Jilted version 2.0

Milena Selkirk

A self-contained virtual rock band for any musician who's ever been stood up or bailed on.


Jilted is a virtual rock band, composed of projected video on screens behind a live performer. It was created out of frustration, after being left in the lurch by flaky musicians, who failed to show up for rehearsals or gigs. This iteration of Jilted features a keyboardist (Sheree) and guitarist (Vanessa), who accompany the performer (me) in performing 5 original songs. The characters are projected on 3D objects and controlled in real time with foot pedals. The thesis iteration of Jilted features real time audio and video clip triggers, audience participation with a webcam, real-time color and speed manipulation with a ribbon controller, attached to a guitar. The band performs 5 songs with skits in between.

Originally created for ITP's NIME class, I chose to continue working on this project for my thesis. I've looked at Japanese robot actors, holograms, and music and video acts like Tracey and the Plastics and Gorillaz, as well as girl groups from the 60s like the Shangri-Las and the Supremes. Exploring character creation, I looked at the work of Cindy Sherman and Marina Abramovic to see the different ways that an artist can also be the "face" of her piece in an interesting, provocative way.

Jilted is for "jilted" musicians, music fans, but also for a much wider audience of people who enjoy multimedia and characters

User Scenario
In a show environment, I can demo Jilted by playing along but let viewers control foot pads, which will change the sound and movement. The viewers' faces/images are captured with a webcam and instantly projected into the background screen.

Video screens, sculpted styrofoam shapes - painted white on one side, 2 projectors (rear and front), a triple head, flat foot pads, ribbon controllers and dials attached to a guitar.

Designing an interactive performance like Jilted, is a very complex process. There are many elements that rest on other ones, and must be completed in a specific order for the whole system to work. I also learned that editing and animating a 25 minute video piece is A LOT of work. This is just the beginning