easy and the other being a little more tricky. We will cover both.
Changed lines 153-155 from:
* Bootloading your Atmega chip in your newly prepared breadboard with an AVR programmer
to:
* Bootloading your Atmega chip in your newly prepared breadboard with an AVR programmer

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_bootload1.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_bootload1.jpg"ArduinoBootload"]] | [-Bootloading on an Arduino board-]
Changed lines 144-145 from:
But wait, there's another step right? If you pulled your Atmega chip out of your Arduino, it is most likely bootloaded at the factory and you won't need to move any further in this tutorial. However, if you purchased some Atmega8 or Atmega168 chips from a store they will NOT be bootloaded with the Arduino bootloader (with the exception of [[http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=17&products_id=56|Adafruit Industries]]). What does this mean? You won't be able to program your chips using the USB to serial breakout board and the Arduino software. So, in order to make your new chips useful you must bootload them and must check out step 4.
to:
But wait, there's another step right? If you pulled your Atmega chip out of your Arduino, it is most likely bootloaded at the factory and you won't need to move any further in this tutorial. However, if you purchased some Atmega8 or Atmega168 chips from a store they will NOT be bootloaded with the Arduino bootloader (with the exception of [[http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=17&products_id=56|Adafruit Industries]]). What does this mean? You won't be able to program your chips using the USB to serial breakout board and the Arduino software. So, in order to make your new chips useful for Arduino you MUST bootload them and MUST check out step 4.
Changed lines 148-153 from:
!!! Step 4: Bootloading your chips
to:
!!! Step 4: Bootloading your chips

There are two options for bootloading your chips. One being quite easy and the other being a little more tricky.

* Bootloading your Atmega chip using a Arduino board and an AVR programmer
* Bootloading your Atmega chip in your newly prepared breadboard with an AVR programmer
Deleted line 141:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Fin-]
Changed lines 144-148 from:
[[<<]]
to:
But wait, there's another step right? If you pulled your Atmega chip out of your Arduino, it is most likely bootloaded at the factory and you won't need to move any further in this tutorial. However, if you purchased some Atmega8 or Atmega168 chips from a store they will NOT be bootloaded with the Arduino bootloader (with the exception of [[http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=17&products_id=56|Adafruit Industries]]). What does this mean? You won't be able to program your chips using the USB to serial breakout board and the Arduino software. So, in order to make your new chips useful you must bootload them and must check out step 4.

[[<<]]

!!! Step 4: Bootloading your chips
Changed lines 136-139 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-16.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-16.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Blue lines-]
Now, let's get the USB to serial breakout board talking with your new Arduino setup. Connect the RX (pin 2) of your Atmega chip to
Here we connect
the AVR ATMEGA8 RX (pin 2) to the FT232 TXD (pin 1) and the ATMEGA8 TX (pin 3) to the FT232 RXD (pin 5)
to:
%lframe width=180px margin-right=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_14.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_14.jpg"TXRX"]] | [-Connecting the TX and RX-]
Now, let's get the USB to serial breakout board talking with your new Arduino setup. Connect the RX (pin 2) of your Atmega chip to pin 10 of the USB to serial board, and connect the TX (pin 3) of your Atmega chip to pin 14 of the USB to serial board.

Changed lines 142-144 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-17.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-17.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the USB socket-]
Now take your USB socket and put it on the board. You will definitely want to check the data sheet of any USB socket you buy to make sure you know how the pins line up because they are determined by industry standards. The USB cable is going to put power out where it puts power out, not where you decide to put the red wire
! In the "Type B" kind we use it goes kinda like [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/USB-B.gif | this]].
to:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Fin-]
And there you have it... ready to be plugged in, powered up and programmed
!
Deleted lines 145-162:

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-18.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-18.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Connect USB socket-]
So once you get your USB port straightened out - you can connect it to the FTDI 232RL like this:

* '''Pin 21''' - '''Ground''' (black) The ground reference (coming from the computer) for the whole board
* '''Pin 20'' (VCC) - '''Power''' (red) The power supply (coming from the computer) for the whole board

You may find that you have to run this breadboard version of things directly from the computer or a well powered hub.

* '''Pin 16''' - USBDM - USB Data Signal Minus, Yellow wire
* '''Pin 15''' - USBDP - USB Data Signal Plus, Blue wire

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Fin-]
And there you have it... ready to be plugged in, powered up and programmed!

[[<<]]
Added lines 126-127:
Connect pin 6 of the breakout board to power and pin 9 to ground. With the USB port facing upward, I'm calling the top left pin 1, the bottom left 9, the top right 10, and the bottom right 18.
Added line 137:
Now, let's get the USB to serial breakout board talking with your new Arduino setup. Connect the RX (pin 2) of your Atmega chip to
Changed lines 114-115 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_12.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_12.jpg"LED"]] | [-Arduino-Ready!-]
to:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_12.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_12.jpg"Arduino-Ready!"]] | [-Arduino-Ready!-]
Changed lines 122-132 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-15.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-15.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add FTDI FT232-]
Here we've already gone ahead and mounted
the surface mount chip on the spark-fun breakout board listed in the materials, stuck it into the breadboard and added the power and ground lines. You can look at the [[http://www.sparkfun.com/datasheets/IC/FT232R_v104.pdf | FT232R Datasheet]]. The pins down the left of the breakout board are conveniently the pins down the left of the chip as pictured in the datasheet.

*  '''Pin 4''' - VCCIO  - ''+1.8V to +5.25V supply to the UART Interface and CBUS group pins (1...3, 5, 6, 9...14, 22, 23)...'' UART stands for "Universal Asynchronous Receiver Transmitter" and basically this pin determines what voltage the USB port will transmit as "high"
*  '''Pin 7''' - GND
*  '''Pin 26''' - TEST (to GND) - ''Puts the device into I.C. test mode. Must be tied to GND for normal operation.''
*  '''Pin 25''' - AGND (to GND) - ''Device analog ground supply for internal clock multiplier''
*  '''Pin 21''' - GND
*  '''Pin 20''' - VCC - ''3.3V to 5.25V supply to the device core.''
*  '''Pin 18''' - GND

to:
%lframe width=180px margin-right=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_13.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_13.jpg"Add USB"]] | [-Add FT232 USB to Serial Board-]

Now we'll be adding
the USB to Serial breakout board to our Arduino breadboard circuit. If you haven't added male headers to your breakout board, you will need to do it now.
Added lines 128-133:
%lframe width=180px margin-right=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_usbback.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_usbback.jpg"USBBack"]] | [-The pinouts of the Sparkfun FT232 breakout-]

Curious what all the pin outs are for the SparkFun FT232 breakout board, just simply flip it over! In this situation we'll be using VCC (to supply 5V from the USB port to your board), GND, TXD, and RXD.

[[<<]]

Added lines 114-115:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_12.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_12.jpg"LED"]] | [-Arduino-Ready!-]
Deleted lines 121-125:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-13.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-13.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-the RESET pin-]
This is where we take advantage of the RESET pin as the way to prepare the chip to recieve a new program from the Arduino sotware. In this step we add a little momentary button and hook it up so that when it's pressed the RESET pin gets exposed to ground. The chip then reboots and listens for any signal being sent to it via the USB port that might represent a new program.

[[<<]]

Changed lines 110-111 from:
Finally, add the LED. The long leg or the cathode connects to the red wire and the short leg or the anode connects to the resistor going to ground.
to:
Finally, add the LED. The long leg or the cathode connects to the red wire and the short leg or the anode connects to the 220 ohm resistor going to ground.
Changed lines 101-105 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_10.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_10.jpg"LEDWires"]] | [-LED leads on pin 13-]
The chip I'm using on this board is actually already programmed using the blink_led program that comes with the Arduino software.  If you already have an Arduino printed circuit board running it is a good idea to go ahead and check the breadboard version you are building with a chip you know works. The blink_led program blinks pin 13. Pin 13 on the Arduino is NOT the AVR ATMEGA8-16PU/ATMEGA168-16PU pin 13. It is actually pin 19 on the Atmega chip. Refer to the [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduino_pinmap.png|pin mapping]] above to be sure you are plugging it in correctly.

There is a nice little picture of the [[http://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/PinMapping | Pin Mapping]] on the Arduino site
.
to:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_10.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_10.jpg"LEDWires"]] | [-LED leads on Arduino pin 13-]
The chip I'm using on this board is actually already programmed using the blink_led program that comes with the Arduino software.  If you already have an Arduino printed circuit board running it is a good idea to go ahead and check the breadboard version you are building with a chip you know works. The blink_led program blinks pin 13. Pin 13 on the Arduino is NOT the AVR ATMEGA8-16PU/ATMEGA168-16PU pin 13. It is actually pin 19 on the Atmega chip.

Refer
to the [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduino_pinmap.png|pin mapping]] above to be sure you are plugging it in correctly.
Changed lines 108-113 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-12.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-12.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Basic Board Done-]
to:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_11.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_11.jpg"LED"]] | [-LED on Arduino Pin 13-]

Finally, add the LED. The long leg or the cathode connects to the red wire and the short leg or the anode connects to the resistor going to ground.

[[<<]]

Changed lines 101-103 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-11.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-11.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-LED on pin "13"-]
The chip I'm using on this board is actually already programmed using the blink_led program that comes with the Arduino software.  If you already have an Arduino printed circuit board running it is a good idea to go ahead and check the breadboard version you are building with a chip you know works. The blink_led program blinks pin 13. Pin 13 on the Arduino is NOT the AVR ATMEGA8-16PU pin 13. There is a nice little picture of the [[http://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/PinMapping | Pin Mapping]] on the Arduino site.
to:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_10.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_10.jpg"LEDWires"]] | [-LED leads on pin 13-]
The chip I'm using on this board is actually already programmed using the blink_led program that comes with the Arduino software.  If you already have an Arduino printed circuit board running it is a good idea to go ahead and check the breadboard version you are building with a chip you know works. The blink_led program blinks pin 13. Pin 13 on the Arduino is NOT the AVR ATMEGA8-16PU/ATMEGA168-16PU pin 13. It is actually pin 19 on the Atmega chip. Refer to the [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduino_pinmap.png|pin mapping]] above to be sure you are plugging it in correctly.

There is a nice little picture of the [[http://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/PinMapping | Pin Mapping]] on the Arduino site.
Changed lines 92-95 from:
16 MHz external clock with two 22 pF capacitors running to ground.

[[<<]]
to:
Add a 16 MHz external clock between pin 9 and 10, and add two 22 pF capacitors running to ground on each of those pins.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_09.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_09.jpg"AddReset"]] | [-Add a reset switch-]
This is where we add the small tactile switch so that we can reset the Arduino whenever we'd like and prepare the chip for uploading a new program. A quick momentary press of this switch will reset the chip when needed. Add the switch just above the top of the Atmega chip crossing the gap in the breadboard. Then, add a wire from the bottom left leg of the switch to the RESET pin of the Atmega chip and a wire from the top left leg of the switch to ground.

[[<<]]

Changed line 91 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_07.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_07.jpg"AddClock"]] | [-Add the Clock & Caps-]
to:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_08.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_08.jpg"AddClock"]] | [-Add the Clock & Caps-]
Changed lines 75-76 from:
Before moving on, this image is a great resource for learning what each of the pins on your Atmega chip do in relation to the Arduino's functions. This will clarify a lot of confusion behind why we hook up certain pins the way we do. For even more detailed information, take a peek at the datasheets for the Atmega 8 and Atmega 168.
to:
Before moving on, this image is a great resource for learning what each of the pins on your Atmega chip do in relation to the Arduino's functions. This will clarify a lot of confusion behind why we hook up certain pins the way we do. For even more detailed information, take a peek at the datasheet for the Atmega 168 ([[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/2545S.pdf|short version]]) ([[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc2545.pdf|long version]]).

[[<<]]

Changed lines 81-82 from:
Start by adding a 10k ohm resistor "up" (to power) an the RESET pin in order to prevent the chip from resetting itself during normal operation. The RESET pin reboots the chip when pulled down to ground. In later steps we will show you how to add a reset switch that takes advantage of this.
to:
Start by adding a 10k ohm resistor "up" (to power) on the RESET pin in order to prevent the chip from resetting itself during normal operation. The RESET pin reboots the chip when pulled down to ground. In later steps we will show you how to add a reset switch that takes advantage of this.
Changed line 91 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-10.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-10.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the Clock-]
to:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_07.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_07.jpg"AddClock"]] | [-Add the Clock & Caps-]
Changed lines 73-75 from:

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_07.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_07.jpg"AddingChipCircuitry"]] | [-Add supporting circuitry-]
to:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduino_pinmap.png|http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduino_pinmap.png"Arduino Pinmap"]] | [-Arduino Pin Map-]

Before moving on, this image is a great resource for learning what each of the pins on your Atmega chip do in relation to the Arduino's functions. This will clarify a lot of confusion behind why we hook up certain pins the way we do. For even more detailed information, take a peek at the datasheets for the Atmega 8 and Atmega 168.

%lframe width=180px margin-right=25px
% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_07.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_07.jpg"AddingChipCircuitry"]] | [-Add supporting circuitry-]
Changed lines 76-84 from:

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-08.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-08.jpg"the supplies
"]] | [-Add the Chip-]
Like other microcontrollers, the AVR chips also need that trusty 10k Ohm resistor "up" (to power) on their master-clear / reset pin in order
to prevent the chip from resetting itself during normal operation. The RESET pin reboots the chip when it is linked to ground. We are going to use that feature later, but for now we just want the chip to run steadily so we hook it up with a high-valued resistor to power.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=180px margin-right: 50px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Basic power and ground lines. You can get more information from the [[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/2486S.pdf| Summary Datasheet]] or the 300 page [[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc2486.pdf | Long Version]]

to:
Start by adding a 10k ohm resistor "up" (to power) an the RESET pin in order to prevent the chip from resetting itself during normal operation. The RESET pin reboots the chip when pulled down to ground. In later steps we will show you how to add a reset switch that takes advantage of this.
Changed line 82 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
to:
%lframe width=180px margin-right: 50px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Added lines 74-76:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_07.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_07.jpg"AddingChipCircuitry"]] | [-Add supporting circuitry-]

Changed line 67 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_06.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_06.jpg"]] | [-Blank Canvas-]
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_06.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_06.jpg"BlankCanvas"]] | [-Blank Canvas-]
Changed lines 66-67 from:
Attach:arduinobb_06.jpg
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-07.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-07.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Blank Canvas-]
to:

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_06.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_06.jpg"]] | [-Blank Canvas-]
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!!!Step 2: ATMEGA8 Basics
to:
!!!Step 2: ATMEGA8/168 Basics
Added line 66:
Attach:arduinobb_06.jpg
Changed line 63 from:
Here there is an LED to signal that the board is getting power on the bottom left. Some people like to power the led across the foot of the board so you can see that both sides are wired up correctly.
to:
Add an LED on the left side of your board across from the voltage regulator. An LED attached to power like this is a great troubleshooting trick. You'll always know when your board is being powered as well as quickly know if your board is being shorted.
Changed line 62 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[ttp://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05.jpg | ttp://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05.jpg"PowerLED"]] | [-LED-]
to:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05.jpg"PowerLED"]] | [-LED-]
Deleted lines 59-63:
[[<<]]
Attach:file.ext
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-05.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-05.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the capacitors-]
These capacitors and power regulator aren't strictly necessary if you're only ever going to power the board from the USB port. They are convenient to have in place just in case you need to wire up a motor or are running a program that doesn't need to be actively communicating with the computer, etc.

Changed line 62 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-06.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-06.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-LED-]
to:
%lframe width=180px% [[ttp://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05.jpg | ttp://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_05.jpg"PowerLED"]] | [-LED-]
Changed lines 58-59 from:
Also, add a 10uF capacitor between the in of the regulator and the ground as well as a 10uF capacitor on the right rail between power and ground.
to:
Also, add a 10uF capacitor between the in of the regulator and the ground as well as a 10uF capacitor on the right rail between power and ground. The silver strip on the capacitor signifies the ground leg.
Changed line 61 from:
to:
Attach:file.ext
Changed lines 56-57 from:
Add the 7805 power regulator and the lines to power the board. The regulator is a TO-220 package where the in-line from the external power supply goes in on the left, ground is in the middle and the 5V out is on the right (when facing the front of the regulator). We're also adding power and ground wires that connect to the right rail and power and ground wires off to the left where our power supply may go.
to:
Add the 7805 power regulator and the lines to power the board. The regulator is a TO-220 package where the in-line from the external power supply goes in on the left, ground is in the middle and the 5V out is on the right (when facing the front of the regulator). We're also adding power out and ground wires that connect to the right rail and power in and ground wires off to the left where our power supply may go.
Changed lines 54-57 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-03.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-03.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the 7805 (A) -]

Add the 7805 power regulator and the lines to power the board. The regulator is a TO-220 package where the in-line from the external power supply goes in on the left, ground is in the middle and the 5V out is on the right (when facing the front of the regulator). We're putting lines across the board to have a little more room for our power supply down the road. You should also add wires to both side-strips of the breadboard leading from the rows that are the "ground" and "out" of the power regulator.
to:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_04.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_04.jpg"7805"]] | [-Add the 7805 and decoupling capacitors -]

Add the 7805 power regulator and the lines to power the board. The regulator is a TO-220 package where the in-line from the external power supply goes in on the left, ground is in the middle and the 5V out is on the right (when facing the front of the regulator). We're also adding power and ground wires that connect to the right rail and power and ground wires off to the left where our power supply may go.

Also, add a 10uF capacitor between
the in of the regulator and the ground as well as a 10uF capacitor on the right rail between power and ground.
Changed lines 61-64 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the 7805 (B)-]

[[<<]]

to:
Added line 47:
Add power and ground wires for where your voltage regulator will be.
Added line 51:
Add power and ground wires at the bottom of your board connecting each rail.
Changed lines 33-36 from:
!!!!AVR Breakout Board for Bootloading

If you plan to follow the optional step for bootloading your Atmega chip, you may like to get your hands on a really handy AVR breakout board from Sparkfun. This isn't required but
will make your life easier. The Sparkfun SKU is [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=8508|BOB-08508]].
to:
!!!!Bootloading your Atmega Chips (Optional)

There are several options for bootloading your Atmega chips, a few of which are covered in this tutorial. If you wish to bootload your Atmega chips using your breadboard, an additional part
will make your life much easier.

AVR Programming Adapter from Sparkfun, SKU
[[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=8508|BOB-08508]]
Added lines 33-36:
!!!!AVR Breakout Board for Bootloading

If you plan to follow the optional step for bootloading your Atmega chip, you may like to get your hands on a really handy AVR breakout board from Sparkfun. This isn't required but will make your life easier. The Sparkfun SKU is [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=8508|BOB-08508]].

Deleted lines 44-46:

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_03.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_03.jpg"bottompower"]] | [-Bottom Power lines-]

Added lines 46-49:
[[<<]]
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_03.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_03.jpg"bottompower"]] | [-Bottom Power lines-]
[[<<]]
[[<<]]
Changed lines 40-45 from:

Attach:file.ext
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg"wires"]] | [-Top Power lines-]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg"wires"]] | [-Bottom Power lines-]
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_02.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_02.jpg"toppower"]] | [-Top Power lines-]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_03.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_03.jpg"bottompower"]] | [-Bottom Power lines-]
Changed lines 40-42 from:
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg"wires"]] | [-Power lines-]
Add the 7805 power regulator and the lines to power the board
. The regulator is a TO-220 package where the in-line from the external power supply goes in on the left, ground is in the middle and the 5V out is on the right (when facing the front of the regulator). We're putting lines across the board to have a little more room for our power supply down the road. You should also add wires to both side-strips of the breadboard leading from the rows that are the "ground" and "out" of the power regulator.
to:

Attach:file.ext
%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg"wires"]] | [-Top Power lines-]

%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg | http://itp
.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg"wires"]] | [-Bottom Power lines-]
Added lines 49-50:
Add the 7805 power regulator and the lines to power the board. The regulator is a TO-220 package where the in-line from the external power supply goes in on the left, ground is in the middle and the 5V out is on the right (when facing the front of the regulator). We're putting lines across the board to have a little more room for our power supply down the road. You should also add wires to both side-strips of the breadboard leading from the rows that are the "ground" and "out" of the power regulator.
Changed lines 9-10 from:
%lfloat width=400px margin-top=5px margin-right=25px margin-bottom=5px margin-left=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
to:
%lfloat width=400px margin-top=5px margin-right=25px margin-bottom=5px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_parts.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/uploads/arduinobb_parts.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
Changed lines 2-6 from:
This tutorial is about building an Arduino compatible breadboard with an ATMEL8 AVR microcontroller and FTDI FT232 breakout board from Spark-fun.  The two skematics this is based on are [[http://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/StandaloneAssembly | here]] and  [[http://www.potemkin.org/uploads/Pid/arduino_usb.jpg | here]]

created June 2
, 2006 by Carlyn\\
last updated July 11, 2006 by Carlyn

to:
This tutorial shows you how to build an Arduino compatible breadboard with an Atmel Atmega8/168 AVR microcontroller and FTDI FT232 breakout board from [[http://www.sparkfun.com/|SparkFun]].

Originally created by Carlyn Maw\\
Updated October 23
, 2008 by Rory Nugent
Changed line 15 from:
* 2 LED
to:
* 2 LEDs
Changed lines 17-19 from:
* 1 10 k Ohm  resistor
* 10 uF capacitor
* 1 (or 2) 1 uF capacitor
to:
* 1 10k Ohm  resistor
* 2 10 uF capacitors
Changed lines 21-42 from:
* small momentary normally open ("off") button

!!!!Parts for wiring up
USB communication with computer

Here you have 2 options, the slightly cheaper build your own breakout board and USB connector option, or a ready made adapter from Spark Fun. We don't have the ready-made adapter yet, but we will follow up with that when we get it

!!!!Option 1:
This is
the option we are using in the below tutorial and it involves surface mounting the FTDI Chip on the the board yourself and making a little adapter for the USB connector because they are really annoying to hand solder directly on to wires...

* 1 USB Female Type B Connector mounted on perf-board with some headers
* FTDI 232RL USB to serial converter chip
* [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=500|SSOP to DIP Adapter 28-Pin]] SKU#: PCB-SSOP-28

!!!!Option 2:
* [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=718 | Spark Fun Breakout Board for FT232RL USB to Serial]] SKU#: PCB-FT232RL

[[<<]]

!!!Step 1: Power the board

If you've already worked with microcontrollers, it is likely that you already have a preferred way to wire up a power supply to your board, so go ahead and do it that way. In case you need some reminders,  here are some pictures of one way to go about it. (We are going for a 5V regulated power supply)

to:
* small momentary normally open ("off") button, i.e. Omron type B3F

!!!!
USB to Serial Communication Board

You will need a FT232 USB Breakout board from [[http://www.sparkfun.com/|SparkFun]].

There are two options available from them:
* FT232RL USB to Serial Breakout Board, SKU [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=718|BOB-0071]]
* Arduino Serial USB Board, SKU [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=8165|DEV-08165]]

If you plan to use the top option and have not yet soldered headers to
the breakout board, now would be a good time.
Added lines 34-39:

!!!Step 1: Adding circuitry for a power supply

If you've already worked with microcontrollers, it is likely that you already have a preferred way to wire up a power supply to your board, so go ahead and do it that way. In case you need some reminders,  here are some pictures of one way to go about it. (We are going for a 5V regulated power supply)

[[<<]]
Changed lines 9-11 from:
%lfloat width=400px margin-top=5px margin-right=25px
margin-bottom=5px margin-left=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
to:
%lfloat width=400px margin-top=5px margin-right=25px margin-bottom=5px margin-left=25px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
Changed lines 9-10 from:
%lframe width=400px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
to:
%lfloat width=400px margin-top=5px margin-right=25px
margin-bottom=5px margin-left=25px
% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
Changed lines 111-112 from:
Here we've already gone ahead and mounted the surface mount chip on the spark-fun breakout board listed in the materials, stuck it into the breadboard and added the power and ground lines. You can look at the [[http://www.ftdichip.com/Documents/DataSheets/DS_FT232R_v104.pdf | FT232R Datasheet]]. The pins down the left of the breakout board are conveniently the pins down the left of the chip as pictured in the datasheet.
to:
Here we've already gone ahead and mounted the surface mount chip on the spark-fun breakout board listed in the materials, stuck it into the breadboard and added the power and ground lines. You can look at the [[http://www.sparkfun.com/datasheets/IC/FT232R_v104.pdf | FT232R Datasheet]]. The pins down the left of the breakout board are conveniently the pins down the left of the chip as pictured in the datasheet.
Added line 135:
Changed line 113 from:
*  '''Pin 4''' - VCCIO  - ''+1.8V to +5.25V supply to the UART Interface and CBUS group pins (1...3, 5, 6, 9...14, 22, 23). In USB bus powered designs connect to 3V3OUT to drive out at 3.3V levels, or connect to VCC to drive out at 5V CMOS level. This pin can also be supplied with an external 1.8V - 2.8V supply in order to drive out at lower levels. It should be noted that in this case this supply should originate from the same source as the supply to Vcc. This means that in bus powered designs a regulator which is supplied by the 5V on the USB bus should be used.''
to:
*  '''Pin 4''' - VCCIO  - ''+1.8V to +5.25V supply to the UART Interface and CBUS group pins (1...3, 5, 6, 9...14, 22, 23)...'' UART stands for "Universal Asynchronous Receiver Transmitter" and basically this pin determines what voltage the USB port will transmit as "high"
Changed lines 129-130 from:
Now take your USB socket and put it on the board. You will definitely want to check the data sheet of any USB socket you buy to make sure you know how the pins line up because we are dealing with an industry standard. The USB cable is gonna put power out where it puts power out, not where you decide to put the red wire! In the "Type B" kind we use it goes kinda like [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/USB-B.gif | this]].
to:
Now take your USB socket and put it on the board. You will definitely want to check the data sheet of any USB socket you buy to make sure you know how the pins line up because they are determined by industry standards. The USB cable is going to put power out where it puts power out, not where you decide to put the red wire! In the "Type B" kind we use it goes kinda like [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/USB-B.gif | this]].
Changed lines 135-137 from:
* '''Pin 21''' and actually the whole board! - The '''Ground''' reference (black) is  from the computer and it runs into
*
'''Pin 20'' (VCC) to supply the chip, and the board. - '''Power''' (red) is coming from the computer and we run it into
to:
* '''Pin 21''' - '''Ground''' (black) The ground reference (coming from the computer) for the whole board
* '''Pin 20'' (VCC) -
'''Power''' (red) The power supply (coming from the computer) for the whole board
Changed lines 106-107 from:
This is where we set up the RESET pin as the way to reset the chip as preparation for downloading a new program from the Arduino sotware. In this step we add a little momentary button and hook it up so when pressed we expose the RESET pin to ground, rebooting the chip and priming it to listen to any signal we're going to send it via the USB port.
to:
This is where we take advantage of the RESET pin as the way to prepare the chip to recieve a new program from the Arduino sotware. In this step we add a little momentary button and hook it up so that when it's pressed the RESET pin gets exposed to ground. The chip then reboots and listens for any signal being sent to it via the USB port that might represent a new program.
Changed lines 84-85 from:
* '''Pin 20''' - AVcc - ''Suppply voltage for the ADC converter. ˜needs to be connected to power if ADC isn't being used and to power via a low-pass filter if it is''
to:
* '''Pin 20''' - AVcc - ''Suppply voltage for the ADC converter. Needs to be connected to power if ADC isn't being used and to power via a low-pass filter if it is'' (a low pass filter is a circuit that cleans out noise from the power source, we aren't using one)
Changed lines 99-100 from:
At this point if you had already programmed your chip somewhere else and didn't need the circuit you were building to be able to reprogram the chip, this is where you could stop... but we want to take it that extra step and really make a full USB-Arduino-circuit on a breadboard.
to:
At this point if you had already programmed your chip somewhere else and didn't need this breadboard circuit to reprogram the chip, you could stop here. But part of the fun is in-circuit programming so keep going to really make a full USB-Arduino-circuit on a breadboard!
Changed lines 73-74 from:
Like other microcontrollers, the AVR chips also need that trusty 10k Ohm resistor "up" on their master-clear / reset pin to keep the chip from resetting during normal operation. The RESET pin reboots the chip when it is linked to ground. We are going to use that feature later, but for now we just want the chip to run steady so we hook it up to high resistance to power.
to:
Like other microcontrollers, the AVR chips also need that trusty 10k Ohm resistor "up" (to power) on their master-clear / reset pin in order to prevent the chip from resetting itself during normal operation. The RESET pin reboots the chip when it is linked to ground. We are going to use that feature later, but for now we just want the chip to run steadily so we hook it up with a high-valued resistor to power.
Changed lines 84-85 from:
* '''Pin 20''' - AVcc - ''Suppply voltage for the ADC converter. ˜eeds to be connected to power if ADC isn't being used and to power via a low-pass filter if it is''
to:
* '''Pin 20''' - AVcc - ''Suppply voltage for the ADC converter. ˜needs to be connected to power if ADC isn't being used and to power via a low-pass filter if it is''
Changed lines 5-6 from:
last updated June 8, 2006 by Carlyn
to:
last updated July 11, 2006 by Carlyn
Changed lines 2-3 from:
This tutorial is about building an Arduino compatible breadboard with an ATMEL8 AVR microcontroller and FTDI FT232 breakout board from Spark-fun.
to:
This tutorial is about building an Arduino compatible breadboard with an ATMEL8 AVR microcontroller and FTDI FT232 breakout board from Spark-fun.  The two skematics this is based on are [[http://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/StandaloneAssembly | here]] and  [[http://www.potemkin.org/uploads/Pid/arduino_usb.jpg | here]]
Deleted line 48:
Changed lines 4-6 from:
created June 2, 2006 by Carlyn
updated June 8, 2006 by Carlyn
to:
created June 2, 2006 by Carlyn\\
last
updated June 8, 2006 by Carlyn
Changed lines 42-43 from:
If you've already worked with microcontrollers, it is likely that you already have a way you normally wire up the board. So go ahead and do it that way. In case you need some reminders,  here are some pictures of one way to go about it.
to:
If you've already worked with microcontrollers, it is likely that you already have a preferred way to wire up a power supply to your board, so go ahead and do it that way. In case you need some reminders,  here are some pictures of one way to go about it. (We are going for a 5V regulated power supply)
Changed lines 46-47 from:
Add the lines in and lines to both side-strips of the breadboard leading from where the power regulator is about to go.
to:
Add the 7805 power regulator and the lines to power the board. The regulator is a TO-220 package where the in-line from the external power supply goes in on the left, ground is in the middle and the 5V out is on the right (when facing the front of the regulator). We're putting lines across the board to have a little more room for our power supply down the road. You should also add wires to both side-strips of the breadboard leading from the rows that are the "ground" and "out" of the power regulator.
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Add the 7805 power regulator. Here a T0-220 package where the in-line from the external power supply goes in on the left, ground is in the middle and the 5V out is on the right (when facing the front of the regulator).
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Changed lines 126-127 from:
Here we connect the ATmega RX (pin 2) to the FT232 TXD (pin 1) and the ATmega TX (pin 3) to the FT232 RXD (pin 5)
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Here we connect the AVR ATMEGA8 RX (pin 2) to the FT232 TXD (pin 1) and the ATMEGA8 TX (pin 3) to the FT232 RXD (pin 5)
Changed lines 131-132 from:
Here we take our soldered up USB socket and put it on the board. You will definitely want to check the data sheet of any USB socket you buy to make sure you know how the pins line up because we are dealing with an industry standard. The USB cable is gonna put power out where it puts power out, not where you decide to put the red wire! In the "Type B" kind we use it goes kinda like [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/USB-B.gif | this]].
to:
Now take your USB socket and put it on the board. You will definitely want to check the data sheet of any USB socket you buy to make sure you know how the pins line up because we are dealing with an industry standard. The USB cable is gonna put power out where it puts power out, not where you decide to put the red wire! In the "Type B" kind we use it goes kinda like [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/USB-B.gif | this]].
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And there you have it... ready to be plugged in and powered up!
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And there you have it... ready to be plugged in, powered up and programmed!
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At this point if you, like us, had already programmed your chip somewhere else, this is where you could stop... but we want more! Way too much blank breadboard to be filled here.
to:
At this point if you had already programmed your chip somewhere else and didn't need the circuit you were building to be able to reprogram the chip, this is where you could stop... but we want to take it that extra step and really make a full USB-Arduino-circuit on a breadboard.
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-13.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-13.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-the MCLR pin-]
This is where we finally get to use the MCLR pin as it was intended. In this step we add a little momentary button and hook it up so when pressed we expose the MCLR pin to ground, rebooting the chip and priming it to listen to any signal we're going to send it via the USB port.
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-13.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-13.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-the RESET pin-]
This is where we set up the RESET pin as the way to reset the chip as preparation for downloading a new program from the Arduino sotware. In this step we add a little momentary button and hook it up so when pressed we expose the RESET pin to ground, rebooting the chip and priming it to listen to any signal we're going to send it via the USB port.
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Here we've already gone ahead and mounted the surface mount chip on the spark-fun breakout board, stuck it into the breadboard and added the power and ground lines. You can look at the [[http://www.ftdichip.com/Documents/DataSheets/DS_FT232R_v104.pdf | FT232R Datasheet]]. The pins down the left, conveniently are the pins down the left!
to:
Here we've already gone ahead and mounted the surface mount chip on the spark-fun breakout board listed in the materials, stuck it into the breadboard and added the power and ground lines. You can look at the [[http://www.ftdichip.com/Documents/DataSheets/DS_FT232R_v104.pdf | FT232R Datasheet]]. The pins down the left of the breakout board are conveniently the pins down the left of the chip as pictured in the datasheet.
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Here we connect the ATmega RX (PD0 / pin 2) to the FT232 TXD (pin 1) and the ATmega TX (PD1 / pin 3) to the FT232 RXD (pin 5)
to:
Here we connect the ATmega RX (pin 2) to the FT232 TXD (pin 1) and the ATmega TX (pin 3) to the FT232 RXD (pin 5)
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Basic power and ground lines. You can get more information from the [http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/2486S.pdf| Summary Datasheet] or the 300 page [http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc2486.pdf | Long Version]
to:
Basic power and ground lines. You can get more information from the [[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/2486S.pdf| Summary Datasheet]] or the 300 page [[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc2486.pdf | Long Version]]
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16 MHz external clock with two 22 pF capacitors running to ground
to:
16 MHz external clock with two 22 pF capacitors running to ground.
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The chip on this board is actually already programmed using the blink_led program that comes with it. That program blinks pin 13. Pin 13 on the Arduino is NOT the AVR ATMEGA8-16PU pin 13. THere is a nice little picture of the [[http://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/PinMapping | Pin Mapping]] on the Arduino site.
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The chip I'm using on this board is actually already programmed using the blink_led program that comes with the Arduino software.  If you already have an Arduino printed circuit board running it is a good idea to go ahead and check the breadboard version you are building with a chip you know works. The blink_led program blinks pin 13. Pin 13 on the Arduino is NOT the AVR ATMEGA8-16PU pin 13. There is a nice little picture of the [[http://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/PinMapping | Pin Mapping]] on the Arduino site.
Changed lines 75-76 from:
Like other microcontrollers, the AVR chips also need that trusty 10k Ohm resistor (brown-black-orange) "up" on their master-clear pin (MCLR) to keep the chip from resetting during normal operation. The MCLR pin reboots the chip when it is hooked up to ground. We are going to use that feature later, but for now we just want the chip to run steady so we hook it up to high resistance to power.
to:
Like other microcontrollers, the AVR chips also need that trusty 10k Ohm resistor "up" on their master-clear / reset pin to keep the chip from resetting during normal operation. The RESET pin reboots the chip when it is linked to ground. We are going to use that feature later, but for now we just want the chip to run steady so we hook it up to high resistance to power.
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* '''Pin 7''' - Vcc - ''http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc2486.pdf''
to:
* '''Pin 7''' - Vcc - ''Digital Supply Voltage''
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* '''Pin 21''' - AREF - ''''
* '''Pin 20
''' - AVcc
to:
* '''Pin 21''' - AREF - ''Analog reference pin for ADC''
* '''Pin 20''' - AVcc - ''Suppply voltage for the ADC converter. ˜eeds to be connected to power if ADC isn't being used and to power via a low-pass filter if it is''
Changed lines 80-81 from:
Basic power and ground lines.
* '''Pin 7''' - Vcc
to:
Basic power and ground lines. You can get more information from the [http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/2486S.pdf| Summary Datasheet] or the 300 page [http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc2486.pdf | Long Version]

* '''Pin 7''' - Vcc - ''http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc2486.pdf''
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* '''Pin 21''' - AREF (reference voltage )
to:
* '''Pin 21''' - AREF - ''''
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Add the lines in and lines to both side-strips of the breadboard
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Add the lines in and lines to both side-strips of the breadboard leading from where the power regulator is about to go.
Changed lines 51-52 from:
Add the 7805 power regulator
to:
Add the 7805 power regulator. Here a T0-220 package where the in-line from the external power supply goes in on the left, ground is in the middle and the 5V out is on the right (when facing the front of the regulator).
Changed lines 59-60 from:
These capacitors and power regulator aren't strictly necessary if you're only ever going to power the board from the USB port, but they are convenient to have in place, just in case.
to:
These capacitors and power regulator aren't strictly necessary if you're only ever going to power the board from the USB port. They are convenient to have in place just in case you need to wire up a motor or are running a program that doesn't need to be actively communicating with the computer, etc.
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Here there is an LED to signal that the board is getting power on the bottom left. Some people like to power the led across the foot of the board so you can see that both sides are wired up.
to:
Here there is an LED to signal that the board is getting power on the bottom left. Some people like to power the led across the foot of the board so you can see that both sides are wired up correctly. 
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Now that the basics are done we are ready to load on the chip!
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Now that the power-basics are done we are ready to load on the chip!
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!!!Step 2: ATMEL8 Basics
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!!!Step 2: ATMEGA8 Basics
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Like the PIC, the AVR chips also need that trusty 10 k resistor up in the top left hand corner, for exactly the same reason. This is the master-clear pin that reboots the chip when it is hooked up to ground. We are going to use that feature later, but for now we just want the chip to run steady so we hook it up to high resistance to power.
to:
Like other microcontrollers, the AVR chips also need that trusty 10k Ohm resistor (brown-black-orange) "up" on their master-clear pin (MCLR) to keep the chip from resetting during normal operation. The MCLR pin reboots the chip when it is hooked up to ground. We are going to use that feature later, but for now we just want the chip to run steady so we hook it up to high resistance to power.
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* '''Pin 21''' - AREF
to:
* '''Pin 21''' - AREF (reference voltage )
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!!!Step 1: Power the board as usual

However you like to do
it... here are some pictures as reminders
to:
!!!Step 1: Power the board

If you've already worked with microcontrollers,
it is likely that you already have a way you normally wire up the board. So go ahead and do it that way. In case you need some reminders,  here are some pictures of one way to go about it.
Changed lines 5-6 from:
updated June 8, by Carlyn
to:
updated June 8, 2006 by Carlyn
Added lines 4-6:
created June 2, 2006 by Carlyn
updated June 8, by Carlyn

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!!!!Basic Parts for wiring up Arduino
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!!!!Parts for wiring up USB communication with computer

Here you have 2 options, the slightly cheaper build your own breakout board and USB connector option, or a ready made adapter from Spark Fun. We don't have the ready-made adapter yet, but we will follow up with that when we get it

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These capacitors and power regulator aren't strickly necessary if you're only ever going to power the board from the USB port, but they are convenient to have in place, just in case.
to:
These capacitors and power regulator aren't strictly necessary if you're only ever going to power the board from the USB port, but they are convenient to have in place, just in case.
Changed line 64 from:
Here there is an LED to signal that the board is getting power on the bottm left. Some poeple like to power the led accross the foot of the board so you can see that both sides are wired up.
to:
Here there is an LED to signal that the board is getting power on the bottom left. Some people like to power the led across the foot of the board so you can see that both sides are wired up.
Changed lines 129-130 from:
Here we take our soldered up USB socket and put it on the board. You will definately want to check the data sheet of any USB socket you buy to make sure you know how the pins line up because we are dealing wth an industry standard.The USB cable is gonna put power out where it puts power out, not where you decide to put the red wire! In the "Type B" kind we use it goes kinda like [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/USB-B.gif | this]].
to:
Here we take our soldered up USB socket and put it on the board. You will definitely want to check the data sheet of any USB socket you buy to make sure you know how the pins line up because we are dealing with an industry standard. The USB cable is gonna put power out where it puts power out, not where you decide to put the red wire! In the "Type B" kind we use it goes kinda like [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/USB-B.gif | this]].
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%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg"wires"]] | [-Power lines-]
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg"wires"]] | [-Power lines-]
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%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-03.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-03.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the 7805 (A) -]
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-03.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-03.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the 7805 (A) -]
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%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the 7805 (B)-]
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the 7805 (B)-]
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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-05.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-05.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the capacitors-]
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-05.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-05.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the capacitors-]
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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-06.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-06.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-LED-]
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-06.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-06.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-LED-]
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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-07.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-07.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Blank Canvas-]
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-07.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-07.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Blank Canvas-]
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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-08.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-08.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the Chip-]
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-08.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-08.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the Chip-]
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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-10.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-10.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the Clock-]
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-10.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-10.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the Clock-]
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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-11.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-11.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-LED on pin "13"-]
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-11.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-11.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-LED on pin "13"-]
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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-12.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-12.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Basic Board Done-]
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-12.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-12.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Basic Board Done-]
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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-13.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-13.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-the MCLR pin-]
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-13.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-13.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-the MCLR pin-]
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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-15.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-15.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add FTDI FT232-]
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-15.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-15.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add FTDI FT232-]
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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-16.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-16.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Blue lines-]
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-16.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-16.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Blue lines-]
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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-17.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-17.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the USB socket-]
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-17.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-17.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the USB socket-]
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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-18.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-18.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Connect USB socket-]
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-18.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-18.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Connect USB socket-]
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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Fin-]
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%lframe width=180px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Fin-]
Changed lines 120-121 from:
Here we take our soldered up USB socket and put it on the board. You will definately want to check the data sheet of any USB socket you buy to make sure you know how the pins line up because we are dealing wth an industry standard.The USB cable is gonna put power out where it puts power out, not where you decide to put the red wire! In the "Type B" kind we use it goes kinda like [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/USB-B.gif | this]]
to:
Here we take our soldered up USB socket and put it on the board. You will definately want to check the data sheet of any USB socket you buy to make sure you know how the pins line up because we are dealing wth an industry standard.The USB cable is gonna put power out where it puts power out, not where you decide to put the red wire! In the "Type B" kind we use it goes kinda like [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/USB-B.gif | this]].
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to:
So once you get your USB port straightened out - you can connect it to the FTDI 232RL like this:
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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Basic power and ground lines. If you forget this step you can always double check on the Datasheet.
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Fin-]
And there you have it... ready to be plugged in and powered up!
Changed lines 120-121 from:
Here we take our soldered up USB socket and put it on the board. You will definately want to check the data sheet of any USB socket you buy to make sure you know how the pins line up because we are dealing wth an industry standard.The USB cable is gonna put power out where it puts power out, not where you decide to put the red wire!
to:
Here we take our soldered up USB socket and put it on the board. You will definately want to check the data sheet of any USB socket you buy to make sure you know how the pins line up because we are dealing wth an industry standard.The USB cable is gonna put power out where it puts power out, not where you decide to put the red wire! In the "Type B" kind we use it goes kinda like [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/USB-B.gif | this]]
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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-17.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-17.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Basic power and ground lines. If you forget this step you can always double check on the Datasheet.
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-17.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-17.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the USB socket-]
Here we take our soldered up USB socket and put it on the board. You will definately want to check the data sheet of any USB socket you buy to make sure you know how the pins line up because we are dealing wth an industry standard.The USB cable is gonna put power out where it puts power out, not where you decide to put the red wire!
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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-18.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-18.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Basic power and ground lines. If you forget this step you can always double check on the Datasheet.
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-18.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-18.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Connect USB socket-]

* '''Pin 21'''
and actually the whole board! - The '''Ground''' reference (black) is  from the computer and it runs into
* '''Pin 20'' (VCC) to supply the chip, and the board
. - '''Power''' (red) is coming from the computer and we run it into

You may find that you have to run this breadboard version of things directly from the computer or a well powered hub.

* '''Pin 16''' - USBDM - USB Data Signal Minus, Yellow wire
* '''Pin 15''' - USBDP - USB Data Signal Plus, Blue wire

Changed lines 17-18 from:
* small momentary button
to:
* small momentary normally open ("off") button
Changed lines 72-76 from:
* Pin 7 = Vcc
* Pin 8 = GND
* Pin 22 = GND
* Pin 21 is AREF
* Pin 20 is AVcc
to:
* '''Pin 7''' - Vcc
* '''Pin 8''' - GND
* '''Pin 22''' - GND
* '''Pin 21''' - AREF
* '''Pin 20''' - AVcc
Changed lines 104-111 from:
*  Pin 4 - VCCIO
*  Pin 7 - GND
*  Pin 26 - TEST (to GND)
*  Pin 25 - AGND
(to GND)
*8
*9 Power
18
GND
to:
'''Pin 4''' - VCCIO  - ''+1.8V to +5.25V supply to the UART Interface and CBUS group pins (1...3, 5, 6, 9...14, 22, 23). In USB bus powered designs connect to 3V3OUT to drive out at 3.3V levels, or connect to VCC to drive out at 5V CMOS level. This pin can also be supplied with an external 1.8V - 2.8V supply in order to drive out at lower levels. It should be noted that in this case this supply should originate from the same source as the supply to Vcc. This means that in bus powered designs a regulator which is supplied by the 5V on the USB bus should be used.''
*  '''Pin 7''' - GND
*  '''Pin 26''' - TEST (to GND) - ''Puts the device into I.C. test mode. Must be tied to GND for normal operation.''
*  '''Pin 25''' - AGND (to GND) - ''Device analog ground supply for internal clock multiplier''
*  '''Pin 21''' - GND
*  '''Pin 20''' - VCC - ''3.3V to 5.25V supply to the device core.''
*  '''Pin 18''' -
GND
Changed lines 102-103 from:
Here we've already gone ahead and mounted the surface mount chip on the spark-fun breakout board, stuck it into the breadboard and added the power and ground lines. You can look at the FT 232 Datasheet. The pins down the left, conveniently are the pins down the left!
to:
Here we've already gone ahead and mounted the surface mount chip on the spark-fun breakout board, stuck it into the breadboard and added the power and ground lines. You can look at the [[http://www.ftdichip.com/Documents/DataSheets/DS_FT232R_v104.pdf | FT232R Datasheet]]. The pins down the left, conveniently are the pins down the left!

*  Pin 4 - VCCIO
*  Pin 7 - GND
*  Pin 26 - TEST (to GND)
*  Pin 25 - AGND (to GND)
*8
*9 Power
18 GND

Changed lines 114-116 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-16.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-16.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Basic power and ground lines. If you forget this step you can always double check on the Datasheet.
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-16.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-16.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Blue lines-]
Here we connect the ATmega RX (PD0 / pin 2) to the FT232 TXD (pin 1) and the ATmega TX (PD1 / pin 3) to the FT232 RXD (pin 5)
Changed lines 101-103 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-14.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-14.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Basic power and ground lines. If you forget this step you can always double check on the Datasheet.
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-15.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-15.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add FTDI FT232-]
Here we've already gone ahead and mounted the surface mount chip on the spark-fun breakout board, stuck it into the breadboard and added the power and ground lines. You can look at the FT 232 Datasheet. The pins down the left, conveniently are the pins down the left!
Changed line 106 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-15.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-15.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-16.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-16.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Changed line 111 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-16.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-16.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-17.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-17.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Changed line 116 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-17.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-17.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-18.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-18.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Changed line 121 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-18.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-18.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Deleted lines 124-128:

%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Basic power and ground lines. If you forget this step you can always double check on the Datasheet.

[[<<]]
Changed lines 17-18 from:
to:
* small momentary button
Changed lines 97-98 from:
This is where we finally get to use the MCLR pin as it was intended.
to:
This is where we finally get to use the MCLR pin as it was intended. In this step we add a little momentary button and hook it up so when pressed we expose the MCLR pin to ground, rebooting the chip and priming it to listen to any signal we're going to send it via the USB port.
Changed lines 15-17 from:
to:
* 16 MHz clock crystal
* 2 22 pF capacitors

Changed lines 88-90 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-12.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-12.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the Chip-]
Like the PIC, the AVR chips also need that trusty 10 k resistor up in the top left hand corner, for exactly the same reason. This is the master-clear pin that reboots the chip when it is hooked up to ground. We are going to use that feature later, but for now we just want the chip to run steady so we hook it up to high resistance to power.
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-12.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-12.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Basic Board Done-]
At this point if you, like us, had already programmed your chip somewhere else, this is where you could stop... but we want more! Way too much blank breadboard to be filled here.
Changed lines 95-97 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-13.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-13.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Basic power and ground lines. If you forget this step you can always double check on the Datasheet.
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-13.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-13.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-the MCLR pin-]
This is where we finally get to use the MCLR pin as it was intended.
Changed lines 68-69 from:
Basic power and ground lines. If you forget this step you can always double check on the Datasheet.
to:
Basic power and ground lines.
* Pin 7 = Vcc
* Pin 8 = GND
* Pin 22 = GND
* Pin 21 is AREF
* Pin 20 is AVcc
Changed lines 72-73 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-10.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-10.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the Chip-]
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-10.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-10.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the Clock-]
16 MHz external clock with two 22 pF capacitors running to ground
Changed lines 77-79 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-11.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-11.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Basic power and ground lines. If you forget this step you can always double check on the Datasheet
.
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-11.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-11.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-LED on pin "13"-]
The chip on this board is actually already programmed using the blink_led program that comes with it. That program blinks pin 13. Pin 13 on the Arduino is NOT the AVR ATMEGA8-16PU pin 13. THere is a nice little picture of the [[http://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/PinMapping | Pin Mapping]] on the Arduino site
.
Added lines 86-87:
!!! Step 3: Arduino-Ready
Changed line 76 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-11.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-11.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-11.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Changed line 81 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-12.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-08.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the Chip-]
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-12.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-12.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the Chip-]
Changed line 86 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-13.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-13.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-13.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Changed line 91 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-14.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-14.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-14.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Changed line 96 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-15.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-15.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-15.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Changed line 101 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-16.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-16.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-16.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Changed line 106 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-17.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-17.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-17.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Changed line 111 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-18.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-18.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-18.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Changed line 116 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Changed lines 69-119 from:
[[<<]]
to:

[[<<]]

%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-10.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-10.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the Chip-]

[[<<]]

%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-11.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Basic power and ground lines. If you forget this step you can always double check on the Datasheet.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-12.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-08.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the Chip-]
Like the PIC, the AVR chips also need that trusty 10 k resistor up in the top left hand corner, for exactly the same reason. This is the master-clear pin that reboots the chip when it is hooked up to ground. We are going to use that feature later, but for now we just want the chip to run steady so we hook it up to high resistance to power.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-13.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Basic power and ground lines. If you forget this step you can always double check on the Datasheet.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-14.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Basic power and ground lines. If you forget this step you can always double check on the Datasheet.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-15.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Basic power and ground lines. If you forget this step you can always double check on the Datasheet.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-16.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Basic power and ground lines. If you forget this step you can always double check on the Datasheet.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-17.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Basic power and ground lines. If you forget this step you can always double check on the Datasheet.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-18.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Basic power and ground lines. If you forget this step you can always double check on the Datasheet.

[[<<]]

%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-19.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Basic power and ground lines. If you forget this step you can always double check on the Datasheet.

[[<<]]
Added lines 65-66:
[[<<]]
Changed line 69 from:
[[<<]]
to:
[[<<]] 
Added lines 58-59:
[[<<]]
Changed line 67 from:
[[<<]]
to:
[[<<]] 
Changed line 52 from:
Here I've put an LED to signal that the board is getting power on the bottm left. Some poeple like to power the led accross the foot of the board so you can see that both sides are wired up.
to:
Here there is an LED to signal that the board is getting power on the bottm left. Some poeple like to power the led accross the foot of the board so you can see that both sides are wired up.
Changed lines 58-63 from:
[[<<]]

%lframe width=120px valign=center
% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-08.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-08.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]

[[<<]]
to:
!!!Step 2: ATMEL8 Basics

%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-08.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-08.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the Chip-]
Like the PIC, the AVR chips also need that trusty 10 k resistor up in the top left hand corner, for exactly the same reason. This is the master-clear pin that reboots the chip when it is hooked up to ground. We are going to use that feature later, but for now we just want the chip to run steady so we hook it up to high resistance to power.

%lframe width=120px valign=center%
[[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Power and Ground-]
Basic power and ground lines. If you forget this step you can always double check on the Datasheet.
[[<<]]
Changed lines 55-56 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-07.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-07.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-07.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-07.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Blank Canvas-]
Now that the basics are done we are ready to load on the chip!

Changed line 63 from:
[[<<]]
to:
[[<<]] 
Changed lines 46-48 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-05.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-05.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-LED-]
Here I've put an LED to signal that the board is getting power on the bottm left. Some poeple like to power the led accross the foot of the board so you can see that both sides are wired up.
to:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-05.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-05.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the capacitors-]
These capacitors and power regulator aren't strickly necessary if you're only ever going to power the board from the USB port, but they are convenient to have in place, just in case.
Changed lines 50-54 from:
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-06.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-06.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
to:

%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-06.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-06.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-LED-]
Here I've put an LED to signal that the board is getting power on the bottm left. Some poeple like to power the led accross the foot of the board so you can see that both sides are wired up.
[[<<]]

Changed line 62 from:
[[<<]]
to:
[[<<]] 
Added line 37:
Added line 45:
Changed line 58 from:
[[<<]]
to:
[[<<]] 
Added line 35:
Added line 39:
Deleted line 40:
Deleted line 47:
Changed line 56 from:
[[<<]]
to:
[[<<]] 
Changed lines 33-34 from:
%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg"wires"]] | [-Power lines-] Add the lines in and lines to both side-strips of the breadboard
to:
%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg"wires"]] | [-Power lines-]
Add the lines in and lines to both side-strips of the breadboard
Deleted line 36:
%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the 7805 (B)-]
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%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the 7805 (B)-]

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%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg"wires"]] | [-Add the lines in and lines to both side-strips of the breadboard -]
%lframe width=120px%
[[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-03.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-03.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the 7805 power regulator (view 1)-]
%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the 7805 power regulator (view 2)-]
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-05.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-05.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
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%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg"wires"]] | [-Power lines-] Add the lines in and lines to both side-strips of the breadboard
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%lframe width=120px% [[
http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-03.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-03.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the 7805 (A) -]
%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the 7805 (B)-]
Add the 7805 power regulator
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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[
http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-05.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-05.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-LED-]
Here I've put an LED to signal that the board is getting power on the bottm left. Some poeple like to power the led accross the foot of the board so you can see that both sides are wired up.

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%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-03.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino
-USB-BB-03.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
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%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg"wires"]] | [-Add the lines in and lines to both side-strips of the breadboard -]
%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-03.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-03.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the 7805 power regulator (view 1)-]
%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-Add the 7805 power regulator (view 2)
-]
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%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-03.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-05.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
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%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-03.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-03.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-05.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-05.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-06.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-07.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-08.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]

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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-06.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-06.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-07.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-07.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]

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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[
http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-08.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-08.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]

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However you like to do it... here are some pictures as reminders

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%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-02.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-03.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
%lframe width=120px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-04.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-05.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]

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%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-06.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-07.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-08.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
%lframe width=120px valign=center% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-09.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]

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This tutorial is about building an Arduino compatible breadboard with an ATMEL8 AVR microcontroller and FT232 breakout board from Spark-fun.
to:
This tutorial is about building an Arduino compatible breadboard with an ATMEL8 AVR microcontroller and FTDI FT232 breakout board from Spark-fun.
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%lframe width=600px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
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%lframe width=400px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
* A breadboard
* 22 AWG wire
* 7805 Voltage regulator
* 2 LED
* 2 220 Ohm resistors
* 1 10 k Ohm  resistor
* 1  10 uF capacitor
* 1 (or 2) 1 uF capacitor

!!!!Option 1:
This is the option we are using in the below tutorial and it involves surface mounting the FTDI Chip on the the board yourself and making a little adapter for the USB connector because they are really annoying to hand solder directly on to wires...

* 1 USB Female Type B Connector mounted on perf-board with some headers
* FTDI 232RL USB to serial converter chip
* [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=500|SSOP to DIP Adapter 28-Pin]] SKU#: PCB-SSOP-28

!!!!Option 2:
* [[http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=718 | Spark Fun Breakout Board for FT232RL USB to Serial]] SKU#: PCB-FT232RL

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!!!Step 1: Power the board as usual

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%lframe width=600px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
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%lframe width=600px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]
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!! Overview
This tutorial is about building an Arduino compatible breadboard with an ATMEL8 AVR microcontroller and FT232 breakout board from Spark-fun.

!!!! To do this, you'll need:

%lframe width=600px% [[http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg | http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/images/tutorials/Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg Arduino-USB-BB-01.jpg"the supplies"]] | [-The Supplies-]

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