Category Archives: Fall 2022

Science of Movement (DANC-UT 1605)

The Science of Movement will introduce students to the multidisciplinary field of how the human brain controls movements, how we learn new movements, and the rehabilitation of various movement disorders and injuries. This course is appropriate for undergraduate students with an interest in human movement, neuroscience and behavior, physical medicine, dance and/or athletics. No prior course of study in neuroscience is necessary to successfully engage with the course material. This course will count towards general education requirements for social science for Tisch undergraduate students.

Dance (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Social Media Strategy (MKTG-UB 45)

The course covers marketing, advertising, and communications strategies in the new media landscape where traditional media (e.g., television, print) and the online social media (i.e., Web 2.0; e.g., online social networks, user-generated content, blogs, forums) co-exist. Students are expected to have knowledge about the fundamentals of traditional advertising methods and strategies. With this background knowledge, the primary focus of the course is on understanding social media, developing social media marketing strategies, and tracking their effectiveness. This course does not look at more tactical aspects of advertising/communications such as creative, message management, and publicity.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MKTG-UB 45-000 (10761)
02/03/2021 – 03/17/2021 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Images (PHIL-UH 2416)

Images depict, words describe. A picture of the cat of the mat depicts the cat as being on the mat. The sentence ’the cat is on the mat’ describes the cat as being on the mat. Both represent the world as being in a certain state, but they do so in different ways. What is the difference in these ways of representing? What does it take for an image to depict? This course covers most major theories of depiction, including resemblance, experience, recognition, pretense, and structural theories. We then expand the scope of inquiry to include topics such as systems of depiction, analog vs. digital representation, maps, film, comics, maps, mental imagery, and relations to the cognitive science of vision.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PHIL-UH 2416-000 (5805)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rabin, Gabriel

Marx and the Culture of Capitalism (GERM-UA 242)

The course serves as an introduction to the thought and legacy of Karl Marx. Marx’s theory of capitalism centers on the concept of value. Value is the interface between culture and commerce, the hinge on which Marx’s theory and Marxism turn. Although Marx sometimes distinguished between an economic “base” and a legal-cultural “superstructure,” he managed to depict the culture of capitalism as a whole. This method forms one of his crucial legacies, which we will explore in and after Marx. Organized around a slow reading of Capital, Volume 1, the course will also feature short readings from those who inspired Marx (David Ricardo, G. W. F. Hegel, Charles Babbage and Ada Lovelace) and those his work influenced (Rosa Luxemburg, Theodor W. Adorno, Stuart Hall, Donna Haraway). We will follow the trajectory that Capital itself takes, from the commodity and the concept of value to machinery, cooperation, and accumulation.

German (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


GERM-UA 242-000 (20010)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Weatherby, Leif

Music for Film and TV (FMTV-UT 1008)

This course examines the artistic, aesthetic, and technical aspects in composing and creating music for film and television. It provides an inside look into the relationship between composer, director, and music editor, exploring music as a creative tool. Through lectures, analysis, demonstrations, and presentations by guest speakers, students learn and deal with the specifics of the film composer’s job, duties, and responsibilities, including the basics of film scoring. As a result, students develop the listening and production skills necessary for creative use of music in films, television, and media. In addition to creative and technical considerations, the business and personal relationship between composer and director/producer will be discussed. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1008-000 (19412)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Electronics (ENGR-UH 3611)

This course focuses on fundamentals of electronics theory and design. The topics covered include semiconductor physics, diodes, diode circuits such as limiters, clamps; bipolar junction transistors; small-signal models; cut-off, saturation, and active regions; common emitter, common base and emitter-follower amplifier configurations; field-effect transistors (MOSFET and JFET); biasing; small-signal models; common-source and common gate amplifiers; and integrated circuit MOS amplifiers. The laboratory experiments include the design, building and testing of diode circuits, including rectifiers, BJT biasing, large signal operation and FET characteristics, providing hands-on experience of design, theory and applications, with emphasis on small signal analysis and amplifier design. The course also covers the design and analysis of small-signal bipolar junction transistor and field-effect transistor amplifiers; and, diode circuits. The students are introduced to designing and analyzing circuits using the LTPSpice or Cadence simulation tool.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3611-000 (3595)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ha, Sohmyung


ENGR-UH 3611-000 (3596)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sheikh, Muhammad Faraz · Ha, Sohmyung

Introduction to Data Analysis for Engineers (ENGR-UH 2027)

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of data analysis. The course starts with tools used to summarize and visualize data. The focus then shifts to fitting and parameter estimation. The derivation of estimators of parameters using both maximum likelihood and least-squares techniques are covered. Analysis of the statistical properties of estimators is also covered. The course includes hands-on exercises using MATLAB.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ENGR-UH 2027-000 (17233)
10/26/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Jabari, Saif Eddin Ghazi


ENGR-UH 2027-000 (17234)
10/26/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Electronic Rituals, Oracles and Fortune-Telling (IMNY-UT 289)

According to anthropologists Filip de Boeck and René Devisch, divination “constitutes a space in which cognitive structures are transformed and new relations are generated in and between the human body, the social body and the cosmos.” In this class, students will learn the history of divination, engage in the practice of divination, and speculate on what forms divination might take in a world where the human body, the social body, and even the cosmos(!) are digitally mediated. Starting with an understanding of ritual and folk culture, we will track the history of fortune-telling from the casting of lots to computer-generated randomness to the contemporary revival of Tarot; from reading entrails to astrology to data science; from glossolalia to surrealist writing practices to the “ghost in the machine” of artificial intelligence. Weekly readings and assignments culminate in a final project.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


IMNY-UT 289-000 (21942)
09/07/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Parrish, Allison

Animation: Methods of Motion (IMNY-UT 288)

This course explores the fundamentals of storytelling through animation and takes students from traditional animation techniques to contemporary forms. In the first part of the course, students will focus on traditional animation, from script to storyboard through stop motion and character-based animation. The course then examines opportunities afforded by new technologies, such as interactivity, projection mapping and game engines. Drawing skills are not necessary for this course, however students will keep a personal sketchbook.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

DIGITAL LOGIC AND STATE MACHINE DESIGN (ECE-UY 2204)

This course covers combinational and sequential digital circuits. Topics: Introduction to digital systems. Number systems and binary arithmetic. Switching algebra and logic design. Error detection and correction. Combinational integrated circuits, including adders. Timing hazards. Sequential circuits, flipflops, state diagrams and synchronous machine synthesis. Programmable Logic Devices, PLA, PAL and FPGA. Finite-state machine design. Memory elements. A grade of C or better is required of undergraduate computer-engineering majors. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 1114 (C- or better) or CS-UY 1133 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UH 1001 (C- or better) or ENGR-UH 1000 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 101 (C- or better)

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11545)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11546)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11547)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11548)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11549)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Reagen, Brandon

Architectural Design and Drawing (ARTS-UG 1621)

This architecture workshop introduces the basic principles of design. It begins with an analysis of a house by an important architect that examines the design concept or parti of the building, historical and environmental issues, as well as function, circulation, spatial organization, site, zoning, light, proportions, structure, and materials. In developing this project, students are also introduced to a vocabulary of design terms and the process of creating an architectural concept. In the projects that follow, students create their own designs for various types of structures. The assignments might include a New York loft space, a house in the country, or a small public or commercial building. These exercises provide the experience of creating designs by applying the concepts learned in the analysis. The basic techniques of drafting, rendering, and using Sketchup or similar software are also discussed. Films, lectures and texts on architectural theory provide additional insight. Design experience is useful, but not required.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1621-000 (16717)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goodman, Donna

Culture, Hist/Imaging Photography Studies (PHTI-UT 1003)

Offered Fall Only. Required of all freshmen majors and highly recommended for incoming transfers. Students are required to register for the lecture and the recitation sections. No prerequisites for this course. The course will consist of a series of weekly lectures, discussions, readings and field trips to museums and galleries in the city. Lectures will present historic and contemporary art and photography and it’s ideation as a basis for understanding the work the students are viewing on their weekly field trips. Students will visit selected exhibitions chosen for their quality and relevance and arranged by geographic area of the city (One week the Whitney, the next Chelsea, etc). Students will be required to monitor the daily press and periodicals for reviews of work they’ve seen and to highlight exhibitions the class should see. Additional readings of historic material will be assigned and short papers will be required.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


PHTI-UT 1003-000 (13385)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kobielski, Lili


PHTI-UT 1003-000 (13386)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Statistics for Business and Economics (BUSF-SHU 101)

This course introduces students to the use of statistical methods. Topics include: descriptive statistics; introduction to probability; sampling; statistical inference concerning means, standard deviations, and proportions; correlation; analysis of variance; linear regression, including multiple regression analysis. Applications to empirical situations are an integral part of the course. Pre-requisites: None Fulfillment: This course satisfies the following: Major req: BUSF, BUSM, ECON, CS, DS Foundational course; Social Science: methods course; IMB Business elective.

Business and Finance (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


BUSF-SHU 101-000 (17187)
09/13/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Zheng, Dan


BUSF-SHU 101-000 (17188)
09/13/2022 – 12/16/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Zheng, Dan


BUSF-SHU 101-000 (17189)
09/13/2022 – 12/16/2022 Fri
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Zheng, Dan

Virgins Martyrs Monks & Saints: Early Christianity (RELST-UA 846)

What was it about Christianity that it made it so popular in the ancient world? Was it the martyrs volunteering for public execution? Monks’ sexual renunciation? The isolation of hermits living on the tops of columns in the wilderness? Or perhaps orthodoxy and its politically divisive anxieties about heretics and Jews? In fact, all these things (and more) explain how a small Jewish messianic sect from Palestine became the dominant religion of the Roman Empire. This course will provide an introduction to the big questions in the history of early Christianity. The focus will be on early Christian literature, such as martyr texts, saints’ lives, and works of monastic spirituality and mysticism. Issues addressed will include the Christian reception of Greco-Roman antiquity, the origins of anti-Semitism, gender and sexuality in the early Church, and the emergence of Christian theology.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

The Bible as Literature (HBRJD-UA 23)

Over the past few decades, many readers have come to a fuller appreciation of the emotional and imaginative power of the Bible?s narratives, which still speak with remarkable clarity to our own sensibilities, leading one critic to characterize the Bible as a ?full-fledged kindred spirit? of modernism. The course pursues this ?kindred spirit,? using a broadly literary approach as its guide. While the focus is on narrative?the Pentateuch (Genesis?Deuteronomy) and the Former Prophets (Joshua?Kings), as well as shorter narrative books (Ruth, Jonah, and Esther)?it also studies Ecclesiastes and Job as ancient precursors to modern skepticism. Finally, it studies one modernist engagement with the Bible: Kafka?s Amerika.

Hebrew & Judaic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


HBRJD-UA 23-000 (21860)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Feldman, Liane

History in the Headlines (HIST-UA 70)

The key events you read about in your morning twitter feed or on your favorite news sites are usually not unique in world affairs. They have a background, a context, that makes them more understandable and often more interesting. History is about everything that happened before you started reading this course description. And thinking historically means trying to make sense of the new in the context of what human beings have done before. In this lecture series, NYU’s historians take you on a behind the scenes tour of current events you thought you knew, with the goal of making you a better observer and analyst of news about the world around you.

History (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

The Novel in Antiquity (CLASS-UA 203)

Survey of Greek and Roman narrative fiction in antiquity, its origins and development as a literary genre, and its influence on the tradition of the novel in Western literature. Readings include Chariton?s Chaereas and Callirrhoe, Longus?s Daphnis and Chloe, Heliodorus?s Ethiopian Tale, Lucian?s True History, Petronius?s Satyricon, and Apuleius?s Golden Ass. Concludes with the Gesta Romanorum and the influence of this tradition on later prose, such as Elizabethan prose romance.

Classics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CLASS-UA 203-000 (19322)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Barchiesi, Alessandro

Philosophical Approaches to Race and Racism (PHIL-UA 8)

This introductory-level course is needed to provide students with a firm understanding of distinctively philosophical approaches to issues concerning race and racism. This course has two themes. The first is an exploration of the concept of race. This is a question in social ontology, which is the philosophical study of the nature of social entities. The second is an examination of some of the normative and conceptual issues surrounding the most morally significant of the ways in which “race” has mattered for social life, namely as the concept that defines the object of the attitudes, practices, institutions and beliefs we call “racist.” We shall ask what racism is, what sorts of things can be racist, and what makes racism wrong.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHIL-UA 8-000 (10079)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Appiah, Kwame Anthony


PHIL-UA 8-000 (10080)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ulerie, Jodell


PHIL-UA 8-000 (10081)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ulerie, Jodell


PHIL-UA 8-000 (10082)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grabelsky, Dana


PHIL-UA 8-000 (10083)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grabelsky, Dana

British Art in London (ARTH-UA 9011)

The principal aim of this course is to familiarize students with the history of British art from the Stuarts to the early Victorian era. Teaching will be conducted entirely on sites in London or its immediate vicinity. The course will begin with the elite patronage of the Stuart court and end with the development of public institutions of art from the mid-eighteenth century. The social significance of portraiture, the cult of antiquity, the art market and the rise of landscape will all be studied as themes. There will be a strong emphasis on the European sources of British visual culture and the emergence of a distinctive national tradition of painting from Hogarth through to Turner.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTH-UA 9011-000 (2722)
09/02/2024 – 12/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Schuster, Jana


ARTH-UA 9011-000 (2723)
09/02/2024 – 12/06/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Weiner, Julia

Introduction to The New Testament (RELST-UA 302)

Introduces students to issues and themes in the history of the Jesus movement and early Christianity through a survey of the main texts of the canonical New Testament as well as other important early Christian documents. Students are given the opportunity to read most of the New Testament text in a lecture hall setting where the professor provides historical context and focus on significant issues, describes modern scholarly methodologies, and places the empirical material within the larger framework of ancient history and the theoretical study of religion.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


RELST-UA 302-000 (26095)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cady, Alyssa

Advanced Seminar: (SOC-UA 9942)

This interdisciplinary course examines the works of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud, three German speaking writers who pioneered radically different and influential interpretations of modern life, which continue to shape our contemporary understanding of society and individuality. The seminar not only delves into the origins of these prominent traditions of modern Western thought, but also underscores their relevance in modern social theories and poetics. Hence, the course will also include references to the writings of their contemporaries, as well as explications of the direct and indirect influences of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud on other writers.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


SOC-UA 9942-000 (3750)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Wed
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by Michaelis-König, Andree

Contemporary Music Performance I (ARTS-UG 1305)

This course is designed to help students develop a better understanding of music by presenting the opportunity to experience music as a musician. Students review basic music theory and develop rudimentary musicianship skills; learn how to utilize the basic functionality of common digital audio workstations; and use that experience to create music. The goal is for each student to be able to compose, rehearse, and then perform, original contemporary pieces of music, individually and in a group setting, in a wide range of musical idioms. The course culminates in a public recital of works written and performed by students.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ARTS-UG 1305-000 (12193)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Castellano, John

Advanced Seminar in Personality Disorders (CAMS-UA 202)

Can we truly classify one’s personality, the very essence of an individual, as “disordered”? We explore the history, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of personality disorders. We begin with an overview of personality and theories of personality development and then complete an in-depth review of each disorder. We consider the genetic, neurobiological, and developmental research supporting and refuting these diagnoses. We review various classification systems, observe how the media often portrays personality disorders, and challenge the notion that undesirable personality traits are always maladaptive. Finally, we utilize both research and clinical material and aims at a nuanced understanding of these disorders and their sustained impact upon affected individuals.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CAMS-UA 202-000 (9695)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Ross · Davis, Jordan

TrendingMentalHealth (CAMS-UA 504)

Addresses current problems facing our society and threatening our mental health, such as the opioid epidemic, gun violence, video game addiction, legal use of marijuana, and prolonged separation of children from their parents. Students contrast what is scientifically understood with what is commonly believed and learn critical reading and thinking skills as they parse fact from fiction, reality from supposition. Given the topical nature of this course, themes may vary by semester and instructor expertise (including a focus on social and cultural issues, novel neuroscience, digital health technology, etc.).

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CAMS-UA 504-000 (9479)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Waugh, Whitney


CAMS-UA 504-000 (9700)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Castellanos, Francisco · Baroni, Argelinda


CAMS-UA 504-000 (19793)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gerson, Ruth · Marsh, Akeem · Chhabra, Divya

Introduction to Computer Programming (Limited Prior Experience) (CSCI-UA 3)

This course introduces object-oriented programming, recursion, and other important programming concepts to students who already have had some exposure to programming in the context of building applications using Python. Students will design and implement Python programs in a variety of applied areas.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CSCI-UA 3-000 (9289)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Arias Hernandez, Mauricio

The Family (SOC-UA 451)

Introduction to the sociology of family life. Addresses a range of questions: What is the relationship between family life and social arrangements outside the family (e.g., in the workplace, the economy, the government)? How is the division of labor in the family related to gender, age, class, and ethnic inequality? Why and how have families changed historically? What are the contours of contemporary American families, and why are they changing?

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

SERVICE DESIGN INNOVATION (MG-UY 3734)

Products are used not in isolation but as part of a wider mesh of artifacts and interactions, both digital and non-digital. The discipline of service design takes this holistic view of a process or product, considering not just the use of an artifact but the wider service it is situated within across several ‘touch points’. With a growing service-based economy, in many cases the product is the service, which challenges conventional views of what the designer creates. Services are complex to understand and design, and require a participatory approach with deep engagement with stakeholders. This Service Design Innovation course is for students with various backgrounds and diverse interests for their future careers: technologists who want to understand how the technology can support service innovation; designers who want to broaden their skills; product and project managers who want to understand the relationship between products, services, and design; policy makers who want to understand how to develop human-centered policies that create real impact; managers and entrepreneurs who want to understand how to create new innovative and sustainable system offerings.

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 3734-000 (14097)

Industrial Revolutions and the Future of Work (CCOL-UH 1074)

How has the automation economy changed the ways we live and work? What challenges and opportunities does automation pose for the future? This multidisciplinary colloquium draws on materials in social science, science, and the humanities to explore how societies have organized themselves relative to technology in the past, and what changes are currently taking place. As we are now in the midst of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, what lessons can be learned from its predecessors? What consequences might new technologies pose for global challenges such as peace, education, equality, or sustainable development? How does the very definition of the “human” stand to be affected? Students will examine the wave of technology-driven transformations occurring on a global scale, including artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, and virtual reality. They will consider the Fourth Industrial Revolution as an opportunity to critique theories of technological change and construct their own narratives of change in individual case study analysis assignments.

Core: Colloquium (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


CCOL-UH 1074-000 (16829)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Gleason, Nancy

Future of Medicine (CCOL-UH 1010)

One of the biggest challenges in medicine is to prevent disease and ensure personalized treatment. This is now becoming possible thanks to high-resolution DNA sequencing technology that can decipher our individual information. These developments are already impacting global health, but they raise global challenges such as equality. How will these new technologies blend into healthcare systems? What regulations are needed to ensure that personalized medicine reaches all layers of society? How do we prevent discrimination based on our genes? Through an inquiry-based approach we will examine the science, economics, and politics behind medicine and evaluate the ethical issues that arise in this fast-developing field.

Core: Colloquium (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CCOL-UH 1010-000 (3677)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Percipalle, Piergiorgio

What is Science and Technology Studies (HUMN-SHU 110)

This course is an introduction to Science and Technology Studies (STS), an interdisciplinary field treating science and technology as socially embedded enterprises. We will examine how social, political, cultural, and material conditions shape scientific and technological activity and how science and technology, in turn, shape society. You will become familiar with the basic concepts and methods developed by STS scholars in history, sociology, and anthropology and explore how the scope of the field has expanded to include a variety of empirical case studies, theoretical arguments, and scholarly debates. The kinds of questions we will explore include: What counts as scientific knowledge? How is it produced? How do scientists establish credibility? Can there be a scientific study of scientific inquiry? To what extent are science and technology shaped by historical context? Prerequisite: None.

Humanities (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


HUMN-SHU 110-000 (23807)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by

Photography of Architecture, City and Territory (IPHTI-UT 1210)

City, territory and architecture have been, from the beginning of photography, privileged objects for its practice. Photography has become a tool to strengthen the understanding of architecture, to highlight aesthetic and design ideas and to critically interpret the space. This class focuses on architectural photography and the photography of urban space, both in relation to their historical roots and contemporary practice. Florence offers a perfect environment to develop one’s artistic talent while learning the art of photography and discovering the secrets of one of the most fascinating cities in the world. Assignments are designed to help explore options for technical control as well as visual experimentation and individual style. Keeping in mind the inseparability of photographic technique and expression, students are expected to articulate their particular choices in relation to the overall conceptual approach of the projects. Critiques of assignments are important to the progress of each individual in the class, to help verbalize visual concepts, and to learn to see actively. The final exam consists of the presentation of a portfolio of photographs and an artist’s statement. Students are expected to work on their projects to develop an aesthetic and coherent photographic language and a personal approach to the photographic medium in a different environment. An emphasis is also placed on refining craft in relation to ideas, and to research on an individual basis, since it is crucial in developing an artistic practice. The course includes lectures, shooting sessions and field trips, discussions and critiques of the photographs. Each student must have a camera with manually adjustable aperture and shutter speed.

Int`l Pgms, Photography (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


IPHTI-UT 1210-000 (13446)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by

Ethics, Technology, and Business (BUSOR-UH 1009)

This course examines the ethical issues that arise in the context of the rapid development of technology and the increasing power of business corporations. In recent years, technological progress has allowed us to achieve many things, including the creation of intelligent machines that can surpass human capabilities. Yet, for all these benefits, the development of science and technology has spawned a host of problems such as: conflict between individual rights and social welfare; clash between respect for personal autonomy and expertise; automation and unemployment; and the replication of human bias by algorithms. Along with technological progress, the social role of businesses and corporations are also becoming increasingly important. How should corporations, for example, balance the pursuit of profit with respect for employees’ rights and liberties? Should the state refuse to enforce unconscionable contracts, even when enforcing those contracts would make both parties better off? What is the social role of corporations in the context of increasing inequality?

Business & Organizational Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


BUSOR-UH 1009-000 (17905)
08/29/2022 – 12/13/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Kim, Soo Jin

Distributed Ledger Technology: Ethereum, DeFi, and Beyond (BUSF-SHU 274)

One of the most exciting socio-technological developments in the past decade has been the emergence of blockchain technology, and with it the Blockchain Economy. This subset of the digital economy has mostly been driven by the Internet-of-Value (web3.0) where decentralized platforms compete over user’s investments in various blockchain verticals. These include Decentralized Finance (DeFi) – a vibrant decentralized money management ecosystem, NFT’s that promise to overhaul how we consume and invest in art, DAO’s that decentralize business governance, various novel financial instruments such as perpetuals, ERC20’s to disintermediate resource sharing, and many more. Fulfillment: BUSF Non-finance Elective; BUSM Non-marketing Elective; IMB Business Elective. Prerequisite: CSCI-SHU 11 Introduction to Computer Programming. Antirequisite: Students who have taken ECON-SHU 232 Blockchain, Cryptocurrency & Money or BUSF-SHU 366 Applications in Entrepreneurial Finance: Fintech are not eligible to enroll.

Business and Finance (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Asian Art and Architecture (ART-SHU 180)

This course surveys Asian art and architecture from the earliest civilizations to the present day through several themes. It focuses more on the arts and monuments from China, Japan, and India but also introduces those from Korea and Southeast Asia. We will study how artistic traditions transmit and develop in distinctive yet interconnected societies in Asia, as well as how those traditions interact with specific political, religious, social, and cultural contexts in which they grow. Issues investigated include (but are not limited to): the spread and metamorphosis of Buddhist art, the artistic exchanges between the “East” and the “West” (and the formations of the ideas of the “East” and the “West”), the production and consumption of art as related to various forms of power such as political authority, social hierarchy, and gender, and the “Asian-ness” in the contemporary world. Prerequisite: None.

Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


ART-SHU 180-000 (23806)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Kong, Hyoungee

Real Estate Data Science, Artificial Intelligence, and Machine Learning (FINC-UB 36)

Exponential growth in the availability of high quality real estate and real estate-related data is fueling a major shift in development, investment, and lending decision-making processes. In this highly applied course, students will be introduced to major data analysis and machine learning platforms; a wide range of public and private real estate and urban data sources; approaches to exploratory data analysis, real estate data visualization, and communication of findings; applied statistical modeling, including forecast modeling; and, emerging and prospective real estate applications for artificial intelligence and machine learning. Assessment will include case work focusing on real-world real estate decisions and coding assignments. While the data and applications for this course are principally in the real estate sector, the applied skills learned may be of interest for students across a wide range of industries.

Finance (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 12 Weeks

Sports Economics (ECON-UB 211)

This course applies microeconomic theory and econometric analysis to sports and explores some public policy issues that have arisen in the design of sports competitions. The course is divided into four main parts: the structure of sports leagues, labor market issues, college sports, and the market for sports betting.

Economics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ECON-UB 211-000 (22435)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bowmaker, Simon

Sound and the City (ARTS-UG 1494)

New York’s soundscape is hard to ignore: it can be overwhelming, it is always intricate, but also surprisingly subtle, and there is much that we hear that we don’t really listen to. We will interrelate the subjects of noise, silence, and the city, ranging from important moments in the history of noise abatement in New York City to the philosophy and work of composers such as John Cage. New York City’s diverse population strongly affects and produces its unique soundscape; how does this particular city reflect its inhabitants? There will be off-site field trips to events such as the West Indian Day Parade in Brooklyn, as well as visits to sited works such as Max Neuhaus’s Times Square. We will consider how sound is often explicitly designed to affect and influence us in places such as retail environments. How do our attempts to mediate sound with devices like headphones affect our listening? Students will engage the ideas of writers such as Stuart Hall, Jacques Attali, Luigi Russolo, John Cage, Emily Thompson, R. Murray Schaefer, and Shuhei Hosokawa, as well as works by Christina Kubisch, Susan Phillipz, and Pauline Oliveros. There will be three short production assignments, some of which will be made for specific sites in the city as a way of investigating the interplay between public spaces and listening. At its core, you will be asked to consider the politics and subjectivity of your own listening as a citizen of New York. Who do you hear? How do you sound?

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Delicious Movement: Time Is Not Even, Space Is Not Empty (ARTS-UG 1275)

Distance is Malleable is a multi-faceted course that contemplates the notions of human fragility, existential solitude, and metaphorical “nakedness.” Led by NYC-based interdisciplinary performing artist Eiko Otake, students will engage in movement study, art making, and exploration of different places and people, living or dead. How does being or becoming a mover reflect and alter each person’s relationship with the environment, history, language, and other beings? How are we defined by or/and how do we define our relationships to the particulars of place? How do we maximize the potentials of selected encounters with other human beings, places, and things? Reading assignments will focus on our collective experience of massive violence and human failure. In addition to the Gallatin studio, we will also work at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine and the Brooklyn Botanic Garden where Eiko is an artist-in-residence. Weekly reading and journal entries are required. Students will share their projects in class.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1275-000 (16980)
09/03/2024 – 10/22/2024 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Otake, Eiko

Rites of Passage into Contemporary Art Practice (ARTS-UG 1420)

Modern art has been a balancing act between control and letting go. This course focuses on the psychological interface between the two, the “liminal” zone. We will survey modern artists’ techniques for tapping sources of creativity, including Dada collagists’ free-associations; Surrealists’ automatic writing, doodles, and “cadavres exquises”; and Abstract Expressionists’ embrace of chaos. We will engage in simple exercises: doodling, speed drawing, painting an abstract mural as a group, keeping a liminal journal, collaging, and exploring ritualistic techniques. We will follow up with discussions, take a trip to the Met to dialogue with an African oracle sculpture,and conclude the course reexamining modern art in light of the inner journey threshold drama each of us has taken during the course. Readings include van Gennep’s Rites of Passage, Chipp’s Theories of Modern Art, R.D. Laing, Federico Garcia Lorca on duende, Victor Turner on liminal, Mircea Eliade on Shamanism Techniques of Ecstasy, James Elkins on alchemy and art, and Frida Kahlo’s journal.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1420-000 (16715)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ruhe, Barnaby

History of Animation (FMTV-UT 1144)

Offered in the fall semester only. A chronological survey of the art and commerce of the animated film internationally over the last 100 years. Designed to expand students’ awareness of the origins of a significant 20th-century art form and to acquaint them with a wide variety of practical techniques and styles, from pre-film influences to computer-generated images; from “Golden Age” studio cartoon factories to today’s independent avant-garde animator-filmmakers. Designed to expand student aesthetic sensibilities and sharpen critical perceptions about this unique genre. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES. Non-majors must process a “Permission Notice for Non-Majors” form to register for the course (subject to availability).

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1144-000 (19501)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kosarin, Ray

Projects in Photography (ART-UE 1380)

Students work directly with internationally recognized figures in photography. Topics for workshops range from the techniques of established photographers to discussions of issues in photographic theory, history, & criticism.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 1380-000 (9681)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harouni, Shadi

Mixing in the Digital Audio Workstation (MPATE-UE 1135)

This course explores the art and craft of mixing records, with special attention to “mixing in the box” (via a digital audio workstation). Focus on methodology and technique, with particular emphasis on establishing balances, using such tools as compression and automation to enhance dynamics and develop unique coloration. Examines intersection of technology, budgets, and the marketplace. Students execute their own mixes, with guidance and critique from the instructor. Basic level of DAW proficiency required.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1135-000 (13050)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Killen, Kevin


MPATE-UE 1135-000 (13051)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Killen, Kevin

Midi for Non-Majors (MPATE-UE 1810)

An introduction to MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) with an emphasis on sequencing, production and arranging techniques. Open to students without previous experience in music technology.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1810-000 (10676)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Phillips, Andrew

Electronic Product Design for Music and Audio (MPATE-UE 1017)

This is a multidisciplinary course in which students with previous experience with analog and digital electronics create a novel hardware–based electronic musical instrument, controller, effects unit, or other device related to their interests in music and audio. Student projects may be analog, digital, or a hybrid, and should be unique in some way from devices currently in the commercial marketplace. Students present their designs and functioning physical prototypes with the class as they evolve throughout the semester for feedback.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1017-000 (13044)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven


MPATE-UE 1017-000 (13045)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven

Aesthetics of Recording (MPATE-UE 1227)

A critical listening study of acoustic music recordings that develops the student’s ability to define and evaluate aesthetic elements of recorded music. Students explore recorded music attributes including dynamic range, stereo imaging, perceived room acoustics, the use of reverb and equalization, naturalness, and the listening perspectives.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1227-000 (12988)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wojcik, Leszek

Fundamentals of Music Technology (MPATE-UE 1801)

A general introduction to the fundamental concepts of music technology, including: MIDI and sequencing, the basics of digital audio, sound recording, mixing and sound synthesis,. The course will also briefly overview advanced topics and applications in the field.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (12129)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Geluso, Paul


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (10670)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Las Heras, Diego


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (10673)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mueller, Charles


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (12130)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mann, Mason

Midi Technology II (MPATE-UE 1014)

Programming for MIDI, C, and other appropriate techniques. Design and implementation of software sequencers, interface drivers, and hardware applications will be the focus.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1014-000 (12979)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krauss, Briggan

Rcdg Tech for Non Majors (MPATE-UE 1022)

Introduction to the physical aspects of sound, psychoacoustics, basic electricity, principles and practice of magnetic recording and an overview of the recording studio, including an introduction to multi-track recording techniques. Students perform various duties just as they would in a professional recording session with live musicians in the recording studio. Open to students without previous experience in recording technology.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10658)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Filadelfo, Gary


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10660)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Griffin, J Chris


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10662)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Losada, Juan

Fund of Audio Tech I: Stu Maint (MPATE-UE 1008)

An introduction to maintenance and troubleshooting concepts used in the recording studio. Procedures discussed are those necessary in utilizing sophisticated audio equipment and understanding essential aspects of studio design.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1008-000 (10656)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Glanz, Jake

Concert Recording (MPATE-UE 1011)

Introduction to the concepts of live concert recording. Microphone selection, characteristics & placement as well as acoustic problems encountered in concert halls will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to apply the lecture material by recording undergraduate rehearsals & recitals.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1011-000 (12977)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MPATE-UE 1011-000 (12978)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Studio Production Techniques (MPATE-UE 1005)

Principles covered in MPATE-UE1001 & MPATE-UE-1003 are put into practice with additional theory & techniques. Students perform various duties just as they would in a professional recording session. Studio Lab assignments are performed outside of class reinforcing weekly topics.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1005-000 (12127)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by O’Reilly, Michael

Communicating For Influence (IMBX-SHU 104)

Communication sits at the core of all human interactions and is highly valued in workplaces. Beyond the minimal goal of articulating and presenting one’s ideas effectively, communication also involves building empathy, cultivating an eye for detail, developing awareness of goals and contexts, and integrating critical and reflective thinking. How can we communicate our own projects to different audiences? Why should other people care? What types of media can we use and how do we know they are effective? How can collaborative and participatory elements help to improve engagement levels? This course aims to guide students to review and create their own learning profiles as they learn to engage a diverse range of targeted audience. Prerequisite: Not open to freshman. Fulfillment: IMA Major Electives; IMB Major Interactive Media Elective.

Interactive Media and Business (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


IMBX-SHU 104-000 (22138)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Thu
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Wang, Nicole

Making Virtual Sense: 3D Graphic Studio for Critically-Driven Creative Applications (ARTS-UG 1647)

Until recently, the creation of interactive 3D graphics was only possible for large and capital-intensive uses: the armed forces, large-scale architectural/engineering work, mass entertainment. Now, open-source applications and powerful personal and portable computers are making it practical for individuals and small groups to independently build and share alternative visions. Whether you are interested in exploring new ways to construct complex networks of ideas in the present, or to imagine physical spaces to reflect and support new ways of life, this arts workshop provides a blend of critical orientation and hands-on experience. In this open project studio, the majority of course time and work will be taken up with the development of student-built individual or small team concepts, to be developed as 3D graphic “fly-through” models. Theoretical discussions will be initiated with a mix of relevant writings and media. Here is a representative sampling of sources: Douglas Engelbart, Eric Raymond, William Gibson, Zaha Hadid, Judith Donath, the Athenian Acropolis, the Kalachakra mandala, Salisbury Cathedral, the Schindler house, Artigas gardens, the 1958 World’s fair Philips pavilion, the Seagram’s building, Grant Theft Auto IV, the monastery of La Tourette, the Mangin plan, compendium.org, Betaville.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1647-000 (16961)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Skelton, Carl

The Meme: Images and Words Make Ideas (ARTS-UG 1664)

This course explores image making, writing and their juxtaposition, as a method of thinking through and evoking ideas. At times, images lead, and text follows, providing descriptions of images, and at other times, text leads and images illustrate that text. In the realm of the contemporary American meme, just about every time images and words are present they have an effect upon each other in the mind of the viewer, which changes the meaning of both, producing something which is more than what is present in both image and text. That third and phantasmic image exists in the mind. The examples of Chinese Literati painting, and Surrealism will provide a historical point of departure, from which we to engage 21st century examples of image and word juxtapositions that create new ideas. This course will provide students with a general history of the relationship between the image and word, and a critical understanding of the composition and decomposition of image-word printed and digital matter. Along with skills in Lino-cut printmaking, Risograph printmaking, and publication design, students will also write poetry, short essays, and art criticism. Students will participate in the content production, design, and publishing of a book and magazine, zine and poster.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1664-000 (17074)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bryant, Ernest

Digital Art and New Media (ARTS-UG 1635)

This workshop seeks to bring students from varying backgrounds together to engage in evaluating and sharing digital new media for the Internet and other new media art mediums. Each student brings to the class a set of experiences and skills, such as research, writing, design, film, music, photography, computer gaming, performance, animation, computer literacy, software knowledge, virtual reality, augmented reality, mixed reality, A.I. (Artificial Intelligence) Generative Art experiences, among others. The class will discuss new media concepts, content strategies, and frameworks that bridge theory and practice. Through lectures (including a survey of digital new media innovations), group discussions, virtual or other lectures and/or workshops, students will develop individual projects, based on their new media skills. The class intends to be a part of the development of the Virtual Reality (VR) Museum (“Virtual Museum XR”), or other Gallatin arts initiatives, such as Rabbit Hole. Digital new media projects may include digital photography, animated films, podcasts, sound art installations, TikTok, music videos, VR, AR, A.I. Generative Art, to name a few. Class projects, readings, and week-to-week journal-keeping reports are essential components of this workshop. They will reside in a designated Google Docs site, specific for this class. Students are encouraged to supply their own media and take advantage of NYU’s LinkedIn Learning new media tutorials and access NYU’s LaGuardia Studio and LaGuardia Co-op hardware and software opportunities.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1635-000 (16719)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Allen, Cynthia

Hardware Security (ENGR-UH 4320)

This course covers topics related to security and trustworthiness of electronic hardware. Lectures and in-class discussions on recent research papers cover the following topics: Trustworthiness of integrated circuits; counterfeit chips, hardware Trojans, reverse engineering and IP piracy. Design-for-Trust; hardware metering, logic encryption, split manufacturing, IC camouflaging. Encryption hardware; AES, DES, etc. Testability vs Security; misuse of test infrastructure to attack encryption hardware and countermeasures. Encrypted architectures; homomorphic encryption, privacy-preserving computation. Signal processing in the encrypted domain. Malware detection through hardware structures, side channel attacks, cyber-security for the smart grid. Lectures are complemented by hands-on lab exercises.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ENGR-UH 4320-000 (17229)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


ENGR-UH 4320-000 (17230)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Computer Vision (ENGR-UH 3331)

An important goal of artificial intelligence (AI) is to equip computers with the capability of interpreting visual inputs. Computer vision is an area in AI that deals with the construction of explicit, meaningful descriptions of physical objects from images. It includes the techniques for image processing, pattern recognition, geometric modeling, and cognitive processing. This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and techniques used in computer vision, which includes image representation, image pre-processing, edge detection, image segmentation, object recognition and detection, and neural networks and deep learning. In addition to learning about the most effective machine learning techniques, students will gain the practical implementation of applying these techniques to real engineering problems.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ENGR-UH 3331-000 (22825)
01/24/2023 – 03/10/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi


ENGR-UH 3331-000 (22826)
01/24/2023 – 03/10/2023 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi

Thermodynamics (ENGR-UH 3710)

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of thermodynamics and their applications to engineering problems. The following topics are covered in this course: properties of pure substances; concepts of work and heat; closed and open systems; the fundamental laws of thermodynamics; Carnot and Clausius statements of the 2nd law; entropy and entropy production; heat engines, refrigerators, heat pumps; efficiencies, coefficients of performance.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3710-000 (3597)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ryu, Je Ir


ENGR-UH 3710-000 (3598)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Al-Chalabi, Mohammed · Ryu, Je Ir

Transportation and Traffic Engineering (ENGR-UH 3413)

The course introduces students to fundamental concepts that underlie highway design, traffic operations and control, and transportation systems. The course begins with vehicle performance and the role it has on road design. We later cover the fundamentals of traffic flow theory and operations. In combination with such fundamentals we also discuss the use and collection of traffic data, as well as more advanced concepts on traffic safety, public transportation, and traffic management and control. Moreover, we look at clear applications of the concepts covered in class with a real-world student led project.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3413-000 (3541)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Menendez, Monica


ENGR-UH 3413-000 (3542)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zekar, Aicha · Menendez, Monica

Computer Organization and Architecture (ENGR-UH 3511)

The course introduces the principles of computer organization and basic architecture concepts. It discusses the basic structure of a digital computer and study in details formal descriptions, machine instruction sets design, formats and data representation, addressing structures, mechanization of procedure calls, memory management, arithmetic and logical unit, virtual and cache memory organization, I/O processing and interrupts, fundamental of reliability aspects. The course also covers performance and distributed system models. The labs emphasize experiential learning of computer organization and architecture concepts, and require students to use learned knowledge to create and build prototypes and evaluate their performance.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3511-000 (3593)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Maniatakos, Michail


ENGR-UH 3511-000 (3594)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Maniatakos, Michail · Annor, Prince

Bio-sensors and Bio-chips (ENGR-UH 4142)

This course covers the principles, technologies, methods and applications of biosensors and bioinstrumentation beginning with an examination of the ethical, legal, cultural, religious, and social implications of nanotechnologies. The objective of this course is to link engineering principles to understanding of biosystems in sensors and bioelectronics. The course provides students with detail of methods and procedures used in the design, fabrication, and application of biosensors and bioelectronic devices. The fundamentals of measurement science are applied to optical, electrochemical, mass, and pressure signal transduction. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to be able to explain biosensing and transducing techniques; design and construct biosensors instrumentation.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


ENGR-UH 4142-000 (23421)
08/29/2022 – 12/13/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Song, Yong-Ak


ENGR-UH 4142-000 (23422)
08/29/2022 – 12/13/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Song, Yong-Ak

Engineering Statics (ENGR-UH 2011)

This course introduces students to the field of mechanics through study of rigid bodies in static equilibrium. Knowledge and understanding of static equilibrium is essential for future study of topics as diverse as dynamics, solid mechanics, structures, robotics, and fluid mechanics. The methods, techniques, theory, and application of equilibrium in the solution of engineering problems are presented for two-dimensional systems. Topics covered include collinear forces, coincident forces, general equilibrium, moments and torques, analysis of trusses, frames and machines, Coulomb friction, centroid, center of mass, and moments of inertia.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3556)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sousa, Rita Leal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3557)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sousa, Rita Leal · Mengiste, Eyob


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3792)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Celik, Kemal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (4361)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sousa, Rita Leal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3793)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ayed, Lana Odeh · Celik, Kemal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (4362)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mengiste, Eyob

Senior Design Capstone Project I (ENGR-UH 4011)

Students learn about the process of design with measurable metrics, and how to incorporate appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints in the design process. Students learn how to clearly frame the design problem and follow the design process to result in an optimized solution. Students perform a review of the relevant literature, develop a preliminary design, generate solution concepts and selection criteria, and review and evaluate the chosen design. Students must consider social, economic, lifecycle, environmental, ethical, and other constraints, and must document the design process and the evolution of their design. This project culminates with a final report and presentation that proposes the actual design selected for further development and/or prototyping and testing in the subsequent semester.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 4011-000 (3947)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by George, Pradeep


ENGR-UH 4011-000 (4045)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by George, Pradeep

Computer Programming for Engineers (ENGR-UH 1000)

The objective of the course is for students to acquire the fundamental knowledge of computer programming, develop transferable programming skills, and learn to solve engineering problems via programming. The course is primarily based on the C programming language and an introduction to another programming language such as MATLAB (to demonstrate transferring programming knowledge from one language to another). The course explores the application of engineering computation in various engineering domains including mechanical, civil, computer, and electrical engineering. The following topics are covered: introduction to computer systems, standard input/output, file input/output, decision structures, loop structures, functions, arrays, addressing, dynamically allocated memory, structures, introduction to object oriented programming, problem solving via programming algorithm design, and applications in another programming language such as MATLAB.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3554)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3555)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Jamil, Muhammad Hassan · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3567)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Negoiu, Elena · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3588)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Negoiu, Elena · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3991)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Jamil, Muhammad Hassan · Eid, Mohamad

Re-Design (CADT-UH 1025)

Giorgio Vasari defined Mannerism in terms still used today in Art History: in the wake of the Renaissance masters, copying became the standard way to learn. But what do we really learn by copying? Would a contemporary mannerism fit in today’s world, dominated by visual information? How then does creativity work? How does change happen? Why did we wait half a century before having personal computers in colors other than beige? Why do we seem oblivious to the manufactured filters mediating our observation of nature itself? What are the trade-offs when we delegate creative choices to Google’s algorithms? What separates the artists of the past and the brand consultants of today? This course addresses the role and limits of copying as students explore many facets of graphic design, visual communication, and artistic value. The vibrant visual culture-in-the-making of Abu Dhabi and the UAE provide an ideal background for such explorations. Students will elaborate on the tension (real or perceived) among today’s artists, designers, and scientists, while discussing why a multidisciplinary mind is fundamental for contemporary attempts to re-design the world around us.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


CADT-UH 1025-000 (17329)

Autonomous and Social Robots (CADT-UH 1038)

How do we feel about robots? With technological developments in capability, performance, autonomy, ease of use, and cost-effectiveness, robots have arrived in everyday life. This course considers the history and ethics of human-robot interaction and explores unsolved hurdles we face as robots assume a ubiquitous presence in our lives. How are robots currently integrating into human-centered, civic industries such as education, heath, and smart cities? What roles might robots play in the future of these industries? What are the economic and labor implications associated with robotic integration? How will consumers respond to the increased use of robots in daily life? How have popular media representations over the last century influenced the way we experience these changes? Topics will also include the miniaturization of robots and their use in situations such as focused drug delivery within the human body, save-and-rescue missions, or military combat. Students will assemble and program several Lego Mindstorm robots capable of carrying prefabricated objects and will also assemble a small house.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CADT-UH 1038-000 (3704)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by García de Soto, Borja


CADT-UH 1038-000 (7562)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by García de Soto, Borja

Designing Health (CADT-UH 1053)

What constitutes innovation in medical technology? Is it always necessary? How is its value determined? How would we know if innovation has peaked, or reached a point of diminishing returns? What do global perspectives reveal about medical devices and healthcare in general? In what ways are cultural contexts important to consider? How can the med-tech innovation process address issues of diversity, inclusion, and accessibility? This course takes up the above questions through several case studies and examples, including bioprinting and COVID-19 vaccines — two topics with current relevance — as well as two of the most important historical med-tech innovations that have gone wrong in the past: The Malaria Project and The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. How can current design and innovation avoid repeating past mistakes? Working in cross-disciplinary teams, students will engage in design projects that will apply what we have learned from this course and address some of the paradoxes present in our ongoing quest to design healthier bodies and societies.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CADT-UH 1053-000 (3840)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sanjairaj, Vijayavenkataraman

Memoir and Anti-Memoir: Experiments in Text and Image (CADT-UH 1027)

How does one attempt to write or portray the self? If we associate that practice with traditional memoir and self-portraiture forms, what happens when subjectivity is fundamentally unstable or under attack? Is the genre also simultaneously deconstructed? How is subjectivity literally made and remade through the exploration of new forms? In this course we will look at text and image projects across cultures, eras, locations, and across art forms that raise questions about the self and the collective, representation and memory, and about the remarkable as well as the everyday. Sometimes the doubt about attempts at portrayals is philosophical, but it may also be cultural-historical and context-dependent. To explore this question, and to develop skills in art, to experiment with the studio habits of artists, and to generate our own poetics of memoir/anti-memoir we will generate text and image experiments that both create and investigate an anti-memoir body of work.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CADT-UH 1027-000 (5220)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Magi, Jill

Introduction to Cryptography (CSCI-SHU 378)

The study of modern cryptography investigates mathematical techniques for securing information, systems and distributed computations against adversarial attacks. We introduce fundamental concepts of this study. Emphasis will be placed on rigorous proofs of security based on precise definitions and assumptions. Topics include: one-way functions, encryption, signatures, pseudorandom number generators and zero-knowledge proofs. Prerequisite: Algorithms, theory of probability, or permission of the instructor. Fulfillment: Mathematics Additional Electives; Honors Mathematics Electives; CS Electives.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CSCI-SHU 378-000 (18506)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Mon,Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Guo, Siyao

Natural Language Processing (CS-UH 2216)

The field of natural language processing (NLP), also known as computational linguistics, is interested in the modeling and processing of human (i.e., natural) languages. This course covers foundational NLP concepts and ideas, such as finite state methods, n-gram modeling, hidden Markov models, part-of-speech tagging, context free grammars, syntactic parsing and semantic representations. The course surveys a range of NLP applications such as information retrieval, summarization and machine translation. Concepts taught in class are reinforced in practice by hands-on assignments.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 2216-000 (9051)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Habash, Nizar

Desert Media Art (IM-UH 3315)

How does bringing an artwork outside change its interaction with people and the environment? What new possibilities exist if we create an electronic artwork that can travel with us and be installed anywhere? Desert Media Art is a production-based course where students research, propose, produce, install, and document an electronic artwork designed for Abu Dhabi’s desert. The desert is an iconic landscape with a rich history of use by artists as an alternative to the white box of the gallery. We will study historical and contemporary outdoor art practices as well as local ecology and culture. Students will work in groups to create an Arduino-based project that is battery powered and ready to be taken into the field. The project will be installed in the desert, documented, and then presented in an indoor exhibition. Technologies used will include Arduino, 3D printing for enclosure design, rapid prototyping using laser cutting, battery power, and video production. Students will not just build a project and install it in the field, but also learn how to communicate their work to the public using video documentation and indoor exhibition.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IM-UH 3315-000 (4008)

Design Project (CS-UY 4523)

Students or several students work with a faculty member and/or graduate students on a current topic in computer science. Each term, a project course with a particular theme is offered by the Department of Computer and Information Science. A faculty member assigns individual or group projects. The project course is highly structured and supervised closely by faculty. Students are expected to use the design and project-management skills they learned in CS-UY 4513 Software Engineering. Alternatively, students may work with a faculty member on an individual project of mutual interest. A written report and oral presentation are required. | Prerequisite: CS-UY 4513 or CS-UY 3513.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4523-000 (12266)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred


CS-UY 4523-000 (12267)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred

PROBLEM SOLVING AND PROGRAMMING I (CS-UY 1113)

This course introduces problem solving and computer programming and is for undergraduate engineering students who do not have prior experience in programming in any language. The course covers fundamentals of computer programming and its underlying principles using the Python programming language. Concepts and methods introduced in the course are illustrated by examples from engineering and other disciplines. | Co-requisite: EX-UY 1; Anti-requisite: CS-UY 1114

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 1113-000 (12329)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Romero Cruz, Sebastian


CS-UY 1113-000 (12330)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Romero Cruz, Sebastian


CS-UY 1113-000 (12331)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12332)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12333)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12334)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12335)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12336)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12337)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter

Penetration Testing and Vulnerability Analysis (CS-UY 4773)

The course will start off with an in-depth review of the exploitation mitigations introduced in modern operating systems. The instructors will demonstrate their limitations through simple examples and gradually develop the basic exploitation techniques into more complicated methods applicable to real-world exploitation. Unlike most other exploitation courses, we will focus on approaching exploitation as a creative problem-solving process rather than an exercise of applying cookbook techniques to common types of vulnerabilities. Most of the course will focus on the hands-on application of the material through exercises and leading the students through the development of reliable exploits for recently patched vulnerabilities in widely used software. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: CS-UY 3933 and (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better). | Prerequisites for CAS Students: CS-UY 3933 and CSCI-UA 201. | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UY 3933 and CS-AD 103

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4773-000 (16116)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at ePoly
Instructed by Rajpal, Mantej

Indesign (PHTI-UT 1021)

This course is devoted to a different level of understanding the design and production of making a book. On the first day of class, students bring in digital versions of their art and decide to translate it into a printed piece. The class we’ll focus on book design. Students will begin to explore InDesign and learn how to use the program to create a publication, deciding on the size nand order of image and where text will go. On the second day of class students learn how to work with type. The class explores how to make type work for you and what typefaces work best depending on your design and art. The class will talk about image pacing and the flow of text throughout a publication. On the third day of class, homework is reviewed and InDesign files are revised if needed. The class then turns to production. We will go over each file and make it as final as possible and ready for print. The class will also discuss the different ways to get your document published and how to do each one. In the beginning of this course the students will walk into the classroom with a loose body of work and leave, after the third day, with their work organized into a book format. This course is charged a lab fee. Graduate course numbers are available on Albert.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Elementary Yoruba I (SCA-UA 182)

Yoruba is a language spoken in West Africa by approximately 20 million people. This course is an introduction to Yoruba language, people and culture and is designed for students without prior knowledge. The main goal is to develop elementary communicative competence in the language. It is designed to enable students read, write, listen to and talk about simple concepts, ensuring that they can minimally understand and be understood in the language, while developing a fundamental knowledge of the Yoruba culture. Emphases are on Yoruba as used by contemporary native speakers in the present day West Africa. Skills are developed through intensive interactive conversations, grammar exercises, and classroom activities designed for a learner to use the language in various daily activities.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


SCA-UA 182-000 (9690)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mabayoje, Moses

Landcapes of Consumption (SCA-UA 625)

Consumption of objects, images, and places is central to the culture and economy of metropolitan life. The class will explore how the relationship between consumption and cities has developed by examining three key moments—the late nineteenth century and the invention of urban commodity spectacles, post-war America and the rise of suburban consumer spaces, and contemporary America and the selling of the commodity city. The class addresses three questions: Why do we want things? How does landscape organize our consumer desires? How does place become an object of consumption? We will begin with an examination of classic theoretical works that probe the relationships between people, things, and cities. We will then embed these in discussions of changing forms and practices of consumption and urbanism. The empirical cases we will examine range from the development of the department store, to the fashioning of commodity home, to the work of shopping, and to the emergence of a thriving urban debt industry.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies: The Politics of Indigeneity (SCA-UA 747)

This course is a general introduction to the field of Native American and Indigenous Studies (NAIS). The course will introduce students to the central questions and debates of NAIS, including but not limited to: Native American hidden histories and oral histories; comparative indigeneities; questions of “discovery” and colonialism; the politics and representations of lands, massacres, and museums; and questions of law, gender and sexuality. It begins by asking students to consider the history of the field and weaves throughout questions about the complicated and contested terrain of the term Indigeneity. It ends with discussions about decolonizing research and indigenous futures, thus preparing students to consider theories and methodologies they will encounter in more advanced courses for the NAIS minor. By the end of the semester, students will have gained both historical and ethnographic perspectives on how museums and other forms of representation help us to know and reproduce ourselves and “others,” and how institutions craft, control, and circulate cultural heritage in various social lives.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

French/African Relations (SCA-UA 9914)

A historical and political inquiry into the French system of relations with Francophone Africa from the ‘race to Empire’ in the 19th century to the current day. The main goals of the course are: to describe the historical development of French-African relations from the colonial to the post-independence era; to investigate the political, economic and cultural mechanisms of French influence in contemporary Francophone Africa; to understand the consequences for France of complex developments subsequent to colonialism, such as African immigration in France. Conducted in French.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


SCA-UA 9914-000 (18471)
09/01/2023 – 12/06/2023 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by Taraud, Christelle

Community Empowerment (SCA-UA 613)

Empowerment is defined as those processes, mechanisms, strategies, and tactics through which people, as well as organizations and communities, gain mastery over their lives. It is personal as well as institutional and organizational. Addresses these issues in a wide variety of community settings. Designed to be challenging and rewarding to those students interested in helping people work together to improve their lives.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Elementary Cantonese I (SCA-UA 331)

An introduction to Cantonese with an emphasis on the spoken and written language and conversational proficiency as a primary goal. Emphasizes grammar, listening comprehension, and oral expressions. Designed to give beginning students a practical command of the language. Upon completion of the course, students can expect to converse in simple sentences and recognize An introduction to Cantonese with an emphasis on the spoken and written language and conversational proficiency as a primary goal. Emphasizes grammar, listening comprehension, and oral expressions. Designed to give beginning students a practical command of the language. Upon completion of the course, students can expect to converse in simple sentences and recognize and write about 350 Chinese characters. Students with passable conversational ability or native speakers from Cantonese-speaking communities should not enroll in this course.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Intermediate Cantonese I (SCA-UA 333)

An advanced-level language and culture course following Elementary Cantonese. At this level, when the basic skills and working vocabulary have been mastered, emphasis is placed on the linguistic rules to enable students to communicate with more competence. The lessons focus not only on language, but also use a holistic approach and incorporate discussions on history, current events, literature, pop culture, and native values. Because language is key to connecting with community concerns, the course also includes field trips to Chinatown and to other Cantonese-speaking neighborhoods.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


SCA-UA 333-000 (8389)

Constitution and People of Color (SCA-UA 366)

Examines how the American legal system decided constitutional challenges affecting the empowerment of African, Latino, and Asian American communities from the 19th century to the present. Topics include the denial of citizenship and naturalization to slaves and immigrants, government-sanctioned segregation, the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, the prison industry, police brutality, post-9/11 detention issues, and voting rights. Course requirements include attendance at a community function involving constitutional issues, a midterm, and an interactive oral and written final project comparing a present-day issue affecting racial minorities in New York City and proposing measures to collectively address the issue.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Elementary Filipino I (SCA-UA 321)

An introduction to Filipino with an emphasis on mastering basic grammar skills and working vocabulary. Lessons incorporate discussions on history, current events, literature, pop culture, and native values. Open to beginning language students, and lessons are modified according to the needs of individual students. Because language is key to connecting with community concerns, the course includes field trips to Filipino neighborhoods in Queens and Jersey City.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


SCA-UA 321-000 (7439)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Magtoto, Agnes

Intermediate Filipino I (SCA-UA 323)

At this level, when the basic skills and working vocabulary have been mastered, emphasis can be placed on the linguistic rules to enable the student to communicate with more competence. There is also a focus on translation. Lessons use a holistic approach and incorporate discussions on history, current events, literature, pop culture, and native values. To observe and experience the language at work, the course includes field trips to Filipino centers in the New York/ New Jersey area, as well as invited guests who converse with students in Filipino about their life and work.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


SCA-UA 323-000 (8905)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Francia, Luis

Elementary Swahili I (SCA-UA 121)

Provides students with an elementary understanding of Swahili, a Bantu language with a rich oral and written tradition that is spoken by about 100 million people from Somalia to Mozambique and Zanzibar. After a short presentation of Swahili?s history, codification, and relation to other languages, students are drilled in phonetics and grammar. They are also introduced to poems, songs, and oral narratives.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


SCA-UA 121-000 (9390)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nanji, Abdul

History & Literatures of The So Asian Diaspora (SCA-UA 313)

America is not always the answer. This class offers an introduction to the many and varied fictions that have been produced by diasporic South Asians across the globe over the last 150 years: in Australia, Africa, Europe, Caribbean. Our exploration of the poetics and politics of immigration will attend to different types of traveller (inc. soldiers, students, athletes, medics, cosmonauts) and draw on a wide range of media (inc. literature, cinema and music). Particular attention will be paid to the diverse geographies of Asian migration – be they plantations, dance Floors, restaurants, call centres. Themes to be addressed include coolietude, globalization, the impact of 9/11 and techno-servitude.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


SCA-UA 313-000 (9910)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sandhu, SS

Russian Grammar & Composition I (RUSSN-UA 5)

Designed for students who speak some Russian at home but have virtually no reading and writing skills. Does not satisfy the College Core Curriculum language requirement.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


RUSSN-UA 5-000 (8293)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Korsounskaia, Ekaterina


RUSSN-UA 5-000 (8850)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Belodedova, Irina

Advanced Russian I (RUSSN-UA 9107)

The course combines the traditional grammatical approach with a communicational, interactive method. Since the size of the classes is usually small we can put a great emphasis on improving speaking in Russian on various subjects. Students will be given short topics to talk about at the beginning of every lesson and most written essays will have to be presented orally in class. The class also focuses on improving your writing skills. That is why the students are expected to keep a diary in Russian and write several compositions during the course. The students will also read several Russian short stories in original which will be discussed in class. We will review familiar grammar and study some advanced grammatical structures. The greater emphasis is also put on and broadening your vocabulary and the students will do considerable amount of vocabulary exercises as part of the home assignments. Several short lectures on various aspects of Russian culture and history will be given during the course and we will watch two Russian films that would be followed by the discussions.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RUSSN-UA 9107-000 (18090)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by

American Religion (RELST-UA 480)

Explores the relationship between religion and American identity. We will analyze the role of religion in American culture, politics, and law and question if the United States has a secular government, what the separation of church and state means, and if religious freedom exists for everyone. Considers the role of religion in slavery, settler colonialism, Native American and immigrant assimilation, and also how religion has influenced the U.S. political system. Examines the role of religion within movements for racial justice, reproductive choice, and LGBTQ equality.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


RELST-UA 480-000 (20867)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Theories & Methods in The Study of Religion (RELST-UA 1)

Offered in the fall. 4 points. Focuses on fundamental theoretical and methodological issues pertaining to the academic study of religion. Exposes students to, and familiarizes them with, some of the more important theories of the origin, character, and function of religion as a human phenomenon. Students are given an opportunity to encounter and test an assortment of the main scholarly approaches to understanding and interpreting religious phenomena, including psychological, sociological, anthropological, and hermeneutical perspectives.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


RELST-UA 1-000 (9385)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McGrath, William

Motivation and Volition (PSYCH-UA 74)

The course provides an overview of the major theories and findings in research on motivation and volition. More specifically, we will address the history of research on motivation and volition, classic phenomena of being motivated versus lacking motivation and willpower, the psychology of goals (goal setting, goal implementation, effortful goal pursuits, disengagement, content and structure of goals, the mental representation of goals), disorders of self-regulation, and cognitive-neuropsychological research as well as the perspective of economics on motivation and volition. We will focus on understanding the interrelations and contradictions between the different approaches, and on designing research that promotes these different lines of thinking.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

On Eating Others (PORT-UA 403)

The notion of cannibalism is a recurring concern in the history of ideas regarding the primitive, the animalistic, the monstrous, or any of the other classifications frequently invoked to mark others, regardless of their actual culinary preferences. Reflection upon cannibalism as an intellectual phenomenon suggests how people eating people, or at least the possibility of it, says a great deal about those that do not. In some regions of the Caribbean and Brazil, ideas regarding cannibalism have made an important turn, such that the cannibal has become a provocative affirmation of self. The aim of this course is to think about cannibalism, not, as it often is, as a theme for anthropologists and ethnographers, but rather as an intellectual problem that has enjoyed a very long life in the history of ideas about self. In this course, we shall revisit a selection of texts regarding cannibalism from Columbus’ diaries to the present, and including works by, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Oswald de Andrade, Nelson Pereira dos Santos, and Suely Rolnik, in the company of some key notions involving postcolonial theory. Readings will be made available in Portuguese, Spanish, and English, and course papers may be carried out in any of the three languages according to student interest and ability.

Portuguese (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PORT-UA 403-000 (22046)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Robbins, Dylon

Games, Strategy, and Politics (POL-UA 844)

Offered every year. 4 points. Theories of political strategy with emphasis on the theory of games. Uses of strategy in defense and deterrence policies of nations, guerrilla warfare of revolutionaries and terrorists, bargaining and negotiation processes, coalitions and the enforcement of collective action, and voting in committees and elections. Secrecy and deception as political strategies and uses of power, with some applications outside political science.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


POL-UA 844-000 (9366)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brams, Steven


POL-UA 844-000 (9369)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


POL-UA 844-000 (9370)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Terrorism (POL-UA 742)

Comparative study of terrorism as a domestic political phenomenon. Examines foundational issues, economic, psychological, strategic, and social theories of terrorism as well as theories of the cessation of terrorist violence, government negotiation with terrorists, the relationship between terrorists and nonviolent political actors, and the internal political economy of terrorist organizations. Considers terror in the Middle East (especially emphasizing Hamas), nationalist terror (ETA and the IRA), and Maoist revolutionary terror (with emphasis on the Shining Path).

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Politics of Poverty & Welfare (POL-UA 382)

Prerequisite: V53.0300. Offered in the spring. 4 points. Poverty and welfare problems in the United States and the controversies aroused by them. Concentrates on the causes of poverty and dependency among the controversial working-age poor, the history of programs and policies meant to help them, and the enormous impact these issues have had on national politics.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


POL-UA 382-000 (9662)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williams III, Napoleon

Comparative Politics of South Asia (POL-UA 562)

Introduces the comparative politics of South Asia. Analyzes the politics of South Asian countries, including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Nepal, individually and in a comparative framework. Readings are chosen from across disciplines, including political science, anthropology, economics, and history. The course also uses novels and films on South Asia to illustrate themes highlighted in the readings.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


POL-UA 562-000 (20838)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chandra, Kanchan

Congress & Legislative Assemblies (POL-UA 320)

Origin, structure, functions, and dynamics of legislatures in the United States. Although some attention is given to state legislatures and municipal lawmaking bodies, the major emphasis is on the Congress. Readings include a textbook, official sources such as the Congressional Record and Congressional District Data Book, and the new behavioral studies and commentaries.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Gender in Law (POL-UA 336)

Examines the relationship between gender politics, legal theory, and social policy. Studies the role that the legal arena and certain historical conditions have played in creating, revising, and protecting particular gender identities and not others and examines the political effects of those legal constructions. Analyzes the major debates in feminist legal theory, including theories of equality, the problem of essentialism, and the relevance of standpoint epistomology. In addition to examining how the law understands sex discrimination in the workplace and the feminization of the legal profession, also addresses to what extent understandings of the gender affect how law regulates the physical body by looking at the regulation of reproduction and of consensual sexual activity. In light of all of the above, considers to what extent law is or is not an effective political resource in reforming notions of gender in law and society.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


POL-UA 336-000 (20835)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harrington, Christine

Amer Political Thought (POL-UA 170)

Study of American political ideas and debate from colonial times to the present. Topics include Puritanism, revolution and independence, the Constitution framing, Hamiltonian nationalism, Jeffersonian republicanism, Jacksonian democracy, pro- and antislavery thought, Civil War and Reconstruction, social Darwinism and laissez-faire, the reformist thought of populism, progressivism and socialism, legal realism, the New Deal and 20th-century liberalism, modern conservatism, civil rights, and war protest. Readings and discussion are based on original and interpretative sources.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


POL-UA 170-000 (20834)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Electricity & Magnet I (PHYS-UA 131)

Introduction to Maxwell’s equations with applications to physical problems. Topics include electrostatics, magnetostatics, the solution of the Laplace and Poisson equations, dielectrics and magnetic materials, electromagnetic waves and radiation, Fresnel equations, transmission lines, wave guides, and special relativity.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHYS-UA 131-000 (8212)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gruzinov, Andrei


PHYS-UA 131-000 (8213)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 131-000 (9331)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Computational Physics (PHYS-UA 210)

Introduction to computational physics, with an emphasis on fields of current research interest where numerical techniques provide unique physical insight. Topics are chosen from various branches of physics, including numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations, eigenvalue problems, Monte Carlo methods in statistical mechanics, field theory, dynamical systems, and chaos.

Physics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHYS-UA 210-000 (8214)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sels, Dries


PHYS-UA 210-000 (8871)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

20th Cent Concepts of Space, Time, & Matter (PHYS-UA 20)

The 20th century has been witness to two major revolutions in man’s concepts of space, time, and matter. Einstein’s special and general theories of relativity: implications of the special theory, for our understanding of the unity of space and time, and the general theory, for our understanding of the nature of gravity. Quantum mechanics: a new picture of the basic structure and interactions of atoms, molecules, and nuclei. Topics include the uncertainty principle, wave-particle duality, and the continuing search for the fundamental constituents of matter.

Physics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHYS-UA 20-000 (8204)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wray, Lewis Andrew

Quantum Mechanics I (PHYS-UA 123)

Designed to deepen the insights into quantum mechanics introduced in PHYS-UA 103, 104 and to provide an introduction to the more formal mathematical structure of quantum mechanics. The Schr?dinger and Heisenberg description of quantal systems; perturbation theory; spin and statistics; coupling of angular momenta; scattering theory; and applications to atomic, molecular, nuclear, and elementary particle physics.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHYS-UA 123-000 (8210)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grier, David


PHYS-UA 123-000 (8211)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 123-000 (9336)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Advanced Logic (PHIL-UA 72)

An introduction to the basic concepts, methods, and results of metalogic, i.e., the formal study of systems of reasoning.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHIL-UA 72-000 (20815)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dorr, Cian


PHIL-UA 72-000 (20816)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Roth, Richard


PHIL-UA 72-000 (20817)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Roth, Richard

Cellular & Molecular Neurobiology (NEURL-UA 210)

Lecture and laboratory course that provides students with broad exposure to current questions and experimental approaches in cellular neuroscience. Lectures and laboratories are organized into three areas: cell structure aLecture and laboratory course that provides students with broad exposure to current questions and experimental approaches in cellular neuroscience. Lectures and laboratories are organized into three areas: cell structure and organization of the vertebrate central nervous system, mechanisms underlying neural signaling and plasticity, and control of cell form and its developmental determinants. Laboratory instruction in anatomical, physiological, and biochemical methods for investigating the biology of nerve cells.

Neural Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


NEURL-UA 210-000 (9291)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aoki, Chiye · Shapley, Robert


NEURL-UA 210-000 (9292)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NEURL-UA 210-000 (9293)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NEURL-UA 210-000 (9343)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NEURL-UA 210-000 (10246)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cellular & Molecular Neurobiology Lab (NEURL-UA 211)

Lecture and laboratory course that provides students with broad exposure to current questions and experimental approaches in cellular neuroscience. Lectures and laboratories are organized into three areas: cell structure and organization of the vertebrate central nervous system, mechanisms underlying neural signaling and plasticity, and control of cell form and its developmental determinants. Laboratory instruction in anatomical, physiological, and biochemical methods for investigating the biology of nerve cells.

Neural Science (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


NEURL-UA 211-000 (8176)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aoki, Chiye · Shapley, Robert

Mediterranean Worlds (MEIS-UA 660)

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 660-000 (21873)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Balbale, Abigail


MEIS-UA 660-000 (21874)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cuyler, Zack


MEIS-UA 660-000 (21875)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cuyler, Zack

Intermediate Hindi I (MEIS-UA 407)

Designed to further develop fluency in oral and written communication. In addition to the class, small-group activities, and language and computer lab sessions, students are given an individual assignment to work with native speakers from the community and report on their findings. The reading assignments are designed to broaden understanding of content used for oral presentations.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 407-000 (8168)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhargava, Rajni


MEIS-UA 407-000 (10148)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ilieva, Gabriela Nik

Advanced Hindi I (MEIS-UA 409)

Offers an overview of Indian culture via original texts and is designed to improve students’ advanced-level reading, as well as their written and oral discourse in Hindi. Emphasis is placed on the development of linguistic skills required for a close reading and in-depth analysis of complex texts. Introduction is learner-centered, and students have a choice in the selection of the texts and topics for their presentations. Taught seminar-style, the course combines classroom discussions, oral reports, and occasional background lectures. Students should have completed the two-year sequence of Hindi or have an equOffers an overview of Indian culture via original texts and is designed to improve students’ advanced-level reading, as well as their written and oral discourse in Hindi. Emphasis is placed on the development of linguistic skills required for a close reading and in-depth analysis of complex texts. Introduction is learner-centered, and students have a choice in the selection of the texts and topics for their presentations. Taught seminar-style, the course combines classroom discussions, oral reports, and occasional background lectures. Students should have completed the two-year sequence of Hindi or have an equivalent background.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 409-000 (10149)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ilieva, Gabriela Nik

Elementary Persian I (MEIS-UA 401)

Grammar, phonetics, and pronunciation of modern standard Persian, reading simple texts, and writing short compositions. Builds basic skills in modern standard Persian in preparation for reading classical Persian literature.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 401-000 (8166)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Alizadeh, Yass

Elementary Hindi (MEIS-UA 405)

As a part of a two-year curriculum, prepares the student for a high level of proficiency in Hindi. Through a variety of class, small-group, and paired activities, as well as language and computer lab sessions, students are expected to develop reading, speaking, listening, and writing skills. The instructor also takes into consideration individual needs.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 405-000 (10146)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhargava, Rajni


MEIS-UA 405-000 (10147)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhargava, Rajni

Intermediate Urdu I (MEIS-UA 303)

Continues where Elementary Urdu leaves off. The students are introduced to literary texts. Along with specific language tasks, criticism and analysis now form part of the curriculum. Dictation, memorizing poetry, comprehension, and engaging in longer sessions of conversation form an important part of this course. By the end of this course, students should have achieved some fluency in reading literary texts, writing short essays, and carrying on a conversation.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 303-000 (8165)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Naqvi, Tahira

Intermediate Arabic I (MEIS-UA 103)

Builds on the skills acquired in Elementary Arabic I and II, with increased emphasis on writing and reading from modern sources, in addition to aural/oral proficiency.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 103-000 (8161)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Alnaemi, Ali


MEIS-UA 103-000 (8162)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Alnaemi, Ali


MEIS-UA 103-000 (8163)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Amani

Elementary Arabic I (MEIS-UA 101)

Builds basic skills in modern standard Arabic, the language read and understood by educated Arabs from Baghdad to Casablanca. Five hours per week of instruction and drills, stressing the proficiency approach, plus work in the language laboratory.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 101-000 (8158)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badawi, Ghada


MEIS-UA 101-000 (8159)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badawi, Ghada


MEIS-UA 101-000 (8160)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Amani


MEIS-UA 101-000 (25871)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Suliman, Anas

Intro to Math Modeling (MATH-UA 251)

Formulation and analysis of mathematical models. Mathematical tools include dimensional analysis, optimization, simulation, probability, and elementary differential equations. Applications to biology, economics, other areas of science. The necessary mathematical and scientific background is developed as needed. Students participate in formulating models as well as in analyzing them.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Analysis (MATH-UA 325)

This course is an introduction to rigorous analysis on the real line. Topics include: the real number system, sequences and series of numbers, functions of a real variable (continuity and differentiability), the Riemann integral, basic topological notions in a metric space, sequences and series of functions including Taylor and Fourier series.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 325-000 (8400)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by De Philippis, Guido


MATH-UA 325-000 (8401)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Peilen, Luke


MATH-UA 325-000 (10138)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Peilen, Luke


MATH-UA 325-000 (10139)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Weilin


MATH-UA 325-000 (10140)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beekie, Raj


MATH-UA 325-000 (10141)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beekie, Raj


MATH-UA 325-000 (10135)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cao, Yu


MATH-UA 325-000 (10136)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hess-Childs, Elias


MATH-UA 325-000 (10137)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hess-Childs, Elias


MATH-UA 325-000 (10627)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Weilin


MATH-UA 325-000 (10628)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Semenov, Vadim


MATH-UA 325-000 (10629)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Semenov, Vadim

Grammatical Analysis II (LING-UA 16)

Introduces primary literature in syntactic theory and leads to an independent research project. Topics vary: binding theory, control, case theory, constraints on movement, antisymmetry, argument structure and applicatives, ellipsis, derivation by phase, etc.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


LING-UA 16-000 (19354)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harves, Stephanie · Kayne, Richard

Field Methods (LING-UA 44)

Analysis (LING-UA 13), or permission of the instructor. Offered every year. Collins, Gallagher, Gouskova. 4 points. Students interview a native speaker of an unfamiliar language to study all aspects of the language’s grammar: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics. We evaluate and organize real, nonidealized linguistic data and formulate generalizations that serve as the basis for research.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


LING-UA 44-000 (9373)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gallagher, Gillian · Collins, Christopher

Linguistics as Cognitive Science (LING-UA 48)

Approaches from linguistics, philosophy, and psychology. Topics: the evidence for constructing grammars, the interpretation of grammatical rules as cognitive or neural operations, the significance of neo-behaviorist approaches to language and computational modeling for a cognitive theory of language, the connection between linguistics theory and genetics, and the importance of sociocultural and historical variation for understanding the nature of language.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


LING-UA 48-000 (9629)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Marantz, Alec

Bilingualism (LING-UA 18)

Considers social forces that favor or inhibit bilingualism, as well as the educational consequences of bilingual education (and of monolingual education for bilingual children). Examines the impact of bilingualism on the languages involved. Special attention to code switching, with particular reference to its psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic aspects.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


LING-UA 18-000 (8465)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vrzic, Zvjezdana · Møller Krogh, Simone

Language and Mind (LING-UA 3)

Introduces the field of cognitive science through an examination of language behavior. Begins with interactive discussions of how best to characterize and study the mind. These principles are then illustrated through an examination of research and theories related to language representation and use. Draws from research in both formal linguistics and psycholinguistics.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


LING-UA 3-000 (8921)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cournane, Ailis · McElree, Brian


LING-UA 3-000 (8922)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grosu, Ioana


LING-UA 3-000 (8923)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flower, Nigel

Sound and Language (LING-UA 11)

Phonetic and phonological theory at an elementary level. Topics include the description and analysis of speech sounds, the anatomy and physiology of speech, speech acoustics, and phonological processes. Students develop skills to distinguish and produce sounds used in the languages of the world and to transcribe them using the International Phonetic Alphabet.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


LING-UA 11-000 (8045)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Davidson, Lisa


LING-UA 11-000 (8046)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


LING-UA 11-000 (8047)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Repetti-Ludlow, Chiara

Choreography: A Field Guide for Dance (ARTS-UG 1220)

This class is a guide through the works of choreographers who can teach us the elements of making dance and enable us to create our own movement identity. The psychological storytelling of Martha Graham, George Balanchine’s blazing neo-classicism, the chance field dances of Merce Cunningham, Twyla Tharp’s humorous inversions, the deconstructions of William Forsythe, Mathew Bourne’s gay Swan Lake, and the powerful Black gospel songs of Alvin Ailey are observed through video and readings. After a warmup of technique and improvisation, the student begins with small movement studies, leading to group studies of increasing complexity, with teacher and students responding with supportive feedback. New this semester will be a section, “Dance as Protest,” which explores texts such as Hot Feet and Social Change: African Dance and Diaspora Communities. We will study the movie In the Heights, where Afro-Caribbean dance, ballet, contemporary and hip hop convey ideas about community and representation. Texts include The Intimate Art of Choreography and “Dance in the Age of Black Lives Matter.” Students can have studied dance or simply wish to move and compose using their body and imagination. Student works in a final performance in the theater will be recorded.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1220-000 (17011)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Posin, Kathryn

Adv Reporting: (JOUR-UA 301)

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


JOUR-UA 301-000 (9062)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Newkirk, Pamela


JOUR-UA 301-000 (10023)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Swarns, Rachel


JOUR-UA 301-000 (8962)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Maloney, Jason

Modern Italy (ITAL-UA 9868)

This course introduces contemporary Italy in all its complexity and fascination. Reviewing politics, economics, society, and culture over the past two centuries, the course has a primary goal — to consider how developments since the 1800s have influenced the lives and formed the outlook of today’s Italians. In other words, we are engaged in the historical search for something quite elusive: Italian “identity”. Topics will include the unification of the country, national identity in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the First World War, and Italian fascism, World War Two and the resistance, the post-war Italian Republic, the economic “miracle”, the South, the Mafia, terrorism, popular culture, and the most recent political and social developments, including Italy and the European Union. Lectures combine with readings and films (taking advantage of Italy’s magnificent post-war cinema).

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITAL-UA 9868-000 (2402)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Lombardo, Davide

HUMAN-CENTERED PRODUCT DESIGN STUDIO (MG-UY 3724)

This course is an industrial design overview for non-designers. It explores the industrial design process from researching and establishing user and client needs to developing product specifications, prototyping and iterating. It also covers conceptual and visual design, detail design, design for manufacturing, and design for environmental sustainability. It includes skills such as sketching, model making, 3 D printing techniques. The course is formulated as two short exercises and one semester-long project in which teams choose from several product design categories and develop their ideas from concept to prototype. Probable Tandon MakerSpace related material fees. | Prerequisite: MakerSpace Safety Course

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 3724-000 (14096)

American Cinema: Origins to 1960 (CINE-UT 50)

This course offers a broad survey of American cinema from its beginnings (and even its pre-history) up to 1960. While the emphasis will be on the dominant, narrative fiction film, there will be attention to other modes of American cinema such as experimental film, animation, shorts, and non-fiction film. The course will look closely at films themselves — how do their styles and narrative structures change over time? — but also at contexts: how do films reflect their times? how does the film industry develop? what are the key institutions that had impact on American film over its history? We will also attend to the role of key figures in film’s history: from creative personnel (for example, the director or the screenwriter) to industrialists and administrators, to censors to critics and to audiences themselves. The goal will be to provide an overall understanding of one of the most consequential of modern popular art forms and of its particular contributions to the art and culture of our modernity.

Cinema Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CINE-UT 50-000 (13927)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
6:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Treihaft, Lauren


CINE-UT 50-000 (13928)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CINE-UT 50-000 (13929)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CINE-UT 50-000 (13930)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Theatre as Art Form (MPAET-UE 60)

This course introduces non-majors to theatre as a live and performing art through a variety of experiences including attendance at live performances, readings of play scripts, and theoretical texts, and the creation of original plays. Through lectures, discussions, and written assignments, students will explore the roles of the playwright, actor, director, and designer in the production process, as well as examines the role of the audience in the live performance. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Expressive Cultures

Educational Theatre (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MPAET-UE 60-000 (12371)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Huff, Keith


MPAET-UE 60-000 (12883)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Huff, Keith

Environmental Social Movements (ENVST-UA 9481)

How do social movements form in response to environmental concerns? What makes them effective or ineffective? This course analyses the various social movements that organized in response to environmental concerns. Both historical and sociological dimensions of environmental movements are covered, with particular attention given to how issues of environmental protection and social justice intersect. At NYU Berlin, the course includes American (I), European, and in particular German (II), as well as global movements (III).

Environmental Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENVST-UA 9481-000 (2369)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by

Logic (PHIL-UA 70)

An introduction to the basic techniques of sentential and predicate logic. Students learn how to put arguments from ordinary language into symbols, how to construct derivations within a formal system, and how to ascertain validity using truth tables or models.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHIL-UA 70-000 (8448)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Peluce, Vincent


PHIL-UA 70-000 (8449)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Peluce, Vincent


PHIL-UA 70-000 (9185)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gomez, Veronica

Central Problems in Philosophy (PHIL-UA 1)

The most basic questions about human life and its place in the universe. Topics may include free will, the relation of body and mind, and immortality; skepticism, self-knowledge, causality, and a priori knowledge; religious and secular ethical codes and theories; and intuition, rationality, and faith. Includes classic and current philosophers (e.g., Plato, Descartes, Hume, Russell, Sartre).

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Ethics (PHIL-UA 40)

Examines fundamental questions of moral philosophy: What are our most basic values, and which of them are specifically moral values? What are the ethical principles, if any, by which we should judge our actions, ourselves, and our lives?

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHIL-UA 40-000 (23262)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 40-000 (23303)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Penn, Aidan


PHIL-UA 40-000 (23318)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Penn, Aidan


PHIL-UA 40-000 (23327)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferreira, Jorge


PHIL-UA 40-000 (23331)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferreira, Jorge

Advanced Modern Greek I (HEL-UA 107)

Focus is on advanced composition and oral practices, with the aim of refining an understanding and general facility with written and spoken Greek. Course work is designed to help students develop a comprehensive vocabulary, improve pronunciation, and increase their effectiveness, accuracy, and fluency in writing and speaking the language. Enhances and perfects reading, speaking, conversational, and writing skills through the close study of selected modern Greek literary texts, current newspaper articles and essays, films, advertisements, and comprehensive discussions of contemporary Greek society. Explores major facets and phenomena of Greek culture: current social and political issues, events, and controversies in Greece; Greece’s position “in the margins of Europe” and at the crossroads of East and West; gender politics; the educational system; the political landscape; discourses on the question of Greek identity; and topics in popular culture. Through individual projects, oral reports, class presentation, and written assignments, students are expected to pursue an in-depth “reading” of present-day Greece.

Hellenic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


HEL-UA 107-000 (8033)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Venetsanos, Anna

Seminar On Modern Greek Culture (HEL-UA 130)

Topics in Hellenic Studies vary; please consult Notes section below for current course offering.

Hellenic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


HEL-UA 130-000 (9294)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Theodoratou, Helen


HEL-UA 130-000 (20589)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Astrinaki, Eleftheria

Elementary Moder Greek I (HEL-UA 103)

Open to students with no previous training in Greek and to others by permission of the instructor. Elementary I offered in the fall; Elementary II offered in the spring. 4 points per term. An introduction to modern Greek. Provides students with the fundamentals of grammar, syntax, oral expression, listening comprehension, reading, and composition. Students develop the skills and vocabulary necessary to read simple texts and hold basic conversations. Students are introduced to modern Greek culture, history, and society, since the ultimate goal of the course is to enrich our understanding of multiple, living Greek realities through the language. Teaching materials include current newspaper articles, graded literary passages, songs, and various linguistic games.

Hellenic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


HEL-UA 103-000 (8032)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Venetsanos, Anna

Intermediate Mod Greek I (HEL-UA 105)

Designed for students already familiar with modern Greek. Students are expected to be acquainted with the most significant structures of grammar and syntax, and to have acquired the foundations for basic conversation in Greek. Introduces students to more complex linguistic and grammatical analysis, advanced composition, and graded reading. It also provides further practice in speaking and works to enrich the student’s vocabulary. Readings and discussions of selected works of prose, poetry, and theatre serve as an introduction to aspects of modern Greek civilization and as an occasion for comprehensive discuPrerequisite: V56.0104 for V56.0105, V56.0105 for V56.0106, or permission of the instructor. Intermediate I offered in the fall; Intermediate II offered in the spring. 4 points per term. Designed for students already familiar with modern Greek. Students are expected to be acquainted with the most significant structures of grammar and syntax, and to have acquired the foundations for basic conversation in Greek. Introduces students to more complex linguistic and grammatical analysis, advanced composition, and graded reading. It also provides further practice in speaking and works to enrich the student’s vocabulary. Readings and discussions of selected works of prose, poetry, and theatre serve as an introduction to aspects of modern Greek civilization and as an occasion for comprehensive discussions of contemporary Greek society.

Hellenic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


HEL-UA 105-000 (9942)

Statics (ME-UY 2213)

The course covers three-dimensional vector treatment of the static equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies. Topics: Equivalent force and couple systems. Distributed force systems. Static analysis of trusses, frames and machines. Friction, impending motion. Methods of virtual work. | Prerequisite: PH-UY 1013 and MA-UY 1024

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 2213-000 (12689)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Benbelkacem, Ghania


ME-UY 2213-000 (12690)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hajesfandiari, Arezoo

Managing Creative Content Development (MKTG-UB 4)

This course provides students with an opportunity to learn about the individual and collaborative services provided by professional managers both inside and outside EMT companies. It develops a system by which to evaluate the quality of the service provided, the nature of the service and how these services are being implemented through collaboration with industry creative and business executives. Through discussions with and lectures by entertainment and media lawyers, accountants, talent and literary agents, studio executives, producers, publicity and advertising specialists, the student will understand the diversity of talents required to complete a project or product successfully. Course Objectives: To provide students with an understanding of the role of the executive in the entertainment and media industries who can assemble a team of creative professionals and manage their activities so that successful content can be the outcome. To share an overview of the various disciplines and content genres/typology needed for the industry sectors that include movies, television, music, publishing, electronic games, theater, and related businesses. To gain insights into legal and financial issues pertaining to the various entertainment and media industry sectors, including basic copyright, intellectual property and privacy issues. To examine the roles and responsibilities of each of the members of the team assembled by the manager (producer, head of production, student head, manager/agent, manager/lawyer, business coach, management consultant). To review and be capable of implementing business plans for funding entertainment projects offered through venture capital, limited partnerships, angels or other specialists in financial deal making. To learn from the experts using lectures, cases, film, texts and guest lectures.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Social Media Strategy (MKTG-UB 9045)

This course will introduce students to social media marketing. Through case studies, interactive sessions, and class exercises, students will learn best practices and develop the skills to connect business objectives with social media strategy, platforms and tactics. We will study how to develop a strategy for a product or service in social media, how to execute that strategy and how to assess the results. Topics will include choosing appropriate platforms, creating effective and engaging social media content, content management, social listening and creating a social media plan. The course also has a practical component, for which students work in small groups and individually.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MKTG-UB 9045-000 (4955)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Grazzini, Laura

Digital Business Strategy (MKTG-UB 9056)

This course covers the digital technology industry (e.g. consumer electronics, software) from a strategic and marketing perspective. The objectives are to understand how these industries function, the unique challenges they face, and how digital technology companies can leverage their strengths to achieve success in the marketplace. The focus is on understanding the interactions between competition, technology evolution, and firm capabilities.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MKTG-UB 9056-000 (4852)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by

Digital Business Strategy (MKTG-UB 56)

This course covers the digital technology industry (e.g. consumer electronics, software) from a strategic and marketing perspective. The objectives are to understand how these industries function, the unique challenges they face, and how digital technology companies can leverage their strengths to achieve success in the marketplace. The focus is on understanding the interactions between competition, technology evolution, and firm capabilities.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Business of Video Games (MKTG-UB 58)

Video games are now a mainstream form of entertainment. In economic terms, this industry has experienced tremendous growth, despite a grueling recession, growing to an estimated $60 billion worldwide. A key development that has changed the playing field for both the producers and consumers of interactive entertainment is a shift away from physical retail to digital and online game distribution. The audience for games has also shifted—no longer the exclusive practice of hardcore gamers, video games have gained mass appeal in the form of social and casual gaming, on the internet, on consoles, and smartphones. At the same time, the development and publishing of games has become far more accessible. The game behind the game, in a manner of speaking, has changed. In this class, we explore the basic components of the current video game industry. Every week, we review major current events, will hear from people currently working in the industry, examine case studies, and discuss the overall business landscape. Central to each class is the notion that practical business considerations and the design-driven creative process do not have to be in opposition.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MKTG-UB 58-000 (10780)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Entertainment & Media Industries (MKTG-UB 40)

This course provides students with a framework for understanding the economics and key strategic issues facing organizations in the entertainment industry. It establishes a basis for the formulation of marketing tactics and strategies for firms competing for consumers’ discretionary spending. Recent developments in major sectors of the entertainment industry are covered, including movies, television and cable, theatre, and sports. Issues that cut across all types of entertainment industries are examined, including licensing, promotion, and new technologies.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10507)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Tuschman, Robert


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10508)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)at Washington SquareInstructed by Krushel, Kenneth J


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10509)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Hardart, Paul


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10510)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Lieberman, Alvin


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10547)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Lieberman, Alvin


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10601)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Narayanan, Sunder


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10640)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Narayanan, Sunder


MKTG-UB 40-000 (22981)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)at Washington SquareInstructed by

Advertising (MKTG-UB 3)

This course provides students with a comprehensive framework and tools to understand the advertising process and to appreciate managerial and theoretical perspectives in advertising. It tackles the stages in developing an advertising plan- from analyzing the situation and defining clear advertising objectives to execution. Students learn tools related to various skill areas in advertising, including account planning, media planning and buying, and copywriting/art direction, while developing a broader appreciation of how each skill area fits into the overall structure of the advertising process. Coursework involves a comprehensive group project that utilizes learning in all functional areas of advertising, while simulating the development of an advertising campaign.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MKTG-UB 3-000 (10504)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cohen, Daniel

Arts and Cultures across Antiquity (ACA-UF 101)

This course introduces the arts from their origins to the end of antiquity, as defined for these purposes by the roughly coincident dissolutions of the Gupta, Han, and Western Roman empires, focusing on how individuals and social relations are shaped in literature, the visual, plastic, and performing arts, and through music. Conceptions of the divine, the heroic, power and disenfranchisement, beauty, and love are examined within the context of the art and literature of East and South Asia, the Mediterranean world, and contiguous regions (such as Germania, Nubia, and Mesopotamia). Instructors prepare the way for Cultural Foundations II by giving some attention to the modes by which cultural transmission occurred across these regions prior to the rise of Islam.

Art and Cultures across Antiquity (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ACA-UF 101-000 (12767)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Doubrovskaia, Maria


ACA-UF 101-000 (12768)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Boisvere, Joseph


ACA-UF 101-000 (12769)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stokes, Matthew


ACA-UF 101-000 (12855)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fleming, Benjamin


ACA-UF 101-000 (12785)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hsieh, Yu-Yun


ACA-UF 101-000 (12856)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Braico, Giovanni


ACA-UF 101-000 (12801)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Omid, Mehrgan


ACA-UF 101-000 (12802)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stokes, Matthew


ACA-UF 101-000 (12857)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Braico, Giovanni


ACA-UF 101-000 (12858)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kertz, Lydia


ACA-UF 101-000 (12859)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Boisvere, Joseph


ACA-UF 101-000 (12860)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hsieh, Yu-Yun


ACA-UF 101-000 (12861)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Thomas

Life Science (LISCI-UF 101)

The course examines some of the fundamental principles and processes of biological science. The primary focus is on evolution, genetics, and the physiology and molecular function of the cell, with special emphasis on the human species. Also included is a series of readings and discussions on how our knowledge of the life sciences has been put to practical use, the function and treatment of HIV infection, and other current frontiers and ethical issues in the discipline. The course takes a historical approach to the material: readings include some of the fundamental texts upon which our understanding of life is based, such as works by and about Charles Darwin, Gregor Mendel, Oswald Avery, James Watson, Rosalind Franklin, and Francis Crick. This course satisfies the requirement in Life Science.

Life Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Unruly Images: Centering the (In)visible and (Im)possible (OART-UT 833)

This course explores unruly images, bodies, and even feelings that exist at the margins of categorization, making them powerful subjects for artistic work. We will manipulate image-making tools and give form to expressions that reveal the hidden structures of power. Through lectures, discussions, workshops, and readings, we will look at images previously deemed unimaginable due to material affordance and bias (Rosa Menkman); illegitimate emotions that fall outside western standards of empathy (Xine Yao); liminal bodies, faces, and spaces that exist between conventional categories. We will pay particular attention to selected writings from Legacy Russel, Catherine D’Ignazio, Lauren Klein, Peter Galison, Hito Steyerl, Ursula K. Le Guin, etc and apply these critiques to emerging perceptual technologies that the students will use to create their projects. This class is also designed for students who look to explore emerging photo techniques (volumetric capturing, simulations, AR/VR, video games, animations, WebGL) as their creative toolkit, have interests in the theory and pedagogy of photography and participatory processes, and seek to reimagine new forms of representation through the study of intersectional mappings of the face, body, and spatial dimensions.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OART-UT 833-000 (13615)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Thu1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by

Software Engineering (CSCI-UA 474)

An intense hands-on study of practical techniques and methods of software engineering. Topics include advanced object-oriented design, design patterns, refactoring, code optimization, universal modeling language, threading, user interface design, enterprise application development, and development tools. All topics are integrated and applied during the semester-long group project. The aim of the project is to prepare students for dynamics in a real workplace. Members of the group meet on a regular basis to discuss the project and to assign individual tasks. Students are judged primarily on the final project presentations.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CSCI-UA 474-000 (21436)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bloomberg, Amos

Object Oriented Programming (CSCI-UA 470)

Object-oriented programming has emerged as a significant software development methodology. This course introduces the important concepts of object-oriented design and languages, including code reuse, data abstraction, inheritance, and dynamic overloading. It covers in depth those features of Java and C that support object-oriented programming and gives an overview of other object-oriented languages of interest. Significant programming assignments, stressing object-oriented design.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sonic Utopia: Unconventional Applications for Sound (OART-UT 1096)

Sound is physical. It can move objects, vibrate surfaces, perceptually alter our emotions, and shape the way viewers engage with spaces. As artists, we are conditioned to aspire to situate our work within traditional settings. How can we reposition sound as a main element of a work within unconventional contexts? This course will use the question of a sonic utopia as a platform to create interdisciplinary projects that exist between installation, sculpture, video, performance, movement, and music. Students will learn sound theories through lectures and in-class workshops and are encouraged to incorporate their individual interests into each of the four main projects that aim to position sound as a primary element of a work in order to expand the possibilities of working with sound.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OART-UT 1096-000 (13635)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Introduction to Game Engines (OART-UT 1621)

Introduction to Game Engines is a course intended for students who already have an understanding of programming fundamentals that introduces concepts, problems, and methods of developing games and interactive media using popular game engines. Game engines are no longer just used for the development of games, they have increasingly gained popularity as tools for developing animations, interactives, VR experience, and new media art. Throughout the semester, students will have weekly programming assignments, using a popular game engine. There will be a final game assignment, as well as weekly quizzes and a final exam. The course assumes prior programming knowledge, if students do not have the appropriate prerequisites a placement exam may be taken. There will be an emphasis on using code in a game engine environment as a means of creative expression.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 1621-000 (14528)
10/26/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hawk, Danny

Photography I (OART-UT 11)

A basic black-and-white photography course designed for those with little or no experience in photography. Emphasis is placed on the application of technique in terms of personal expression through the selection and composition of subject matter. Class size is limited, providing for a greater degree of individual critique and classroom participation. The course comprises technical lectures, readings and discussions about critical issues in photography, slide lectures on historical and contemporary work as well as class critiques. Each student must have a camera with manually adjustable aperture and shutter speeds.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 11-000 (14186)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Frocheur, Nichole

Afro-American Drama (DRLIT-UA 255)

The study of African American dramatic traditions from early minstrelsy to turn-of-the-century musical extravaganzas; from the Harlem Renaissance folk plays to realistic drama of the 1950s; from the militant protest drama of the 1960s to the historical and experimental works of the present. Issues of race, gender, class; of oppression and empowerment; of marginality and assimilation are explored in the works of such playwrights as Langston Hughes, Alice Childress, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Adrienne Kennedy, Charles Fuller, George C. Wolfe, Ntozake Shange, August Wilson, Suzan-Lori Parks, and Anna Deavere Smith. The sociohistorical context of each author is also briefly explored.

Dramatic Literature (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


DRLIT-UA 255-000 (20524)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

The Directors Process (FMTV-UT 125)

This class is an introduction to the craft of directing. We will take a step-by-step look at the director’s process and responsibilities in this most collaborative of arts. Our focus will include script, character and scene analysis; performance, casting and rehearsal; design and visual style; assembling the final form. We’ll talk about what an actor wants from a director, how to talk to the cinematographer and production/costume designers and why we look at editing as the final rewrite. Through lectures, screenings, assignments and discussions with working professionals, the class will offer a comprehensive foundation for the director on which to build a rich creative experience at Tisch and a long and satisfying professional career thereafter.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


FMTV-UT 125-000 (14309)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zentelis, Enid


FMTV-UT 125-000 (14375)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brown, Alrick

Evolutionary Zoology (BIOL-UA 700)

Animals are one of life’s most successful lineages, occupying nearly every environment. This course provides an introduction to the diversity of animal form and function in the context of phylogeny and evolution, with a focus on the invertebrates, the majority of animals. Lectures will be devoted alternately to individual branches of the tree of animals and to common themes in the ways animals have evolved to fit and shape their environments. We will discuss morphology, physiology, reproduction, development, and ecology. We will discuss the unique genomic and molecular characteristics of each branch of animal life, with attention to the ways that nonmodel organisms can provide insights into core cellular and molecular processes, including cell-cell communication and biomineralization. We will also discuss the intersection of these animals with human interests, including economic zoology, ecosystem services, and medicine. In laboratory and field exercises, students will learn to collect and identify invertebrate animals and to form and test hypotheses about their attributes.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


BIOL-UA 700-000 (19677)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rockman, Matthew


BIOL-UA 700-000 (19678)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rockman, Matthew

Life Drawing: The Figure (FMTV-UT 1112)

Reccomended for students studying both animation and live action. This course is designed to train animation students to think visually, and to strengthen their overall drafting and design skills. The focus of the course is drawing humans and animals from live subjects, thereby learning to translate the three-dimensional world into two-dimensional terms. Drafting skills are important to all animators, regardless of their chosen media or focus. In particular, strong drafting skills are essential for character animators. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1112-000 (19493)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Camhy, Sherry

Storytelling Strategies (FMTV-UT 20)

The ability to understand “what makes a good story well told” is a skill that is crucial to your growth as a filmmaker whether you become a writer, director, producer, actor, editor, cinematographer, etc. Storytelling Strategies looks at how narrative stories work through an examination of the structural and mythic elements first established by the ancient Greek playwrights and recognized by Aristotle in his “Poetics” thousands of years ago. The course continues this examination up to and including such contemporary story models as Joseph Campbell’s “The Hero with a Thousand Faces” as well as the current Hollywood paradigm, “the three-act structure.” We will seek to find those principles that form the backbone of successful narrative screenplays and contribute to a film’s ability to resonate with an audience. The lecture is for analysis. The recitations are for applying what you have learned, through writing exercises and a completed short screenplay. This course allocates as Scriptwriting for Film & TV majors. Course may not be repeated.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Arts of Africa (ARTH-UA 560)

Formerly ARTH-UA 80. Identical to SCA-UA 787. Survey of art of West and Central Africa and the South Pacific. Although art from these areas is popularly thought of in terms of its impact on the West, the art is primarily studied in relation to its meaning and function in its own society, where art socializes and reinforces religious beliefs, reflects male and female roles, and validates leadership. Films and field trips to a museum and gallery supplement classroom lectures.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


ARTH-UA 560-000 (21852)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meier, Sandy Prita

North American Indian Arts (ARTH-UA 570)

Major traditions in painting, sculpture, and architecture of the native peoples of North America, Mexico, Central America, and Andean South America. Material from pre-contact times through the 20th century. Deals with questions of theory and differences between indigenous and Western world views; the relationship of the arts to shamanism, priesthoods, guardian spirits, deities, and beliefs regarding fauna and flora; impact of European contact on indigenous arts and civilization.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


ARTH-UA 570-000 (21853)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Corbin, George

Art in The Islamic World II: Mongols to Modernism (ARTH-UA 541)

This course is intended as an introduction to the arts of Islam during a period of dynamic cultural and political change in the Islamic world. Beginning with the Mongol invasions of the 13th century, the course traces the development of Islamic art and architecture through the eras of Timur, the ?gunpowder empires? (the Mughals, Ottomans, Safavids) and European colonialism, to the art of the nation-state in the 20th-century.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


ARTH-UA 541-000 (21851)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abid, Hiba

Evolutionary Medicine (ANTH-UA 55)

Examines human health and disease within an ecological framework, exploring the interactions of environmental, genetic, physiological, and cultural factors in the expression and distribution of human diseases. Develops pathology profiles for nonhuman primates; prehistoric human populations; and hunting and gathering, agricultural, and industrial groups, with emphasis on the expression of infectious disease in human history and newly (re-) emerging diseases.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


ANTH-UA 55-000 (23015)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by DeCasien, Alex · Hernandez Burgos, Saine

Anthropology of Indigenous Australia (ANTH-UA 9037)

This course offers an introduction to some of the classical and current issues in the anthropology of Indigenous Australia. The role of anthropology in the representation and governance of Indigenous life is itself an important subject for anthropological inquiry, considering that Indigenous people of Australia have long been the objects of interest and imagination by outsiders for their cultural formulations of kinship, ritual, art, gender, and politics. These representations—in feature films about them (such as Rabbit-Proof Fence and Australia), New Age Literature (such as Mutant Message Down Under), or museum exhibitions (such as in the Museum of Sydney or the Australian Museum)—are now also in dialogue with Indigenous forms of cultural production, in genres as diverse as film, television, drama, dance, art and writing. The course will explore how Aboriginal people have struggled to reproduce themselves and their traditions on their own terms, asserting their right to forms of cultural autonomy and self-determination. Through the examination of ethnographic and historical texts, films, archives and Indigenous life-writing accounts, we will consider the ways in which Aboriginalities are being challenged and constructed in contemporary Australia. The course will consist of lectures interspersed with discussions, student presentations, and films/other media; we may also have guest presenters.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ANTH-UA 9037-000 (2844)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by

Data: Code it, Make it (INTM-SHU 261)

Data Physicalization is an emerging research area. It explores new techniques to design and encode data into physical artifacts through geometry or material properties. Recent advances in Computational Design and Fabrication offer novel opportunities to complement traditional screen-based visualizations enhancing people’s ability to discover, understand, and communicate data. This course uses a data visualization approach to define new methods of computational design and digital fabrication. Students will create unique, data-driven, everyday objects and sculpt meaning into them. Through the use of platforms such as Rhinoceros: a 3D modeling software, and Grasshopper: a visual programming language, students will be introduced to fundamental computational methods for designing and fabricating, as well as the understanding of digital fabrication strategies for parametrically generated design. Prerequisite: Interaction Lab or Creative Coding Lab. Fulfillment: IMA/IMB Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 261-000 (17317)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Godoy, Marcela

Industrial Design in Action (INTM-SHU 129)

Industrial Design in Action is a course that will help you bridge the gap between your ideas and their physical form. From initial research to conception, you will practice and apply different design methodologies that lead to creative and innovative ideas; acquire a fundamental understanding of form, function and design language; and utilize sketching and visual storytelling to communicate a message and features of a compelling product. In addition, you will become familiar with various Computer Aided Design (CAD) softwares; explore different types of materials for different uses and applications; and experiment with a myriad of fabrication techniques, from basic hand tools to advanced digital fabrication, you will learn to use the right tool for the job. Altogether these skills will enable you to go from prototype to a finished product. In a nutshell, this course is about designing and fabricating things we love. Prerequisite: Interaction Lab or Communications Lab or Application Lab. Fulfillment: IMA/IMB Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 129-000 (17315)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Garcia, Andy

Immersive Design for Video Games (INTM-SHU 259)

The current design methods and technologies in the field of digital entertainment, from design concepts to design tools, are still based on 2D screens, but the product is often 3D. This contradiction results in the designers not being able to see the final consequences of their work directly. Can existing VR technologies solve this contradiction? Immersive design is a new design method for digital creativities beyond the screen. It usually takes VR, AR, or MR devices as design interfaces to craft 3D models, textures, game environments, and other gaming experiences. Not only game assets creation but also game design concepts can be changed with these new technical inputs. In this course, students will answer the following questions: ○ Is immersive design more intuitive? ○ Is immersive design more efficient? ○ Do immersive design techniques have lower learning costs? ○ What traditional design lessons and concepts can be applied in an immersive design environment? In view of these questions, students from different disciplines will give answers through discussions, projects, collaboration, documentation, and VR games. Prerequisite: Communications Lab. Fulfillment: IMA/IMB Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 259-000 (17316)
09/05/2022 – 10/28/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Zhang, Xingchen

Advanced Seminar: Seminar in Media Studies: Media’s Material and Environmental Relations (INTM-SHU 350)

In response to the popular conception of the “immaterial” Internet, and “datafication” of all aspects of life, how might we rethink the materiality and environmentality of media in our research? This upper-level seminar will introduce students to various theoretical frameworks in media studies including new materialism, media archaeology, studies of media infrastructures and ecologies, cultural geographies, and elemental media. Students are expected to critically assess the (geo)politics of material/environmental media and to adopt a mix of these frameworks to develop a research project and essay. Prerequisite: Junior standing OR What is New Media. Fulfillment: IMA/B Elective, Advanced IMA Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 350-000 (17319)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Pan, Weixian

Expanded Web (INTM-SHU 201)

This course draws from net art, interface design, and post-digital / post- internet practices to explore interactions that bridge screen and physical. Students are led to conceptualize and develop bespoke “interfaces” (in the widest sense), in which either aspects of the web are reflected in the physical world, or – conversely – the habitual mode of browsing is being updated in ways that capture the user’s physical and bodily presence. A reflection of the medium web, its vernacular, and practical daily use is the starting point of this project. The students’ work is additionally being informed by analysis of select examples from art and design, exemplary for ways of re-framing the technical everyday. This course will make use of web technologies (p5.js), and physical computing techniques – and introduce students to various ways those can be technically, and conceptually, combined. Prerequisite: Interaction Lab or Creative Coding Lab. Fulfillment: IMA/IMB Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 201-000 (17300)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Haider, Gottfried

Hello Metaverse (INTM-SHU 305)

The aim of this course is to explore the relationship between the virtual self and environment and to assess both as a space for learning and collaboration using virtual reality. This course takes place entirely in virtual, immersive environments. Students will be provided Oculus Quest 2 virtual reality headsets and specialized software. See the principles above for further details. Prerequisite: IMA Major with junior or senior standing. Fulfillment: IMA/IMB Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 305-000 (17306)
10/31/2022 – 12/16/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Grewell, Christian

Digital Arts and New Media (INTM-SHU 125)

This course investigates digital art and new media from creative, theoretical, and historical perspectives. We will examine the paradigm shift resulting from the rise of digital art and its expansion as well as explore current ideas, creative strategies, and issues surrounding digital media. The topics of study will include digital image, digital sound, net art, systems, robotics, telematics, data art, and virtual/augmented reality. The course provides students with the means to understand what digital media is, and establish their own vision of what it can become, from both a practical and a theoretical perspective. The course consists of lectures, field trips, and small studio-based practices. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: IMA/IMB Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 125-000 (17296)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Lee, Inmi

Advanced Lab: Web Page to Web Space (INTM-SHU 304)

Web Page to Web Space is a course that explores virtual interactive experience in the context of Virtual Embodiment, Virtual Space, Telepresence, and Metaverse. Students will investigate new possible ways of using the Web to create new immersive environments in a web platform, by utilizing algorithmic 3D animation and server-side programming. This is an advanced course with technically challenging concepts with three.js and node.js and suitable for students with prior knowledge in visual programming. Prerequisite: Nature of Code or Machine Learning for New Interfaces or Critical Data and Visualization or ABC Browser Circus or Kinetic Interfaces or Machine Learning for Artists and Designers or Expanded Web or Movement Practices and Computing. Fulfillment: IMA/IMB Elective, Advanced IMA Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 304-000 (17318)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Moon, Jung Hyun

Learning with Turtles (INTM-SHU 151)

Learning with Turtles explores programming languages, systems, and activities designed to help learners in computational environments. Starting from a constructionist principle that systems designed for beginners must be able to embody the most powerful ideas in computing, we master some of those systems, explore how those have been designed, and engage in contemporary debates. The environments we learn with include Turtle Geometry, Craft Computing withTextiles, Modelling, and other interactive projects using programming and modelling systems such as Snap!, TurtleArt, Turtlestitch and NetLogo. Individual and group projects involve students in advancing their computational knowledge and skills and provide opportunities to design for others, to teach, to study learning and expertise, and present projects in community and public forums. The course is fundamentally about ideas, and how some powerful ideas from computation can empower a learner to be a better creator and problem solver. Writing, presentations, and discussions will emphasize reflection on our own learning within the course. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: IMA Major Electives; IMB Major Interactive Media Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 151-000 (17299)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Mon
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Minsky, Margaret

ABC Browser Circus (INTM-SHU 227)

Welcome to the ABC Browser Circus (ABC), where acrobats juggle with hyperlinks, dance across scrolling grids, and jump through open server ports. This course introduces the students to the history of the internet, the World Wide Web, and specifically to the browser as a cultural object and its role in (net)art; in parallel, it teaches web development and guides the students to create three web-based projects. Theory and practice-based components are each conducted during one of two 75 minute classes per week. Prerequisite: Creative Coding Lab. Fulfillment: IMA Major Electives; IMB Major Interactive Media Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 227-000 (17302)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue,Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Eckert, Leon

ENTREPRENEURSHIP (MG-UY 4404)

This course focuses on key aspects of entrepreneurship as a critical engine for innovation. It also treats entrepreneurship as a state of mind that is not limited to small firms. Students discuss current theories and practices related to starting and managing entrepreneurial enterprises, emphasizing firms in technology- , information- and knowledge-intensive environments. Particular attention is paid to the critical issues of (1) identifying opportunities that provide competitive advantage; (2) the development of a solid business plan; (3) the marketing of new ventures; (4) entrepreneurial business operations, including human-resource and process management; (5) ethical and social issues in entrepreneurial firms; and (6) financial management and fund raising for entrepreneurial firms. | Prerequisites: Junior or senior student status.

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 4404-000 (14073)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Husain, Badrul


MG-UY 4404-000 (14074)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Jimenez Leon, Bertha

Fashion in Context (ARCS-UE 1088)

Why do fashion designers and brands exert such influence in contemporary society? What explains the trajectory from The House of Worth to Chanel to this season’s hottest label? This course investigates the interlocking forces shaping fashion: the designer system, celebrities, technology, politics, the arts and media. Through lectures and film viewings, readings, discussions, and individual research, students explore fashion as a crucial aspect of culture and how the fashion system evolved from roots in Parisian couture to become a global phenomenon. Liberal Arts Core/MAP Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Expressive Cultures

Art and Costume Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARCS-UE 1088-000 (9717)
at Online
Instructed by Cole, Daniel


ARCS-UE 1088-000 (9718)
at Online
Instructed by Cole, Daniel

The Art and Craft of Poetry (WRTNG-UG 1560)

In this workshop (practicum), poets will focus on the foundations and intricate dynamics of poetry as a writer’s process. A weekly reading of a new poem by each poet in the circle will serve as point of departure for discussion of the relationships of craft and expression. A final portfolio of polished poems is required at the end of the course.

Advanced Writing Courses (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


WRTNG-UG 1560-000 (12069)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hightower, Scott

Expressive Culture: Architecture (CORE-UA 725)

Please check the departmental website for description

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 725-000 (19742)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cohen, Jean-Louis


CORE-UA 725-000 (19743)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 725-000 (19744)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 725-000 (19745)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 725-000 (19746)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: Russia Since 1917 (CORE-UA 528)

Major periods, developments, and interpretative issues in Russian politics, history, and society, from the 1917 revolution to the present. The emphasis is on the Soviet experience, though the Tsarist past and post-Soviet developments are also considered. Special attention is given to the role of historical traditions, leadership, ideology, ramifying events, and socioeconomic factors.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 528-000 (19720)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by O’Donnell, Anne


CORE-UA 528-000 (19721)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 528-000 (19722)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 528-000 (19723)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 528-000 (19724)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 528-000 (19725)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 528-000 (19726)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

The Poetics and Politics of Mourning (IDSEM-UG 1835)

If “the past is never dead,” as Faulkner wrote, how does it continue to live on? How do its ghosts continue to haunt the political present? Can these ghosts be exorcised or does one have to learn to live with them? These questions become especially urgent and consequential in the aftermath of war and catastrophe, as writers and artists confront the legacy of violence and try to memorialize annihilated bodies and spaces. The aesthetic modes they choose to address both the dead and the living and the ways in which they narrate the past have political consequences for the future. We will explore and try to answer these questions by reading a selection of texts (fiction, poetry, film, and visual art) as sites and acts of mourning. We will read and view works from and about Armenia, South Africa, Palestine, Iraq, Lebanon, and the US. Readings will include Benjamin, Boulus, Butler, Darwish, Derrida, Freud, Khoury, Morrison, and Youssef.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


IDSEM-UG 1835-000 (19459)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Antoon, Sinan

World Dance (ARTS-UG 1212)

Dance reflects the cultural heritage and is a key to understanding diverse societies. Each week the students are introduced to a different dance form through videos, reading and a dance class. There is a Capoeira teacher of this Brazilian martial art disguised as a dance, and guest lecturers of Indian, Middle Eastern or Bellydance, Irish, Russian, Balinese and African dance from their locations. Dance can be seen as encoded forms of a society’s religious, artistic, political, economic and familial values. We discuss globalization, fusion and authenticity. Migration, missionaries the diaspora have created new forms like “Bollywood,” “Tribal,” and “K-Pop.” The internet has brought further influence for dance as signifier of new values during the pandemic, but live performance and ethnic roots survive. The student’s project is to find their own world dance. They themselves become researchers in the field, performers and creators of new forms.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Topics in Recorded Music: David Bowie (REMU-UT 1143)

David Bowie’s life and work offer a template for how to survive and continue to evolve as a musical artist. David Bowie has kept the music industry, his fans and the world guessing throughout a career that spans over four decades. Bowie himself put his secret best in his prophetic 1972 song, “Ch-ch-ch-ch Changes”; a multi-talented performer, writer and visual artist, Bowie has played his career like an instrument, selecting trends of every generation to process, absorb and adapt into successive phases of his ever-evolving chameleon persona. In this day of ceaseless multiple media, Bowie’s most recent, and typically perverse, coup was keeping secret the recording of his 2013 album, The Next Day, over a two-year recording period. The manipulative bravado of knowing when and how to keep a star’s inaccessibility and mystery, or to expose oneself, as Bowie did on TV in his own darkest days, has given David Bowie a singular, enduring mystique, glamour and respect. Examining the arc of his work is a window into significant scenes of every decade since the 1950s, and offers insight into: the British Blues scene that produced the Beatles and the Rolling Stones; the hippy free festival counter-culture; r’n’b; futurism; electronica;glam and gender games, improvisation; soul; funk; dance; disco; minimalism; ambient; avant-garde theater; and above all, the endlessly evolving sound of US and UK young clubland, including recent jungle and garage, to which Bowie consistently returns to recharge and find a new direction to make his own.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


REMU-UT 1143-000 (21902)
10/26/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Goldman, Vivien

Queer and Trans Game Studies (MCC-UE 1043)

This course examines the political movement of queer and transgender artists and programmers who are creating games and computational media. Throughout the semester, we will read work by queer, trans, and feminist scholars and designers and play the games they created in order to situate today’s queer and trans games movement within the histories, contributions, and politics of queer and trans people & people of color. How might we re-imagine the radical potentiality of video games and software by centering game studies on queer and trans life, history, & politics?

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1043-000 (11428)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pow, Whitney

Revolution and Media (MCC-UE 1352)

This course examines the role of media in the history of empires and revolutions and the history of media empires. It focuses on the investment in media forces by both empires and revolutions, and the tendency of media to form empires that are subject to periodic ’revolution’ in the marketplace with the contexts of colonization, decolonization and globalization. Media discussed include prints, paintings, photography, journalism, fiction, cinema, the Internet and digital media.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1352-000 (11392)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Raza, Sara

Human Computer Interaction (CS-UY 4543)

Designing a successful interactive experience or software system takes more than technical savvy and vision–it also requires a deep understanding of how to serve people’s needs and desires through the experience of the system, and knowledge about how to weave this understanding into the development process. This course introduces key topics and methods for creating and evaluating human-computer interfaces/digital user experiences. Students apply these practices to a system of their choosing (I encourage application to prototype systems that students are currently working on in other contexts, at any stage of development). The course builds toward a final write-up and presentation in which students detail how they tackled HCI/user experience design and evaluation of their system, and results from their investigations. Some experience creating/participating in the production of interactive experiences/software is recommended.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4543-000 (16119)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Goyal, Nitesh


CS-UY 4543-000 (16120)
at ePoly
Instructed by Lutzky, Raymond

Performing Voice and Talking Machines (OART-UT 25)

This course will introduce students to technologies for speech synthesis and speech recognition from the point of view of performance art. Through weekly assignments and in class lectures, we will explore voice interfaces and their role in technology, design, art, and culture. We will begin with understanding human speech, and then delve into computer speech. We will learn how to program existing technologies such as p5.js to create our own talking machines. The class will research the current limitations and biases of these technologies and models, and respond by leveraging these constraints as ground for performative expression. Students will be required to develop a performative piece as their final project, this could be a live performance, an interactive installation piece, or a performative object or tool. Students are encouraged to bring their interests into the classroom and apply the course into their practice. Prior knowledge of computer programming will be helpful, however, it is not required. NYU is a global community. You are welcome to bring your own language, your accent, and your spoken identity into the class.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OART-UT 25-000 (13600)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kananuruk, Tiriree

The Ethics of Big Tech & Social Media: Technoethics (DANC-UT 701)

This course offers a look at the lack of ethics and affects and effects upon humanity in the development of big tech, social media and the internet. Kicking off with the viewing of the number one doc on this topic “The Social Dilemma”, we begin a conversation around the impact of social media and technology on our lives and how to address it. Students will view documentaries, read books and engage in conversations in break out think tank groups in order to come up with solutions in a midterm one page manifesto for the greater good of humanity. Required readings include from “Understanding New Media Extending Marshall McLuhan” by Robert K Logan to set a framework of what technology is, followed by reading Jaron Lanier, “10 arguments for deleting your social media accounts right now”, and dipping into the spirituality side with “igods” by Craig Detweiler, ending with “Irresistible” by our very own NYU Professor Adam Alter. In partnership with the center for Humane Technology and their curricula support for academics, this course seeks to ask hard questions, dispel mistruths, host constructive conversations, test experiments and create a dialogue around how we must change the ways we develop and interact with tech for our survival. A willingness to take part in class experiments and experience based learning around topics of social media and technology is required. Final culmination of work from the course is a utopian project pitch deck that students design with the task of creating seedlings for new sustainable and humane business models for social media, big tech, and entrepreneurial situations, in hopes that some may go on to grow, bloom and fruit necessary change for the greater good of all. Students at the end of the semester will ethically assess their work and assign their own grade based on their self evaluation.

Dance (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


DANC-UT 701-000 (14794)at Washington SquareInstructed by

Auto Fictions (ITPG-GT 2066)

Auto Fictions is a studio class focusing on the creation of immersive, multi-path and interactive experiences based on personal narrative. Documentary art has included the art of installation for decades, but new technologies have given artists affordable tools that allow them to rapidly prototype and then refine immersive media experiences. Auto Fictions is an interdepartmental course that may include students from Film, ITP and Theater disciplines. Students will create production teams. Each team will make a project and each student will help the other create their work through intensive collaboration. The intention here is to practice collaboration across disciplines, methods, values, and artistic cultures to create a work of immersive fiction based on materials gathered from the past, captured or created in the present and/or imagined for the future. We will look at several possible approaches to the creation of immersive media works. Including multiplexing software programs. Students with the requisite knowledge in these tools or gaming engines with similar capabilities may use them for the creation of their works. But it is not required. There may be an opportunity for building intuitive interactivity into some of the experiences. In response to the Covid-19 pandemic we will be exploring how to adapt our working methods and our work itself to these conditions as they develop. The goal of the course will be to physically realize the works but to do that we will go through a detailed comprehensive design, planning and budgeting process so that if conditions permit all aspects of the work will be fully created or planned and ready to build. If conditions permit, we will meet one day at the beginning of the semester to install and introduce the platform, create teams, and review the assignment. Otherwise we will meet online and begin work there. Students will be provided with access to online tutorials for relevant software and systems.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2066-000 (15717)
09/09/2024 – 12/09/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Cunningham, Kevin · Dysinger, Carol

Cities on the Move: Migration and Urban Landscapes (SASEM-UG 9104)

The rapid expansion of urban areas is the major driving force of global environmental change. As most urban landscapes expand in number and size, their inhabitants place increasing demands on resources and energy. These demands pose great challenges for ensuring human welfare and protecting biodiversity. Urban land use change has always been a question for urban planners and researchers, but understanding contemporary competition for urban land and associated resources is perhaps more urgent than ever. The inflow of large numbers of migrants, not only from the rural counterparts of larger cities but also from all over the world, poses new challenges to environmental processes and the functioning of urban systems. A critical question emerges: how can we sustainably integrate new migrants into large urban areas without compromising the environmental wellbeing and livelihood of existing local populations? Urban development concepts like smart growth, eco-cities and sponge cities have previously grappled with this question; through them, researchers, urban planners, architects, and other professionals have imagined new forms and functions for buildings, material infrastructure, and open or vegetated spaces. The central challenge is to improve the resilience capacity of urban landscapes. Here, the notion that cities themselves may be reinvented in more ecologically vital ways portends to offer solutions to the dire environmental stresses that climate change, natural resource scarcity, and geopolitical instability promise. There is an important interdisciplinary dimension to this challenge: different stakeholders speak different scientific and functional languages. This course emphasizes inter- and trans-disciplinary approaches in an effort to highlight the multiple and distinct knowledge forms and data types relevant to understanding linkages between landscape structure, landscape function, and urban socio-natural transformation.

Study Away Seminar (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


SASEM-UG 9104-000 (18839)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by

Place-Building-Time:The Architecture of Berlin (ARTH-UA 9651)

Berlin is a unique modern Metropolis. Its alternating history with often drastic changes offers a comprehensive background to explore and investigate the nature of architecture in correlation to the various developmental processes of urban life and culture. Architecture is embedded in the urban fabric in which place and time serve as the main threads, constantly changing their multifaceted and layered relationships. This urban fabric provides the fertile soil for urban life and culture, which literally takes place in various scales between the public and the private realm, two further threads intertwined in the urban fabric. Experiencing the city through walking is essential for learning how to observe, see and read “Place, Building and Time” in Berlin. Tours will alternate with classroom discussions and workshops.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTH-UA 9651-000 (2322)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by Sigel, Paul

Politics of Portraiture (OART-UT 826)

This course explores the pictorial articulation of individual human likeness and its fiction in the public forum. The art of portraiture has survived its own origins in myth making and archetype building. The human image, or icon, forever landmarks the voices, textures, physicality, spirituality, symbols, politics, aesthetic concerns and military contexts, religious rituals, government, calendar ceremonies, daily functions, heroic acts and social disorders of diverse cultures throughout recorded history. It is the history of creation, the story of romance, the mark of progress, the record of royalty and the profile of democracy. It is the revolution of fine art and a catalyst of discipline. Imaging the individual in the public eye is the story of humankind. This course bridges the worlds of the oral and written mythologies which inhabit and empower us and the creative manifestation (conscious and unconscious) of these ancient archetypes into contemporary art, media and design. Students will critically rethink the implied and material presence of portraiture in everyday life. Students will gain practical knowledge and insight into the origins and potential power of the archetypes which permeate our collective unconscious.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 826-000 (14196)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cameron, Donna

Media Moguls in the 20th Century (OART-UT 562)

This course attempts to track the American entertainment industry from its plebian origins through its rise to becoming the predominant mass entertainment culture in the world. Students discover the origins of the production practices that are employed in the entertainment industry today by following the legendary characters, movie moguls, and media titans of the early 20th century and the companies they built. The emphasis is on the way the visionaries of the time impacted seemingly risk-averse systems to invigorate and sometimes completely revolutionize them. These innovative men and women include, but are not limited, to Louis B. Mayer, George Lucas, Maya Deren, Shirley Clark, Nam Jun Paik, Lucille Ball, Russell Simmons, Clive Davis, Julie Taymor, and Steve Jobs.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 562-000 (14193)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Falk, Leon


OART-UT 562-000 (14212)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Falk, Leon

World Dance Cultures (OART-UT 701)

This class used to be called History of Dance. This course explores why and how dance acts as a vital participant in cultural practices around the world. Looking back through the perspective of present research, we will examine how dance is inherently a reflection of the culture it represents. A wide overview of dance and its myriad purposes will be covered, from a means of worship in India, Turkey, and Haiti; its inclusion in the rituals of Bali; noh and kabuki theatrical traditions of Japan; fertility and death ceremonies of the Wodaabe, Yoruba, and Dogon tribes of Africa; the healing zar dances of North Africa, and the rituals/activism of Native American tribes. The presentation of court dance as a symbol of power will be examined in Hawai’i, Java, and Cambodia, as well as in Catherine de Medici’s Renaissance pageants and in the French Baroque spectacles of Louis XIV’s Versailles and the Paris Opera. The inevitable impact of politics on dance will be examined in viewing the bloody genocide of Cambodia’s Royal Dancers; the propagandist works of China’s Cultural Revolution; the French Revolution’s influence upon Romantic ballets such as La Sylphide and Giselle; and how the repression of a Gitano culture led to the emergence of flamenco in Spain. In addition to written texts and video documentation, we will review examples of related art forms (visual arts, music, and drama).

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 701-000 (14352)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beaman, Patricia

Statistics for The Behavioral Sciences (PSYCH-UA 10)

Bauer. Offered every semester. 4 points. Students gain familiarity with data description, variance and variability, significance tests, confidence bounds, and linear regression, among other topics. Students work on psychological data sets, learn approaches to statistical prediction, and learn to interpret results from randomized experiments.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8659)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bauer, Elizabeth


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8660)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zuo, Shimiao


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8661)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Wenze


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8662)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zuo, Shimiao


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8663)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Stan


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8664)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Stan


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8665)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bauer, Elizabeth


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8666)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Glinton, Kristen


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8667)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Glinton, Kristen


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8668)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Parihar, Sushmeena


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8669)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Parihar, Sushmeena


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8670)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Judy


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (26969)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Wenze


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (27040)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Judy

Immersive Arts (INTM-SHU 257)

This course aims to provide students with the means to understand immersive media experiences, and conduct experiments from both a practical and a theoretical perspective. The course consists of lectures, research, discussion and studio-based practice. Students will learn to produce stereoscopic – 3D images and photogrammetric 3D models, utilize multi-channel video and sound systems, and be introduced to the Unity game engine and VR hardware. For the final project, students produce VR environments in experimental and meaningful ways. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: IMA/IMB elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 257-000 (17304)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Her, Yun

Responsive Environments: Designing Interactive, Sentient, and Intelligent Spaces (INTM-SHU 138)

In this course, students focus on the study and development of responsive environments, framed within a contextual and critical exploration of the architectural space as a cultural, social and technological phenomenon, and also on the application of practical scenarios for interaction, sentience, and intelligence. Through the making of creative media designs and physical prototypes, students aim to demonstrate how our habitats/spaces/architectures can facilitate novel frameworks for experiencing and living. Prereq for INTM-SHU 138 is Creative Coding Lab OR Interaction Lab OR Application Lab OR Media Architecture Fulfillment: IMA/IMB Elective

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 138-000 (17298)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Mon
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Didakis, Stavros

Emerging Media Studio: (PHTI-UT 1018)

The Emerging Media Studio courses explore methods to creatively think through and hybridize artistic photographic practice with emerging media technologies from medicine, the military, archaeology, urban planning, environmental science and other industries. Projects may take open-ended forms such as video, virtual reality environments, site-based performance, spatial imaging, 3D fabrication and photographic documentation. Critical readings and ideas drawn from artists as well as professionals in other fields are discussed. Our practice is learning how to adapt to and position ourselves as artists making unique contributions to the social dynamics of culture and a constantly shifting universe of media.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PHTI-UT 1018-000 (18655)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fu, Snow Yunxue


PHTI-UT 1018-000 (18656)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fu, Snow Yunxue

Political Economy of Education: Why Does College Cost So Much? (EDST-UE 1321)

Why do so many high school students apply to study at expensive institutions when there are cheaper alternatives available? Who is able to attend, and who is excluded? Why do college costs keep rising so fast? Shouldn’t college be free? Students explore answers to these kinds of questions in this course. Students explore a range of economic concepts and empirical evidence that speaks to the value of Field available for additional information in footerhigher education for individuals and societies; state and institutional financial aid policies; and university budgets and spending priorities.

Education Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


EDST-UE 1321-000 (11588)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by Brewer, Dominic

Art on the Edge (OART-UT 1019)

Taking off from the practices of medium-based art categories, this course is structured across key topics in contemporary art – “art of today, produced by artists who are living in the twenty-first century”. During the semester, via the framework of readings, projects and assignments, we will consider the importance of the visual arts in the larger context of society. Each week we will look at a different topic, which will be organized around key concepts, artists and artwork examples. The main goal is to allow us to contemplate the process of interaction between visual art, history, cultural, socio-economical, and technological forces. The stress of our gatherings will be on the artist as a thinker and a maker.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OART-UT 1019-000 (13644)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aguilar, Gustavo

The Science of Happiness (CAMS-UA 110)

Examines the state of college-student mental health and wellness on a personal and systems level. As undergraduate university students approach the end of adolescence, they often reevaluate the beliefs, values, and assumptions with which they left home. Young adulthood is a time of great promise, but the transition from child to adult is never easy. We look at how individuals can create positive change by reinterpreting their goals and identifying steps toward a successful college experience. Key findings from the fields of neuroscience and positive psychology are referenced to inform our study of the biopsychosocial underpinnings of success and happiness. Through lectures and discussions, students learn about a variety of wellness topics that include mindfulness, relationships, and self-esteem. The final project requires students to promote an area of mental wellness on campus.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CAMS-UA 110-000 (7390)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan · Lerner, Daniel Louis


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9676)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9677)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 8:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9678)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9679)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9680)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
8:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9682)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 8:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9683)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9684)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9685)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9686)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9687)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9688)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9689)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9690)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9691)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 8:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan · Lerner, Daniel Louis


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9692)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan · Lerner, Daniel Louis


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9693)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9694)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan · Lerner, Daniel Louis

Contemporary Techniques in Sound Art (DM-UY 3113)

This course explores sound as an art form and technical practice in its own right. Topics include contemporary techniques in composition, sound art, and interactive installation. Students will produce sound with narrative elements that evoke social, cultural & critical-thinking. Their final projects can be experimental podcasts, music (performance and/or recordings), multi-channel audio installations, or multimedia projects. | Prerequisite: DM-UY 1113 or MPATE-UE 1001

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 3113-000 (12650)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by O’Keefe, Timothy

Design Studio for Non-Majors (ART-UE 1421)

A continuing exploration of graphic design to help students refine their skills & develop more personally expressive ways to solving problems through visual communication. Assignments, readings, & research projects will allow students to consider the complex nature of graphic design. Both traditional & digital approaches to typography & layout will be incorporated with a wide range of assignment. A priority is placed on the use of concepts to dictate design techniques & on the pursuit of a genuinely creative vision.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 1421-000 (9687)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Darts, David


ART-UE 1421-000 (9689)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rader, Michael

Data Visualization (CUSP-GX 6006)

Visualization and visual analytics systems help people explore and explain data by allowing the creation of both static and interactive visual representations. A basic premise of visualization is that visual information can be processed at a much higher rate than raw numbers and text. Well-designed visualizations substitute perception for cognition, freeing up limited cognitive/memory resources for higher-level problems. This course aims to provide a broad understanding of the principals and designs behind data visualization. General topics include state-of-the-art techniques in both information visualization and scientific visualization, and the design of interactive/web-based visualization systems. Hands on experience will be provided through popular frameworks such as matplotlib, VTK and D3.js.

Ctr for Urban Sci and Progress (Graduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CUSP-GX 6006-000 (7543)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sun, Qi

Korean Culture and Society through K-pop (HUMN-SHU 180)

Considers the trajectory of changes in the production, circulation, and reception of Korean popular music from the turn of the twentieth century to the latest K-pop hits across successive political, social, and economic junctures, with regard for major themes such as nationalism, race, gender, technology, and globalization; and investigates music culture in relation to hybridity, authenticity, transculturation, cyber-culture, and fandom, among other subjects Prereq: None Fulfillment: Humanities Introductory Course (18-19 Topic Courses).

Humanities (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


HUMN-SHU 180-000 (22093)
09/13/2022 – 12/16/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Choi, Hye Eun

Cultures & Contexts: Japan (CORE-UA 507)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 507-000 (19713)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shimabuku, Annmaria


CORE-UA 507-000 (19714)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 507-000 (19715)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 507-000 (19716)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 507-000 (19717)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 507-000 (19718)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 507-000 (19719)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Life Science: Molecules of Life (CORE-UA 310)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 310-000 (9800)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jordan, Trace


CORE-UA 310-000 (9801)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 310-000 (9802)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 310-000 (9803)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 310-000 (9804)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 310-000 (9805)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 310-000 (9806)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Applied Cryptography (CS-GY 6903)

This course examines Modern Cryptography from a both theoretical and applied perspective, with emphasis on “provable security” and “application case studies”. The course looks particularly at cryptographic primitives that are building blocks of various cryptographic applications. The course studies notions of security for a given cryptographic primitive, its various constructions and respective security analysis based on the security notion. The cryptographic primitives covered include pseudorandom functions, symmetric encryption (block ciphers), hash functions and random oracles, message authentication codes, asymmetric encryption, digital signatures and authenticated key exchange. The course covers how to build provably secure cryptographic protocols (e.g., secure message transmission, identification schemes, secure function evaluation, etc.), and various number-theoretic assumptions upon which cryptography is based. Also covered: implementation issues (e.g., key lengths, key management, standards, etc.) and, as application case studies, a number of real-life scenarios currently using solutions from modern cryptography. | Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6903-000 (15957)
at ePoly
Instructed by Chen, Zhixiong


CS-GY 6903-000 (15958)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Di Crescenzo, Giovanni


CS-GY 6903-000 (15959)
at ePoly
Instructed by Di Crescenzo, Giovanni

Application Security (CS-GY 9163)

This course addresses the design and implementation of secure applications. Concentration is on writing software programs that make it difficult for intruders to exploit security holes. The course emphasizes writing secure distributed programs in Java. The security ramifications of class, field and method visibility are emphasized. | Knowledge of Information, Security and Privacy equivalent to CS-GY 6813. Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 9163-000 (15952)
at ePoly
Instructed by


CS-GY 9163-000 (15953)
at ePoly
Instructed by


CS-GY 9163-000 (15954)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Satt, Mo

Big Data (CS-GY 6513)

Big Data requires the storage, organization, and processing of data at a scale and efficiency that go well beyond the capabilities of conventional information technologies. In this course, we will study the state of art in big data management: we will learn about algorithms, techniques and tools needed to support big data processing. In addition, we will examine real applications that require massive data analysis and how they can be implemented on Big Data platforms. The course will consist of lectures based both on textbook material and scientific papers. It will include programming assignments that will provide students with hands-on experience on building data-intensive applications using existing Big Data platforms, including Amazon AWS. Besides lectures given by the instructor, we will also have guest lectures by experts in some of the topics we will cover. Students should have experience in programming: Java, C, C , Python, or similar languages, equivalent to two introductory courses in programming, such as “Introduction to Programming” and “Data Structures and Algorithms. | Knowledge of Python. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6513-000 (16126)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rodriguez, Juan


CS-GY 6513-000 (16128)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rodriguez, Juan


CS-GY 6513-000 (16127)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Sat
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Patel, Amit


CS-GY 6513-000 (16129)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

COMPUTER VISION (CS-GY 6643)

An important goal of artificial intelligence (AI) is to equip computers with the capability of interpreting visual inputs. Computer vision is an area in AI that deals with the construction of explicit, meaningful descriptions of physical objects from images. It includes as parts many techniques from image processing, pattern recognition, geometric modeling, and cognitive processing. This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and techniques in computer vision. | Knowledge of Data Structures and Algorithms, proficiency in programming, and familiarity with matrix arithmetic. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6643-000 (15999)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Computer Networking (CS-GY 6843)

This course takes a top-down approach to computer networking. After an overview of computer networks and the Internet, the course covers the application layer, transport layer, network layer and link layers. Topics at the application layer include client-server architectures, P2P architectures, DNS and HTTP and Web applications. Topics at the transport layer include multiplexing, connectionless transport and UDP, principles or reliable data transfer, connection-oriented transport and TCP and TCP congestion control. Topics at the network layer include forwarding, router architecture, the IP protocol and routing protocols including OSPF and BGP. Topics at the link layer include multiple-access protocols, ALOHA, CSMA/CD, Ethernet, CSMA/CA, wireless 802.11 networks and linklayer switches. The course includes simple quantitative delay and throughput modeling, socket programming and network application development and Ethereal labs. | Knowledge of Python and/or C. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6843-000 (16008)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Reddington, Thomas


CS-GY 6843-000 (16009)
at ePoly
Instructed by Portnoy, Rafail


CS-GY 6843-000 (16010)
at ePoly
Instructed by Portnoy, Rafail


CS-GY 6843-000 (16011)
at ePoly
Instructed by Zhao, John

Artificial Intelligence I (CS-GY 6613)

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is an important topic in computer science and offers many diversified applications. It addresses one of the ultimate puzzles humans are trying to solve: How is it possible for a slow, tiny brain, whether biological or electronic, to perceive, understand, predict and manipulate a world far larger and more complicated than itself? And how do people create a machine (or computer) with those properties? To that end, AI researchers try to understand how seeing, learning, remembering and reasoning can, or should, be done. This course introduces students to the many AI concepts and techniques. | Knowledge of Data Structures and Algorithms. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6613-000 (15997)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Monogioudis, Pantelis


CS-GY 6613-000 (15998)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Wong, Edward

Digital Photography (OART-UT 13)

This is a standard digital photography course designed for those with little or no experience in photography. This course will emphasize personal expression through the application of technique to the presentation of subject matter. Open Arts will have enough Sony A7r cameras for students to share. If students plan to borrow the DSLR cameras, they are first required to purchase College Student Insurance, (CSI). While it is not required that you own your own digital camera to enroll in this course, it is recommended that you borrow or acquire your own camera for the duration of this course, or if you would like to avoid having to share one of the department’s cameras with another student. If you would like to purchase your own camera, a digital single lens reflex (SLR) or mirrorless digital camera is highly recommended for this course. The camera needs to have manual aperture and shutter speed controls. The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the technical and aesthetic aspects of making photographic images. We will apply fundamental photographic techniques such as composition, framing, lighting and manual camera controls to the images we create. We will discuss the way we see, compared to how cameras and lenses see, evaluate the similarities and differences and how that impacts the creation of images and how we analyze them. Students will make photographs that are effective as individual images and photographs that work together in a series. Students will learn how to create a narrative with a series of photographs and express a feeling or mood with a series of photographs. Class discussions will introduce students to a variety of concepts related to visual literacy. Students will also be introduced to the work of historically significant photographers from a broad range of backgrounds. Students will learn how to use Adobe Creative Cloud software to adjust images for print and digital publishing. By the end of the course, students will understand how to use a digital SLR or mirrorless camera to create compelling photographs using manual controls, process their images using Adobe Creative Cloud software and best practices for publishing their images digitally as well as best practices for printing their images. Finally, students will enhance their critical thinking skills while developing a deeper understanding of visual/photographic language. Students are expected to shoot a minimum of 108 exposures (photographs) each week.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 13-000 (14496)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ross-Smith, Bayete

Choreography (OART-UT 805)

The purpose of this course is to enable the student to gain a heightened awareness, appreciation, and knowledge of dance through movement and performance. We focus on the foundations of dance such as control, aesthetics, alignment, dynamics, athleticism, musicality, use of space, development of learning strategies within a group context, and personal, artistic expression. The students exploration of their creativity, expression and concepts, as well as their work on other dancer’s bodies is part of the work of this course. Through individual and collective kinesthetic participation in unfamiliar patterns, the student is physically and conceptually challenged and informed. Students will be asked to problem solve as homework assignment and in-class composition exercises. Dance experience is recommended, but formal dance training is not required.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 805-000 (14213)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Energy and the Enviroment (CORE-UA 9203)

This course explores the scientific foundations of current environmental issues and the impact of this knowledge on public policy. One goal of the course is to examine several topics of pressing importance and lively debate in our society – e.g., global warming, the quest for clean air and water, atmospheric ozone depletion, and the continuing search for viable sources of energy. A parallel goal is to develop the chemical, physical, and quantitative principles that are necessary for a deeper understanding of these environmental issues. The relevant topics include the structure of atoms and molecules, the interaction of light with matter, energy relationships in chemical reactions, and the properties of acids and bases. Throughout the course we also examine how scientific studies of the environment are connected to political, economic and policy concerns. The laboratory experiments are closely integrated with the lecture topics and provide hands-on explorations of central course themes. Overall, this course will provide you with the foundation to carefully evaluate environmental issues and make informed decisions about them.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CORE-UA 9203-000 (21001)
at NYU Tel Aviv (Global)
Instructed by

Great Works in Philosophy (PHIL-UA 2)

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHIL-UA 2-000 (10163)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chaplin, Rosalind


PHIL-UA 2-000 (10164)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pohl, Stephan


PHIL-UA 2-000 (10165)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pohl, Stephan

Cultures & Contexts: The Black Atlantic (CORE-UA 9534)

This course considers the Black Atlantic as a socio-cultural economic space from the first arrival of Africans in the ‘New World,’ beginning around in the 15th century, through the rise of slavery in the Americas. During this class we will trace the origins and importance of the concept of the Black Atlantic within broad political contexts, paying special attention to the changing social, cultural and economic relations that shaped community formation among people of African descent and laid the foundations for modern political and economic orders. Once we have established those foundations, we will think about the Black Atlantic as a critical site of cultural production. Using the frame of the Atlantic to ask questions about the relationship between culture and political economy. We will explore a range of genres–film, fiction, music, as well as formal scholarship–so as to explore questions of evidence in the context of the real and the imaginary. Topics to be covered include African enslavement and settlement in Africa and the Americas; the development of transatlantic racial capitalism; variations in politics and culture between empires in the Atlantic world; creolization, plantation slavery and slave society; the politics and culture of the enslaved; the Haitian Revolution; slave emancipation; and contemporary black Atlantic politics and racial capitalism.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CORE-UA 9534-000 (4806)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9534-000 (2315)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Accra (Global)
Instructed by Baku, Kofi


CORE-UA 9534-000 (2746)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9534-000 (2516)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9534-000 (2618)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Washington DC (Global)
Instructed by

Expressive Culture: Art and Culture in Contemporary Israel (CORE-UA 9764)

The location of Israel at the geographic junction between the West and the East, between the Arab world and the Western world, against the background of the long historical complexity of this piece of land provides a panoramic view of Israeli culture and art by examining thematic crossroads and ideas, via problems and social conflicts which lie at the heart of those art works and are reflected by them. Themes include: religion and secularism, universalism/globalism versus localism, Jews and Arabs, Ashkenazic and Sephardic cultures, multiculturalism in Israel, Zionism and Post-Zionism, right and left political world views, questions of gender, historical perspectives on war and peace and the Holocaust. Students explore the way different forms of art—visual, literary, and performance—reflect and shape the understanding of the “Israeli mosaic” while learning about the way the artists and writers internalize, consciously and unconsciously the complex Israeli reality.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CORE-UA 9764-000 (21002)
at NYU Tel Aviv (Global)
Instructed by

Texts and Ideas: (CORE-UA 9400)

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CORE-UA 9400-000 (4853)
08/29/2024 – 12/04/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Buenos Aires (Global)
Instructed by Orellana, Patricio


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2609)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9400-000 (4939)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Giglioli, Matteo


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2508)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2510)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2512)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2520)
08/29/2024 – 12/04/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Soto, Teresa


CORE-UA 9400-000 (3460)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Thorne, Vanda


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2849)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by Hallsworth, Djuna

Cultures & Contexts: Latin America (CORE-UA 9515)

Over the last 50 years, millions of Latin Americans have experienced extraordinary shifts in their social, political, and cultural landscape, a result of the transformative effects of revolution or insurgency, state repression, popular resistance and social movements. We focus on events that had continental, hemispheric, and even global impact, including the Cuban Revolution of 1959, the military coups of the 1970s, and the Zapatista uprising in 1994. Drawing on a range of primary sources and cultural forms, we listen carefully to the voices of the major social actors of the time. Our sources are drawn from a wide range of media: newsprint, television broadcasts, transcripts, testimony, essay, documentary and feature film, art, and music. We deliberately mix artistic representations with documentary evidence to understand how the arts—music, visual art, literature, film—do not just reflect the reality around them, but are themselves vital sites for shaping and changing that reality and our imagination of it, both then and now.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CORE-UA 9515-000 (4854)
08/29/2024 – 12/04/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Buenos Aires (Global)
Instructed by Palmeiro, Cecilia

Cultures & Contexts: Germany (CORE-UA 556)

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 556-000 (9858)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wood, Christopher


CORE-UA 556-000 (9859)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 556-000 (9860)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 556-000 (9861)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 556-000 (9862)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 556-000 (9863)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 556-000 (9864)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: Spain (CORE-UA 544)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 544-000 (19734)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mendelson, Jordana


CORE-UA 544-000 (19735)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 544-000 (19736)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 544-000 (19737)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 544-000 (19738)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 544-000 (19739)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 544-000 (19740)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 544-000 (19741)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Culture and Context: Italy (CORE-UA 9554)

The course examines how Italian identity has been transformed through encounters with foreigners. These foreigners were not only invading armies and colonizing powers but also artists and scholars, travelers and tourists. All contributed in fundamental ways to the evolution of Italian society and culture.Through the study of primary sources we will explore, for example, how the Greek, Arab, Byzantine, and Jewish presences reshaped Italian civilization up until the Renaissance. As well as outlining the historical circumstances for each of these encounters, our account will focus on their cultural consequences from a number of perspectives, from science to language, from philosophy to art and architecture. A field trip to Ravenna (capital of the Western Roman Empire, then of the Ostrogothic Kingdom, and later of the Byzantine Exarchate) will offer a vantage point to appreciate the many layers of Italian cultural history. As a case study, we will analyze a number of coeval reports on the sacks of Rome by the Visigoths (410 AD) and by the troops of Charles V (1527).Florence will be used as a primary source. The city and its surroundings will provide the most favorable context also to address the issue of tourism, from the Grand Tour to the most recent developments of mass tourism in Italy.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CORE-UA 9554-000 (2441)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Anichini, Federica

Cultures & Contexts: Contemporary Latino Cultures (CORE-UA 529)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 529-000 (19727)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beltran, Cristina


CORE-UA 529-000 (19728)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 529-000 (19729)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 529-000 (19730)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 529-000 (19731)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 529-000 (19732)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 529-000 (19733)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: Asian / Pacific / American Cultures (CORE-UA 539)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 539-000 (9846)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saranillio, Dean


CORE-UA 539-000 (9847)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 539-000 (9848)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 539-000 (9849)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 539-000 (9850)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 539-000 (19710)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 539-000 (19711)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 539-000 (19712)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: Egypt of The Pharaohs (CORE-UA 545)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 545-000 (9411)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Roth, Ann


CORE-UA 545-000 (9412)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 545-000 (9413)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 545-000 (9450)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 545-000 (9451)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: African Diaspora (CORE-UA 532)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 532-000 (8791)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gomez, Michael


CORE-UA 532-000 (8792)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 532-000 (8793)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 532-000 (8794)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 532-000 (8795)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 532-000 (8827)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 532-000 (8828)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: Ancient Israel (CORE-UA 514)

The history and culture of the ancient Israelite societies of biblical times and the Greco-Roman period seen from the perspective of the process of urbanization and the role of cities in the development of classical Judaism, covering the period from c. 1250 b.c.e. through the third century c.e. Surveys the history and achievements of these cities and their contribution to the development of law and social organization, prophetic movements, history of Israelite religion and early Judaism, and the background of Christianity. The Bible and ancient Jewish texts preserve much evidence for the history of ancient Israel; and archaeological excavations, as well as the discovery of ancient writings in Hebrew and related languages, have added to our knowledge. In addition, new discoveries in the Dead Sea Scrolls contribute greatly to our understanding of the history of Judaism and the emergence of Christianity. Throughout, we remain focused on the growth of cities and their role in the creation and development of ancient Israel’s culture and literature.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 514-000 (8019)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fleming, Daniel


CORE-UA 514-000 (8020)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 514-000 (8021)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 514-000 (8022)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 514-000 (8023)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 514-000 (19709)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Texts & Ideas: Antiquity & The Renaissance (CORE-UA 402)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 402-000 (9519)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gilman, Ernest


CORE-UA 402-000 (9520)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 402-000 (9521)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 402-000 (9522)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 402-000 (9523)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 402-000 (9831)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 402-000 (9832)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Texts & Ideas: Antiquity & The 19th Century (CORE-UA 404)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 404-000 (8017)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Renzi, Vincent


CORE-UA 404-000 (8483)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 404-000 (8484)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 404-000 (19697)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 404-000 (8018)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 404-000 (9248)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 404-000 (19698)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 404-000 (19699)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Texts & Ideas: (CORE-UA 400)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 400-000 (8004)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Barbiero, Emilia


CORE-UA 400-000 (8005)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8006)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8007)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8008)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8009)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Konstan, David


CORE-UA 400-000 (8010)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8011)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8012)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9232)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9414)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9415)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (19688)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8013)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hopkins, Robert


CORE-UA 400-000 (8014)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8015)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8016)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8488)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8489)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kotsonis, Yanni


CORE-UA 400-000 (8490)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8491)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8492)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8493)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9030)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9078)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8757)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kennedy, Philip


CORE-UA 400-000 (8758)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8759)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9028)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9029)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9150)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9151)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8760)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shaw, Lytle


CORE-UA 400-000 (8761)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8762)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8763)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9031)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9233)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (19694)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9818)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cipani, Nicola


CORE-UA 400-000 (9819)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9820)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9821)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9822)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8937)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Barker, Chris


CORE-UA 400-000 (8938)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8939)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8940)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8941)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9245)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (19695)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8949)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Samalin, Zachary


CORE-UA 400-000 (8950)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8951)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (8952)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9027)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9247)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9444)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (19696)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9032)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Waters, John


CORE-UA 400-000 (9033)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9034)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9035)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9036)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (10204)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (10245)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9817)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vatulescu, Cristina


CORE-UA 400-000 (9824)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9825)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9826)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9827)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (9828)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (19689)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by LaPorta, Kathrina


CORE-UA 400-000 (19690)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (19691)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (19692)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 400-000 (19693)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: Indigenous Australia (CORE-UA 536)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 536-000 (8930)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Myers, Fred


CORE-UA 536-000 (8931)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 536-000 (8932)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 536-000 (8933)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 536-000 (8934)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 536-000 (8935)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 536-000 (8936)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Green World (OART-UT 1057)

According to the World Health Organization, 6.5 million people will die prematurely this year due to air pollution. That’s more deaths due to breathing bad air than from AIDS, auto accidents, cholera, malaria, and war combined. Climate change, fossil fuels, lack of drinking water, over-population, GMOs, pollution, and the wholesale corporate campaign to discredit science are among the most critical problems of our time. Living in denial of these issues has become the West’s de facto cultural standard with only a fraction of the public taking action. How can artists, citizen-scientists, and storytellers intervene in existing narratives regarding some of humanity’s most life-threatening issues? How will you further important conversations and seize the potential to activate change? Green World explores contemporary environmental issues while guiding artists to create informed, responsible works of positive social change using technology as a force multiplier. This course is open to all NYU students interested in developing an activist’s artistic, social, and/or scientific leverage point to help save the world. This course features an optional research trip to Black Rock Forest Consortium.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OART-UT 1057-000 (13418)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Ferris, Alexander

Games 101 (GAMES-UT 101)

Games 101 is the foundational course for the NYU Game Center. The focus of Games 101 is game literacy – a shared understanding of games as complex cultural and aesthetic objects. The class will incorporate lectures, discussion, readings, and writing assignments, but the primary activity of the class is critical play – playing games in order to better understand and appreciate them. The class will cover games on and off the computer, including classic and contemporary board and card games, sports, and games on the PC, internet, and consoles.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14339)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Clark, Naomi


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14340)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Jones-Brewster, Jordan


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14342)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Porter, Caroline


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14341)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Boyer, Chapin


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14343)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Jones-Brewster, Jordan


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14344)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sorensen, Samuel


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14723)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Croasdill, D

The Planetary: Computation in the Anthropocene (INTM-SHU 296)

This course will examine the relationship between planetary-scale computation and the development of planetarity. We take as starting points that (1) the very notion of climate change is an epistemological accomplishment of planetary-scale sensing, modeling and computation systems and (2) the ecological costs of computation are on an unsustainable trajectory. The seminar will ask: what are alternative futures for computation as human and ecological infrastructure? The primary subject of research is the transition from computation as a digital media object to computation as continental scale infrastructure. The scope and significance of this shift are fundamental for the development of interactive art and design that seeks to explore critical alternatives to extant models for this. What we call planetary-scale computation takes different forms at different scales—from energy and mineral sourcing and subterranean cloud infrastructure to urban software and massive universal addressing systems; from interfaces drawn by the augmentation of the hand and eye to users identified by self—quantification and the arrival of legions of sensors, algorithms, and robots. Each of these may represent a direct harm upon effected ecosystems and/or a means for and informed viable administration of those same systems. The course is primarily geared to advanced IMA students but is open to students from any major who are interested in engaging with contemporary issues of computation, society and ecology. Final projects will combine original written work and speculative design that can draw on diverse student core skill sets. Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing. Fulfillment: IMA Major Electives; IMB Major Interactive Media Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 296-000 (17305)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Bratton, Benjamin Hugh

Creative Coding Lab (INTM-SHU 103)

In this foundation course students will learn the fundamentals of computation, software design, and web technologies, through a series of creative projects. The course is intended to equip students with the skills to develop artistic and business projects that include a significant computational component. Topics such as variables, functions, components, and functional and reactive programming will be brought together to create interactive applications, generative art, data visualization, and other domains. Within the framework of these creative projects students will develop a greater understanding of how computer programs operate, be exposed to various concepts used to create experiences and interactions, and become more familiar with some of the technologies that constitute the internet. This course is intended for students with no prior programming background. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: CORE AT; IMA Major Other Foundation; IMB Major Emerging Media Foundation.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 103-000 (17271)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 103-000 (17272)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 103-000 (17273)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue,Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 103-000 (17274)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 103-000 (17276)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 103-000 (17277)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 103-000 (17278)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Fri
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 103-000 (17279)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by

Creative Coding (MCC-UE 1585)

“Creative Coding” is a practice-based course designed to teach basic programming skills in the context of critical & cultural media studies & the digital humanities. The course requires no prior programming experience, simply a willingness to explore code at a more technical level with the aim of using computation as an expressive, analytical, critical & visualizing medium. Students will learn basic coding techniques such as variables, loops, graphics, & networking, all within a larger conversation on the social, cultural, & historical nature of code & coding practices.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1585-000 (14057)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Galloway, Alexander

Ordinary Diff Equations (MA-UY 4204)

A first course in ordinary differential equations, including analytical solution methods, elementary numerical methods, and modeling. Topics to be covered include: first-order equations including integrating factors; second-order equations including variation of parameters; series solutions; elementary numerical methods including Euler’s methods, Runge-Kutta methods, and error analysis; Laplace transforms; systems of linear equations; boundary-value problems. Restricted to Tandon math majors and students with a permission code from the math department. Fulfills ordinary differential equations requirement for the BS Math degree. | Prerequisites: C or better in (MA-UY 2114 or MA-UY 2514 or MATH-UH 1020 or MATH-UH 1021 or MATH-SHU 151) and (MA-UY 3044 or MA-UY 3054 or MA-UY 3113 or MATH-UH 1022 or MATH-SHU 140 or MATH-SHU 141). Note: Not open to students who have taken MA-UY 2034 or MA-UY 4254

Mathematics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MA-UY 4204-000 (6810)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Holland, David


MA-UY 4204-000 (6811)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 4204-000 (6812)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gerber, Edwin


MA-UY 4204-000 (6813)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 4204-000 (18504)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by O’Neil, Mike


MA-UY 4204-000 (18505)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Gou, Tianrun


MA-UY 4204-000 (6814)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Antonelli, Gioacchino


MA-UY 4204-000 (6815)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Intro to Math Modeling (MA-UY 4444)

Formulation and analysis of mathematical models. Mathematical tools include dimensional analysis, optimization, simulation, probability, and elementary differential equations. Applications to biology, sports, economics, and other areas of science. The necessary mathematical and scientific background will be developed as needed. Students participate in formulating models as well as in analyzing them. | Prerequisites: C or better in MA-UY 2114 or MA-UY 2514 Note: Not open to students who have taken MA-UY 2393.

Mathematics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MA-UY 4444-000 (6804)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rangan, Aaditya


MA-UY 4444-000 (6805)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 4444-000 (6806)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 4444-000 (6807)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Smith, K.


MA-UY 4444-000 (6808)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 4444-000 (6809)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 4444-000 (18501)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rangan, Aaditya


MA-UY 4444-000 (18502)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


MA-UY 4444-000 (18503)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Data Analysis (MA-UY 2224)

An introductory course to probability and statistics. It affords the student some acquaintance with both probability and statistics in a single term. Topics in Probability include mathematical treatment of chance; combinatorics; binomial, Poisson, and Gaussian distributions; the Central Limit Theorem and the normal approximation. Topics in Statistics include sampling distributions of sample mean and sample variance; normal, t-, and Chi-square distributions; confidence intervals; testing of hypotheses; least squares regression model. Applications to scientific, industrial, and financial data are integrated into the course.NOTE: Not open to math majors or students who have taken or will take MA-UY 2054 or MA-UY 3014 or MA-UY 3514 or ECE-UY 2233. | Prerequisite: MA-UY 1124, MA-UY1424, or MA-UY 1132 or MATH-UH 1020 or MATH-UH 1021 or MATH-SHU 151

Mathematics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MA-UY 2224-000 (18487)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Qian, Jinghua


MA-UY 2224-000 (18488)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Malcom, Alekzander


MA-UY 2224-000 (18489)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Qian, Jinghua


MA-UY 2224-000 (18490)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Constantine, Adam


MA-UY 2224-000 (18491)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Malcom, Alekzander


MA-UY 2224-000 (18492)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Zhao, Fang


MA-UY 2224-000 (18493)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Zhao, Fang

WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS (ECE-UY 4183)

The required design project consists of two three-credit courses. The first course, EE DP1, is one of a number of specialty lab/project courses offered by the department in various subdisciplines such as electronics, machinery, robotics, imaging, communications, etc. (EE-UY 4113-4183, below). DP1 provides significant background laboratory experience in the student’s area of concentration. Students begin independent projects by finding an adviser and initiating the project work, and exercising oral presentation and written communication skills. | Prerequisite: ECE-UY 3054 and Senior Level

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 4183-000 (11572)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Knox, Michael


ECE-UY 4183-000 (11573)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Knox, Michael


ECE-UY 4183-000 (11574)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Knox, Michael

Introduction to Embedded Systems Design (ECE-UY 4144)

The course covers architecture and operation of embedded microprocessors; microprocessor assembly language programming; address decoding; interfacing to static and dynamic RAM; Serial I/O, Parallel I/O, analog I/O; interrupts and direct memory access; A/D and D/A converters; sensors; microcontrollers. Alternate-week laboratory. Objectives: to provide foundations of embedded systems design and analysis techniques; expose students to system level design; and teach integration of analog sensors with digital embedded microprocessors. | Prerequisites: CS-UY 2204 (C- or better) and EE-UY 2024 or EE-UY 2004 (C- or better). ABET competencies: a, c, d, e, g, j, k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 4144-000 (11565)


ECE-UY 4144-000 (11566)


ECE-UY 4144-000 (11567)


ECE-UY 4144-000 (11568)


ECE-UY 4144-000 (11569)


ECE-UY 4144-000 (11570)


ECE-UY 4144-000 (11571)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Campisi, Matthew

Signals and Systems (ECE-UY 3054)

This course centers on linear system theory for analog and digital systems; linearity, causality and time invariance; impulse response, convolution and stability; the Laplace, z- transforms and applications to Linear Time Invariant (LTI) systems; frequency response, analog and digital filter design. Topics also include Fourier Series, Fourier Transforms and the sampling theorem. Weekly computer-laboratory projects use analysis- and design-computer packages. The course establishes foundations of linear systems theory needed in future courses; use of math packages to solve problems and simulate systems; and analog and digital filter design. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: MA-UY 2012/2132, MA-UY 2034 or MA-UY 3044. | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: MATH-AD 116 and MATH-AD 121. | Prerequisites for Shanghai Students: MATH-SHU 124 and MATH-SHU 140. ABET competencies a, b, c, e, k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 3054-000 (11559)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Marzetta, Thomas


ECE-UY 3054-000 (11560)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Marzetta, Thomas

Fundamentals of Electronics I (ECE-UY 3114)

This course focuses on circuit models and amplifier frequency response, op-amps, difference amplifier, voltage-to-current converter, slew rate, full-power bandwidth, common-mode rejection, frequency response of closed-loop amplifier, gain-bandwidth product rule, diodes, limiters, clamps and semiconductor physics. Other topics include Bipolar Junction Transistors; small-signal models, cut-off, saturation and active regions; common emitter, common base and emitter-follower amplifier configurations; Field-Effect Transistors (MOSFET and JFET); biasing; small-signal models; common-source and common gate amplifiers; and integrated circuit MOS amplifiers. The alternate-week laboratory experiments on OP-AMP applications, BJT biasing, large signal operation and FET characteristics. The course studies design and analysis of operational amplifiers; small-signal bipolar junction transistor and field-effect transistor amplifiers; diode circuits; differential pair amplifiers and semiconductor device- physics fundamentals. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: EE-UY 2024 or EE-UY 2004 (C- or better) and PH-UY 2023 | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 214 and SCIEN-AD 110. | Prerequisites for Shanghai Students: EENG-SHU 251 (C- or better) and PHYS-SHU 93 or CCSC-SHU 51. ABET competencies a, b, c, e, k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 3114-000 (11561)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3114-000 (11562)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3114-000 (11563)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3114-000 (11564)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

FUND. OF ELECTRIC CIRCUITS (ECE-UY 2004)

Fundamentals of Circuits includes circuit modeling and analysis techniques for AC, DC and transient responses. Independent and dependent sources, resistors, inductors and capacitors are modeled. Analysis techniques include Kirchhoff’s current and voltage laws, current and voltage division. Thevenin and Norton theorems, nodal and mesh analysis, and superposition. Natural and forced responses for RLC circuits, sinusoidal steady-state response and complex voltage and current (phasors) are analyzed. Alternate-week laboratory. A minimum of C- is required for students majoring in EE. Objective: fundamental knowledge of DC and AC circuit analysis. | Co-requisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: (MA-UY 2034 or MA-UY 3044) and PH-UY 2023 | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: SCIEN-AD 110, MATH-AD 116, and MATH-AD 121. ABET competencies a, c, e, k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 2004-000 (11550)


ECE-UY 2004-000 (11551)


ECE-UY 2004-000 (11552)


ECE-UY 2004-000 (11553)


ECE-UY 2004-000 (11554)


ECE-UY 2004-000 (11555)


ECE-UY 2004-000 (11556)


ECE-UY 2004-000 (11557)


ECE-UY 2004-000 (11558)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Knox, Michael

Electromagnetic Waves (ECE-UY 3604)

Electromagnetic wave propagation in free space and in dielectrics, starting from a consideration of distributed inductance and capacitance on transmission lines. Electromagnetic plane waves are obtained as a special case. Reflection and transmission at discontinuities are discussed for pulsed sources, while impedance transformation and matching are presented for harmonic time dependence. Snell’s law and the reflection and transmission coefficients at dielectric interfaces are derived for obliquely propagation plane waves. Guiding of waves by dielectrics and by metal waveguides is demonstrated. Alternate-week laboratory. Objectives: Establish foundations of electromagnetic wave theory applicable to antennas, transmissions lines and materials; increase appreciation for properties of materials through physical experiments. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: EE-UY 2024 or EE-UY 2004 (C- or better). | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 214. | Prerequisites for Shanghai Students: EENG-SHU 251 (C- or better). ABET competencies: a, b, c, e, k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 3604-000 (11593)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3604-000 (11594)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3604-000 (11595)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3604-000 (11596)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Das, Nirod

Introduction to Machine Learning (ECE-UY 4563)

This course provides a hands on approach to machine learning and statistical pattern recognition. The course describes fundamental algorithms for linear regression, classification, model selection, support vector machines, neural networks, dimensionality reduction and clustering. The course includes computer exercises on real and synthetic data using current software tools. A number of applications are demonstrated on audio and image processing, text classification, and more. Students should have competency in computer programming. | Prerequisites: ECE-UY 2233, MA-UY 2233, MA-UY 3012, MA-UY 2224 or MA-UY 2222, MA-UY 3514

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 4563-000 (11607)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Fundamentals of Electronics II (ECE-UY 3124)

The course concentrates on differential and multistage amplifier, current mirrors, current sources, active loads; frequency response of MOSFET, JFET and BJT amplifiers: Bode plots; feedback amplifiers, gain-bandwidth rule and feedback effect on frequency response; Class A, B and AB output stages; op-amp analog integrated circuits; piecewise-linear transient response; determination of state of transistors; wave-shaping circuits; MOS and bipolar digital design: noise margin, fan-out, propagation delay; CMOS, TTL, ECL; and an alternate week laboratory. The course studies design and analysis of analog integrated circuits, frequency response of amplifiers, feedback amplifiers, TTL and CMOS digital integrated circuits. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Engineering Students: EE-UY 3114. | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: EENG-SHU 322. ABET competencies a, c, e, g, k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 3124-000 (11588)


ECE-UY 3124-000 (11589)


ECE-UY 3124-000 (11590)


ECE-UY 3124-000 (11591)


ECE-UY 3124-000 (11592)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Knox, Michael

Software Engineering (CS-UY 4513)

Focusing on software engineering, the course introduces techniques to specify, design, test and document medium and large software systems. Design techniques include information engineering, object orientation and complexity measures. Also covered are testing methods, such as path testing, exhaustive test models and construction of test data. An introduction to software tools and project management techniques is presented. Student projects involve team software development and tracking. | Prerequisites: Juniors or higher majoring in Computer Science, Computer Engineering or Electrical and Computer Engineering. Co-requisite: CS-UY 3224

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4513-000 (12271)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred


CS-UY 4513-000 (12272)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred


CS-UY 4513-000 (12273)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at ePoly
Instructed by Callahan, Eugene

Introduction to Parallel and Distributed Systems (CS-UY 3254)

This course offers a solid grounding in the basic issues and techniques of parallel and distributed computing. The material covers the spectrum from theoretical models of parallel and distributed systems to actual programming assignments. | Prerequisite: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and CS-UY 3224.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


CS-UY 3254-000 (15277)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Epstein, Jeff

Game Development Studio I (CS-UY 3233)

This class introduces the principles of 2D and 3D computer game design. Students learn about the range of game types and understand their conceptual building blocks. Students complete a structured sequence of assignments towards the design for a new game.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 3233-000 (12661)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Garcia, Diego

INTRO TO GAME PROGRAMMING (CS-UY 3113)

A programming intensive introduction to the creation of computer games. Using mostly two-dimensional sprite-based programming, we examine and experiment with animation, physics, artificial intelligence and audio. In addition, the course explores the mathematics of transformations (both 2D and 3D) and the ways they may be represented. | Prerequisite: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better).

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 3113-000 (12268)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Romero Cruz, Sebastian

DESIGN & ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS (CS-UY 2413)

This course covers fundamental principles of the design and analysis of algorithms. Topics include asymptotic notation, recurrences, randomized algorithms, sorting and selection, balanced binary search trees, augmented data structures, advanced data structures, algorithms on strings, graph algorithms, geometric algorithms, greedy algorithms, dynamic programming and NP completeness. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and MA-UY 2314; Corequisite: EX-UY 1 | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: (ENGR-UH 3510 or CS-UH 1050) (C- or better) and CS-UH 1002 | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 210 (C- or better) and CSCI-SHU 2314

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 2413-000 (12269)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hellerstein, Lisa


CS-UY 2413-000 (12270)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hellerstein, Lisa

COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE AND ORGANIZATION (CS-UY 2214)

This course covers a top-down approach to computer design. Topics: Computer architecture, introduction to assembly language programming and machine language set design. Computer organization, logical modules; CPU, memory and I/O units. Instruction cycles, the datapath and control unit. Hardwiring and microprogramming. The memory subsystem and timing. I/O interface, interrupts, programmed I/O and DMA. Introduction to pipelining and memory hierarchies. Fundamentals of computer networks. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Engineering Students: CS-UY 2204 (C- or better) for computer engineering majors; (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and MA-UY 2314 for computer science majors. Students who are neither computer engineering majors nor computer science majors must take either CS-UY 2204 (C- or better) OR (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and MA-UY 2314.| Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 121. | Prerequisites for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 2314 and CSCI-SHU 210 (C- or better) or CENG-SHU 201. ABET competencies: a, c, e.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 2214-000 (12257)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dey, Ratan


CS-UY 2214-000 (12258)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dey, Ratan


CS-UY 2214-000 (12259)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dey, Ratan


CS-UY 2214-000 (12260)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dey, Ratan


CS-UY 2214-000 (12261)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dey, Ratan


CS-UY 2214-000 (12262)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dey, Ratan


CS-UY 2214-000 (12263)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dey, Ratan


CS-UY 2214-000 (12264)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (