Reports.SolarCell History

Hide minor edits - Show changes to output

Changed line 62 from:
solar panels can be put in series for sun of voltage, or in parallel
to:
solar panels can be put in series for sum of voltage, or in parallel
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This solar cell doesn't have a large voltage output. The Range of number I was able to measure in the lad under indoor low light conditions was between 0-20. I expect this number range would triple in full sunlight.
to:
This solar cell doesn't have a large voltage output. The Range of number I was able to measure in the lab under indoor low light conditions was between 0-20. I expect this number range would triple in full sunlight.
Changed lines 158-165 from:
->-Open Circuit Voltage = maximum voltage available from the solar cell


GRAMMAR/ETC:

-"...can be put in series for *SUM of voltage," not “sun”. capitalize 't' at the start of the next sentence.
- “I was able to measure in the LAB” (not “lad”)
- “was low, DUE to…..” (not “do”)
to:
->-Open Circuit Voltage = maximum voltage available from the solar cell
Changed lines 38-41 from:
'''**H&J: Neither Solarbotics or either ITP author mentions specific wavelength ranges for the solar cell. '''The specs from Solarbotics show a power,voltage,current/load chart for a sunny solstice day at noon somewhere in Canada. This seems pretty typical for a solar cell, as they are, after all, manufactured to be used with a very specific type of radiation (solar). The authors tested the solar cell indoors, using those awful ITP fluorescent lights.
Solar cells are PN (positive/negative)''''''

junction light detectors otherwise known as photonic semiconductors. They
to:
'''**H&J: Neither Solarbotics or either ITP author mentions specific wavelength ranges for the solar cell. The specs from Solarbotics show a power,voltage,current load chart for a sunny solstice day at noon somewhere in Canada. This seems pretty typical for a solar cell, as they are, after all, manufactured to be used with a very specific type of radiation (solar). The authors tested the solar cell indoors, using those awful ITP fluorescent lights.
Solar cells are PN (positive negative)'''

Solar cells are
junction light detectors otherwise known as photonic semiconductors. They
Added line 46:
'''**H&J: This is a bit unclear.'''
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'''**H&J: Cute picture, but may not be helpful.'''
Changed lines 38-39 from:
'''**H&J: Neither Solarbotics or either ITP author mentions specific wavelength ranges for the solar cell. The specs from Solarbotics show a power,voltage,current/load chart for a sunny solstice day at noon somewhere in Canada. This seems pretty typical for a solar cell, as they are, after all, manufactured to be used with a very specific type of radiation (solar). The authors tested the solar cell indoors, using those awful ITP fluorescent lights.
Solar cells are PN (positive/negative)'''
to:
'''**H&J: Neither Solarbotics or either ITP author mentions specific wavelength ranges for the solar cell. '''The specs from Solarbotics show a power,voltage,current/load chart for a sunny solstice day at noon somewhere in Canada. This seems pretty typical for a solar cell, as they are, after all, manufactured to be used with a very specific type of radiation (solar). The authors tested the solar cell indoors, using those awful ITP fluorescent lights.
Solar cells are PN (positive/negative)''''''
Changed lines 15-20 from:
'''***H&J:
->-
Short Circuit Current = maximum current that can be drawn from the solar cell
->-Open Circuit Voltage = maximum voltage available from the solar cell'''

T
his
solar cell
to:
'''***H&J: Short Circuit Current = maximum current that can be drawn from the solar cell; Open Circuit Voltage = maximum voltage available from the solar cell'''

This solar cell
Added lines 3-4:
'''**H&J: The cell can be used to either detect or harness light. The author of the main sensor report covers the solar cell as an energy harnesser, but there is a link to a project utilizing the cell as a light detector. It's a bit pricey for what it offers as a detector (you can detect light with a 50 cent photodiode). '''
Changed lines 9-11 from:
Purchased from [[http://www.solarbotics.com/| solarbotics]] for $5. '''**H&J: Solarbotics appears to no longer manufacture/sell the polycrystalline cell, but offers a monocrystalline version: (monocrystalline and polycrystaliline refer to the silicon used in the solar cell; the first being purer, more efficient, and a bit more pricey than the latter.)'''
to:
Purchased from [[http://www.solarbotics.com/| solarbotics]] for $5. '''***H&J: Solarbotics appears to no longer manufacture/sell the polycrystalline cell, but offers a monocrystalline version: (monocrystalline and polycrystaliline refer to the silicon used in the solar cell; the first being purer, more efficient, and a bit more pricey than the latter.)'''
Changed lines 15-20 from:
This solar cell
to:
'''***H&J:
->-Short Circuit Current = maximum current that can be drawn from the solar cell
->-Open Circuit Voltage = maximum voltage available from the solar cell'''

T
his
solar cell
Changed lines 41-43 from:
Solar cells are PN (positive/negative)
to:
'''**H&J: Neither Solarbotics or either ITP author mentions specific wavelength ranges for the solar cell. The specs from Solarbotics show a power,voltage,current/load chart for a sunny solstice day at noon somewhere in Canada. This seems pretty typical for a solar cell, as they are, after all, manufactured to be used with a very specific type of radiation (solar). The authors tested the solar cell indoors, using those awful ITP fluorescent lights.
Solar cells are PN (positive/negative)'''
Added line 61:
'''***H&J: Clearer explanation of linking multiple solar cells together.'''
Added lines 105-106:
'''**H&J: The microcontroller shot should include the connection to the sensor (the PIC code needs to be updated to Arduino analog in code:'''
Added lines 121-122:

'''***H&J: The visualization's amplitude could be increased (via the processing sketch) to clarify the output. What is this output? What is the microcontroller reading? The descriptions of the screen shots could be clearer.'''
Changed line 7 from:
Purchased from [[http://www.solarbotics.com/| solarbotics]] for $5. ""**H&J: Solarbotics appears to no longer manufacture/sell the polycrystalline cell, but offers a monocrystalline version: (monocrystalline and polycrystaliline refer to the silicon used in the solar cell; the first being purer, more efficient, and a bit more pricey than the latter.)""
to:
Purchased from [[http://www.solarbotics.com/| solarbotics]] for $5. '''**H&J: Solarbotics appears to no longer manufacture/sell the polycrystalline cell, but offers a monocrystalline version: (monocrystalline and polycrystaliline refer to the silicon used in the solar cell; the first being purer, more efficient, and a bit more pricey than the latter.)'''
Changed lines 7-8 from:
Purchased from [[http://www.solarbotics.com/| solarbotics]] for $5.
to:
Purchased from [[http://www.solarbotics.com/| solarbotics]] for $5. ""**H&J: Solarbotics appears to no longer manufacture/sell the polycrystalline cell, but offers a monocrystalline version: (monocrystalline and polycrystaliline refer to the silicon used in the solar cell; the first being purer, more efficient, and a bit more pricey than the latter.)""
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I will use this solar cell to create a decorative personal warning device. The device will be triggered by full sun activating a mechanical movement of a decorative feature, letting the person wearing it know when it's time for sun protection. It also functions a kinetic ornamentation. The inspiration for this project comes from a current social fascination with safety, and a whimsical exploration into solar energy. Coincidentally at MoMa [[http://www.moma.org/exhibitions/2005/safe/safe.html| safety exhibit]].
to:
I will use this solar cell to create a decorative personal warning device. The device will be triggered by full sun activating a mechanical movement of a decorative feature, letting the person wearing it know when it's time for sun protection. It also functions a kinetic ornamentation. The inspiration for this project comes from a current social fascination with safety, and a whimsical exploration into solar energy. Coincidentally at MoMa [[http://www.moma.org/exhibitions/2005/safe/safe.html| safety exhibit]].

Edit
Hannah & Jen

Solarbotics appears to no longer manufacture/sell the polycrystalline cell, but offers a monocrystalline version: (monocrystalline and polycrystaliline refer to the silicon used in the solar cell; the first being purer, more efficient, and a bit more pricey than the latter.)

The cell can be used to either detect or harness light. The author of the main sensor report covers the solar cell as an energy harnesser, but there is a link to a project utilizing the cell as a light detector. It's a bit pricey for what it offers as a detector (you can detect light with a 50 cent photodiode).

Neither Solarbotics or either ITP author mentions specific wavelength ranges for the solar cell. The specs from Solarbotics show a power,voltage,current/load chart for a sunny solstice day at noon somewhere in Canada. This seems pretty typical for a solar cell, as they are, after all, manufactured to be used with a very specific type of radiation (solar). The authors tested the solar cell indoors, using those awful ITP fluorescent lights.

The microcontroller shot should include the connection to the sensor (the PIC code needs to be updated to Arduino analog in code:

A simple description of what the solar cell is doing and how that relates to the output, might be more helpful than links to wikipedia. The wikipedia links might be helpful for more advanced explanation of electron holes and pn junctions.

The visualization's amplitude could be increased (via the processing sketch) to clarify the output.

The descriptions of the screen shots of the processing code could be clearer.

Clearer explanation of linking multiple solar cells together.

difference between open circuit and short circuit - why is one in volts and one in mA?
->-Short Circuit Current = maximum current that can be drawn from the solar cell
->-Open Circuit Voltage = maximum voltage available from the solar cell


GRAMMAR/ETC:

-"...can be put in series for *SUM of voltage," not “sun”. capitalize 't' at the start of the next sentence.
- “I was able to measure in the LAB” (not “lad”)
- “was low, DUE to…..” (not “do”)
Changed line 3 from:
''See also John Schimmel's [[Class.JohnsDatalogging|datalogging assignment]] for notes on using a solar cell as a light sensor.\\
to:
''See also [[~js3646|John Schimmel]]'s [[Class.JohnsDatalogging|datalogging assignment]] for notes on using a solar cell as a light sensor.\\
Changed line 3 from:
''See also John Schimmel's [[Class.JohnsDatalogging|datalogging assignment for notes on using a solar cell as a light sensor.\\
to:
''See also John Schimmel's [[Class.JohnsDatalogging|datalogging assignment]] for notes on using a solar cell as a light sensor.\\
Changed lines 4-5 from:
[[~tigoe]]
''
to:
[[~tigoe]]''
Added lines 3-5:
''See also John Schimmel's [[Class.JohnsDatalogging|datalogging assignment for notes on using a solar cell as a light sensor.\\
[[~tigoe]]
''
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[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volatge/| wikipedia: volatge]]
to:
[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volatge/| wikipedia: voltage]]
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circuits for sum of current. they are often wired to rechargable cells
to:
circuits for sum of current. they are often wired to rechargeable cells
Changed lines 2-5 from:
The model is SCC2433a - 24 x 33mm. Purchased from [[http://www.solarbotics.com/| solarbotics]] for $5.
to:

The model is SCC2433a - 24 x 33mm.
Purchased from [[http://www.solarbotics.com/| solarbotics]] for $5.
Changed lines 1-6 from:
Solar Cell Report by -[[~mjl359]]

The model is SCC2433a - 24 x 33mm
to:
Polycrystalline Solar Cell Report by -[[~mjl359]]
The model is SCC2433a - 24 x 33mm. Purchased from [[http://www.solarbotics.com/| solarbotics]] for $5.
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Added lines 108-109:
This solar cell doesn't have a large voltage output. The Range of number I was able to measure in the lad under indoor low light conditions was between 0-20. I expect this number range would triple in full sunlight.
Changed lines 114-120 from:
In this image there is an decline in the data as I turn the solar cell towards away from the light.

Describe
the behavior of the sensor when
you use it to sense something
. Note any peculiarities that you had to
work around, or things that might affect someone else's use. Graphs and
images are useful here.
to:
In this image there is an decline in the data as I turn the solar cell towards away from the light. The voltage the solar cells sends the pic drops.
Added lines 54-59:

http://itp.nyu.edu/~mjl359/sensors/images/seriesolarpower.jpg


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to:
For more information about the relationship between Volts, Amps, and Current...

[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volatge/| wikipedia: volatge]]
[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ampere/| wikipedia: ampere]]
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Solar Cell Report by -[[~mjl359]]
Added lines 64-66:
This is able to output 2.6 volts, but no amps. It is only at lower voltages is the cell able to output a combination of volts and amps. 2.56 volts and 4.56 amps is the highest volt to lowest amp ratio.
Changed line 104 from:
I will use this solar cell to create a decorative personal warning device. The device will be triggered by full sun activating a mechanical movement of a decorative feature, letting the person wearing it know when it's time for sun protection. It also functions a kinetic ornamentation. The inspiration for this project comes from a current social fascination with safety, and a whimsical exploration into solar energy. Coincidentally at MoMa [[http://www.moma.org/exhibitions/2005/safe/safe.html| safety exhibit]]
to:
I will use this solar cell to create a decorative personal warning device. The device will be triggered by full sun activating a mechanical movement of a decorative feature, letting the person wearing it know when it's time for sun protection. It also functions a kinetic ornamentation. The inspiration for this project comes from a current social fascination with safety, and a whimsical exploration into solar energy. Coincidentally at MoMa [[http://www.moma.org/exhibitions/2005/safe/safe.html| safety exhibit]].
Added lines 56-61:


http://itp.nyu.edu/~mjl359/sensors/images/powerchart.jpg

This chart shows the load, average voltage, current (micro Amps) and power (micro Watts) out put of this model solar cell. Although this isn't part of it's light sensing data I collected. It is interesting to see
the relationship between the output. it's important to know what combination of Average and Voltage you will need for your project in order to use this cell most efficiently.
Added line 79:
Changed lines 79-80 from:
to:
[[Code.solarprocessing | Processing code]]
Changed lines 78-80 from:
[=[[Code.myCodeSample | Code
Sample
]]=]
to:
[[Code.solarpic | pic ADC in code]]
Changed lines 85-86 from:
to:
The graph on the image above is low, do to the indoor low light condition of the lab, where i did these measurements. None the less you can see the visual differential of the solar cell in it's detection of light. In this image there is an incline in the data image as I turn the solar cell towards the light.
Added lines 88-89:

In this image there is an decline in the data as I turn the solar cell towards away from the light.
Changed lines 81-87 from:
!!!Typical Behavior
to:
!!!Typical Behavior

http://itp.nyu.edu/~mjl359/sensors/images/dimtobrighter.jpg


http://itp.nyu.edu/~mjl359/sensors/images/dimtolower.jpg
Changed lines 71-75 from:
Explain how to
connect the sensor to a microcontroller or computer. Include a schematic
and any other necessary diagrams. Make sure to include a list of every
part in the schematic.
to:
Added line 73:
Added line 59:
Added lines 64-70:

This shows the pic circuit, with a 10K resistor on the solar cell, which i decided to abandon after testing the circuit. i got the best number range without any resistor.

http://itp.nyu.edu/~mjl359/sensors/images/circuitschematic.jpg

Schematic of the photograph you see above (without a 10k resistor on the solar cell input
Changed lines 57-61 from:
Give a list of the pins, and a pin diagram
as appropriate. Detail the function of each
pin in a short paragraph
following the list
.
to:
http://itp.nyu.edu/~mjl359/sensors/images/backofsolar.jpg

There at positive and negative output
pins at the back of the solar cell. Positive goes into an input pin for the micro-controller. Negative goes to ground. This will create an analog light sensor circuit. It's not a way to measure voltage as accurately as another instrument like a multi-meter, however you can now use the data to power data visualization or small robots with as great of precision as you can get data range from your solar cell.
Added line 62:
http://itp.nyu.edu/~mjl359/sensors/images/piccircuit.jpg
Changed line 83 from:
I will use this solar cell to create a decorative personal warning device. The device will be triggered by full sun activating a mechanical movement of a decorative feature, letting the person wearing it know when it's time for sun protection. It also functions a kinetic ornamentation. The inspiration for this project comes from a current social fascination with safety, and a whimsical exploration into solar energy. Coincidentally at MoMa [[http://www.moma.org/exhibitions/2005/safe.html| safety exhibit]]
to:
I will use this solar cell to create a decorative personal warning device. The device will be triggered by full sun activating a mechanical movement of a decorative feature, letting the person wearing it know when it's time for sun protection. It also functions a kinetic ornamentation. The inspiration for this project comes from a current social fascination with safety, and a whimsical exploration into solar energy. Coincidentally at MoMa [[http://www.moma.org/exhibitions/2005/safe/safe.html| safety exhibit]]
Changed lines 54-56 from:
out [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_cell/| wikipedia: solar
cells
]]
to:
out [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_cell/| wikipedia: solarcells]]
Changed lines 84-85 from:
I will use this solar cell to create a decorative personal warning device. The device will be triggered by full sun activating a mechanical movement of a decorative feature, letting the person wearing it know when it's time for sun protection. It also functions a kinetic ornamienation. The inspiration for this project comes from a current social facination with safety, and a whimsical expolarion into solar energy.
coincidentally at MoMa [[http://www.moma.org/exhibitions/2005/safe.html| safety exhibit]]
to:
I will use this solar cell to create a decorative personal warning device. The device will be triggered by full sun activating a mechanical movement of a decorative feature, letting the person wearing it know when it's time for sun protection. It also functions a kinetic ornamentation. The inspiration for this project comes from a current social fascination with safety, and a whimsical exploration into solar energy. Coincidentally at MoMa [[http://www.moma.org/exhibitions/2005/safe.html| safety exhibit]]
Changed lines 84-86 from:
Describe your own
application of the sensor. Link to any external documentation of your
project, and discuss how you got the sensor to do what you needed it to
.
to:
I will use this solar cell to create a decorative personal warning device. The device will be triggered by full sun activating a mechanical movement of a decorative feature, letting the person wearing it know when it's time for sun protection. It also functions a kinetic ornamienation. The inspiration for this project comes from a current social facination with safety, and a whimsical expolarion into solar energy.
coincidentally at MoMa [[http://www.moma.org/exhibitions/2005/safe.html| safety exhibit]]
Changed lines 27-30 from:
[[http://downloads.solarbotics.com/PDF/Solarbotics_Solarcell_Datasheet.pdf|
soloar cell data sheet]],
to:
[[http://downloads.solarbotics.com/PDF/Solarbotics_Solarcell_Datasheet.pdf| solar cell data sheet]]
Changed line 54 from:
out [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_cell/| wikipedia: solar
to:
out [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_cell/| wikipedia: solar
Changed lines 56-57 from:
out
[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_cell| wikipedia: solar
to:
out [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_cell/| wikipedia: solar
Changed lines 1-11 from:
Polycrystalline Solar Cell report by [[~mjl359 | Marta Lwin]] November, 22nd, 2005

This report is in Progress!!! Check back here November 22nd, for finished report


'''Polycrystalline Solar Cell''' from
[[http://www.solarbotics.com/| solarbotics]],

The model is SCC2433a - 24 x
33mm
to:
The model is SCC2433a - 24 x 33mm
Changed lines 8-10 from:
This solar cell is an efective light sensor as well as power source for small scale robotics. This particular solar cell measures 24 x 33mm and generates .3V and 16mA in normal sun and in strong sunlight, up to 2.9V (open circuit) and 30mA (short circuit). Put in a ciruit with a capacitor, and even one of these cells can power a small robot to move around, draw, shake, and generally amuse.
This cell, as with most polycrystalline cells, excels in outdoor applications, however it can be used indoors for lower power needs.
to:
This solar cell
is an effective light sensor as well as power source for small scale
robotics. This particular solar cell measures 24 x 33mm and generates .3V
and 16mA in normal sun and in strong sunlight, up to 2.9V (open circuit)
and 30mA (short circuit). Put in a circuit with a capacitor, and even one
of these cells can power a small robot to move around, draw, shake, and
generally amuse.
This cell, as with most polycrystalline cells, excels in
outdoor applications, however it can be used indoors for lower power
needs.
Changed lines 21-30 from:
The typical use of this solar cell is to power small robotics, calculators and cute desk accessories and of course art projects.

!!!Electrical Characteristics

[[http://downloads.solarbotics.com/PDF/Solarbotics_Solarcell_Datasheet.pdf| soloar cell data sheet]],

Solar cells are PN (positive/negative) junction light detectors otherwise known as photonic semiconductors. They are made of silicone and have exceptionally large light sensative areas. Typically, a single silicone solar cell (about an inch square) generates 0.5 volt in bright sunlight.

Light hits the surface, where a photon will create a hole electron pair at the PN junction. A current will flow if two sides of the junction are connected.
to:
The typical use of this solar cell is to power
small robotics, calculators, cute desk accessories and of course art
projects.

!!!Electrical
Characteristics

[[http://downloads.solarbotics.com/PDF/Solarbotics_Solarcell_Datasheet.pdf|
soloar cell data sheet]],

Solar cells are PN (positive/negative)
junction light detectors otherwise known as photonic semiconductors. They
are made of silicone and have exceptionally large light sensitive areas.
Typically, a single silicone solar cell (about an inch square) generates
0.5 volt in bright sunlight.

Light hits the surface, where a photon will
create a hole electron pair at the PN junction. A current will flow if two
sides of the junction are
connected.
Changed lines 44-46 from:
Picture from Forest M. Mim's book: Getting started in Electronics.
to:
Picture
from Forest M. Mim's book: Getting started in
Electronics.
Changed lines 49-53 from:
The solar panels can be put in series for sun of voltage, or in parrellel cuircuits for sum of current. they are often wired to rechargable cells and batteries.

For more easy to read and very through information on the development and physics operating the solar cell, you can check out
[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_cell| wikipedia: solar cells]]
to:
The
solar panels can be put in series for sun of voltage, or in parallel
circuits
for sum of current. they are often wired to rechargable cells
and batteries.

For more easy to read and very through information on the
development and physics operating the solar cell, you can check
out
[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_cell| wikipedia: solar
cells]]
Changed lines 61-63 from:
Give a list of the pins, and a pin diagram as appropriate. Detail the function of each pin in a short paragraph following the list.
to:
Give a list of the pins, and a pin diagram
as appropriate. Detail the function of each pin in a short paragraph
following the list.
Changed lines 67-68 from:
Explain how to connect the sensor to a microcontroller or computer. Include a schematic and any other necessary diagrams. Make sure to include a list of every part in the schematic.
to:
Explain how to
connect the sensor to a microcontroller or computer. Include a schematic
and any other necessary diagrams. Make sure to include a list of every
part in the schematic.
Changed lines 73-76 from:
Give a code sample for the microcontroller you developed the example on. Link it to the Code group of the wiki, formatting the link like this:

[=[[Code.myCodeSample | Code Sample]]=]
to:
Give a code sample for the
microcontroller you developed the example on. Link it to the Code group
of the wiki, formatting the link like this:

[=[[Code.myCodeSample | Code
Sample]]=]
Changed lines 81-82 from:
Describe the behavior of the sensor when you use it to sense something. Note any peculiarities that you had to work around, or things that might affect someone else's use. Graphs and images are useful here.
to:
Describe the behavior of the sensor when
you use it to sense something. Note any peculiarities that you had to
work around, or things that might affect someone else's use. Graphs and
images are useful here.
Changed lines 87-89 from:
Describe your own application of the sensor. Link to any external documentation of your project, and discuss how you got the sensor to do what you needed it to.
to:
Describe your own
application of the sensor. Link to any external documentation of your
project, and discuss how you got the sensor to do what you needed it to.
Changed lines 35-38 from:

For more easy to read intro information on the physics operating the solar cell, you can check out
[[http://http://www
.howstuffworks.com/solar-cell.htm/printable| how stuff works]]
to:
The solar panels can be put in series for sun of voltage, or in parrellel cuircuits for sum of current. they are often wired to rechargable cells and batteries.

For more easy to read and very through information on the development and physics operating the solar cell, you can check out
[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_cell| wikipedia: solar cells
]]
Changed lines 30-32 from:
http://itp.nyu.edu/~mjl359/sensors/images/excited.jpg

Pictures from Forest M. Mim's book: Getting started in Electronics.
to:
http://itp.nyu.edu/~mjl359/sensors/images/electronhole.jpg

Picture from Forest M. Mim's book: Getting started in Electronics.
Added lines 30-31:
http://itp.nyu.edu/~mjl359/sensors/images/excited.jpg
Changed lines 24-25 from:
[[http://http://downloads.solarbotics.com/PDF/Solarbotics_Solarcell_Datasheet.pdf| soloar cell data sheet]],
to:
[[http://downloads.solarbotics.com/PDF/Solarbotics_Solarcell_Datasheet.pdf| soloar cell data sheet]],
Changed lines 31-33 from:
[[http://www.forrestmims.com/| forrest mims website]],
to:
[[http://www.forrestmims.com/| forrest mims website]]
Changed lines 26-27 from:
Solar cells are PN junction light detectors otherwise known as photonic semiconductors. They are made of silicone and have exceptionally large light sensative areas. Typically, a single silicone solar cell (about an inch square) generates 0.5 volt in bright sunlight.
to:
Solar cells are PN (positive/negative) junction light detectors otherwise known as photonic semiconductors. They are made of silicone and have exceptionally large light sensative areas. Typically, a single silicone solar cell (about an inch square) generates 0.5 volt in bright sunlight.
Changed lines 30-31 from:
Picture from Forest M. Mim's book: Getting started in Electronics.
to:
Pictures from Forest M. Mim's book: Getting started in Electronics.
[[http://www.forrestmims.com/| forrest mims website]],
Changed line 32 from:
For more information on the physics operating the solar cell, you can ccheck out
to:
For more easy to read intro information on the physics operating the solar cell, you can check out
Changed lines 28-29 from:
Light hits the surface, where a photon will create a hole electron pair at the PN junction.
to:
Light hits the surface, where a photon will create a hole electron pair at the PN junction. A current will flow if two sides of the junction are connected.
Changed lines 32-36 from:

Give the voltage and amperage ranges, and any other relevant electrical data.

Describe the electrical changes when the sensor senses whatever physical changes it senses.
to:
For more information on the physics operating the solar cell, you can ccheck out
[[http://http://www.howstuffworks.com/solar-cell.htm/printable| how stuff works]]
Changed lines 26-32 from:
Solar cells are PN junction light detectors otherwise known as photonic semiconductors. They are made of silicone and have exceptionally large light sensative areas. A single silicone solar cell generates 0.5 volt in bright sunlight.
to:
Solar cells are PN junction light detectors otherwise known as photonic semiconductors. They are made of silicone and have exceptionally large light sensative areas. Typically, a single silicone solar cell (about an inch square) generates 0.5 volt in bright sunlight.

Light hits the surface, where a photon will create a hole electron pair at the PN junction.

Picture from Forest M. Mim's book: Getting started in Electronics.
Changed lines 26-28 from:

Put a link to the datasheet at the top. Also link any retail sources, for example if you're using a breakout board, or any other parts that making the sensor easier
.
to:
Solar cells are PN junction light detectors otherwise known as photonic semiconductors. They are made of silicone and have exceptionally large light sensative areas. A single silicone solar cell generates 0.5 volt in bright sunlight.
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[[http://http://downloads.solarbotics.com/PDF/Solarbotics_Solarcell_Datasheet.pdf| soloar cell data sheet]],
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This solar cell is an efective light sensor as well as power source for small scale robotics. This particular solar cell measures 24 x 33mm and generates up to 2.7 volts in full sun. Put in a ciruit with a capacitor, and even one of these cells can power a small robot to move around, draw, shake, and generally amuse.
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This solar cell is an efective light sensor as well as power source for small scale robotics. This particular solar cell measures 24 x 33mm and generates .3V and 16mA in normal sun and in strong sunlight, up to 2.9V (open circuit) and 30mA (short circuit). Put in a ciruit with a capacitor, and even one of these cells can power a small robot to move around, draw, shake, and generally amuse.
This cell, as with most polycrystalline cells, excels in outdoor applications, however it can be used indoors for lower power needs.
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Put a paragraph or two here introducing the the sensor. You might want to add an introductory image as well.
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This solar cell is an efective light sensor as well as power source for small scale robotics. This particular solar cell measures 24 x 33mm and generates up to 2.7 volts in full sun. Put in a ciruit with a capacitor, and even one of these cells can power a small robot to move around, draw, shake, and generally amuse.
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Describe some typical applications of this sensor. You can often get this from the datasheet, but a few examples from companies or individuals who've used it would be useful as well.
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The typical use of this solar cell is to power small robotics, calculators and cute desk accessories and of course art projects.
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Polycrystalline Solar Cell report by [[~mjl359 | Marta Lwin]] November 22nd 2005
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Polycrystalline Solar Cell report by [[~mjl359 | Marta Lwin]] November, 22nd, 2005

This report is in Progress!!! Check back here November 22nd, for finished report
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The Solar Cell is a '''Polycrystalline Solar Cell''' from
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Polycrystalline Solar Cell report by [[~mjl359 | Marta Lwin]] November 22nd 2005

'''Polycrystalline Solar Cell''' from
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'''Applications'''

'''Electrical Characteristics'''


http://itp.nyu.edu/~mjl359/sensors/images/2433a.jpg
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http://itp.nyu.edu/~mjl359/sensors/images/2433a.jpg


Put a paragraph or two here introducing the the sensor. You might want to add an introductory image as well.


!!!Applications

Describe some typical applications of this sensor. You can often get this from the datasheet, but a few examples from companies or individuals who've used it would be useful as well.

!!!Electrical Characteristics
Put a link to the datasheet at the top. Also link any retail sources, for example if you're using a breakout board, or any other parts that making the sensor easier.

Give the voltage and amperage ranges, and any other relevant electrical data.

Describe the electrical changes when the sensor senses whatever physical changes it senses.

!!! Pin Descriptions
Give a list of the pins, and a pin diagram as appropriate. Detail the function of each pin in a short paragraph following the list.


!!!Microcontroller Connections
Explain how to connect the sensor to a microcontroller or computer. Include a schematic and any other necessary diagrams. Make sure to include a list of every part in the schematic.

!!!Code Sample
Give a code sample for the microcontroller you developed the example on. Link it to the Code group of the wiki, formatting the link like this:

[=[[Code.myCodeSample | Code Sample]]=]

!!!Typical Behavior
Describe the behavior of the sensor when you use it to sense something. Note any peculiarities that you had to work around, or things that might affect someone else's use. Graphs and images are useful here.

!!!Application Notes
Describe your own application of the sensor. Link to any external documentation of your project, and discuss how you got the sensor to do what you needed it to.
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The Solar Cell is a '''Polycrystalline Solar Cell''' from
[[http://www.solarbotics.com/| solarbotics]],

The model is SCC2433a - 24 x 33mm

'''Applications'''

'''Electrical Characteristics'''


http://itp.nyu.edu/~mjl359/sensors/images/2433a.jpg