All posts by Alison Pen-chi Huang

AUTO IF

Algorithms run our lives by dictating what we as a society deem as “correct” or “true.” Just like how Joy Buolamwini’s face was unable to be registered in the MIT Media Lab, many times facial recognition is unable to properly recognize the correct user. Joy discovered  that the program was unable to recognize her, the only darker skinned person’s, face in the experiment. What comes to mind is the Apple iPhone problem when the facial recognition lock screen opened for the wrong user. The phone owner and the wrong user were both asian women similar in age. It could be argued that a lot of asian people “look alike,” but in reality this would never happen to any two white people-unless they’re twins.

The reactions to this iPhone fail alone proves how society views each race with different standards. The stereotype that all asian people look alike only exists in America because America is a white dominant country. In asia, they can tell Chinese from Japanese from Korean from just a quick glance. Algorithms are only pushing us to think it is okay to think this was because it will return either an unlocked phone or a locked phone ingraining the racial stereotypes in us without us even noticing.

Algorithms run our lives just like society runs our lives. Many people never stop to think how much society’s rules and ideals have changed the way we think and act, and are ingrained into our way of life. I think algorithms can work the same way. We never stop to think about the ingrained stereotypes that are present in our daily lives.

Algorithms are created by the top 1% to cater to themselves. They are looking for ways to benefit themselves and make many of their choices on money, power, or influence.

iConcert

video

https://vimeo.com/306778810

Powerpoint

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1NNjm1CEuwuVWFnFWEf7kPRYFj-TYYB47

p5

https://editor.p5js.org/ach549@nyu.edu/sketches/rJ82qfVxE

Arduino

#define PIN_ANALOG_X 0
#define PIN_ANALOG_Y 1
#define PIN_ANALOG_X2 2
#define PIN_ANALOG_Y2 3
#define PIN_ANALOG_X3 4
#define PIN_ANALOG_Y3 5
#define PIN_ANALOG_X4 6
#define PIN_ANALOG_Y4 7
#define PIN_ANALOG_X5 8
#define PIN_ANALOG_Y5 9
#define PIN_ANALOG_X6 10
#define PIN_ANALOG_Y6 11

int sensor1 = analogRead(A0);
int sensor2 = analogRead(A1);
int sensor3 = analogRead(A2);
int sensor4 = analogRead(A3);
int sensor5 = analogRead(A4);
int sensor6 = analogRead(A5);
int sensor7 = analogRead(A6);
int sensor8 = analogRead(A7);
int sensor9 = analogRead(A8);
int sensor10 = analogRead(A9);
int sensor11 = analogRead(A10);
int sensor12 = analogRead(A11);

//joystick 2 X A2 Y A3

void setup() {
Serial.begin(9600);
pinMode(A0, INPUT_PULLUP);
pinMode(A1, INPUT_PULLUP);
pinMode(A2, INPUT_PULLUP);
pinMode(A3, INPUT_PULLUP);
pinMode(A4, INPUT_PULLUP);
pinMode(A5, INPUT_PULLUP);
pinMode(A6, INPUT_PULLUP);
pinMode(A7, INPUT_PULLUP);
pinMode(A8, INPUT_PULLUP);
pinMode(A9, INPUT_PULLUP);
pinMode(A10, INPUT_PULLUP);
pinMode(A11, INPUT_PULLUP);

PIN_ANALOG_X != PIN_ANALOG_Y;
PIN_ANALOG_X2 != PIN_ANALOG_Y2;
PIN_ANALOG_X3 != PIN_ANALOG_Y3;
PIN_ANALOG_X4 != PIN_ANALOG_Y4;
PIN_ANALOG_X5 != PIN_ANALOG_Y5;
PIN_ANALOG_X6 != PIN_ANALOG_Y6;

// pinMode(2, OUTPUT);
}

void loop() {

Serial.print(analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_X)+analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_Y));
Serial.print(“,”);

Serial.print((analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_X2)+analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_Y2))+3000);
Serial.print(“,”);

Serial.print((analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_X3)+analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_Y3))+6000);
Serial.print(“,”);

Serial.print(-analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_X4)-analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_Y4));
Serial.print(“,”);

Serial.print((-analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_X5)-analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_Y5))-3000);
Serial.print(“,”);

Serial.println((-analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_X6)-analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_Y6))-6000);

delay(10);

}

What

My project is a cross between an instrument and a sound remixer. It is preloaded with 3 sounds and 3  tunes the user can “remix.” It can be considered the “kid’s version” of DJ equipment.

Why

So many people love music and have personal things they would change about certain songs or performances, but no way to do it. Learning how to use really DJ equipment is difficult, time consuming, and usually left to the professionals. Actual DJ equipment is expensive ad bulky. That’s why I created the “kid’s version” of DJ equipement giving regular people a chance to make music.

How

The project consists of 6 joysticks all mapped to speed and volume. There are 4 joysticks on the bottom and 2 joysticks on the top sitting where the fingers naturally would when holding a video game controller. I made the case out of foam and resemble a nintendo or PS4 shape to be more comfortable, user-friendly, and intuitive. Out of the 6 joysticks, the 3 on the right are connected to 3 different real songs and the 3 on the left are connected to 3 different tunes/beats.

Prototype

So far, I’ve gotten the basic codes working and am waiting for my joysticks to come in the mail. Instead of having 10 joysticks in a keyboard style, I think I’m going to have 6 that would be positioned in a “video game controller” style (see pictures below). Right now, all the joysticks are in a sponge because I don’t exactly know what I want the case to look like or how I’m going to make it and the sponge was a cheap easy way to experiment.

Now, I need to figure out what type of sounds I want it to make, how I’m going to make the case, and if I still want to make a display with it. Also, I ran out of analog pins in the arduino and don’t know what to do about that.

Other ideas:

Maybe, instead of having each joystick’s volume and speed be directly proportional, I could have the X axis control volume and the Y axis control speed so each sound could have any combination of volume and speed. I was also thinking to possibly have it be a song remixer instead of whatever I was originally trying to go for.

Arduino:

#define PIN_ANALOG_X 0
#define PIN_ANALOG_Y 1
#define PIN_ANALOG_X2 2
#define PIN_ANALOG_Y2 3
#define PIN_ANALOG_X3 4
#define PIN_ANALOG_Y3 5

int sensor1 = analogRead(A0);
int sensor2 = analogRead(A1);
int sensor3 = analogRead(A2);
int sensor4 = analogRead(A3);
int sensor6 = analogRead(A4);
int sensor7 = analogRead(A5);

void setup() {
Serial.begin(9600);
pinMode(A0, INPUT_PULLUP);
pinMode(A1, INPUT_PULLUP);
pinMode(A2, INPUT_PULLUP);
pinMode(A3, INPUT_PULLUP);
pinMode(A4, INPUT_PULLUP);
pinMode(A5, INPUT_PULLUP);



// pinMode(2, OUTPUT);
}

void loop() {

Serial.print(analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_X)+analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_Y));
Serial.print(",");

Serial.print((analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_X2)+analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_Y2))+3000);
Serial.print(",");


Serial.println((analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_X3)+analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_Y3))+6000);
//Serial.print(",");
delay(10);


}

p5:

https://editor.p5js.org/ach549@nyu.edu/sketches/rk3t5zRpX

Prototype:

Hold like a video game controller.

Bottom

a

Top

a

Block diagram:

a

 

Prior Art

Other Artists:

“Grand Seaboard”- Roland Lamb

“TouchTone Synth”- Ruiz Brothers

“Looper/synth/drum thing”- Youtuber “otemrellik”

“Joytone”- David Sharples

References So Far:

Using potentiometer to vary pitch of a Piezo speaker

https://www.electromaker.io/blog/article/4-amazing-raspberry-pi-synthesizer-projects-67

https://www.allaboutcircuits.com/projects/level-up-arduino-joystick-shield-v2.4/

Meet Joytone: the Raspberry Pi musical instrument with joysticks for keys

http://www.szynalski.com/tone-generator/

https://www.looperman.com/loops/detail/142744/slower-and-slower-125bpm-trap-synth-loop

Globalization

Technology has aided in globalization, but technology has not caused globalization. In “It’s Not Technology That’s Disrupting Our Jobs” the author, Louis Hyman, argues that it is not technology that is disrupting our jobs, but instead it is the result of big business. Prior to technology, cultures and ideas were still spread around the world mostly through trade along popular passages such as the Silk Road. Through trade, different areas now had access to new resources that led to new products and were now introduced to new ideas and ways of thinking. Technology has only sped up the process. Instead of traveling along the Silk Road, we can now tap an app and be bombarded with an infinite amount of opinions in seconds.

Like everything else in the world, globalization is simultaneously good and bad. In my words, globalization is the spread of an idea or item on a global scale. This quote by Hyman “If this emergent flexible economy were all bad or all good, there would be no need to make a choice about it,” backs this. If in every decision we had to make, the options were only “good” or “bad,” then they wouldn’t really be decisions. Some pros of globalization are the rapid spread of news, information, and resources. A con is that people get lazy, too lazy to care, too lazy to interact with others, and too lazy to learn. According to Business Insider, the 11 largest protests and marches in american history range from the 1963 Freedom March to the 2017 Women’s March on Washington. It’s almost as if they like being overtaxed. From Today in Criminal History, in 1773, “Mohawk Indians dumped crates of tea into Boston harbor as a protest against the Tea Act and its provisions for taxation of tea” eventually becoming know as the Boston Tea Party. Business Insider is just of the many websites on the internet that prioritize only focusing on more recent events, glorifying present day America and highlighting how Americans now know more and do less. We #blacklivesmatter and feel as if we just dumped a crate of tea into the Boston harbor. The speed and accessibility to information from technology is undeniably a key part of our global developments, but the negatives tend to be overlooked and ignored.

Many

For this week, I decided to do something I could also use in my final project. I decided to have a joystick that would change sounds when the user pushed it in different directions. Originally,  I wanted the sound was suppose to come from an arduino buzzer, but for some unknown reason it didn’t want to work. So, I decided to connect it to p5 and have the sound play from my laptop. After some trial and error, it finally worked!

Click the link below to see!

Arduino:

#define PIN_ANALOG_X 0

#define PIN_ANALOG_Y 1

int sensorValue1 = analogRead(A0);
int sensorValue2 = analogRead(A1);

void setup() {
Serial.begin(9600);
pinMode(A0, INPUT_PULLUP);
pinMode(A1, INPUT_PULLUP);
}

void loop() {

if (analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_X)<30 && analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_Y)<30) {
Serial.println(0);
}else{

if (analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_X)<30 && analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_Y)>93){
Serial.println(1);
}else{

if (analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_Y)<30 && analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_X)>93){
Serial.println(2);
}else{

if (analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_Y)>93 && analogRead(PIN_ANALOG_X)>93){
Serial.println(3);
}
delay(200);
}}}}

 b

a

P5:

https://editor.p5js.org/ach549@nyu.edu/sketches/BJe9woL2m

 

No Pets, Just Music

For my project,  I stepped up my original “keyboard.” Instead of using a piezo buzzer as a sound output, I used serial communication to have the sound played by my laptop through p5.

Here is the finished product: https://vimeo.com/297586614

This my arduino code. Each button was assigned a number to print when it was pressed. The number would then be read by p5 through serial communication.

a a

In p5, each number that was serial printed by the arduino was assigned a corresponding sound. P5 would then check if the button was already pressed. If it was not already pressed down, and I  had just pressed it down, the corresponding sound would play.

https://editor.p5js.org/ach549@nyu.edu/sketches/SkdJGX0j7

a

Also, don’t forget to open the p5.serialcontrol app!

Final Project Ideas

  1. Drawing with music:

For my first idea, I want to create a keyboard/piano that is connected to a screen (p5 or LEDs maybe?) and draws a picture based on the keys played. It would bring together two popular things-art and music- in a way everyone could do and enjoy!

a

2. Laser Harp

For my second idea, I want to create a “harp” with lasers instead of strings. The lasers would serve the purpose of telling the user where would produce what sound. The sound would be determined by an ultrasonic sensor.

a

3. Drawing Glove

For my third idea, I was thinking about somehow making a glove that could let a user draw (maybe in p5?) without actually having to touch the computer. As a painter who has never used more than basic technology until this year, I feel that there are probably other artists who would want to give digital art a shot but are scared or lazy. This glove would be a way for them to still be “using their hands” to draw in a digital way.

Hyper

Human thinking is anything but linear. Making decisions as simple as what to eat for dinner can sometimes leave us stuck. We consider multiple choices and their consequences before making our decisions. My thought process is typically very skewed. I could start a task just for my mind to wander in every direction except the task at hand.

Hypertext has revolutionized convenience. Anything we want can be accessed with the click of a button-it’s almost too easy. Instead of flipping through book pages at a library or web pages in a computer, so much www information is already perfectly categorized and waiting to be found. Hypertext represents linear thinking. Every hyperlink is direct and straightforward, ready to take u from one place to the other, already predecided and predictable. Unlike human thinking, there is no exterior consideration of the consequences and outcomes of clicking the hypertext.

In a way, everything online is already accessible by URL. Every time we click the “enter” key or a button, said key or button are connected to a link to bring us to the website or place we are trying to arrive at. A way to make URLs more accessible is making technology and technological knowledge more accessible and easy to learn.

Calling the Future

https://editor.p5js.org/ach549@nyu.edu/sketches/Hyj_Wtbs7

For this week, I made a slider controlled face that can represent a person’s mood!

I wanted to build off my last week’s self portrait, but couldn’t figure out how to get the slider controlled mouth to stay in front of the bounce. I also wanted to use the same slider to control the smiley face color, but couldn’t figure out how to use the same input for two outputs.

“The Jump to Universality”

In “The Jump to Universality,” Deutch explains several evolutionary cycles for topics such as written communication, life of Earth, and technology. Deutch begins with written communication. Before communicating through words, humans use pictograms and Roman numerals. Eventually, as civilization grew more and more developed, the Phoenician alphabet, the Greek alphabet, and our current numeric system were created. In the creation of these communication systems, Deutch noticed a pattern of creation, usage, and modification. He goes on to explain the irony of how humans would modified to attain universality, but always stop before they did.

Accessibility would make communication more powerful. In a world limited by language barriers, borders, and oceans, an easy way for all people to be able to convey a message to another person, at any time or any place, would be life changing. In “The Jump to Universality,” Deutch uses pictograms to show one, of many, failed attempts towards universality. Ancient scribes had developed a system where one would put in a pictogram for the sound they wished to convey. To have the “tr” sound, one would put in a pictogram of a tree. Lacking confidence in their “alphabet,” the scribes did not commit to their alphabet, thus showing the failure that frequently occurs in the “modification” step in the pattern of evolution.

Future communication will likely take place on our smartphone screens. Interpersonal communication has already begun decreasing and will only continue. There will be less and less face to face contact as we continue down this path.

1st Time With p5

Originally, I planned on making some bouncing balls; but, one thing led to another and these happened.

Here was the original plan.

https://editor.p5js.org/full/BkHyQjMcQ

https://editor.p5js.org/ach549@nyu.edu/sketches/BkHyQjMcQ

Then, the self portrait…

https://editor.p5js.org/full/BJH9oCfcm

https://editor.p5js.org/full/BJH9oCfcm

Then this!

https://editor.p5js.org/full/B1sZEJQ97

https://editor.p5js.org/ach549@nyu.edu/sketches/B1sZEJQ97

Alison & Amin: Group 9

For our piece of the Rube Goldberg Machine, we decided to us an ultrasonic sensor for our input and an LED for our output. After hearing that group 8 was doing something that “pops up” and group 10 was using a light sensor, we decided the best way to go would be an ultrasonic sensor for motion and an LED for light.

First, we created a schematic for our machine.

a

Next, we assembled our machine.

a

Then, we created the code. We used pins 7, 11, and 13 for the LEDs, trigger pin, and echo pin respectively. The trig pin will receive a signal of 10uS from the Arduino to begin the ultrasonic sensor ranging. Next, the sensor will send out a cycle of 8 bursts at 40 khz and assume it’s maximum radius. An echo line is the width of an echo pulse that is equivalent to the distance to the object. Before detecting an object, the echo line starts at the sensor’s maximum detectable radius. After detecting an object, the sensor lowers its’ echo line to give a give pulse width in uS.

Pulse width is then converted to distance with the formula: distance = (traveltime/2) x speed of sound or cm = (duration/2)/29.1. Travel time/duration is divided by two because the wave had to be sent out, hit the object, then return to the sensor.

We chose a distance of 10 cm to set off the LED because it was close enough so other items would not be likely to effect the sensor, but far enough so the item would still be easily detectable. Our if else statement says if an item is farther then 10 cm, the LED would be off. If an item is closer than 10 cm, the LED would be on.

Lastly, we set our results to be printed in the serial monitor.

aa

Here’s the device!

As you just saw in the video, as the hand gets closer, the serial monitor shows the cm decreasing. When the hand gets farther, the cm count increases.

Sources:

https://alselectro.wordpress.com/tag/ultrasonic-sensors/

https://www.instructables.com/id/Ultrasonic-Distance-Sensor-Arduino-HC-SR04/

Complete Guide for Ultrasonic Sensor HC-SR04 with Arduino

 

 

Embodiment

Our body is the tool we use to perceive the world. Depending on whether one views the brain as embodied or disembodied, will determine if one feels that “reason is disembodied because the mind is disembodied” or “reason is transcendent and universal.” (McNerney) From this, we take take that either our bodies determines the way we perceive the world or our bodies are a tool our brains use to perceive the world. Regardless, our bodies play a major role in our perception of the world and what we take in from the world.

Emotion is defined as a natural instinctive state of mind deriving from one’s circumstances, mood, or relationships with others. Emotion goes together with intuition. We don’t decide to use our emotions when making a decision; it just happens. Like in “Siri Is Not ‘Genderless’,” we see how just based on listener’s perception that Siri is female changes the overall Siri experience. Marketing technology as “feminine” has been a popular marketing strategy throughout history. We use our emotions to think by applying our instinctive perception of something to the decision at hand.

Computers greatly influence the way we think through the constant out-pour of information. Issues such as, body image, cyber-bullying, and jealousy, have all gotten worse because of one reason: the computer allows us to compare ourselves to others. The constant bombardment of what’s trendy or who’s doing what has monopolized so much of our time without us even noticing or caring. Another way technology is influencing our bodies is in the field of medicine. As mentioned in “Cyborg Manifesto,” topics regarding reproduction, genetic modification, and regeneration may pose an issue with some people. Medicine is on track to advancements in these fields, but computers, more specifically cyborgs, could do these things for us. Therefore, the question from last class shifts; is it unmoral just for humans or is it unmoral in the general sense?

Happy Holidays!

In honor of Saturday being the first day of fall, I felt it was only appropriate to start getting in the holiday spirit. For my project, I created a “piano” that would play 5 notes: C, D, E, F, G. I only had five buttons to make this and luckily “Jingle Bells” only requires 5 notes. Coincidence? I think not.

Components: Arduino UNO R3, jumper wires, buzzer, breadboard, 300 ohm resistor

I first drew a schematic to plan out the piano.

schematic

Then I coded the board. I used google to find out the frequencies of the five keys. I had originally used the if else statement, but changed it to the for loop after finding online that it solved problems similar to mine. The if else statements would sometimes interfere with each other causing only certain keys to work.

j

a

Explanation of Code:

I used #define to set my variables (keyC, keyD, keyE, keyF, keyG) equal to their corresponding frequencies in Hertz (523, 587, 659, 698, 784). Next, I defined the music notes (C, D, E, F, G) I used as my integers and set them equal to their corresponding pin (2, 4, 6, 7, 9). Pin 11 was connected to a buzzer with a 300 Ohm resistor. I also set my integer duration to 150 milliseconds to give the sound enough time to be heard, but not too long as to be slowing down the natural rhythm of the song.

Under void setup, I chose input_pullup instead of input so I wouldn’t have a floating voltage without connecting the pin to an external circuit.

Under void loop, I gave each key an if statement, for loop, and tone. The code is boolean so 0 = off/no and 1 = on/yes. The if statement states that “if the (key) is off….” Then the for loop is activated. The for loop is defined as for(statement,question,reaction). In my code, it states that a key is off. It answers yes or no to the question “Is the key still off?” If the answer is no, the loop repeats. If the answer is yes, then the tone is activated. Tone is defined as tone(pin number of the item that is playing the sound, frequency in hertz, duration).

In short, this is the basic logic that’s followed:

The button is not pressed. If the button is not pressed, the code will keep checking if it is pressed. If it is pressed, the tone will be activated.

Here’s the result!

This is the music I used for “Jingle Bells.”

music

Other than just having the Arduino play sounds, I had two other ideas. I wanted to add green and red LED lights to correspond when a key was pressed, but could only get for either the sound to come out when the button was pressed or for the LED to light up when the button was pressed. Whenever I combined the codes, it would cause the later codes not to work or none of them would work at all. I am still trying to figure out the correct sequence for setting up this code. Another idea was to use the LCD to have the tell the player the next key (C,D,E,F,G) in the song. Sadly, my Arduino refused to recognize the Liquid Crystal library.

Some websites that really helped me were:

https://programmingelectronics.com

https://create.arduino.cc

https://instructables.com

 

Emotional Dog Rational Tail

Variables are the parts of a structure that determine what said structure is. In math, changing the x variable from just 1 to 2 will greatly influence the outcome. In life, variables are the unique conditions each individual experiences that effects their lives and personalities. Some life variables are upbringing, social class, family life, environment, and life changing experiences. These variables are greatly influenced by society. Things that are important to measure and change are the things that effect everyone on a daily basis and anything that may cause bias. I would like to think I have a moral code that I apply to my moral decision making, but after reading Emotional Dog Rational Tail by Haidt, I know it’s not true. When making decisions, I predominantly use intuition. Intuition and instinct are the two most commonly used decision making tools. When one is caught off guard and forced to make a quick decision, there is no other option. After making said decision, the only thing that one can do to make themselves feel better is justify their decisions. These two tools are also greatly influenced by the aforementioned variables. From what I have previously stated, I do not believe machines should make moral decisions for humans. No machine is currently able to understand the conditions and variables of every single person and circumstance that may occur. Technology has only complicated moral decision making. We are now opened to a whole new world of information and are able to try to learn and understand all walks of life. But, with great power comes great responsibility. Those who are more socially aware and socially educated now have the responsibility to be more understanding of others and to educate others. Rather than before, when no one thought twice about what they believed their morals were. It has gone from “I believe this because it is right” to “I believe this, but I don’t know why it’s right.” Therefore, machines have made decision making both easier and harder.

Media, Interactions, Stories, and Universal Machines

Computational media has changed the world we live in today. We are able to reach a broad spectrum of people in a matter of seconds. Traditional media has had a good run, but the simple fact is that it just isn’t accessible enough. Phones, computers, and televisions constantly bombard users with new information whether the user wants it or not. Magazines, newspapers, and other forms of traditional media may not be hard to find, but most would no actively seek one out if they did not have a specific goal, such as keeping up with celebrity gossip or keeping up with the news. The most important difference between the two is convenience. Convenience allows for even the laziest of people to complete tasks with minimal effort. It plays a large role in what direction we chose for our media to go in. In an advertising point of view, computational media has dramatically altered how easy it is to promote to others. We are now able to select the group we would like to reach, the time they see it, and how often they see it.

Interactions and stories provide a completely different experience. Interactions are real and what you have experienced, achieved, or failed to do will set off a real chain of events. Stories are a fantasy, a chance to escape from the real world and lose yourself. The only problem is that no matter what happens in the story, it didn’t really happen. Human contact also drastically differs in the two. Small things like eye contact and body language are a large part of what it means to be “human.” Why have most humanoids failed? They lack fluidity. Isolation can cause a person to not know how to interact with other humans. We pick up basic social cues by mimicking the people around us, hence why many people will behave or sound like their family members. But, if we are never around people, we will never be able to mimic anyone. It is near impossible to know how to do something you have never done before much like how it is impossible for a robot to act like a human if it does not have the “human code” programmed into it. When we tell stories of previous interactions, the line between interactions and stories begins to morph. Every story is told from a storyteller’s point of view. Therefore, it is a story. However, it was, what we believe to be, a factual recount of the events that took place in the interaction. Another example would be when telling a story through text. I may feel I am accurately describing my experience, but the reader may be comprehending it a different way turning it into another story. This is similar to the way we perceive social media. What we take in from the tweet or post may not be the same as it’s true intention. We are all producing and consuming these media forms and there is less and less of a chance to avoid it now.

Simply put, a universal machine is a machine that provides universal services. The perfect ideal. No one would ever have to do anything ever again and the world would turn into the movie WALL-E. Ironically, most would thumbs down becoming WALL-E people. Having tasks to complete is what gives our lives purpose. So, I guess it’s not so simple because the idea of a machine that provides all possible services directly contradicts with the perfect ideal.

Unlock the Blinking Lights

Adding on to my previous “Unlock the Light” switch, I coded a conditional if statement to control the light of the LED to differentiate between when the door lock is open and when it is closed. When the door lock is open, the LED will be lit. But when the door lock is closed, the LED will blink.

This is the code I used.

Code

void setup(){

pinMode(4,INPUT);
pinMode(2,INPUT);
pinMode(7,OUTPUT);
}

void loop(){

if (digitalRead(4) == HIGH){
digitalWrite(7,HIGH);
delay(1000);
digitalWrite(7,LOW);
delay(1000);
}else{
digitalWrite(2,HIGH);,
}

}

I had originally planned on just having the door lock hit the wire itself to initiate the blinking, but realized it was too unreliable because they wouldn’t always come in contact enough. Luckily, my neighbors had just given us some cupcakes, so I used the cupcake liner to expand the surface area of conductivity by taping it to the wire.

cupcake

n

Now the chance of the metal door lock coming in contact with the wire is much higher. When the door lock hits the tin foil, it causes the LED to blink. I taped it to the back of my laptop because it was the closest stable surface.

This is the finished product!

(The LED is on when the door lock in unlocked. It just wasn’t picking up well on camera.)

Some real world applications for this switch could be to alert someone if they left their fridge open, easily accessible light for if someone wakes up in the middles of the night, or a quiet way to alert the outside if someone is in danger.

 

 

Unlock the Light

After looking through the junk shelf, I found this conductive metal door lock and thought it would function great as a switch.

I first created a regular circuit as my base.

Then, I drew a schematic to have a visual representation of what I wanted to achieve.

 

Using this schematic, I incorporated the door lock as a switch into the circuit.

I used my foot to slide the door lock and turn on the led.

Click the link below to see the full video!

Unlock the Light

Computers

Like people, computers can only know about someone what that person has told them. My daily searches of the route to 721 Broadway, what food places are open at 1 am, and how to do laundry have probably led my computer to the conclusion that I am just one technologically dependent fish in a sea of technologically dependent web surfers. Society’s heavy reliance on technology has reached a point where some have began to question if technology is helping or enabling us. In less fortunate parts of the world where technology use is not as prominent, the people are still able to survive. However, many are often less educated, less worldly, and less connected. Many are often unaware of the world beyond the town they were born in. Easier access of technology would change the world by giving every person a chance to learn and by having a global wealth of knowledge from every background.  To me, a more inclusive device would have to be a part of the body, something that everyone is entitled to at birth and something that cannot be taken away at any point. However, this may not be ideal as technology would then become a literal part of us. There is no ideal device because there is no standard for ideal. An ideal  inclusive device would impact the lives of millions of people and not everyone would be ready for that. The concept of a single technological device that would appeal to and be welcomed by every audience without any trade offs can never exist.