Category Archives: Fall 2023

Hyper Object (COART-UT 700)

The object, in reality, is anything but inert – it is hyperactive, changing in function and meaning as it moves in time and space. This studio-based course will give students the tools to use objects and materials specifically and deliberately in their work. The course will link intuitive making with research, allowing students to investigate their genuine and unique interests and develop their conceptual goals. During the course of the semester, students will be exposed to a wide range of non-traditional objects and materials that have been employed by artists throughout history. Readings and viewings will supplement the work done in the studio, with four themed sections serving as guided warm ups for a final project of the students’ own direction. These sections are titled: The Other, The Icon, The Minuscule, The Massive. Each student will make a work based on each theme, and group critiques will function as a laboratory in which students can test theories on display, context, form and legibility. This course is best suited to those with an interest in nontraditional art materials, collage, and found objects. Prior experience in sculpture or painting will be particularly helpful, however, it is not required.

Collaborative Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Social Media Strategy (MKTG-UB 45)

The course covers marketing, advertising, and communications strategies in the new media landscape where traditional media (e.g., television, print) and the online social media (i.e., Web 2.0; e.g., online social networks, user-generated content, blogs, forums) co-exist. Students are expected to have knowledge about the fundamentals of traditional advertising methods and strategies. With this background knowledge, the primary focus of the course is on understanding social media, developing social media marketing strategies, and tracking their effectiveness. This course does not look at more tactical aspects of advertising/communications such as creative, message management, and publicity.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MKTG-UB 45-000 (10761)
02/03/2021 – 03/17/2021 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Global Media Seminar: Media Activism and Democracy (ITAL-UA 9513)

The course on “Media, Activism & Democracy” aims at, first, introducing students to the complex and fascinating topic of civil society activism; second, at illustrating them the linkages between activism and media; third, at showing them the impact of civil society’s advocacy on contemporary political systems. In a nutshell, the course aims at providing students with a closer understanding of the civil society activism-media-politics conundrums at the national and global levels.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITAL-UA 9513-000 (2451)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Masrani, Rahoul

Introduction to Editing (FMTV-UT 1016)

This is a hands-on course designed to introduce the student to narrative and documentary editing techniques, and to the role of the editor in shaping the final form of film and video productions. Good editing is crucial to the success of every film and video. This class is recommended to students pursuing directing or producing who want a better understanding of how the post-production workflow functions, as well as to any student, from sophomore to senior, who would like to gain a clearer understanding of the role of the editor as an artist, a technician and a collaborator. To achieve this, the class will delve into the methods, objectives, and technical aspects of post-production. It will thoroughly explore two major editing programs (Avid Media Composer and Adobe Premiere Pro) used in today’s professional post-production environment, and acquaint the student with every stage of the editing workflow from capture to final output. Students will learn to approach these and other non-linear programs as variations on common themes rather than as completely new and foreign tools. In addition, the class will present examples of edited sequences from both narrative and documentary films for discussion, and have invited guests who will share their experiences in bringing films to completion. There will also be a course pack of assigned readings. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Storyboarding (FMTV-UT 1033)

Students will create a storyboard from an assigned literary property (i.e., fairy tales, folk tales, famous short stories, etc.) and research the chosen material visually in picture libraries, print and photo archives, museum/gallery libraries and online. From this basic research, the student will create and develop all the visual elements that lead to a final production storyboard; these elements include character model drawings; styling sketches for costumes and sets; experimental “inspirational” sketches exploring mood, color, and character relationships and experiments in animation and color test footage. Each week, students will “pitch,” (i.e. present material) as it is being developed. Through weekly critiques from the instructor and students, elements and shape of the production storyboard is refined to its final form. The approved storyboard at the end of the semester should be ready to go into production, and must reflect character ,attitude, design, entertainment, mood, expressions, feeling and type of action. It must use dialogue, music/sound effects, and tell the story in the best possible way. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19436)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moore, William


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19437)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baker, Zoya


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19438)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baker, Zoya


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19439)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Organizational Behavior (MG-UY 2104)

This course focuses on the study of human behavior in innovative organizations. Emphasis is on teams, leadership, communication theory and organizational culture and structure. The course includes analyses of organizational behavior problems through case studies and participation in experiential learning.

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 2104-000 (14068)


MG-UY 2104-000 (14069)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at ePoly
Instructed by Bowens, Carla

Journalistic Inquiry: The Written Word (JOUR-UA 101)

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


JOUR-UA 101-000 (8832)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


JOUR-UA 101-000 (23456)


JOUR-UA 101-000 (10147)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by De La Hoz Arias, Felipe


JOUR-UA 101-000 (9303)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Borak, Donna


JOUR-UA 101-000 (8735)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reed, Anika


JOUR-UA 101-000 (8677)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


JOUR-UA 101-000 (9796)


JOUR-UA 101-000 (20665)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Surico, John

History of Italian Cinema (ICINE-UT 1103)

The Italian Cinema is a good way to study the whole Italian history, society, ideology and behaviours. The students will have the opportunity to know such authors as Rossellini, De Sica, Fellini, Antonioni, Visconti, Pasolini, Bertolucci, who are well known in the US. The course will also focus on the difference between auteur films and genre films (comedy, roman-mythological, western, melodrama); it will stress the gender point of view, the problem of a national identity, the role of the film industry. Strong attention will be paid to the relationship between Italian film and literature, art history, television and other disciplines.

Int`l Pgms, Cinema Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ICINE-UT 1103-000 (4946)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Catanese, Rossella


ICINE-UT 1103-000 (20197)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Catanese, Rossella

Florentine Villas: An Interpretation Based on Historical and Social Factors (ARTH-UA 9308)

This course introduces to the many villas surrounding the city of Florence. It aims at illustrating their origins, their history from the Middle-Age to the twentieth century, as well as their economic and ideological factors in the relationship with the city of Florence. The course draws on many disciplines, such as architecture, history, economy, social history, history of art, and landscape art.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTH-UA 9308-000 (2680)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Edelstein, Bruce

Global Fashion Industry: Italy (PRACT-UG 9200)

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-FLORENCE. Global Fashion Industry: Italy will provide students with a deep understanding of the contemporary fashion industry in Italy, as well as of Italy’s position in the global fashion arena. The course will drive students through the entire lifecycle of the fashion business, from forecasting trends to retailing, through design, sourcing, product development and production. Particular attention will be dedicated to different marketing aspects of the process, such as: identity building, brand positioning, merchandising, buying, costing, communication. All levels of retail, from luxury to mass market will be covered. The course will end with an analysis of the new challenges, such as sourcing globalization, emerging markets, sustainability and growing significance of technology. A strong effort will be put into organizing site visits to studios, showrooms and factories, as well as meeting with professional players. Each session will be structured to give students an overview of a particular stage of the Industry, through a mix of lectures from the course leader and visiting professionals, studio and showroom visits, walking tours, reading assignments and practical projects. Conducted in English.

Practicum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Images (PHIL-UH 2416)

Images depict, words describe. A picture of the cat of the mat depicts the cat as being on the mat. The sentence ’the cat is on the mat’ describes the cat as being on the mat. Both represent the world as being in a certain state, but they do so in different ways. What is the difference in these ways of representing? What does it take for an image to depict? This course covers most major theories of depiction, including resemblance, experience, recognition, pretense, and structural theories. We then expand the scope of inquiry to include topics such as systems of depiction, analog vs. digital representation, maps, film, comics, maps, mental imagery, and relations to the cognitive science of vision.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PHIL-UH 2416-000 (5805)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rabin, Gabriel

The Meaning of Life (PHIL-UH 1110)

Is there a point or significance to life as a whole? That is the question about the “meaning of life.” Though this question is notoriously hard to make precise, in one form or another it has animated much literature and art, and also much philosophy. Some philosophers have provided disheartening answers: life is suffering, and then it ends; life is absurd and never gains any meaning. But other philosophers have provided more uplifting answers that support the quest for personal significance. Bot h kinds of answers deserve scrutiny. After reviewing various pessimistic and more optimistic approaches to the meaning of life, we will turn to the subject of death. We will all die eventually. We normally encounter the death of our family and friend s before we must deal with our own. These themes too are the subject of philosophical reflection. We finish the semester with a discussion of the connection between individual significance and the future of humanity. This class will integrate references to art and literature as well as to science where appropriate, but its main focus is on contributions by recent thinkers in the analytical tradition of philosophy.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


PHIL-UH 1110-000 (18561)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Paul, Sarah

Topics in Conversational Chinese (EAST-UA 207)

This is a 2-credit repeatable course designed for students who have completed Intermediate Chinese II or equivalent, and wish to get additional opportunities to further expand their vocabulary and grammatical knowledge with a focus on strengthening their conversational skills and/or get more chance to practice speaking outside of their regular Advanced Chinese I/II classes. Students will perform in various conversational tasks, such as presenting, discussing, debating, etc. and improve the description and narration skills that the advanced level learners are expected to have. Students will engage in conversation in a clearly participatory manner in order to communicate information on autobiographical topics, as well as topics of community, national, or international interest.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


EAST-UA 207-000 (9264)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hou, Xiaohong


EAST-UA 207-000 (9265)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


EAST-UA 207-000 (24496)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hou, Xiaohong

Topics in East Asian Studies (EAST-UA 302)

This course is designed for students whose levels of Japanese are EAST-UA 248 and EAST-UA 249. The overall goal of this course is to help students build reading speed, reading fluency, and vocabularies and expressions through experiencing the pleasure of reading in Japanese. The focus of the class will be individual reading activity and consultations with the instructor.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


EAST-UA 302-000 (19326)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Catherine


EAST-UA 302-000 (19327)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Intro Theory of Probability (STAT-UB 14)

Covers the basic concepts of probability. Topics include the axiomatic definition of probability; combinatorial theorems; conditional probability and independent events; random variables and probability distributions; expectation of functions of random variables; special discrete and continuous distributions, including the chi-square, t, F, and bivariate normal distributions; law of large numbers; central limit theorem; and moment generating functions. The theory of statistical estimation is introduced with a discussion on maximum likelihood estimation.

Statistics & Operations Research (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


STAT-UB 14-000 (20243)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tenenbein, Aaron

Management and Organizations (MGMT-UB 1)

In this course you will attain an understanding of the key factors that contribute to organizational success and the role that managers play in helping their organizations become more successful. The better that you understand these issues, the more effective you will be in your future careers. More specifically, the course will explore how organizational leaders develop winning strategies, and then design their organization in a way that aligns structures, social relationships, tasks, human resource practices, and people to achieve those strategies. In exploring these issues, you will identify the challenges that organizational leaders and managers face as they try to make good decisions in the face of a constantly evolving industry environment, competing goals and agendas, and an increasingly diverse and global workforce.

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19615)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Hee


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19616)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Hee


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19617)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Steiner, Jeff


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19618)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Steiner, Jeff


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19620)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kern, Molly


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19624)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Howard, Elizabeth


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19627)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Howard, Elizabeth

Designing For: (GAMES-GT 310)

“Designing for” classes focus on working with a real-world client or partner, preparing students for professional collaborations with institutions, publishers and media companies beyond the game industry who partner with game developers on playable experiences. Outside partners have included museums, non-profit organizations, non-digital publishers and digital media platforms. In each version of this class, students will interact directly with representatives from one outside partner and collaborate with other students on a single semester-long project tailored to the client’s goals, developing an initial idea from conceptualization through pitching and prototyping, based on criteria and feedback provided by the partner. Students will learn to follow a structured process for ideation, collaboration and prototyping, while taking care to understand the audience, content and goals of the partner organization’s industry and the context of play. The semester culminates in a final presentation of playable prototypes to the partner.

Game Design (Graduate)
2-4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


GAMES-GT 310-000 (25338)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by


GAMES-GT 310-000 (25353)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by Corbetta, Ramiro


GAMES-GT 310-000 (25349)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by Parker, Matthew

Human Development I (APSY-UE 20)

Introduction to research and theory of human development across the life span. Seminal theories & basic research of individual growth & development are analyzed & critiqued. Emphasis is on the range in human development with discussion of normative & non-normative development. Emphasis is also placed on the importance of understanding the influence of normative & non-normative contexts of development, including the impact of culture, heritage, socioeconomic level, personal health, & safety. Relations between home, school, & community and their impact on development are also explored via readings, lectures, discussions, & weekly observations in the field. Interrogation of implicit folk theories as a foundation for exploration of formal knowledge of human development.

Applied Psychology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


APSY-UE 20-000 (11334)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hogan, Frances


APSY-UE 20-000 (11789)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Copeland, Cynthia


APSY-UE 20-000 (11405)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Online
Instructed by Hogan, Frances


APSY-UE 20-000 (21980)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Online
Instructed by Strom, Carolyn

Photography through the Lens of Magnum (IDSEM-UG 2930)

Learn the history of some of the most widely known works of journalistic and documentary photography over the last seventy years through the lens of a globally preeminent photo collective, Magnum Agency. Photographers at this collective have created iconic documentary images and helped define the field of photojournalism as we know it today, setting an influential tone for style and content. Students will examine this in a variety of topics, including the documentation of war, social justice concerns, women’s issues, and sex work. Along the way, students study the business model of this agency to grasp how its differences, from other photographic enterprises, influence the work produced. We use this agency as a lens through which to address a recent history of photography, the trajectory of visual journalism, and the place of advocacy in documentary photography. We also ask critical questions of this visual documentation, assessing power imbalances, ethical complications, and more. Our studies take us through time and around the world via the medium of photography. Specific photographers we may explore include: Robert Capa, Susan Meiselas, Jonas Bendiksen, Nanna Heitmann, Bieke Depoorter, and Eli Reed. Readings include theory, journalistic accounts, history, and other critical literature. Naturally, we spend a lot of time looking at photos, and may have the opportunity to meet some of these photographers. Students visit NYC galleries, write academic papers, and produce a photo project.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IDSEM-UG 2930-000 (17099)
09/03/2024 – 10/22/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Walsh, Lauren

History of Cinematography (FMTV-UT 1206)

This course deals with the history of the art and science of cinematography. A working Director of Photography will relate a perspective that is unique and factual to a theoretical discussion, which is traditionally academic. Cinematography has a strong tradition of adapting its tools to enhance the storytelling experience. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES. “Non-majors must process a “Permission Notice for Non-Majors” form” to register for the course (subject to availability).

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1206-000 (19531)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carmine, Michael

Food and the City (FOOD-UE 1050)

Food is all around us. It influences who we are and how we related to our surroundings. This course explores food in the city from multiple points of view. Students observe and analyze various aspects of food in the city, from personal experiences to large social issues such as gentrification and food insecurity, and examine the cultural, social, and political aspects of food systems. Students acquire familiarity with basic ethnographic skills and methods such as interviews, observations, visual ethnography, and virtual ethnography Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Society & Social Sciences.

Food Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FOOD-UE 1050-000 (10588)
at Online
Instructed by Figueroa, Shayne

Performance and Technology (PERF-UT 304)

On blogs, Twitter, Facebook, Ello, Tumblr, email, SoundCloud, YouTube, and more, we are constantly performing using technology. Performance Studies has long been concerned with technology, but it is only recently concerned with questions brought to the fore by new technologies and new technological practices, particularly on the Internet. This survey course requires us to consider the relationship between Performance Studies as a discipline (one that incorporates performance theory, critical theory, feminist theory, queer theory, and other theoretical genres) with technology, particularly the Internet. Open to Non-Majors.

Performance Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Global Media Capstone (MCC-UE 1220)

Specifically for students in the Global Media Scholars program, this course is the required culminating experience taken in the senior year, alongside a travel component during the January term. Course topics reflect faculty research interests, offering students a chance to explore emerging issues in the field of media studies, and will be site-specific based on the country chosen for January travel.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1220-000 (14063)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mills, Mara

Social Impact: Advertising for Social Good (MCC-UE 1051)

With the COVID-19 pandemic and the rise of social movements like Black Lives Matter and #metoo, the field of social good advertising has rapidly expanded as brands seek social relevance, governments and nonprofits look to inform, and activists try to persuade. In this course, students will learn to plan and execute powerful social advertising campaigns, while thinking critically about the blurred lines between advertising and information, and branding and politics, in what Sarah Banet-Weiser calls “Shopping for Change.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1051-000 (14065)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Railla, Jean

Platforms and Society (MCC-UE 1039)

Platforms are instrumental in mediating a wide range of phenomena, including social interaction, economic transactions, resource access, information circulation, cultural experiences, and more. Their ubiquity in everyday life is documented in concepts of platformization and platform capitalism and an emerging discipline of platform studies. This course explores the metaphors, histories, logics, and materialities of platforms. Through lenses of media studies, political economy, and anthropology, students investigate the implications of platforms in contemporary life.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1039-000 (11429)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Serpe, Joaquin

Global Media Seminar: Britain and Europe (MCC-UE 9457)

With an emphasis on British and European news and journalism, this course explores globalization from a wide range of theoretical frameworks including political economy, cultural analysis, theories of representation, and critical race and postcolonial studies. It considers how technologies, diasporic and transnational communities, and international institutions impact global communications, and how these networks and organizations are challenging, re-imagining and re-shaping social, cultural and geographic boundaries via mediated discourse.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9457-000 (2753)at NYU London (Global)Instructed by

History of Computing (MCC-UE 1170)

This umbrella course focuses on specific time periods, technological developments and cultural contexts relevant to understanding the development of digital computing technology over the course of the 20th century and into the 21st. This course familiarizes students with the social forces and techno-cultural innovations that shaped the computing industry. Specific themes may include: personal computing; Cold War computing; computing and globalization; the quantified self; computational aesthetics; artificial intelligence and machine learning; computing and gender.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1170-000 (14061)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassein, Nabil

Digital Media: Theory and Practice (MCC-UE 1031)

This course offers students a foundational understanding of the technological building blocks that make up digital media & culture, & of the ways they come together to shape myriad facets of life. Students will acquire a working knowledge of the key concepts behind coding, & survey the contours of digital media architecture, familiarizing themselves with algorithms, databases, hardware, & similar key components. These technological frameworks will be examined as the basic grammar of digital media & related to theories of identity, privacy, policy, & other pertinent themes.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1031-000 (11419)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Santos, Leonard

Visual Culture/Science and Technology (MCC-UE 1411)

This course examines the imagery of science and technology, the role of visuality in the construction of scientific knowledge, artistic renditions of science, and the emergence of visual technologies in modern society. It looks at how visuality has been key to the exercise of power through such practices as cataloguing and identification; the designation of abnormality, disease, and pathologies; medical diagnosis; scientific experimentation; and the marketing of science and medicine. We will examine the development of the visual technologies in the emerging scientific practices of psychiatry and criminology; explore the sciences of eugenics, genetics, pharmacology, brain and body scans, and digital medical images of many kinds; the marketing of pharmaceuticals, and the emerging politics of scientific activism.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1411-000 (14031)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Almenara, Maria Paz

Middle East Media (MCC-UE 1341)

This course examines contemporary media in (primarily Arab parts of) the Middle East and media about the Middle East, and Islam within the U.S. it analyzes the role played by these media in representing and reproducing the perceived rift between Islam and the West. Readings and media examples focus on the politics of culture, religion, modernity, and national identity as they shape and intersect with contemporary geopolitical events, cultural formations, and media globalization.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1341-000 (14028)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gurleyik, Ece

Inquiry Seminar (MCC-UE 1200)

MCC Research Inquiry Seminars, taken early in the major, expose students to the department’s culture of scholarly inquiry. Course topics reflect faculty research interests, offering students a chance to explore emerging issues in the field of media studies.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13990)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Benson, Rodney


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13991)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fleetwood, Nicole


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13992)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gitelman, Lisa


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13993)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hegde, Radha


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13994)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Robles, Erica


MCC-UE 1200-000 (5470)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ross, Andrew · Tawil-Souri, Helga


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13995)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13996)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Huda


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13997)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Senior Honors in Media Culture/Communication (MCC-UE 1210)

Seminar for students who have been approved by the department to pursue honors in the major. Extended primary research in Communication Studies, focusing on the development and sharing of individual research projects. Students will enroll concurrently in two points of independent study under the director of a faculty honors sponsor, as outlined in departmental guidelines.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1210-000 (13998)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schull, Natasha

Ethics and Media (MCC-UE 1028)

Students who plan on pursuing careers in the media (professional and academic) will be faced with difficulty choices that carry with them potent ethical repercussions, choices that practical training does not properly equip them to approach in a critical and informed manner. The purpose of this course is therefore twofold: 1) to equip future media professional with sensitivity to moral values under challenge as well as the necessary skills in critical thinking and decision making for navigating their roles and responsibilities in relation to them; and 2) honing those same skills and sensitivities for consumers of media and citizens in media saturated societies.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1028-000 (20074)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cormier, Robert

Ind Study (MCC-UE 1000)

It should be noted that independent study requires a minimum of 45 hours of work per point. Independent study cannot be applied to the established professional education sequence in teaching curricula. Each departmental program has established its own maximum credit allowance for independent study. This information may be obtained from a student?s department. Prior to registering for independent study, each student should obtain an Independent Study Approval Form from the adviser.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
1-6 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1000-000 (13976)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schull, Natasha


MCC-UE 1000-000 (13977)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schull, Natasha

Youth in the Middle East (ACS-UH 2613X)

Roughly one third of the Middle East population today is between 15 and 29 years old – a demographic “bulge” which has brought Middle Eastern youths at the forefront of media and government concerns both at the regional and global scale. But from the figure of the young jihadist to that of the Arab spring revolutionary, dominant perceptions of these youths often fall into highly polarized archetypes. Moving the focus away from politics and religion, this course explores the everyday worlds of Middle Eastern youths and the complex interactions – with institutions, peers and family members – which characterize their daily lives. By analyzing multiple youth cultures divided along the lines of gender, ethnicity, religious affiliation, or social class, students will address the diversity of Middle Eastern youths and question the universality of age categories. A large space will also be devoted to the voices of Middle Eastern youths themselves, from Egyptian literature and Emirati cinema to Moroccan hip-hop. These cultural productions will allow students to look at the way Arab youths use globalized artistic genres to address regional issues and express their fears, hopes and desires.

Arab Crossroads Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Journalism Ideas & Practice (JOUR-UA 25)

This intensive, once-a-week course is designed for students with a serious interest in writing about movies for print and digital media. Students practice various forms of film journalism while developing a deeper understanding of the art form through screenings and close readings of works by Brooks Barnes, Pauline Kael, Peter Bogdanovich, Ellen Willis, James Baldwin and Francois Truffaut. Planned class trips include a major film festival and a tour of the Criterion Collection, a film company specializing in art-house cinema. In addition to discussing individual films and film movements, we will cover essential journalism skills, with guest speakers offering guidance on specific topics like reporting and interviewing techniques. Classwork will include writing exercises, presentations and workshops. By the end of the course, students will have raised their cinema I.Q. and written a variety of film articles that inform and engage.

Journalism (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Management & Organizations (BUSOR-UH 1003)

Why do some organizations succeed while others flounder? Whether it be as an employee within a traditional for-profit business, or within one of the wide spectrum of alternative career paths, all of us will ultimately be a part of organizations. This course will help illuminate the key processes and factors that determine why organizations function as they do, drawing upon the fields of management, strategy, sociology, and psychology in the process. Specific topics covered include: Corporate strategy and achieving competitive advantage, Organizational structure and design, Organizational and national culture, Leadership, Motivation and incentives, Groups dynamics, Power & politics within organizations, including a discussion of persuasion & influence and social networks, Judgment and decision-making.

Business & Organizational Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


BUSOR-UH 1003-000 (3759)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Tekeste, Milena · Kailas, Lakshmi


BUSOR-UH 1003-000 (4139)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Tekeste, Milena · Kailas, Lakshmi

Introduction to Creative Writing (LITCW-UH 1003)

This workshop introduces the basic elements of poetry, fiction, and personal narrative with in-class writing, take-home reading and writing assignments, and substantive discussions of craft. The course is structured as a workshop, which means that students receive feedback from their instructor and their fellow writers in a roundtable setting, and that they should be prepared to offer their classmates responses to their work.

Literature & Creative Writing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


LITCW-UH 1003-000 (3504)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Handal, Nathalie

Elementary Arabic 1 (ARABL-UH 1110)

This course is designed for learners with no prior knowledge of Arabic. Students who have studied Arabic before or who have prior knowledge of Arabic are required to take a placement test. This is a full semester (or equivalent session) course during which students first learn the Arabic alphabet, then move on to work on the sentence and paragraph levels. It is an interactive course designed to build the student’s abilities in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. At the end of the semester students should be able to carry on a short conversation; ask and answer questions; introduce themselves and others; provide simple biographical information; interact in simple daily life situations; ask for assistance; express likes and dislikes; read short texts; and gain a basic understanding of Arab culture. Types of tasks and assignments required for this course include daily homework assignments, periodic quizzes, brief presentations, short essay writing, and a final exam.

Arabic Language (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARABL-UH 1110-000 (3501)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Kittaneh, Khulood


ARABL-UH 1110-000 (3502)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by El Araby, Omima


ARABL-UH 1110-000 (3518)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by El Araby, Omima


ARABL-UH 1110-000 (3623)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Kittaneh, Khulood

Intro to Marketing (MKTG-UB 9001)

This course evaluates marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and a catalyst of business activity. It presents a comprehensive framework that includes a) researching and analyzing customers, company, competition, and the marketing environment, b) identifying and targeting attractive segments with strategic positioning, and c) making product, pricing, communication, and distribution decisions. Cases and examples are utilized to develop problem-solving abilities.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4953)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Thu
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Donvito, Raffaele


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4981)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (21443)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4834)
08/29/2024 – 12/04/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Magarino, Victor


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (3462)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Anton, Muriel


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (21026)
at NYU Tel Aviv (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (3380)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by West, Andrew

Economics of Media and Entertainment (ECON-UB 120)

The media and entertainment industries (including professional sports) share a series of peculiar features: essentially, they (a) produce an intangible output (e.g., a music recording), which can be distributed in a variety of forms and (b) do so based on an input which is extremely idiosyncratic: the creative output of a person or group of persons (e.g., a singer or a band). Finally, (c) recent technological innovation has changed the balance of power between the various players and led various industry segments to re-invent their business model. This course provides an introduction to the businesses of media and entertainment: value chain, key players, significant trends, etc. It takes a distinctive economics perspective to understanding how the forces of supply and demand have changed the business model of various industry segments.

Economics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Entertainment Law (MULT-UB 48)

This two-credit course is about key legal aspects of the entertainment industry. Entertainment law is not a separate legal discipline. There is really no such thing as entertainment law. Instead, it lies at the intersection of several areas of law and applies those disciplines to the diverse entertainment industry of products and services. The course will involve a foundational coverage of the following areas: contract, advertising, protection of ideas by contract, copyright and trademark (including the concepts of parody and fair use), rights of publicity and privacy, defamation, and artist representation. This course should prepare you to analyze a wide variety of entertainment law issues at a general level. Entertainment law does not tend towards an orderly system because it lacks overriding organizational principles that would tie together its myriad facets. As such, this course will appear to lack a logical outline in its progression and instead, will examine this corner of law in separate pieces, which will cover doctrine, analytical problem-solving, practical skills related to law (e.g., analytical writing, reasoning skills, argument structure, etc.), and the particular contexts in which issues arise in the entertainment industry. Dealing with more narrow topics, such as constitutional concerns or union representation, or obtaining a much deeper knowledge of specific topics discussed in class, will require additional, specialized study. This class also helps students further develop their reasoning, communication, and listening skills.

Multidisciplinary (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MULT-UB 48-000 (10639)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MULT-UB 48-000 (10725)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Documenting the African City (ANTH-UA 9087)

This interdisciplinary course combines ethnographic readings, representations, and interpretations of city and urban cultures with a video production component in which students create short documentaries on the city of Accra. The interpretative classes will run concurrently with production management, sights and sound, and post-production workshops. The course will have three objectives: (1) teach students the documentary tradition from Flaherty to Rouch; (2) use critical Cinema theory to define a document with a camera; and (3) create a short documentary film.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ANTH-UA 9087-000 (2318)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Accra (Global)
Instructed by Suberu, Yahaya

Religions of India (RELST-UA 337)

Investigates religious developments in India within their historical context. Familiarizes students with the religions of the subcontinent—including Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Islam, Sikhism, Christianity, and Judaism—through secondary source readings and English translations of primary source materials. Rather than survey religious traditions as closed systems divorced from time or place, students grapple with the central theories and historiographical challenges pertaining to religion in India, especially those that impact our ability to understand everyday religious experience, both past and present.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RELST-UA 337-000 (23005)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Introduction to Food History (FOOD-UE 1210)

Examination of food from historical and transnational perspectives. Topics considered are: the origins of agriculture, the phenomenon of famine, the co-evolution of world cuisines and civilizations, the international exchange and spread of foods and food technologies following 1492, issues of hunger and thirst, and the effects of the emergent global economy on food production, diets, and health. Liberal Arts Core/MAP Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Cultures and Contexts

Food Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Science in Our Lives: Biodiversity and the Earth (SCIED-UE 215)

In this course students explore the Earth as an integrated, dynamic system involving the material world and diversity of living things which we call biodiversity. Specifically, this course explores the flow of energy and materials through the Earth System and potential human impact on this system. Through the practices of science students learn to use data to produce scientific knowledge for themselves and the public while exploring the question of what it means to engage in citizen science.

Science Education (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


SCIED-UE 215-000 (11814)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Milne, Catherine

Ethnicity & The Media (SCA-UA 232)

Examines media images in relation to the making of ethnic and racial identities in the United States. Surveys some of the theoretical approaches to the study of images, paying particular attention to the intersection of history and ideologies or representation. Looks into the nature and politics of stereotypes; inquires into their reproduction through discourses, representations, and practices; and then moves to a comparative examination of media images in relation to the making of African American, Latino, Asian, and Native American images in the media, looking specifically at changes and continuities in the representation of these four minority groups in the media.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


SCA-UA 232-000 (20866)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Davila, Arlene

Counting and Chance (MTHED-UE 1051)

This course is designed to be accessible and approachable for people who will be future teachers of elementary school mathematics. It is also intended for people who want to broaden their knowledge in mathematics and experience it as a relevant, challenging, and enjoyable field. It is not intended for math majors. It will be taught as a problem-based course, that allows for students to explore and develop new ideas, and apply them to real life situations. The course builds on intuitive understandings of fundamental ideas of counting and chance and moves gradually to more formal knowledge of combinatorics and probability concepts and techniques. The learning experiences offered throughout the course are designed to facilitate student interactions and active role in the learning process. Liberal Arts Core/MAP Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Quantitative Reasoning

Mathematics Education (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MTHED-UE 1051-000 (9403)

Urban Ethnography (SCA-UA 9868)

Through a focus on contemporary Paris, this course aims to explore the insights offered by anthropological approaches to cities and urban life. We will consider the relationships between urban spatial organization and an array of social, economic and political phenomena; the relevance of consumption and display to the shaping of urban identities; and the shifting dynamics of social groups and boundaries within the urban context. This will be accomplished through course readings and also through training in urban ethnographic research methods, supporting each student’s own systematic observation over the semester of one locus of everyday Parisian life. The final project for the course will be a piece of ethnographic analysis based on this field research.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


SCA-UA 9868-000 (18401)
09/01/2023 – 12/06/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by Epstein, Beth

Living a Good Life: Greek and Jewish Perspectives (RELST-UA 422)

Key questions: Does living well require acquiring knowledge and wisdom? What is the place of moral responsibility in the good life? Is the good life a happy life, or does it require sacrificing happiness? Does religion lead to living well or does it hinder it? What is friendship and how does it contribute to the good life? Study of primary texts by Plato, Aristotle, Seneca, Avot, Maimonides, Spinoza, and Hermann Cohen.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RELST-UA 422-000 (20451)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gottlieb, Michah

Engaging Early Christian Theology (RELST-UA 840)

What does it mean to say that Jesus Christ was both human and divine? How can the Christian divinity be one yet three? How are the sacraments such as baptism effective? Do we have freewill? These were some of the pressing questions the Church Fathers addressed in the early centuries of Christian history and their answers contributed to the Christian theological tradition for centuries to come. In this course we will examine some of the classic works of early Christian theology. Despite the often highly rhetorical and polemical character of their writings the Church Fathers nevertheless developed an intellectually rigorous field of knowledge, one that has had a significant intellectual historical as well as socio-political impact in the history of the Church. This is not a theological course but rather an introduction to some of the key texts in a historically significant mode of theological inquiry.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RELST-UA 840-000 (19704)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Becker, Adam

Quantified Self (CCOL-UH 1059Q)

Self-tracking. Biohacking. Personal informatics. Quantified self. The contemporary “quantified self” movement makes claims of “self-knowledge through numbers” and improving health and human welfare. There are clearly other elements to self-tracking culture that deserve critical investigation. What does the self become through the lens of data? What is the dark side of data that can be used against us, and without regard for social justice and equality? This multidisciplinary course takes both a theoretical and a practical look at the pressing issue of data aggregation about human beings. It looks to the past for historical forms of self-quantification and to the future of a rapidly expanding globalized landscape of app tracking and wearable technologies. With the question of human data in mind, the course examines the unsure futures of humanity in a variety of domains: medicine and aging, education, the arts, marketing, and the Internet of Things. Students will situate themselves critically within this increasingly dense data landscape by creating data about themselves that can be analyzed and interpreted using a variety of data visualization and storytelling frameworks.

Core: Colloquium (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


CCOL-UH 1059Q-000 (22917)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Wrisley, David

Dancing in the Here and Now: Making Dances, Knowing Bodies (ARTS-UG 1221)

Both dancing and everyday movement offer continual opportunities for embodied experience. Those who regularly dance or engage in movement practices such as yoga, jogging, cycling, and walking typically develop an appetite, even a need, for moving and the breadth of experience it brings. Whether you already feel this appetite or want to explore embodied experience for the first time, this Arts Workshop offers the opportunity for deep investigation of movement, focusing on active and contemplative exploration of bodies in space and time. We will be guided by several research strands linked to the existence and power of embodiment, noting experimental choreographer Susan Rethorst’s term, “the body’s mind”: ways of knowing (individually, culturally) through our bodies. Through many movement options, including dancing and somatic practices, walking and other everyday actions, and personal/cultural/political movement histories, we will encounter or create relationships between what we do and who we are. In the studio and elsewhere, we will consider how our lives as movers, and our sense of ourselves as embodied, bring us into contact with others—walkers, dancers, friends and family—and with our spaces, places, and sociocultural worlds. In this course (open to anyone with/without previous training), our research-in-action will be supported by interdisciplinary scholarship engaged with dance, embodiment, space, everyday culture, phenomenology, environmental studies, and life writing. Readings may include works by Thomas DeFrantz, Anna Halprin, Victoria Hunter, Einav Katan, Marcel Mauss, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Andrea Olsen, Steve Paxton, Georges Perec, Yvonne Rainer, Susan Rethorst, Kathleen Stewart, and Yi-Fu Tuan.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ARTS-UG 1221-000 (12594)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Satin, Leslie

Conserving Our Global Heritage through Science (CCOL-UH 1006)

What is “global heritage”? Is it simply our collective legacy as human societies – how we want to be remembered by future generations – or must we confront more difficult questions about identity, the ownership of culture, and conflicts between local and global stewardship of the cultural treasures and historical evidence? With time, negligence, and even military conflict working to erase the past, we must ask: Can a better understanding of our shared heritage assist us in addressing cultural differences in the present day? And how can science both help us understand the historic record and work to preserve it? This class examines ways in which scientific methods can help define “global heritage” and protect it for future generations. Students explore the history and the science behind the creation of paintings, frescoes, parchments, sculptures, ancient mummies, historical buildings, musical instruments, and other artifacts. They will also examine the methods used to differentiate between an authentic object and a fake and ask how some objects come to be valued more than others: distinctions that can lead, and have led, to cultural conflict in recent years.

Core: Colloquium (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


CCOL-UH 1006-000 (17210)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Arneodo, Francesco · Parthesius, Robert

Cultural Appropriation (CCEA-UH 1069)

Virtually unknown outside of academic discourse until very recently, the term cultural appropriation has become a commonplace in social and popular media, as activists and public intellectuals have highlighted what they see as problematic uses (or abuses) of cultural symbols, artifacts, or expressive modes connected to marginalized groups. But what exactly is cultural appropriation, and under what circumstances can it be said to constitute a form of exploitation or violence? This course approaches these questions both philosophically and empirically, asking, on the one hand: What is culture, and how can it be “owned” or “stolen”? and on the other: How have practices of adopting or using culture been implicated in processes of social subjugation or marginalization? Course readings are drawn from a range of disciplines across the humanities and social sciences, including cultural anthropology, art theory, music studies, and philosophy. By engaging with a rich corpus of ideas through in-class discussions, oral presentations, and written reflections, students will develop critical perspectives on cultural appropriation as well as the broader concepts of culture, race, and ethnicity.

Core: Cultural Exploration & Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


CCEA-UH 1069-000 (16833)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Eisenberg, Andrew Jarad

Composing Music with Max (OART-UT 1097)

The foundations of Max, a powerful visual programming language for music and multimedia, will be covered in this course. We will examine how computers can be utilized to create situations for music creation, performance, and collaborative improvisation as well as applied to building interactive, generative music. In addition to learning Max’s fundamental building blocks, we will also use fundamental music theory as a tool to better understand music making. We will create programs that examine rhythm, melodies, chords, scales, and recognize other qualities of music like timbre, texture, and dynamics while taking into consideration the principles of harmony, melody, and rhythm defined in basic music theory. The final will require you to develop a collaborative piece of interactive computer music, a collaborative performance environment, or another final project that has been discussed and agreed upon together. This class does not require any prerequisite programming skills or prior music theory knowledge.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 3 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


OART-UT 1097-000 (5611)
05/20/2024 – 06/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aguilar, Gustavo

City Photography and Architecture: Discovering Urban Treasures (IPHTI-UT 1210)

City, territory and architecture have been, from the beginning of photography, privileged objects for its practice. Photography has become a tool to strengthen the understanding of architecture, to highlight aesthetic and design ideas and to critically interpret the space. This class focuses on architectural photography and the photography of urban space, both in relation to their historical roots and contemporary practice. Florence offers a perfect environment to develop one’s artistic talent while learning the art of photography and discovering the secrets of one of the most fascinating cities in the world. Assignments are designed to help explore options for technical control as well as visual experimentation and individual style. Keeping in mind the inseparability of photographic technique and expression, students are expected to articulate their particular choices in relation to the overall conceptual approach of the projects. Critiques of assignments are important to the progress of each individual in the class, to help verbalize visual concepts, and to learn to see actively. The final exam consists of the presentation of a portfolio of photographs and an artist’s statement. Students are expected to work on their projects to develop an aesthetic and coherent photographic language and a personal approach to the photographic medium in a different environment. An emphasis is also placed on refining craft in relation to ideas, and to research on an individual basis, since it is crucial in developing an artistic practice. The course includes lectures, shooting sessions and field trips, discussions and critiques of the photographs. Each student must have a camera with manually adjustable aperture and shutter speed.

Int`l Pgms, Photography (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IPHTI-UT 1210-000 (4947)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Capodacqua, Alessandra

Introduction to Mechanical Engineering (ME-UY 1012)

This course introduces students to the range of mechanical engineering and emphasizes the basic principles and devices for storing and using energy, directing motion and satisfying needs. Case studies look at design issues and related ethical and professional practice issues. Emphasis is on a mindset of exploration. Engineering standards and standard parts. Teams work on and present two design challenges. | Prerequisite: Only first-year students are permitted to enroll in this course.

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 1012-000 (12688)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Wilson-Small, Nialah

Re-decentralizing the Internet (ITPG-GT 3032)

Decentralization has become a buzzword in the technology space, and there is much more to decentralized technology than NFTs and cryptocurrency. In this course, we will examine the fundamental concepts of the existing internet infrastructure, work to define what decentralization means, learn about the “why” of decentralization, survey the landscape of decentralized, distributed, and p2p protocols, and develop decentralized applications. We learn about will examine the implementation of decentralized technology and throughout the course, we will look at different use cases of decentralization such as evading censorship, protecting privacy, and creating resilient applications. We will also consider ethical questions about the decentralization movement—how will it grow, who benefits from decentralization, and whether a decentralized internet is even a good solution at all. We will examine the underlying technologies that enable decentralization, as well as looking at the current implementations of decentralized protocols and apps built on top of decentralized protocols. Finally, we will touch on adjacent topics such as local networks, mesh networking, and p2p networks. While this course will cover a breadth of decentralized and self-hosted applications, we will steer away from decentralized financing and NFTs and instead focus on decentralized information sharing. The goal of the class is to challenge students to think critically about the future of the decentralized web and develop applications that leverage these technologies. Students with or without a background in networking are both highly encouraged to enroll.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ITPG-GT 3032-000 (21891)09/08/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by

Shared Minds (ITPG-GT 3033)

“What capabilities does computational media have for depicting and conveying the experience of our minds? In this course we will start out using 3D graphics to depict the conventional physical reality that appears before us. Then we will turn inward to reflect the multidimensional reality of our minds, using artificial neural networks. Finally we return to embodied interfaces connected with cloud networking and databases to share with other people. The class will operate at a conceptual level, inviting students’ empirical psychological and philosophical investigations of the nature of their experience and how to convey it with art and story. It will ask students to look critically at existing computational media’s tendencies to bore, divide or inflame its users. But this is also very much a coding class where students will prototype their own ideas for new media first with 3D graphics using the threejs library, and then with machine learning models like Stable Diffusion using Huggingface APIs or Colab notebooks and finally with networking and databases using Firebase or P5 Live Media. Students can substitute other coding tools but game engines will not work for this class. The coding is in javascript, with a possible touch of python, and is a natural sequel to Introduction to Computational Media.” Prerequisite: ICM / ICM: Media (ITPG-GT 2233 / ITPG-GT 2048)

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3033-000 (15739)
09/04/2024 – 12/04/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by O’Sullivan, Daniel

Fabricating Mechanical Automatons (Batteries Not Included) (ITPG-GT 3034)

How do we make things move, produce sounds, or maybe even emit light without batteries? Through this course, each student will design their own purely mechanical automaton. We will learn how to use simple materials and tools to hand prototype mechanisms in their early stages. CAD software will be used to refine the designs and then a series of traditional and digital fabrication tools (various wood shop tools, laser cutter, CNC, 3D printers, etc.) will be used to produce the final pieces. We will learn how to work iteratively in the shop through weekly exercises, and a midterm and final project.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ITPG-GT 3034-000 (21893)
09/07/2023 – 12/14/2023 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Multisensory Design (ITPG-GT 3027)

Our users have senses that they use to perceive information in different ways. Some perceive best through sight, some through hearing, others through touch. Designers often prioritize visual information, excluding those who benefit from other sensory modalities. In this class, we’ll take a multisensory approach to design that makes interfaces more accessible to disabled and nondisabled users. Students will learn how to design for the senses (think tactile controls combined with atmospheric sounds and olfactory or taste experiences), while gaining an understanding of the assumptions we make about our users’ sensory preferences. Students should come with prior experience with physical computing and fabrication techniques and can expect to learn technical processes for the user research, usability testing, and iterative design of multisensory interfaces. Over the course of 14 weeks, students will design an interface for the 5 senses (sight, hearing, touch, taste, smell), culminating in one final project that includes at least 3 sensory modalities.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3027-000 (15736)
09/05/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Race, Lauren

Game Design & the Psychology of Choice (ITPG-GT 3028)

“As game and interaction designers we create systems and choices that can either prey upon our psychological foibles or help us avoid decision pitfalls. It is our responsibility to understand how we decide, to consider the ethics of the systems we create and to practice designing systems in a purposeful manner. Game Design & The Psychology of Choice will provide interaction and game designers with an understanding of the factors that influence behavior and decision-making by looking at the intertwining of cognitive psychology and economics through the development of behavioral economics. These disciplines study behavior on the individual and group level, often revealing some of the why behind the rules of thumb and folk wisdom that game designers come to intuitively. But understanding the why—why we fall into decision traps; why certain tradeoffs tax our brain more than others; why we are overconfident about our abilities; why certain decisions make us uncomfortable—allows us to more purposefully apply our design craft, both in and out of games. Finally, as a class, we will take what we learn about how we think and create series of game experiences based around key cognitive science concepts. Assignments may include: •Mod a cognitive science experiment into a game or experience •Analyze and present a game through the lens of cognitive science and behavioral economics •Create game or experience based around a particular insight from cognitive science or behavioral economics”

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3028-000 (15737)
09/04/2024 – 12/04/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Parker, Melissa

BioDesigning the Future of Food (ITPG-GT 3030)

For centuries, food production practices such as permaculture fostered ecosystems intended to be sustainable and self-sufficient, while producing nutrient-dense food. Modern farming has introduced harmful monoculture practices proven to cause collateral destruction of biodiversity and seasonal harvesting, distancing us from our food ecosystems. The future of food can be regenerative or continue to contribute to massive health and environmental issues. How can we challenge ourselves to regain connection to our food system? How might we use innovation, personal prowess, design, and biotechnology to reimagine healthier ecosystems? This course examines the historical context of the food ecosystems and encourages students to identify with these systems that we (in urban settings) are disconnected with. Students will build a project around exploring innovative approaches to the future of food and our relationships with it. These projects will incorporate design, technology, science, and research elements.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3030-000 (15738)
09/06/2024 – 12/11/2024 Fri
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Huggins, Nikita

Outside The Box: Site-Specific Immersive Explorations (ITPG-GT 3029)

This course introduces students to modalities for creating site-specific and immersive art and performance. Assignments will examine the work of artists who challenge the limitations of the physical, psychological and transactional spaces that have come to define conventional production models. Students will regularly receive prompts from which collaborative work will be workshopped, generated and presented. The sites and practices explored will de-center script/text as spine, institutional space as gathering place, linear storytelling as narrative, and separation between audience and artist as social contract. Through group performance projects and presentations, students will investigate how Site evokes Narrative and Event differently in brick & mortar, virtual, historic, liminal, dead, found, contested, democratized and community spaces. Our work will unpack the challenges and opportunities presented when we relinquish creative control of such unfixed elements as serendipity, impermanence, improvisation, audience agency, public space, weather, and pandemic.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ITPG-GT 3029-000 (21888)
09/11/2023 – 12/11/2023 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rovegno, Mia

Seeing Machines (ITPG-GT 3031)

A programming course where we’ll explore various techniques and solutions for tracking and sensing people or objects in space. Students will get familiar with the terminology and algorithms behind many sensing topics such as computer vision, depth cameras, positional tracking, and coordinate mapping. As these subjects are explored, we will also dig into communication, and how this information can be transmitted from one tool to another, for example using OSC, Spout/Syphon, MIDI, DMX/ArtNet. The goal being to use the right tool for the job and not limit ourselves to a particular piece of software.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ITPG-GT 3031-000 (21890)
09/05/2023 – 12/12/2023 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Zananiri, Elie

On Becoming: Finding Your Artist Voice (ITPG-GT 3023)

On Becoming is a two-part professional development course. Finding Your Artist Voice (part one) filters your fears and apprehensions so you can declare your creative process and practice courageously. The seven-week system will help you proclaim your artistic identity, theoretical underpinnings, and trajectory with clarity, precision, and commanding written language. Students will build personalized masterplans and workflows to facilitate measurable professional growth while learning to catalog and archive their work. Students will develop a working artist biography, artist statement, and fully documented work samples. For the final project, students will be supported in selecting and submitting a post-graduate fellowship, residency, grant, or open call!

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3023-000 (15732)
09/06/2024 – 10/18/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Williams, Tanika

Alter Egos: Assuming New Identities Through Costume and Performance (ITPG-GT 3024)

Throughout history, musicians have channeled their creativity into outrageous fashion statements and invented personas: think MF DOOM, Sun Ra, Ghostface Killah, Daft Punk, Leikeli47 and Rammellzee. By embracing their alter egos in extreme and outlandish ways, artists have found their authentic creative voices. This course will introduce participants to the art of masquerade using their resourcefulness to create costumes from found materials, and performance as an exploration in creative expression using new media and technology. Students will be introduced to ideas surrounding abstract storytelling, experimental audio video production, and A/V performance using a combination of technical and hands-on approaches. This course requires CL: Hypercinema or equivalent experience. Prerequisite: CL: Hypercinema (ITPG-GT 2004)

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3024-000 (15733)
09/09/2024 – 12/09/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Santana, Ali

Multisensory Storytelling in Virtual Reality and Original Flavor Reality (ITPG-GT 3026)

“In this course, we will explore how to create narratives that leverage our lesser used senses like touch, taste and smell as well as lesser-known ones like space, time, balance and scale. We will dig into the history of experiential storytelling, starting from immersive theater and Smell-O-vision to cutting-edge haptics and mind-bending illusions of proprioception. To help center this back in practical applications, we will also explore how this evolving art is commonly used in exhibition design, experiential marketing and brick and mortar retail. The class will be a healthy mixture of game theory as well as experienced based learning (meaning there will be a couple field trips and multisensory VR projects to explore). A basic knowledge of game engines is ideal but not mandatory because we will be using predesigned templates in Unreal engine to be experienced and manipulated in real-time through virtual reality hardware.”

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3026-000 (15735)
09/05/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Porter, Winslow

Hedonomic VR Design: Principles & Practices (ITPG-GT 3025)

To be a VR creator, it’s not enough to learn the hard skills—it’s also our responsibility to prime ourselves for the human impact of our work. As a means to design VR that is both enjoyable and accountable, this class proposes we borrow design principles from Hedonomics, a branch of ergonomic science that facilitates pleasurable human-technology interaction. Through the Hedonomic Pyramid, we’re able to section our thinking off into regions (Safety, Function, Usability, Pleasure and Individuation) and map out industry-tested VR design guidance for each. The result is a hierarchical checklist of proven principles, specifications and practices—that promote a culture of inclusive and holistic design—built to serve as a quickstart guide to designing accountable VR interfaces and systems. This class, divided into units that represent each level of the Hedonomic pyramid, will unpack both technical and conceptual strategies for creating VR, from visual interface fidelity to avoiding locomotion cybersickness to designing safer social VR spaces.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3025-000 (15734)
09/05/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Cortese, Michelle

Streaming Against the Current (ITPG-GT 3022)

Live streaming is so seamlessly embedded into our online experience. We lay in bed, on our phones watching hearts flicker across the screen as the person we’re watching greets all of the competing messages in the chat, asking for birthday shout outs and follow-backs. While the ability to live stream feels more accessible than ever, it feels very tied to corporate structures, branding and self promotion. How can we push the concept of a live stream in a new direction and rethink what a live stream can be?

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ITPG-GT 3022-000 (21881)
09/08/2023 – 10/20/2023 Fri
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Soto, Amalia

MoCap for the Archive (ITPG-GT 3021)

“How can motion capture (MoCap) be used to archive, preserve, and share intangible heritage forms, such as performing arts, rituals, and other social practices and traditions? This course approaches motion capture through the lens of ethnography — drawing on techniques of observation, participation, and qualitative design research. This class will offer an overview of different motion capture technologies, such as 2D-3D pose estimation and depth mapping, with a practical focus on learning the OptiTrack system at ITP. We will start by covering the basics of OptiTrack and build up to other workflows and techniques used across animation, game design, and virtual production (e.g. OptiTrack to Unreal Engine or Unity).” Prerequisite: CL: Hypercinema (ITPG-GT 2004)

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3021-000 (15730)
10/24/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mehta, Ami

Canvas for Coders (ITPG-GT 3016)

Your web browser is a digital canvas for 21st-century artists. While being one of the most common mediums today, web space has infinite possibilities for new aesthetics. This course covers Three.js fundamentals, providing students with the skills and insights to create arts in web 3D. This course requires ICM or equivalent coding experience. Prerequisite: ICM / ICM: Media (ITPG-GT 2233 / ITPG-GT 2048)

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3016-000 (15726)
09/05/2024 – 10/17/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Park, Joo Hyun

Listening Machines (Digital Synesthesia: Seeing Sound) (ITPG-GT 3018)

“In even the tiniest fragment of digital sound (especially music) there lies a multiplicity of information hidden within. Using audio analysis techniques, this data can be distilled into a vast array of characteristics that describe various different features of the sound. These include things like the loudness, pitch, or the spectrum of frequencies being detected. Through additional analysis, these data points can be used to detect higher level musical features representing things like tempo, rhythm, or melody. Furthermore, the sound and music information can be used to train deep learning models that can then make accurate predictions (eg. what a sound is, what genre a song is, what mood a song evokes). Or, we can use machine learning for generative purposes using the data to guide the creation of new sounds, synthesizers, or even entire songs. The preceding are activities that fall under the areas of digital signal processing, music information retrieval, and machine learning, a trifecta that form the technological foundation for the research area known as machine listening. With a focus on ambient sound and music, this class will explore how tools and techniques from the field of machine listening can become a powerful aspect, or even strategy, in the realm of creative applications. This course will not cover, nor will it assume knowledge of, the underlying technical aspects of machine listening, or music theory. Resources for further pursuance of each week’s topics will be provided but will not be required for class. Instead, our aim will be on understanding what these techniques are doing, when and where to apply them, and how to access and apply them effectively through powerful software libraries. This high level approach will allow us to keep our efforts directed towards creative experimentation without becoming bogged down. Ultimately, students will synthesize the semester’s work into their own creative application involving sound. Here are some examples of the types of projects this class could support: An app that visualizes audio through graphics or DMX/LED lighting to create synesthesia-like effects An automatic system for transcribing music based off of a recording or real-time input A music remixing system where tracks are automatically selected, spliced, processed, and rearranged A musical instrument that adapts to its player based on real-time analysis of the played sound A synthesizer that uses machine learning to optimize and tune its parameters A music education software that visualizes rhythm and melody for the purpose of instruction A rhythm game that derives its gameplay from music information (Guitar Hero, Rock Band, DDR) A tool that analyzes the health of a machine based on its sound through a contact microphone The course will be taught in JavaScript with ICM-level programming experience recommended. No formal training in sound or music is expected or required. This course will be a great fit for any student that is interested in sound and wants to explore it more deeply. Please feel free to reach out to me via email with any questions about the class.”

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ITPG-GT 3018-000 (21877)
09/11/2023 – 10/23/2023 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

The Medium of Memory (ITPG-GT 3019)

“What is the medium of memory? In this 14-week studio class, we will dig into this question through creative storytelling. Starting from a lens-based practice, this class will introduce traditional and bleeding-edge documentary methods to inform our own varied approaches to activating archival material. Through weekly “readings” (articles, podcasts, films), written reflections, and creative assignments, we’ll explore: • how technology has impacted our relationship to memory; • how visual interventions can can surface alternative narratives; • how to make under- and unrecorded histories visible, and call into question the power dynamics embedded in “official” records; and • how we might recast objects and sites of memory-keeping, like heirlooms, journals, and memorials, as a mode of engaged preservation. Mid-way through the course, students will identify either personal or collective histories to open up to their own individual creative reexamination, memorialization, or transformation––each producing a final project with the technology and approaches of their choosing that serves to answer the question we started with––what is the medium of memory?”

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3019-000 (15728)
10/23/2024 – 12/04/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Salvo, Simone

User Experience Design (ITPG-GT 3017)

“This 2-pt course aims to provide students with the critical thinking and practical skills for creating effective and compelling interfaces. We will dissect what a compelling user experience is, apply proven research techniques for approaching and defining UX problems and apply design frameworks including mapping and testing techniques. The class format will include lectures, discussion, in-class design exercises and a final project. Week 1: what is UX Week 2: inclusive research methods Week 3: frameworks for defining a problem Week 4: understanding behavior and motivation Week 5: mapping flow and visual strategies, final project intro Week 6: testing methods and future UX Week 7: final projects”

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3017-000 (15727)
10/25/2024 – 12/11/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Su, Peiqi

Writing Good Code (ITPG-GT 3014)

As software projects become more complex, it becomes increasingly important to keep the code organized and manageable; otherwise, it becomes extremely difficult to implement new ideas, and the project is much more likely to be prone to mysterious and frustrating bugs. This course will demonstrate several approaches to organizing code for larger-scale projects, including how to write and name functions and classes, DRY (Don’t Repeat Yourself), pure functions, unit testing and Test-Driven Development (TDD), and why to avoid “magic numbers” and global variables. The focus of the course will be on JavaScript, using P5.js, but the principles will apply to most languages. We will be doing an ongoing, step-by-step, in-class refactor* of a complex sketch. We will also be using version control to track our changes every class. Students will be expected to complete weekly readings and assignments, and to refactor one of their previous projects, using the principles learned in this course. * Refactoring means rewriting the code, without any changes to how the program behaves.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
1 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ITPG-GT 3014-000 (21874)
10/30/2023 – 11/13/2023 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Tsadok, Daniel

Text-to-Image Ais (ITPG-GT 3020)

“Over the past few years, the unprecedented advancement in text-to-image artificial intelligence models has sparked widespread attention, discussion, and mainstream adoption of these innovative co-creative interfaces, which has resulted in novelty, excitement, and curiosity, as well as concern, anger, and insult. Alongside this, the booming open-sourced text-to-image model development contributes to expanding access to working with AI tools beyond experts, tech giants, and professional technologists. In this 14-week course, we will go over the landscape of text-to-image AIs and dive deep into some of the most well known ones (such as Stable Diffusion and its variants), to see what potential they have in terms of exploring new modes of content creation and helping us re-examine our language pattern. This will be a practice technique course – in the first half, we’ll focus on building good prompting practices, and in the second half, we’ll explore different image synthesis skills related to text-to-image AIs, use Python to train our own models to create customized visuals, and create animations from text. We’ll also discuss how such tools could intervene in the workflows of artists and technologists, what they can provide for researchers, and what are the caveats and things we should look out for when we’re creating with these AIs. Pre-requisites: Introduction to Computational Media (ICM) or the equivalent.” Prerequisite: ICM / ICM: Media (ITPG-GT 2233 / ITPG-GT 2048)

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3020-000 (15729)
09/06/2024 – 12/11/2024 Fri
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Zhang, Yuguang

Low-fi/High-impact (ITPG-GT 3012)

Lo-fi/High-impact is a hands-on workshop for learning rapid response prototyping and distribution techniques. We’ll look at examples of zine makers and artist and activist collectives, like the Guerrilla Girls, Dysturb, and the Illuminator, who create campaigns and interventions with purposeful urgency, and then flex our own creative muscles for getting ideas out of our heads and into our hands. Leveraging materials within reach, we’ll explore three paper-based methods of production: foldable books, enclosures, and wheatpasting. Using the cameo table-top cutting machines, the color and B&W printers on the floor, and materials sourced from our recycling bins, students will have the opportunity to try various techniques and have guided studio time to develop their own creative application/s for what they’ve learned. We will move quickly and get a little messy, and the outcomes will be reflective of the process!

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
1 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ITPG-GT 3012-000 (21872)

Experiments on the Embodied Web (ITPG-GT 3013)

Today’s internet, made up of mostly text documents and two-dimensional images and videos, is the result of historical limitations in bandwidth, graphics processing and input devices. These limitations have made the internet a place where the mind goes, but the body cannot follow. Recent advances in motion capture devices, graphics processing, machine learning, bandwidth and browsers, however, are paving the way for the body to find its place online. Experiments on the Embodied Web will explore the new realm of embodied interactions in the browser across networks. The course will include discussion of influential works in the development of online embodied interaction, including the works of Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz, Susan Kozel, and Laurie Anderson. Together we’ll explore pose detection across webRTC peer connections in p5.js and Three.js. Experience with Node, HTML and JavaScript is helpful but not required. ICM level programming experience is required. Prerequisite: ICM / ICM: Media (ITPG-GT 2233 / ITPG-GT 2048)

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
1 credits – 1 Day

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3013-000 (15725)

Digital Audio Workstations: Ableton Live (REMU-UT 1022)

We live in an age of digital production where so much of today’s music is produced with comparatively few tools, and at the heart of the modern production set up, whether in the bedroom of the studio, is software that uses MIDI. One of the most versatile of today’s platforms which can be used in production, live performance, and even as a visual tool is Ableton Live. Ableton is unique amongst the contemporary software programs making music in that it is the only one that was created by working musicians who were looking for a tool that allowed for both the seamless creation of ideas and could also serve as a performance instrument. In the past 15 years, Ableton has played an important role in creating countless tracks and records in numerous genres and the go-to software for live performance, whether for vocalists and bands or for massive spectacles like Cirque du Soleil. In this course, we will cover Ableton’s unique abilities to manipulate audio which make it the preferred platform for remixing and mash-ups. We will cover the fundamentals of the software, explore techniques to program beats, chordal and melodic ideas, as well as cover creative workflow – how to use Ableton to quickly generate ideas for producers and songwriters. Finally, we will discuss its use as a live performance tool for use with live instrumentalists and vocalists, as a DJ tool and even as a VJing tool. 

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


REMU-UT 1022-000 (13316)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Carrero, Joanne


REMU-UT 1022-000 (21555)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Carrero, Joanne


REMU-UT 1022-000 (21556)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Freeman, Dan


REMU-UT 1022-000 (21557)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Freeman, Dan


REMU-UT 1022-000 (21558)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Freeman, Dan


REMU-UT 1022-000 (21559)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Freeman, Dan

Digital Audio Workstations: ProTools (REMU-UT 1020)

During this course, students will acquire an in-depth, theoretical and practical knowledge of Digital Audio Workstations using the industry standard Pro Tools software through a weekly, lab-based workshop. Each class will be a combination of lecture and immediate application. An emphasis will be placed on getting to know Pro Tools, getting inside Pro Tools, creating sessions, working with media in sessions, audio recording, audio editing, file management techniques, MIDI recording, editing techniques, mixing techniques, backups and stereo mix-down.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 3 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


REMU-UT 1020-000 (3226)
06/11/2024 – 07/02/2024 Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Painson, Phil

Future of Media (ITPG-GT 2297)

This course covers the next several years of evolution in technology, culture, and other trends. It uses scenario planning, a technique for considering complex interrelationships that can’t be predicted, distinguishing predetermined elements from critical uncertainties, and exploring the underlying patterns that influence events. Students will conduct original research on significant trends, use those trends to develop compelling, sophisticated, plausible stories about possible futures, and present the futures – and the strategies they suggest – to a public audience. The course will take place at a pivotal moment of historical uncertainty: recovering from a global pandemic, with AI and other digital technologies crossing a threshold, and dramatic political and economic tensions. All of these, and more, affect media development – and are deeply affected by them. The goal of the course is to enable you to make more robust decisions now in the face of uncertainty — applicable to planning for technological change, starting a business, plotting a career or making major life decisions. This class has developed a longstanding following at ITP because it helps us make sense of complex issues without oversimplifying them. In a climate of candid, respectful discussion and debate, the class explores theories about system dynamics, long-wave organizational and societal change, and economic and technological development.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ITPG-GT 2297-000 (21828)
09/11/2023 – 12/11/2023 Mon
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kleiner, Arthur · Powell, Juliette

Augmented Hacking (ITPG-GT 2356)

With recent advances in hardware and software, millions of us now carry unprecedented spatial computing and world sensing technologies in our pockets. With these technologies in hand, how do we design AR experiences that are contextual at the core – that are sensitive to the spaces we inhabit and the behaviors of people in those spaces? How do we augment this better understanding of reality? This course will be a hands-on workshop where we create spatially aware, contextually driven AR applications unique to particular situations. We will examine the opportunities and challenges when designing for site-specific experiences – museums, live events, retail, medical settings, industrial environments, schools, and others. Topics will include image and object recognition, world mapping, people tracking, location anchors, the ARKit “depth api” (LiDAR enabled features), spatial audio, scene understanding and semantics, and more. For design and development, we’ll primarily use Apple technologies – ARKit, RealityKit and RealityComposer. We’ll also tap a variety of cloud services to store, move, process, and bring intelligence to the data generated and consumed in our experiences. 3D modeling skills are helpful but not required. While we’ll cover the basics, students should expect to spend additional time outside of class learning Swift and other related programming concepts. Full-time access to an iOS device (LiDAR-enabled is ideal but not required) and a Mac laptop running the latest operating systems are required. As part of the design process, we’ll host workshops and guest critiques with designers from top studios around New York City as well as directly interfacing with various teams at Apple.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ITPG-GT 2356-000 (21868)
09/07/2023 – 12/14/2023 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Lam, Nien · Buys, Sebastian

Bio-sensors and Biochips (ENGR-UH 4142)

This course covers the principles, technologies, methods and applications of biosensors and bioinstrumentation beginning with an examination of the ethical, legal, cultural, religious, and social implications of nanotechnologies. The objective of this course is to link engineering principles to understanding of biosystems in sensors and bioelectronics. The course provides students with detail of methods and procedures used in the design, fabrication, and application of biosensors and bioelectronic devices. The fundamentals of measurement science are applied to optical, electrochemical, mass, and pressure signal transduction. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to be able to explain biosensing and transducing techniques; design and construct biosensors instrumentation.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ENGR-UH 4142-000 (19903)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Song, Yong-Ak (Rafael)


ENGR-UH 4142-000 (19904)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Song, Yong-Ak (Rafael)

Interdisciplinary Projects: Guided Practice (ART-UE 9921)

This course provides space and guidance for students to work on self-driven, individual and group projects in art and media. Course content consists of texts, site visits, presentations, workshops, and critiques built around each student’s individual practice. Faculty and guest critics will hold regular studio visits, to help guide students through their process. Students’ material and technical investigations and theoretical inquiries will be addressed in group workshops and demonstrations. This course will culminate in a public presentation of students’ work.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 9921-000 (2387)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by Komarov, Aleksander

Disability Justice and Radical Inclusion (OT-UE 1403)

Explores the implications and meaning of having a disability in global contexts by introducing students to experts’ voices, especially disabled activists, as they seek to advance disability justice and inclusion and demand systemic change in spheres of influence including education, politics, healthcare, the arts, culture, social welfare, and everyday life. Examines how public (government) and private (outside of the government) policies and practices in these sectors affect the inclusion of persons with disabilities. Students explore and identify how international trends in disability and inclusion, local cultural beliefs, and biases influence inclusion.

Occupational Therapy (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OT-UE 1403-000 (11793)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patten, Kristie

Concepts of Film and New Media (FILMM-UH 1011)

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of film and new media studies. The course provides an overview of the historical development of film as an art, technology, and industry and the role of new media as an extension to and reinvention of models for production, distribution, exhibition, and reception. Students are introduced to documentary, experimental, narrative, and new media within different historical and cultural contexts, comparative aesthetics, and the lines of critical enquiry that have been developed for film and new media in dialogue with other fields in the arts and humanities.

Film and New Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FILMM-UH 1011-000 (4002)

Abrupt Climate Change (OART-UT 1058)

Combining science and the art of storytelling, this course will tackle one of the most pressing issues facing the future of humanity: Abrupt Climate Change. In a unique collaboration with NYU physical climate scientist Professor David Holland, students will research and create work that bridges the divide between science and the public through accurate, creative science-based storytelling. This highly multidisciplinary, hands-on course welcomes students from all backgrounds and fields of study to imagine and invent creative ways of telling stories about this global phenomenon and to investigate solutions. Weekly assignments will lead to a final collaborative project and an exhibition open to the public.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OART-UT 1058-000 (13226)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Terezakis, Peter

The Art of Sound (FMTV-UT 1007)

This is a critical studies course exploring the aesthetics and psycho-acoustics of sound: how sound works in art and life; how it affects emotions and stimulates the imagination; and how it is used in film, radio, television and other creative or artistic contexts, particularly its application as a key element in storytelling. This course examines the meaning and character of the soundscape (the acoustic environment) and the ways it has technically and aesthetically evolved throughout film history from the Kinetophone to the iPhone. The course includes reading in the theory of sound, and listening to examples of sound work by composers and sound designers. In previous semesters we have looked at the soundtrack in such films as: Playtime; Apocalypse Now, The Conversation, Aliens, The Evil Dead II, Saving Private Ryan, and Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Class meetings will be devoted to: 1) lecture and discussion based on assigned readings and listening and viewing assignments; and 2) screening of selected audio and video works. Students are graded on class participation, journals, a paper, and exams. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1007-000 (19411)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McKeever, Marsha

The Black Image in Cinema (FMTV-UT 1216)

This is a critical analysis of the Black image in cinema through film screenings, discussions, and selected readings. Film is an art form whose influence dictates how we see others and ourselves. It shapes our worldview and, yet, it is one of the youngest and most misunderstood art forms. On the surface, film viewing might seem like a passive form of learning, but effective films engage us on emotional, intellectual, spiritual, cultural, and political levels. Film is one of the most powerful mediums ever invented and since it’s invention, the Black image and experience has been distorted, demonized, romanticized, erased, appropriated as well as exalted and reified. So, it is our duty and responsibility to know its history, understand its present effects, so we can dictate its future and participate in how the Black image evolves and is treated over time. This course will survey and critically explore an historical range of the Black image on screen and Black films in relation to inspiration, narrative, a scene, set, and site of production. Screening will include a sampling of important Black independently made, and/or Black cast and narrative feature films. We will discuss and analyze specific technical elements (direction, editing, framing and composition, mise-en-scene, music, etc.) that reinforce and demonstrate these larger themes. Accordingly, our discussions and readings will cover the full range of current issues and debates in Black cinema studies, from independence vs. mainstream filmmaking; gender and sexuality; class and color caste; the ghettoization and upwardly mobile integration of urban zones; cooptation and the rise of the bourgeois story as genre, and so on.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1216-000 (19573)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pollard, Jason

Feminist Filmmakers (FMTV-UT 1156)

Feminist Filmmakers examines gender constructs in narrative film and episodic work. We will explore how gender constructs in film and television influence societal views of gender roles, as well as contextualize gender in the era and cultures specific films were made. The vehicle through which this course will examine gender will be the history and work of female directors around the world. Screenings, critical reading in film and gender studies, articles and interviews on current debates regarding gender and diversity inclusion in the film industry, make this class valuable for everyone.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1156-000 (20466)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zentelis, Enid

Music for Film and TV (FMTV-UT 1008)

This course examines the artistic, aesthetic, and technical aspects in composing and creating music for film and television. It provides an inside look into the relationship between composer, director, and music editor, exploring music as a creative tool. Through lectures, analysis, demonstrations, and presentations by guest speakers, students learn and deal with the specifics of the film composer’s job, duties, and responsibilities, including the basics of film scoring. As a result, students develop the listening and production skills necessary for creative use of music in films, television, and media. In addition to creative and technical considerations, the business and personal relationship between composer and director/producer will be discussed. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1008-000 (19412)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Hollywood Auteurs (FMTV-UT 1154)

This course will analyze the possibility of pursuing the ideals of an “author cinema” – a personal way of expressing ideas that can deal with Hollywood mainstream and also with the independents, but will never be considered an integral part of either one. The “author cinema” would be a cinema of personal expression that refuses the mainstream’s prison of “three acts, happy ending, stars, etc.”; and at the same time, refuses the trends and the limited scope of most of the independents: a cinema that shows not only how to make a film, but why. Films from all over the world will be analyzed, focusing in particular on the authors that are able to keep alive their personal vision while dealing with the studios (i.e. Stone, Lee, Scorsese, Kubrick), the ones that dared to fight Hollywood (i.e. Welles, Peckinpah, Cimino, von Stroheim) and the loose cannons independent at heart (Altman, P.T. Anderson, Coen brothers). A series of guests to the class will be comprised of critics, curators and cultural organizers, filmmakers and producers. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES. Non-majors must process a “Permission Notice for Non-Majors” form to register for the course (subject to availability).

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1154-000 (19539)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Monda, Antonio

Film Analysis (FMTV-UT 1204)

A rival reportedly asked Walt Disney why Disney’s films were so much better. Disney replied, “I analyze.” His rival said, “So do I.” Disney answered, “I analyze better.” Film Analysis is an advanced course in film criticism taught by practitioners. We build upon the analytical skills developed in Language of Film, Storytelling Strategies and the various production courses in order to strengthen the students’ ability to critically assess the weave of narrative content, mise-en-scene, cinematic technique and structures. Through this in-depth examination of a wide range of films, students deepen their understanding of how filmmakers over the years and in various cultures have created meaningful experiences for their audiences.This course counts as History & Criticism for Film Majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1204-000 (19541)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Santha, Laszlo

Introduction to Data Analysis for Engineers (ENGR-UH 2027)

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of data analysis. The course starts with tools used to summarize and visualize data. The focus then shifts to fitting and parameter estimation. The derivation of estimators of parameters using both maximum likelihood and least-squares techniques are covered. Analysis of the statistical properties of estimators is also covered. The course includes hands-on exercises using MATLAB.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ENGR-UH 2027-000 (17233)
10/26/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Jabari, Saif Eddin Ghazi


ENGR-UH 2027-000 (17234)
10/26/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Electronics (ENGR-UH 3611)

This course focuses on fundamentals of electronics theory and design. The topics covered include semiconductor physics, diodes, diode circuits such as limiters, clamps; bipolar junction transistors; small-signal models; cut-off, saturation, and active regions; common emitter, common base and emitter-follower amplifier configurations; field-effect transistors (MOSFET and JFET); biasing; small-signal models; common-source and common gate amplifiers; and integrated circuit MOS amplifiers. The laboratory experiments include the design, building and testing of diode circuits, including rectifiers, BJT biasing, large signal operation and FET characteristics, providing hands-on experience of design, theory and applications, with emphasis on small signal analysis and amplifier design. The course also covers the design and analysis of small-signal bipolar junction transistor and field-effect transistor amplifiers; and, diode circuits. The students are introduced to designing and analyzing circuits using the LTPSpice or Cadence simulation tool.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3611-000 (3595)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ha, Sohmyung


ENGR-UH 3611-000 (3596)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sheikh, Muhammad Faraz · Ha, Sohmyung

Art and Technology (OART-UT 1059)

Thesis: All art uses technology. Technology is not art. Whether a work of art is created to bridge the supernatural, convey experience, thought, or a world view, or something more, art is a three letter verb representing the result of an individual’s desire to create difference. This course is an exploration in technological literacy for all NYU students. Students will create a website, capture, edit, and publish digital media to their sites, use software to create objects through subtractive (laser cutting) and additive (3D printing) machining processes, build circuits, learn to program a microcomputer, and build a functioning computer-controlled object.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

France and Islam (FREN-UA 9806)

Islam is the second most important religion in France (after Roman Catholicism) and France has the highest Muslim population in Europe. Complex events from the mid-20th century forward have led to continuous heated debate and controversy about the place of Muslim citizens within the secular Republic. France’s interwoven history with Islam dates back, however, to the first Umayyad conquests of the Iberian peninsula in the 8th century and then to the period of the Crusades. Through the use of primary sources, literary and filmic texts, and critical readings (notably in history, sociology and cultural studies), this course traces the complexity and heterogeneity of French perceptions of Islam within a broad historical perspective beginning with these early encounters and continuing up to the present day.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FREN-UA 9806-000 (2624)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

FOUNDATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT (MG-UY 1002)

This course introduces the principles and practices of management. Management is viewed as a system of tasks and activities, including environmental scanning, planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Within each major task, is a series of processes, which show how to do what has to be done. Management is a science and an art; both aspects of management are covered in this course. Areas covered are management history, philosophy and the theory and practice of management planning, decision making, organizing, motivating and leading. Special emphasis is on providing the technical and managerial challenges presented by emerging and transformative technologies. Particular consideration is given to the managerial options available to both legacy and entrepreneurial organizations.

Management (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 1002-000 (14075)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by COHEN, MATHIAS


MG-UY 1002-000 (14076)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Driscoll, Michael

Global Media Seminar: Sydney, Australia (MCC-UE 9456)

In this seminar- based subject, students will discuss the latest global media developments in the context of key theoretical frameworks. Central topics include: the increasing disruption of established information flows; challenges facing the fourth estate and democracy itself; the role of soft power and popular culture; trust in journalism and traditional media; the rise of social platforms as near-sovereign technocracies; gender and diversity biases in media and emerging media tech; ethics and regulation; the proliferation of fake news and deep fakes; the potential erosion of privacy; the emergence of citizen journalism; the phenomenon of cancel culture; the influence of hacktivism and digital activism; inequality after #metoo and #blacklivesmatter; the emerging architectures of the metaverse and VR/AR; advancements in Web 3.0 and blockchain; as well as the suite of emerging implications resulting from generative AI, including the intensifying and sometimes intimate relationships between humans and machines. The focus will be international, with an emphasis on Australia. Ultimately, the course will examine the ways in which global communication is undergoing a ceaseless paradigm shift.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9456-000 (2843)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by Varga, David

Social Media Practicum (MCC-UE 9032)

In this workshop-based course, students will become well versed in contemporary debates on social media and its impact on self and society, share their own experiences and observations in this area, design an original research project (using methods such as discourse analysis, virtual ethnography, and interviewing), and write a long-form analysis paper.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9032-000 (2831)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Druker, Jeremy

Advertising and Consumer Society (MCC-UE 9015)

This course will examine the emergence of advertising as a form of communication, its influence upon other forms of mediated communication and its impact upon culture and society.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9015-000 (2561)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Murad, Salim

Video Game Economies (MCC-UE 9008)

The course approaches video games through the lens of political economy. This means examining games foremost as commodities, transactional goods through which various modes of economic life occur. This course introduces students to the structure and economics of the game industry since its emergence in the 1970s, particularly across the United States, China, and Japan. Special attention is brought to the dramatic industry changes catalyzed by digital distribution, mobile gaming, live streaming, and other contemporary developments. Examines the emergence of video games as sites of contemporary cultural production & practice. Special attention is given to the symbolic & aesthetic dimensions of video games, including their various narratives forms and sub-genres, & concentrates on their interactive dimensions. The course provides insight into the emerging trends in the interface between humans & media technologies. The course also situates video games within the business practices of the entertainment industries.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9008-000 (2834)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Krobova, Tereza

Rethinking Public Relations (MCC-UE 1750)

Public relations means different things to different things to different people but it has one undeniable element: communication. This course is concerned with arranging, handling, and evaluating public relations programs. Students work with actual case histories and deal with contemporary topics such as the use of the computer in public relations.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1750-000 (14007)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Devitt, James


MCC-UE 1750-000 (14008)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gabrielski, Jo Temah

The Western History of Madness from the Bible to DSM-5 (IDSEM-UG 1961)

Viewed as a natural kind or socially constructed, “madness” was defined and treated, examined and controlled, diagnosed and cured according to the spirit of the time. This course follows the varied social imageries of “madness” throughout Western history, from the Hebrew Bible to the contemporary and controversial Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM), also known as “the bible of psychiatry”, in its most recent 5th edition. Students read primary and secondary texts by philosophers, physicians, theologians, jurists, tragedians, novelists, psychologists, social reformers, policy makers, journalists, historians and individuals who suffered madness, known as “experts by experience.” They also observe art and watch films that portray different aspects of madness. Reading includes: the Bible, Plato, Hippocrates, Ibn Sina, Maimonides, Margery Kempe, Erasmus, Robert Burton, Freud, George Canguilhem, Foucault, Ian Hacking, Elaine Showalter among others. The course explores the interaction between the social, cultural, scientific, political as well as economic factors that have shaped the views of “madness” and its treatment while paying ample attention to the history of ideas that informed and, often, framed them.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IDSEM-UG 1961-000 (17014)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ophir, Orna

Introduction to 3D (FMTV-UT 1110)

This is an introductory course to the fundamentals of 3D computer animation. Through in-depth discussions and hands-on assignments, students will gain a thorough beginner’s understanding of the 3D production process. Using industry-leading Autodesk Maya running on high-end Mac Pro workstations, students will learn the basics of modeling and proceed through UV layout, texturing, rigging, animation, lighting and final render. At the end of the class students will have completed a series of exercises that will culminate in a final scene that showcases all they learned.This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1110-000 (19491)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McNagny, Phil


FMTV-UT 1110-000 (19492)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Guevara, Cesar

Fundamentals of Machine Learning (CSCI-UA 9473)

Machine learning is an exciting and fast-moving field of computer science with many recent consumer applications (e.g., Microsoft Kinect, Google Translate, Iphone’s Siri, digital camera face detection, Netflix recommendations, Google news) and applications within the sciences and medicine (e.g., predicting protein-protein interactions, species modeling, detecting tumors, personalized medicine). This course introduces undergraduate computer science students to the field of machine learning. Students learn about the theoretical foundations of machine learning and how to apply machine learning to solve new problems. Assuming no prior knowledge in machine learning, the course focuses on two major paradigms in machine learning which are supervised and unsupervised learning. In supervised learning, we learn various methods for classification and regression. Dimensionality reduction and clustering are discussed in the case of unsupervised learning

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CSCI-UA 9473-000 (2626)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


CSCI-UA 9473-000 (2627)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Introduction to Engineering and Design (EG-UY 1004)

This course introduces selected aspects of the history, philosophy, methodology, tools, and contemporary topics in engineering. Also included are basic engineering experimentation, data analysis, and a team-design project. This course will provide an understanding of what professional engineers do. In this context, an emphasis will be placed on developing oral and written communication skills. EG1004 is a survey course that introduces students to NYU Tandon academic opportunities, professional and career development, and teamwork skills. Design and project management skills are developed throughout a semester-long design project. Disciplines within engineering will be introduced during lecture, and explored through practice in laboratory assignments.

General Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


EG-UY 1004-000 (12431)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12432)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12433)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12434)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12435)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12436)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12437)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12438)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12439)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12440)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12441)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12442)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12443)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12444)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12445)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12446)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12447)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12448)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12449)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12450)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12451)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12452)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12453)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12454)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rom, Cindy


EG-UY 1004-000 (12455)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12456)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12598)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12457)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12458)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12459)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12460)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12461)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12462)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12463)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12464)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12465)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Clenance, Pamela


EG-UY 1004-000 (12466)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12467)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12468)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter · Röhr, Jason


EG-UY 1004-000 (12469)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12470)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12471)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12472)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12473)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12474)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12475)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12476)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12477)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12478)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12479)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12480)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rom, Cindy


EG-UY 1004-000 (12481)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12482)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12483)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12484)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12485)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12486)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12487)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12488)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12489)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12490)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12491)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12492)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid

DIGITAL LOGIC AND STATE MACHINE DESIGN (ECE-UY 2204)

This course covers combinational and sequential digital circuits. Topics: Introduction to digital systems. Number systems and binary arithmetic. Switching algebra and logic design. Error detection and correction. Combinational integrated circuits, including adders. Timing hazards. Sequential circuits, flipflops, state diagrams and synchronous machine synthesis. Programmable Logic Devices, PLA, PAL and FPGA. Finite-state machine design. Memory elements. A grade of C or better is required of undergraduate computer-engineering majors. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 1114 (C- or better) or CS-UY 1133 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UH 1001 (C- or better) or ENGR-UH 1000 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 101 (C- or better)

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11545)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11546)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11547)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11548)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11549)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Reagen, Brandon

Human-Centered Data Science (CDAD-UH 1044Q)

Data science is changing our lives. While the importance of data science is widely acknowledged, there are also great concerns around it. How are data generated? How can they be used to make predictions and inform insights? What can be the potential dangers of applying data science techniques? What are the social and human implications of their uses? This multidisciplinary course explores these questions through hands-on experience on key technical components in data science and critical reviews of human and social implications in various real-world examples, ranging from social science to arts and humanities to engineering. In the course, students will 1) learn basic concepts and skills in data science (e.g., crawling and visualization); 2) apply these skills in a creative project; 3) discuss social and human implications of data science, including data privacy; algorithmic bias, transparency, fairness, and accountability; research ethics; data curation and reproducibility; and societal impacts. This course encourages students to reconsider our common-place assumptions about how data science works and be critical about the responsible use of data.

Core: Data and Discovery (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CDAD-UH 1044Q-000 (4632)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Park, Minsu

Wayfinding: Graphic Design in the Built Environment (CADT-UH 1020)

In November 2014, Volvo Race’s boat Vestas did not find her way to Abu Dhabi port and got stranded on a reef in the Indian Ocean instead. What went wrong? Is it still possible to get lost today, in the age of ubiquitous and democratized GPS? What does it mean to find one’s way? How do different environments create unique problems, as well as provide solutions? How do we find those solutions ourselves, and how can we intervene in the design of our working and living environments, in the design of our navigational practices, in order to avoid getting lost? What tools do we have? How do they work? What can we learn from navigation before GPS? Informed by new technologies, the demand for sustainability, and the inputs from cognitive studies, “wayfinding” has grown to become a field of research in its own right, related to both architecture and design. It studies the ways in which people orient themselves via the organization of sensory cues from the external environment. The course explores visual design components and theoretical ramifications and will include workshops on campus signage systems, with a focus on accessible design.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CADT-UH 1020-000 (4566)


CADT-UH 1020-000 (5231)

Architectural Design and Drawing (ARTS-UG 1621)

This architecture workshop introduces the basic principles of design. It begins with an analysis of a house by an important architect that examines the design concept or parti of the building, historical and environmental issues, as well as function, circulation, spatial organization, site, zoning, light, proportions, structure, and materials. In developing this project, students are also introduced to a vocabulary of design terms and the process of creating an architectural concept. In the projects that follow, students create their own designs for various types of structures. The assignments might include a New York loft space, a house in the country, or a small public or commercial building. These exercises provide the experience of creating designs by applying the concepts learned in the analysis. The basic techniques of drafting, rendering, and using Sketchup or similar software are also discussed. Films, lectures and texts on architectural theory provide additional insight. Design experience is useful, but not required.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1621-000 (16717)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goodman, Donna

Culture, Hist/Imaging Photography Studies (PHTI-UT 1003)

Offered Fall Only. Required of all freshmen majors and highly recommended for incoming transfers. Students are required to register for the lecture and the recitation sections. No prerequisites for this course. The course will consist of a series of weekly lectures, discussions, readings and field trips to museums and galleries in the city. Lectures will present historic and contemporary art and photography and it’s ideation as a basis for understanding the work the students are viewing on their weekly field trips. Students will visit selected exhibitions chosen for their quality and relevance and arranged by geographic area of the city (One week the Whitney, the next Chelsea, etc). Students will be required to monitor the daily press and periodicals for reviews of work they’ve seen and to highlight exhibitions the class should see. Additional readings of historic material will be assigned and short papers will be required.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


PHTI-UT 1003-000 (13385)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kobielski, Lili


PHTI-UT 1003-000 (13386)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Hist of Nationalism in Cent & Eastern Europe (HIST-UA 9176)

The goal of this course is to introduce the students into nationalism studies and into a plethora of historical and present roots of national identities and manifestations of nationalism in Central and Eastern Europe. The course will examine how selected aspects of national histories have been used (and misused) in 19., 20. and 21. century to support/justify national political programs and leaders; specifically, how a romantic picture of national history influenced the development of national identity and what role its interpretation has had in political struggles and programs of Central and East European nations. The course focuses on forces that triggered many eruptions of ethnic hatred and atrocities in Central and Eastern Europe including Holocaust, post World War II expulsion of Germans, civil war in former Yugoslavia, and most recently the nationalist aspects of conflict between Ukraine and Russia. The course will focus on Ukraine and Russia, Poland, Hungary, former Czechoslovakia, present-day Czech Republic and Slovakia, on former Yugoslavia and on independent states on its territory, and it will motivate the students to formulate a positive and cooperative prospect for the region’s future.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


HIST-UA 9176-000 (2828)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Polisenska, Milada

Germany and East Central Europe (HIST-UA 9514)

This course will focus on the history of the culturally rich region of “Mitteleuropa” through analysis of the parallel evolution of Germany and the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia and Hungary. Mitteleuropa as a region produced such important figures as Franz Kafka, Gustav Mahler, Sigmund Freud, Theodor Herzl and Milan Kundera; historical personalities whose influence internationally is indisputable. We’ll delve into the history of the region and on the central role played by German politics and culture from the end of the 19th century, through the turbulent 20th century to the present day. Emphasis will be on the evolution of the concept of nationalism as well as on Germany’s foreign policy in the “concert of nations”, especially towards its Eastern neighbors. The aim is to achieve an understanding of the complex evolution of national entities and their interaction between the birth of the modern German state and the integration of the Visegrád countries in NATO and the European Union.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


HIST-UA 9514-000 (3470)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Vassogne, Gaelle

Comp Modern Societies: Pol & Soc in 20C Germany (HIST-UA 9133)

The history of Germany in the twentieth century offers rich material to explore various approaches to organizing modern society. Beginning with Imperial Germany in 1900 and moving forward to today’s reunited Germany, we will look at different ways in which the relationship between the state and the individual, and relationship between politics, economy, and society developed over five different political systems. We will interrogate how these institutional arrangements were envisioned and structured and how they were experienced in everyday negotiations. In this course, principle narratives and events will be situated in a European and global context, allowing us to place the concept of German modernity in a comparative framework. Lectures will provide an overview of Germany in the twentieth century; readings and in-class discussions will explore different approaches to analyzing German history and society. During museum visits and walking tours, we will analyze contestations over the various attempts to integrate – both in concerted efforts to memorialize as well as to forget and erase – Germany’s oft-problematic pasts within the narrative of Germany’s present.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


HIST-UA 9133-000 (2797)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by

British Art in London (ARTH-UA 9011)

The principal aim of this course is to familiarize students with the history of British art from the Stuarts to the early Victorian era. Teaching will be conducted entirely on sites in London or its immediate vicinity. The course will begin with the elite patronage of the Stuart court and end with the development of public institutions of art from the mid-eighteenth century. The social significance of portraiture, the cult of antiquity, the art market and the rise of landscape will all be studied as themes. There will be a strong emphasis on the European sources of British visual culture and the emergence of a distinctive national tradition of painting from Hogarth through to Turner.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTH-UA 9011-000 (2722)
09/02/2024 – 12/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Schuster, Jana


ARTH-UA 9011-000 (2723)
09/02/2024 – 12/06/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Weiner, Julia

Advanced Seminar: (SOC-UA 9942)

This interdisciplinary course examines the works of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud, three German speaking writers who pioneered radically different and influential interpretations of modern life, which continue to shape our contemporary understanding of society and individuality. The seminar not only delves into the origins of these prominent traditions of modern Western thought, but also underscores their relevance in modern social theories and poetics. Hence, the course will also include references to the writings of their contemporaries, as well as explications of the direct and indirect influences of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud on other writers.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


SOC-UA 9942-000 (3750)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Wed
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by Michaelis-König, Andree

Contemporary Music Performance I (ARTS-UG 1305)

This course is designed to help students develop a better understanding of music by presenting the opportunity to experience music as a musician. Students review basic music theory and develop rudimentary musicianship skills; learn how to utilize the basic functionality of common digital audio workstations; and use that experience to create music. The goal is for each student to be able to compose, rehearse, and then perform, original contemporary pieces of music, individually and in a group setting, in a wide range of musical idioms. The course culminates in a public recital of works written and performed by students.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ARTS-UG 1305-000 (12193)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Castellano, John

Cultural History of Spain (SPAN-UA 9260)

This course provides an introduction to the making of modern Spain through the study of key cultural practices in literature, visual art, film, and performance from the 19th century to the present. The course is organized around key concepts, which may vary by semester and by instructor.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


SPAN-UA 9260-000 (18385)
08/31/2023 – 12/12/2023 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by

Islam and Spain (SPAN-UA 9466)

From the 8th century until the 17th century, Islam played a crucial role in the history of the Iberian Peninsula. Today this period is often portrayed as one of inter-religious harmony, while al-Andalus is simultaneously mourned in contemporary Islamist discourse as a lost paradise. While we look at the history of Al-Andalus and assess the importance of the contributions of Al-Andalus to Europe and America, we evaluate the significance of its legacy in modern Spain. Furthermore, we will study the protagonist role that Spain has played in relations between Europe and the Mediterranean Islamic countries during the Modern Age. Students will gain further understanding and contextualization of current Arab-Muslim geopolitics. As a case study, we will address the Spanish Protectorate in Morocco, as well as its ensuing process of decolonization and the consequences that shape the current international relations between the two neighboring countries, Spain and Morocco.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


SPAN-UA 9466-000 (18390)
08/31/2023 – 12/12/2023 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Armada, Almudena Ariza

Intensive Interm Spanish (SPAN-UA 9020)

SPAN-UA 9020.002 (Intensive Intermediate Spanish) is a six-credit course that continues and reviews the introductory level Spanish learned in SPAN-UA.1 and SPAN-UA.2, or in SPANUA. 10, while introducing literary readings, short films, and more complex composition exercises. The course involves an integration of the four basic skills: listening, speaking,reading and writing with the aim to improve communication in Spanish. Through this integrated approach, you will participate in a practical application of vocabulary, grammar,and culture. The course emphasizes mastery of language skills through specific contexts and dialogical situations.At the end of the course students will read a novel which will also be used to review many of the grammatical points covered in the textbook and class work, to improve analytical thinking and literary criticism skills, as well as to verbally express opinions about the situations presented in the novel. The goals of this course are to provide you with the opportunity to improve your oral and written communication skills in the language, by applying all the grammar rules you have learned and will be reviewing. You will be expected to substantially increase your working vocabulary and make solid progress in reading and writing skills.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
6 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


SPAN-UA 9020-000 (2585)
at NYU Buenos Aires (Global)
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 9020-000 (2608)
05/21/2024 – 07/01/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
10:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Castillo, Maria

Advanced Spanish for Spanish-Speaking Students (SPAN-UA 9051)

For native and quasi-native speakers of Spanish whose formal training in the language has been incomplete or otherwise irregular.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


SPAN-UA 9051-000 (3938)
at NYU Buenos Aires (Global)
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 9051-000 (3957)
05/21/2024 – 07/01/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Figueroa-Rojas, Armando

Immigration (SOC-UA 9452)

To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


SOC-UA 9452-000 (4016)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Busch, Nicky


SOC-UA 9452-000 (4017)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Busch, Nicky

The Performing Arts in Global Cultures (MPATC-UE 1505)

The study of the intersection of key philosophical and ethical systems with the analysis of performing art works and the music industry. Students learn an “Eclectic Method” of analysis to holistically explore and study works of art from cultures from around the world while studying ethical complexities and analytical systems in relation to the performing arts industries.

Music Theory and Composition (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MPATC-UE 1505-000 (16548)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by White, Leonard · Bush, Christopher

Legal Aspects of The Entertainment Industry (FMTV-UT 1195)

A course that tracks the filmmaking process from its inception, at the idea phase and follows the creative process through development, pre-production, principal photography and post-production. The class will focus on the business and legal issues that arise during every phase of filmmaking. Key topics covered will include: copyright law; option agreements for underlying rights such as books, plays, magazine and newspaper articles; sources of financing; distribution agreements; licensing of music; agreements for actors, directors, producers and writers. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. Students must have Junior or Senior standing. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1195-000 (19505)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lichter, Rosalind

SERVICE DESIGN INNOVATION (MG-UY 3734)

Products are used not in isolation but as part of a wider mesh of artifacts and interactions, both digital and non-digital. The discipline of service design takes this holistic view of a process or product, considering not just the use of an artifact but the wider service it is situated within across several ‘touch points’. With a growing service-based economy, in many cases the product is the service, which challenges conventional views of what the designer creates. Services are complex to understand and design, and require a participatory approach with deep engagement with stakeholders. This Service Design Innovation course is for students with various backgrounds and diverse interests for their future careers: technologists who want to understand how the technology can support service innovation; designers who want to broaden their skills; product and project managers who want to understand the relationship between products, services, and design; policy makers who want to understand how to develop human-centered policies that create real impact; managers and entrepreneurs who want to understand how to create new innovative and sustainable system offerings.

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 3734-000 (14097)

Industrial Revolutions and the Future of Work (CCOL-UH 1074)

How has the automation economy changed the ways we live and work? What challenges and opportunities does automation pose for the future? This multidisciplinary colloquium draws on materials in social science, science, and the humanities to explore how societies have organized themselves relative to technology in the past, and what changes are currently taking place. As we are now in the midst of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, what lessons can be learned from its predecessors? What consequences might new technologies pose for global challenges such as peace, education, equality, or sustainable development? How does the very definition of the “human” stand to be affected? Students will examine the wave of technology-driven transformations occurring on a global scale, including artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, and virtual reality. They will consider the Fourth Industrial Revolution as an opportunity to critique theories of technological change and construct their own narratives of change in individual case study analysis assignments.

Core: Colloquium (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


CCOL-UH 1074-000 (16829)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Gleason, Nancy

Future of Medicine (CCOL-UH 1010)

One of the biggest challenges in medicine is to prevent disease and ensure personalized treatment. This is now becoming possible thanks to high-resolution DNA sequencing technology that can decipher our individual information. These developments are already impacting global health, but they raise global challenges such as equality. How will these new technologies blend into healthcare systems? What regulations are needed to ensure that personalized medicine reaches all layers of society? How do we prevent discrimination based on our genes? Through an inquiry-based approach we will examine the science, economics, and politics behind medicine and evaluate the ethical issues that arise in this fast-developing field.

Core: Colloquium (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CCOL-UH 1010-000 (3677)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Percipalle, Piergiorgio

The Politics of New Media: How the Internet Works and For Whom (PRACT-UG 1460)

This course will examine the communication of ideas online, and how that communication is shaped by commerce and surveillance. We will begin by considering the role of the public sphere in a democratic society, and then turn to the early anonymous days of the internet, the rise of social media platforms, and finally the Snowden revelations, debates over digital free speech, and new technologies like TikTok and virtual reality. We will experiment with simple counter-surveillance techniques like encrypted texts that are increasingly fundamental to the sensible practice of modern journalism and media work. The course will feature occasional guests. Students will finish the course with an understanding of the relationship between modern media forms and the expression of ideas in the public sphere.

Practicum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


PRACT-UG 1460-000 (12539)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leonard, Sarah

Photography of Architecture, City and Territory (IPHTI-UT 1210)

City, territory and architecture have been, from the beginning of photography, privileged objects for its practice. Photography has become a tool to strengthen the understanding of architecture, to highlight aesthetic and design ideas and to critically interpret the space. This class focuses on architectural photography and the photography of urban space, both in relation to their historical roots and contemporary practice. Florence offers a perfect environment to develop one’s artistic talent while learning the art of photography and discovering the secrets of one of the most fascinating cities in the world. Assignments are designed to help explore options for technical control as well as visual experimentation and individual style. Keeping in mind the inseparability of photographic technique and expression, students are expected to articulate their particular choices in relation to the overall conceptual approach of the projects. Critiques of assignments are important to the progress of each individual in the class, to help verbalize visual concepts, and to learn to see actively. The final exam consists of the presentation of a portfolio of photographs and an artist’s statement. Students are expected to work on their projects to develop an aesthetic and coherent photographic language and a personal approach to the photographic medium in a different environment. An emphasis is also placed on refining craft in relation to ideas, and to research on an individual basis, since it is crucial in developing an artistic practice. The course includes lectures, shooting sessions and field trips, discussions and critiques of the photographs. Each student must have a camera with manually adjustable aperture and shutter speed.

Int`l Pgms, Photography (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


IPHTI-UT 1210-000 (13446)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by

Foundations of Photography (VISAR-UH 1010)

This course introduces students to the history, theory, and practice of photography. Students will learn foundational image-making techniques with a focus on Black and White analog photography. A range of studio and darkroom tools and approaches will be explored. Students will be introduced to key artists, themes, and developments in photography and will consider the impact of photographic media on the development of art and society.

Visual Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


VISAR-UH 1010-000 (16675)

Machine Design (ME-UY 3233)

This course introduces students to fundamentals of machine elements, enabling them to employ this knowledge to design machines for various practical applications. The course begins with a brief review of stress, deformation and failure, followed by friction and wear. Subsequently, loaded columns, pressurized cylinders and shafts are presented. Bearings, gears, screws, springs, brakes, clutches and belts are discussed. The course ends with an introduction to MEMS, Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: ME-UY 3213 | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-UH 3210

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 3233-000 (12694)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Park, Kee

Globalization of The Entertainment Industry (MKTG-UB 46)

Provides a framework for understanding the global expansion of media and entertainment companies. Examines the impact that the significant export growth of American leisure products and services has on the U.S economy. Analyzes the strategies of several leading entertainment and media multinational companies and the development of their entertainment businesses within the major world economic zones. International speakers, cases and readings are used in this course.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


MKTG-UB 46-000 (22222)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Brown, Colin


MKTG-UB 46-000 (22228)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)at Washington SquareInstructed by Brown, Colin


MKTG-UB 46-000 (23357)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Maheswaran, Durairaj

Intro to Marketing (MKTG-UB 1)

This course evaluates marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and a catalyst of business activity. It presents a comprehensive framework that includes (1) researching and analyzing customers, company, competition, and the marketing environment; (2) identifying and targeting attractive segments with a strategic positioning; and (3) making product, pricing, communication, and distribution decisions. Cases and examples are utilized to develop problem-solving abilities.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 2 Weeks

Sections (January 2021)


MKTG-UB 1-000 (1219)
01/05/2021 – 01/21/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 4:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Info Technology in Business & Society (TECH-UB 9001)

Provides the background necessary to make decisions about computer-based information systems and to be an “end-user”. Two major parts of the course are hands-on experience with personal computers and information systems management. Group and individual computer assignments expose students to electronic spreadsheet analysis and database management on a personal computer. Management aspects focus on understanding computer technology, systems analysis and design, and control of information processing by managers.

Computing and Data Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


TECH-UB 9001-000 (18394)
08/31/2023 – 12/12/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Sarasua, Asier


TECH-UB 9001-000 (18374)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by

Sports Economics (ECON-UB 211)

This course applies microeconomic theory and econometric analysis to sports and explores some public policy issues that have arisen in the design of sports competitions. The course is divided into four main parts: the structure of sports leagues, labor market issues, college sports, and the market for sports betting.

Economics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ECON-UB 211-000 (22435)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bowmaker, Simon

Delicious Movement: Time Is Not Even, Space Is Not Empty (ARTS-UG 1275)

Distance is Malleable is a multi-faceted course that contemplates the notions of human fragility, existential solitude, and metaphorical “nakedness.” Led by NYC-based interdisciplinary performing artist Eiko Otake, students will engage in movement study, art making, and exploration of different places and people, living or dead. How does being or becoming a mover reflect and alter each person’s relationship with the environment, history, language, and other beings? How are we defined by or/and how do we define our relationships to the particulars of place? How do we maximize the potentials of selected encounters with other human beings, places, and things? Reading assignments will focus on our collective experience of massive violence and human failure. In addition to the Gallatin studio, we will also work at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine and the Brooklyn Botanic Garden where Eiko is an artist-in-residence. Weekly reading and journal entries are required. Students will share their projects in class.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1275-000 (16980)
09/03/2024 – 10/22/2024 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Otake, Eiko

Rites of Passage into Contemporary Art Practice (ARTS-UG 1420)

Modern art has been a balancing act between control and letting go. This course focuses on the psychological interface between the two, the “liminal” zone. We will survey modern artists’ techniques for tapping sources of creativity, including Dada collagists’ free-associations; Surrealists’ automatic writing, doodles, and “cadavres exquises”; and Abstract Expressionists’ embrace of chaos. We will engage in simple exercises: doodling, speed drawing, painting an abstract mural as a group, keeping a liminal journal, collaging, and exploring ritualistic techniques. We will follow up with discussions, take a trip to the Met to dialogue with an African oracle sculpture,and conclude the course reexamining modern art in light of the inner journey threshold drama each of us has taken during the course. Readings include van Gennep’s Rites of Passage, Chipp’s Theories of Modern Art, R.D. Laing, Federico Garcia Lorca on duende, Victor Turner on liminal, Mircea Eliade on Shamanism Techniques of Ecstasy, James Elkins on alchemy and art, and Frida Kahlo’s journal.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1420-000 (16715)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ruhe, Barnaby

COMPUTING IN CIVIL ENGINEERING (CE-UY 3013)

This course aims to introduce the modern computing methods, tools, and best practices for students in civil and urban engineering. The course uses Python as the programming language for solving a series of fundamental computational problems in civil and urban engineering, such as solving linear equations, data interpolation, curve fitting, root finding, numerical differentiation and integration, probability and statistics, linear programming and optimization. The course also introduces a series of generic computation tools and best practices for the students’ future study and research in computing applications in civil and urban engineering, including how to debug a program, visualize data, manage source codes, collaborative programming project management, etc. It aims at laying a solid foundation for civil and urban engineering students to better understand the modern programming workflow and utilize the computing tools. Students are first introduced with the fundamental concepts through the lecture, and then guided step-by-step via the in-class lab session in each weak. There will be multiple homework assignments and in-class quizzes for the evaluating the students’ performances. | Prerequisite: (CS-UY 1113 or CS-UY 1114 or CS-UY 1133) and MA-UY 2034 and MA-UY 2224 or Adviser’s approval.

Civil & Urban Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CE-UY 3013-000 (11388)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Ozturk, Baturalp

Conversations in the Global Music Business Surviving the Future (REMU-UT 9810)

With sales of more than 1.3 billion, the German recorded music market is the third largest in the world: it is larger than the UK music market and behind only the USA and Japan. Beyond just numbers, the Berlin music business is unique: it’s home to hundreds of powerful independent and D.I.Y. record labels; it’s historically been ground zero for innovative electronic and dance music; and it’s a burgeoning tech hub for innovative software/hardware companies like Native Instruments, Ableton and Soundcloud. In this colloquium series, students will meet and hear each week from key creative entrepreneurial figures and innovators in the German and European music business. This course has several purposes. First, students will consider how ongoing economic and technological changes might be impacting the worldwide music business, as speakers discuss controversial trends like the rise of cryptocurrency, block chain and cashless systems, customization technologies like 3D printing and developments in robotics, and radical, disruptive approaches to copyright. Second, students will develop a greater understanding of the chief similarities and differences between the traditional European and US music business operations, particularly with regard to label operations, publishing and copyright, touring and festivals, and nightlife promotion. Third, students will become more informed about the D.I.Y. music business in Berlin itself, as they hear from speakers about the promises and challenges one faces in launching innovative music start ups in Germany. And finally, students will get to meet and network with key movers and shakers in the Berlin scene, past and present. In anticipation for a guest class visit, students may be required to investigate websites, read biographical or contextual material, or attend events outside of class time. Students will be expected to ask informed questions of the guests and to develop responses throughout the course of the class. Students should leave the class with a greater understanding of how the European and German music businesses work and how they themselves might make a business or sales impact on a global scale.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


REMU-UT 9810-000 (13438)
08/31/2023 – 12/07/2023 Mon
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by

History of Animation (FMTV-UT 1144)

Offered in the fall semester only. A chronological survey of the art and commerce of the animated film internationally over the last 100 years. Designed to expand students’ awareness of the origins of a significant 20th-century art form and to acquaint them with a wide variety of practical techniques and styles, from pre-film influences to computer-generated images; from “Golden Age” studio cartoon factories to today’s independent avant-garde animator-filmmakers. Designed to expand student aesthetic sensibilities and sharpen critical perceptions about this unique genre. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES. Non-majors must process a “Permission Notice for Non-Majors” form to register for the course (subject to availability).

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1144-000 (19501)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kosarin, Ray

Internet Design (FMTV-UT 1123)

This course focuses on the fundamentals of Web design and production. It will provide students with a basic understanding of HTML and CSS page construction, designing and optimizing graphics for the Web and the basic technical skills necessary for getting the student and his/her site online. This course teaches the students how to create a Website along with utilizing Social Media tools and channels as an effective part of a promotional strategy. YouTube, Vimeo, FaceBook, Twitter, KickStarter and Mobile all offer opportunities. In this age of multiple media sources competing for our attention it is important to maintain a consistent and integrated Communications and Brand Strategy across all media distribution channels. The class examines various creative and technical approaches to image manipulation, design, and montage as well as discussing the production techniques necessary to implement creative concepts. This course deals with many of the unique technical and creative challenges – graphic optimization, video compression, and file format conversion – for putting one’s reel, trailer or film online. The students are taught typographical design principles, including the aesthetics of text style and font faces. The class will explore the creative possibilities of designing layouts and integrating animation and video into their sites. Students are introduced to a variety of Internet, DHTML and multimedia tools and experiment with their creative applications. We focus on the Internet as a promotion and distribution medium for the independent artist and filmmaker. Branding, audience awareness and usability are also emphasized.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1123-000 (19497)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beaver, Howard

Projects in Photography (ART-UE 1380)

Students work directly with internationally recognized figures in photography. Topics for workshops range from the techniques of established photographers to discussions of issues in photographic theory, history, & criticism.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 1380-000 (9681)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harouni, Shadi

Mixing in the Digital Audio Workstation (MPATE-UE 1135)

This course explores the art and craft of mixing records, with special attention to “mixing in the box” (via a digital audio workstation). Focus on methodology and technique, with particular emphasis on establishing balances, using such tools as compression and automation to enhance dynamics and develop unique coloration. Examines intersection of technology, budgets, and the marketplace. Students execute their own mixes, with guidance and critique from the instructor. Basic level of DAW proficiency required.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1135-000 (13050)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Killen, Kevin


MPATE-UE 1135-000 (13051)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Killen, Kevin

Midi for Non-Majors (MPATE-UE 1810)

An introduction to MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) with an emphasis on sequencing, production and arranging techniques. Open to students without previous experience in music technology.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1810-000 (10676)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Phillips, Andrew

Electronic Product Design for Music and Audio (MPATE-UE 1017)

This is a multidisciplinary course in which students with previous experience with analog and digital electronics create a novel hardware–based electronic musical instrument, controller, effects unit, or other device related to their interests in music and audio. Student projects may be analog, digital, or a hybrid, and should be unique in some way from devices currently in the commercial marketplace. Students present their designs and functioning physical prototypes with the class as they evolve throughout the semester for feedback.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1017-000 (13044)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven


MPATE-UE 1017-000 (13045)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven

Aesthetics of Recording (MPATE-UE 1227)

A critical listening study of acoustic music recordings that develops the student’s ability to define and evaluate aesthetic elements of recorded music. Students explore recorded music attributes including dynamic range, stereo imaging, perceived room acoustics, the use of reverb and equalization, naturalness, and the listening perspectives.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1227-000 (12988)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wojcik, Leszek

Fundamentals of Music Technology (MPATE-UE 1801)

A general introduction to the fundamental concepts of music technology, including: MIDI and sequencing, the basics of digital audio, sound recording, mixing and sound synthesis,. The course will also briefly overview advanced topics and applications in the field.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (12129)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Geluso, Paul


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (10670)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Las Heras, Diego


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (10673)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mueller, Charles


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (12130)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mann, Mason

Rcdg Tech for Non Majors (MPATE-UE 1022)

Introduction to the physical aspects of sound, psychoacoustics, basic electricity, principles and practice of magnetic recording and an overview of the recording studio, including an introduction to multi-track recording techniques. Students perform various duties just as they would in a professional recording session with live musicians in the recording studio. Open to students without previous experience in recording technology.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10658)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Filadelfo, Gary


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10660)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Griffin, J Chris


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10662)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Losada, Juan

Midi Technology II (MPATE-UE 1014)

Programming for MIDI, C, and other appropriate techniques. Design and implementation of software sequencers, interface drivers, and hardware applications will be the focus.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1014-000 (12979)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krauss, Briggan

Fund of Audio Tech I: Stu Maint (MPATE-UE 1008)

An introduction to maintenance and troubleshooting concepts used in the recording studio. Procedures discussed are those necessary in utilizing sophisticated audio equipment and understanding essential aspects of studio design.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1008-000 (10656)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Glanz, Jake

Concert Recording (MPATE-UE 1011)

Introduction to the concepts of live concert recording. Microphone selection, characteristics & placement as well as acoustic problems encountered in concert halls will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to apply the lecture material by recording undergraduate rehearsals & recitals.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1011-000 (12977)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MPATE-UE 1011-000 (12978)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Studio Production Techniques (MPATE-UE 1005)

Principles covered in MPATE-UE1001 & MPATE-UE-1003 are put into practice with additional theory & techniques. Students perform various duties just as they would in a professional recording session. Studio Lab assignments are performed outside of class reinforcing weekly topics.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1005-000 (12127)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by O’Reilly, Michael

Analog Recording Technology (MPATE-UE 1001)

The physical aspects of sound, analog recording technology & studio production techniques are explained & demonstrated. Lecture topics include microphones, stereo recording, analog consoles, multi-track tape recording, equalization, compression, reverberation & mixing. Studio lab assignments are performed outside of class reinforcing weekly lecture topics

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1001-000 (10647)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Filadelfo, Gary


MPATE-UE 1001-000 (10650)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Filadelfo, Gary

Making Virtual Sense: 3D Graphic Studio for Critically-Driven Creative Applications (ARTS-UG 1647)

Until recently, the creation of interactive 3D graphics was only possible for large and capital-intensive uses: the armed forces, large-scale architectural/engineering work, mass entertainment. Now, open-source applications and powerful personal and portable computers are making it practical for individuals and small groups to independently build and share alternative visions. Whether you are interested in exploring new ways to construct complex networks of ideas in the present, or to imagine physical spaces to reflect and support new ways of life, this arts workshop provides a blend of critical orientation and hands-on experience. In this open project studio, the majority of course time and work will be taken up with the development of student-built individual or small team concepts, to be developed as 3D graphic “fly-through” models. Theoretical discussions will be initiated with a mix of relevant writings and media. Here is a representative sampling of sources: Douglas Engelbart, Eric Raymond, William Gibson, Zaha Hadid, Judith Donath, the Athenian Acropolis, the Kalachakra mandala, Salisbury Cathedral, the Schindler house, Artigas gardens, the 1958 World’s fair Philips pavilion, the Seagram’s building, Grant Theft Auto IV, the monastery of La Tourette, the Mangin plan, compendium.org, Betaville.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1647-000 (16961)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Skelton, Carl

The Meme: Images and Words Make Ideas (ARTS-UG 1664)

This course explores image making, writing and their juxtaposition, as a method of thinking through and evoking ideas. At times, images lead, and text follows, providing descriptions of images, and at other times, text leads and images illustrate that text. In the realm of the contemporary American meme, just about every time images and words are present they have an effect upon each other in the mind of the viewer, which changes the meaning of both, producing something which is more than what is present in both image and text. That third and phantasmic image exists in the mind. The examples of Chinese Literati painting, and Surrealism will provide a historical point of departure, from which we to engage 21st century examples of image and word juxtapositions that create new ideas. This course will provide students with a general history of the relationship between the image and word, and a critical understanding of the composition and decomposition of image-word printed and digital matter. Along with skills in Lino-cut printmaking, Risograph printmaking, and publication design, students will also write poetry, short essays, and art criticism. Students will participate in the content production, design, and publishing of a book and magazine, zine and poster.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1664-000 (17074)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bryant, Ernest

Digital Art and New Media (ARTS-UG 1635)

This workshop seeks to bring students from varying backgrounds together to engage in evaluating and sharing digital new media for the Internet and other new media art mediums. Each student brings to the class a set of experiences and skills, such as research, writing, design, film, music, photography, computer gaming, performance, animation, computer literacy, software knowledge, virtual reality, augmented reality, mixed reality, A.I. (Artificial Intelligence) Generative Art experiences, among others. The class will discuss new media concepts, content strategies, and frameworks that bridge theory and practice. Through lectures (including a survey of digital new media innovations), group discussions, virtual or other lectures and/or workshops, students will develop individual projects, based on their new media skills. The class intends to be a part of the development of the Virtual Reality (VR) Museum (“Virtual Museum XR”), or other Gallatin arts initiatives, such as Rabbit Hole. Digital new media projects may include digital photography, animated films, podcasts, sound art installations, TikTok, music videos, VR, AR, A.I. Generative Art, to name a few. Class projects, readings, and week-to-week journal-keeping reports are essential components of this workshop. They will reside in a designated Google Docs site, specific for this class. Students are encouraged to supply their own media and take advantage of NYU’s LinkedIn Learning new media tutorials and access NYU’s LaGuardia Studio and LaGuardia Co-op hardware and software opportunities.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1635-000 (16719)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Allen, Cynthia

Hardware Security (ENGR-UH 4320)

This course covers topics related to security and trustworthiness of electronic hardware. Lectures and in-class discussions on recent research papers cover the following topics: Trustworthiness of integrated circuits; counterfeit chips, hardware Trojans, reverse engineering and IP piracy. Design-for-Trust; hardware metering, logic encryption, split manufacturing, IC camouflaging. Encryption hardware; AES, DES, etc. Testability vs Security; misuse of test infrastructure to attack encryption hardware and countermeasures. Encrypted architectures; homomorphic encryption, privacy-preserving computation. Signal processing in the encrypted domain. Malware detection through hardware structures, side channel attacks, cyber-security for the smart grid. Lectures are complemented by hands-on lab exercises.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ENGR-UH 4320-000 (17229)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


ENGR-UH 4320-000 (17230)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Transportation and Traffic Engineering (ENGR-UH 3413)

The course introduces students to fundamental concepts that underlie highway design, traffic operations and control, and transportation systems. The course begins with vehicle performance and the role it has on road design. We later cover the fundamentals of traffic flow theory and operations. In combination with such fundamentals we also discuss the use and collection of traffic data, as well as more advanced concepts on traffic safety, public transportation, and traffic management and control. Moreover, we look at clear applications of the concepts covered in class with a real-world student led project.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3413-000 (3541)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Menendez, Monica


ENGR-UH 3413-000 (3542)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zekar, Aicha · Menendez, Monica

Thermodynamics (ENGR-UH 3710)

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of thermodynamics and their applications to engineering problems. The following topics are covered in this course: properties of pure substances; concepts of work and heat; closed and open systems; the fundamental laws of thermodynamics; Carnot and Clausius statements of the 2nd law; entropy and entropy production; heat engines, refrigerators, heat pumps; efficiencies, coefficients of performance.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3710-000 (3597)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ryu, Je Ir


ENGR-UH 3710-000 (3598)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Al-Chalabi, Mohammed · Ryu, Je Ir

Computer Organization and Architecture (ENGR-UH 3511)

The course introduces the principles of computer organization and basic architecture concepts. It discusses the basic structure of a digital computer and study in details formal descriptions, machine instruction sets design, formats and data representation, addressing structures, mechanization of procedure calls, memory management, arithmetic and logical unit, virtual and cache memory organization, I/O processing and interrupts, fundamental of reliability aspects. The course also covers performance and distributed system models. The labs emphasize experiential learning of computer organization and architecture concepts, and require students to use learned knowledge to create and build prototypes and evaluate their performance.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3511-000 (3593)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Maniatakos, Michail


ENGR-UH 3511-000 (3594)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Maniatakos, Michail · Annor, Prince

Senior Design Capstone Project I (ENGR-UH 4011)

Students learn about the process of design with measurable metrics, and how to incorporate appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints in the design process. Students learn how to clearly frame the design problem and follow the design process to result in an optimized solution. Students perform a review of the relevant literature, develop a preliminary design, generate solution concepts and selection criteria, and review and evaluate the chosen design. Students must consider social, economic, lifecycle, environmental, ethical, and other constraints, and must document the design process and the evolution of their design. This project culminates with a final report and presentation that proposes the actual design selected for further development and/or prototyping and testing in the subsequent semester.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 4011-000 (3947)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by George, Pradeep


ENGR-UH 4011-000 (4045)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by George, Pradeep

Engineering Statics (ENGR-UH 2011)

This course introduces students to the field of mechanics through study of rigid bodies in static equilibrium. Knowledge and understanding of static equilibrium is essential for future study of topics as diverse as dynamics, solid mechanics, structures, robotics, and fluid mechanics. The methods, techniques, theory, and application of equilibrium in the solution of engineering problems are presented for two-dimensional systems. Topics covered include collinear forces, coincident forces, general equilibrium, moments and torques, analysis of trusses, frames and machines, Coulomb friction, centroid, center of mass, and moments of inertia.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3556)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sousa, Rita Leal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3557)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sousa, Rita Leal · Mengiste, Eyob


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3792)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Celik, Kemal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (4361)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sousa, Rita Leal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3793)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ayed, Lana Odeh · Celik, Kemal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (4362)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mengiste, Eyob

Computer Programming for Engineers (ENGR-UH 1000)

The objective of the course is for students to acquire the fundamental knowledge of computer programming, develop transferable programming skills, and learn to solve engineering problems via programming. The course is primarily based on the C programming language and an introduction to another programming language such as MATLAB (to demonstrate transferring programming knowledge from one language to another). The course explores the application of engineering computation in various engineering domains including mechanical, civil, computer, and electrical engineering. The following topics are covered: introduction to computer systems, standard input/output, file input/output, decision structures, loop structures, functions, arrays, addressing, dynamically allocated memory, structures, introduction to object oriented programming, problem solving via programming algorithm design, and applications in another programming language such as MATLAB.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3554)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3555)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Jamil, Muhammad Hassan · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3567)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Negoiu, Elena · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3588)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Negoiu, Elena · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3991)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Jamil, Muhammad Hassan · Eid, Mohamad

Bioimaging (ENGR-UH 2812)

This introductory course to Bioimaging is designed to provide an understanding on how images of organs, tissues, cells and molecules can be obtained using different forms of penetrating radiation and waves. Students will learn the imaging techniques used for soft and hard tissue visualization such as X-ray, Computed Tomography (CT), Ultrasound (US), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Spectroscopy and Optical Imaging. The course will give students an insight into the theoretical physics of imaging, real-life clinical applications of these modalities and demonstration of post-processing of the images using high-level programming.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2812-000 (4287)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zam, Azhar


ENGR-UH 2812-000 (4288)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zam, Azhar · Sabah, Shafiya

Applied Machine Learning (ENGR-UH 3332)

Machine Learning is the basis for the most exciting careers in data analysis today. This course introduces students to the concepts of machine learning and deep learning. This course covers a broad introduction to machine learning techniques, which include both supervised learning and unsupervised learning techniques such as classification, support vector machines, decision trees, ensemble learning and random forests, dimensionality reduction, and neural networks and deep learning. In addition to learning about the most effective machine learning techniques, you will gain the practical implementation of applying these techniques to real engineering problems.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3332-000 (4110)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi · Annor, Prince


ENGR-UH 3332-000 (20903)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi · Fang, Yi

Computer-Aided Design (ENGR-UH 3720)

This course provides an introduction to computer-aided design (CAD) using solid modeling. Students learn to create solid object models using extrusions, revolutions, and swept paths, and learn to modify parts using cutting, patterns, fillets, chamfers, and other techniques. Assemblies of multiple parts are used to demonstrate the need for geometric tolerances, and students spend a large portion of class in hands-on use of software tools. The labs emphasize experiential learning of CAD concepts and applications using software tools.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3720-000 (4030)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Montalvo Navarette, Jorge


ENGR-UH 3720-000 (4031)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Montalvo Navarette, Jorge

Circuits Fundamentals (ENGR-UH 2019)

This module provides an introduction to electrical circuits. The topics covered include DC circuits, passive DC circuit elements, Kirchoff’s laws, electric power calculations, analysis of DC circuits, nodal and loop analysis techniques, voltage and current division, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems, and source free and forced responses of RL, RC and RLC circuits.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (3560)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Gyorgy, Andras


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (3561)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mulugeta, Tadesse · Gyorgy, Andras


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (3812)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rasras, Mahmoud


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (4062)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (3813)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mulugeta, Tadesse


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (4063)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Avdeev, Alexander

Probability and Statistics for Engineers (ENGR-UH 2010Q)

Introductory course in probability and statistics with an emphasis on how these topics are relevant in engineering disciplines. Topics in probability theory include sample spaces, and counting, random variables (discrete and continuous), probability distributions, cumulative density functions, rules and theorems of probability, expectation, and variance. Topics in statistics include sampling, central limit theorem, and linear regression. The course emphasizes correct application of probability and statistics and highlights the limitations of each method presented. NOTE: This course may be replaced with MATH-UH 1003Q or MATH-UH 2011Q

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2010Q-000 (3562)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain


ENGR-UH 2010Q-000 (4098)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Diabat, Ali


ENGR-UH 2010Q-000 (3628)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain · Ayed, Lana Odeh


ENGR-UH 2010Q-000 (4099)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ayed, Lana Odeh · Diabat, Ali

Numerical Methods (ENGR-UH 2017)

This course provides an introduction to the methods, techniques, theory, and application of numerical methods in the solution of engineering problems. Topics to be covered include the following: finding roots of equations, numerical differentiation and integration, time marching methods in solving ordinary differential equations, and optimization. MATLAB software is the primary computing environment.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2017-000 (3651)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Karathanasopoulos, Nikolaos


ENGR-UH 2017-000 (4055)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Karathanasopoulos, Nikolaos


ENGR-UH 2017-000 (3652)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Khalifa, Duoaa Magdi


ENGR-UH 2017-000 (4056)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Khalifa, Duoaa Magdi

Object-Oriented Programming (ENGR-UH 2510)

This intermediate-level programming course focuses on object oriented programming using C . Classes and objects including constructors, destructors, member functions and data members. Topics in this course include data representation, pointers, dynamic memory allocation and recursion, inheritance and templates, polymorphism, the process of compiling and linking using makefiles, memory management, exceptional control flow, introduction to performance evaluation, and optimization.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2510-000 (3818)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alhanai, Tuka


ENGR-UH 2510-000 (3819)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alhanai, Tuka

Digital Logic (ENGR-UH 2013)

This module provides a rigorous introduction to topics in digital logic design mostly focusing on combinational circuits but also touching upon basic concepts in sequential circuits. Introductory topics include: classification of digital systems, number systems and binary arithmetic, error detection and correction, and switching algebra. Combinational design analysis and synthesis topics include: logic function optimization, arithmetic units such as adders and subtractors, and control units such as decoders and multiplexers. A brief overview of sequential circuits by introducing basic memory elements such as flip-flops, and state diagrams concludes the module.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (3810)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (3811)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (3660)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (4060)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (3661)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (4061)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur

Conservation Laws in Engineering (ENGR-UH 2012)

Conservation laws play a fundamental role in the analysis of engineering problems by providing a framework to derive the relationships between various physical properties of isolated systems. This course aims to introduce the students to these laws, namely, the conservation of mass, conservation of linear momentum, conservation of angular momentum, conservation of energy, and conservation of charge. These laws of conservation will be derived in integral forms and applied to selected case studies involving electrical, chemical, thermal, and fluid mechanical systems. In addition to the development of a unified framework for analysis of engineering problems, this course will also help the students develop a deeper understanding of the concepts of control volume and mass, work and heat, fluid pressure and hydrostatics, properties of pure substances, and the fundamental laws of thermodynamics.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (3794)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Hashaikeh, Raed


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (20078)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Julias, Margaret


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (3795)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Hashaikeh, Raed · Salim, Wahib


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (4364)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Julias, Margaret


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (3558)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Hashaikeh, Raed


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (3559)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Al-Chalabi, Mohammed

Instrumentation, Sensors, Actuators (ENGR-UH 3110)

The course focuses on theory of measurement systems, selected electrical circuits and components for measurement, including passive and active filtering for signal conditioning, dynamic measurement system response characteristics, analog signal processing, analog to digital conversion, data acquisition, sensors, actuators and actuator characteristics. The laboratory involves topics related to the design of measurement systems pertaining to all disciplines of engineering such as data acquisition, operational amplifiers, sensors for the measurement of force, vibration, temperature etc. In addition, actuators will also be introduced, including electric motors and pneumatics. Design of virtual instrumentation systems using LabVIEW is also included.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ENGR-UH 3110-000 (17388)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Tzes, Anthony


ENGR-UH 3110-000 (17389)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Re-Design (CADT-UH 1025)

Giorgio Vasari defined Mannerism in terms still used today in Art History: in the wake of the Renaissance masters, copying became the standard way to learn. But what do we really learn by copying? Would a contemporary mannerism fit in today’s world, dominated by visual information? How then does creativity work? How does change happen? Why did we wait half a century before having personal computers in colors other than beige? Why do we seem oblivious to the manufactured filters mediating our observation of nature itself? What are the trade-offs when we delegate creative choices to Google’s algorithms? What separates the artists of the past and the brand consultants of today? This course addresses the role and limits of copying as students explore many facets of graphic design, visual communication, and artistic value. The vibrant visual culture-in-the-making of Abu Dhabi and the UAE provide an ideal background for such explorations. Students will elaborate on the tension (real or perceived) among today’s artists, designers, and scientists, while discussing why a multidisciplinary mind is fundamental for contemporary attempts to re-design the world around us.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


CADT-UH 1025-000 (17329)

Designing Health (CADT-UH 1053)

What constitutes innovation in medical technology? Is it always necessary? How is its value determined? How would we know if innovation has peaked, or reached a point of diminishing returns? What do global perspectives reveal about medical devices and healthcare in general? In what ways are cultural contexts important to consider? How can the med-tech innovation process address issues of diversity, inclusion, and accessibility? This course takes up the above questions through several case studies and examples, including bioprinting and COVID-19 vaccines — two topics with current relevance — as well as two of the most important historical med-tech innovations that have gone wrong in the past: The Malaria Project and The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. How can current design and innovation avoid repeating past mistakes? Working in cross-disciplinary teams, students will engage in design projects that will apply what we have learned from this course and address some of the paradoxes present in our ongoing quest to design healthier bodies and societies.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CADT-UH 1053-000 (3840)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sanjairaj, Vijayavenkataraman

Autonomous and Social Robots (CADT-UH 1038)

How do we feel about robots? With technological developments in capability, performance, autonomy, ease of use, and cost-effectiveness, robots have arrived in everyday life. This course considers the history and ethics of human-robot interaction and explores unsolved hurdles we face as robots assume a ubiquitous presence in our lives. How are robots currently integrating into human-centered, civic industries such as education, heath, and smart cities? What roles might robots play in the future of these industries? What are the economic and labor implications associated with robotic integration? How will consumers respond to the increased use of robots in daily life? How have popular media representations over the last century influenced the way we experience these changes? Topics will also include the miniaturization of robots and their use in situations such as focused drug delivery within the human body, save-and-rescue missions, or military combat. Students will assemble and program several Lego Mindstorm robots capable of carrying prefabricated objects and will also assemble a small house.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CADT-UH 1038-000 (3704)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by García de Soto, Borja


CADT-UH 1038-000 (7562)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by García de Soto, Borja

Memoir and Anti-Memoir: Experiments in Text and Image (CADT-UH 1027)

How does one attempt to write or portray the self? If we associate that practice with traditional memoir and self-portraiture forms, what happens when subjectivity is fundamentally unstable or under attack? Is the genre also simultaneously deconstructed? How is subjectivity literally made and remade through the exploration of new forms? In this course we will look at text and image projects across cultures, eras, locations, and across art forms that raise questions about the self and the collective, representation and memory, and about the remarkable as well as the everyday. Sometimes the doubt about attempts at portrayals is philosophical, but it may also be cultural-historical and context-dependent. To explore this question, and to develop skills in art, to experiment with the studio habits of artists, and to generate our own poetics of memoir/anti-memoir we will generate text and image experiments that both create and investigate an anti-memoir body of work.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CADT-UH 1027-000 (5220)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Magi, Jill

Silence (CADT-UH 1052)

How does “silence” help to define our sense of being and existence? Across different cultures, various philosophies of art, science, and society have viewed and thought about silence differently. This course invites students to think about and experience silence by asking three fundamental questions: 1) What does it mean to be silent? (Literally and metaphorically); 2) Does silence shape our lives? And if so, how? 3) Can we have an active relationship and recognition with silence just as we do with sound or action? Drawing on multi-disciplinary sources from around the world to explore the philosophical frameworks and thought systems that have engaged in the study and observation of silence, the syllabus will include works of art, literature, theater, films, architecture, and music, which students will engage via a mix of seminar, lecture, and studio methods of teaching, to enable the creations of their own artistic responses to their experience of silence and the material presented in class.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CADT-UH 1052-000 (19965)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Özhabeş, Özlem

Machines in Islamic Civilization (CADT-UH 1037X)

Is automation a science or a tool? Muslim contributions in automation, overlooked in the history of science, were long regarded as means for caliphs and the rich to impress the masses. But Muslim engineers excelled in creating complex automated systems, using them as gifts to foreign leaders, as public attractions, or to augment religious ceremony such as daily calls to prayer. Mainly powered by kinetic energy, these automata drew on scholars’ deep knowledge of hydraulics and complex levers and included musical instruments, horologia, automated drinking fountains, and clocks that told time using complex audiovisual tools. This course draws on historical sources and foundational science to explore Muslim advancements in automation. What roles did translation play as Muslim scientists encountered and documented the work of previous scholars? What were the basic automatic systems they developed and how do they compare to current technologies? How did they draw on environmental resources to develop automated systems without the need for non-renewable energy? Students will address such questions as they explore implications for their own projects in design and engineering.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CADT-UH 1037X-000 (3919)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Qasaimeh, Mohammad

Utilitas, Venustas, Firmitas (CADT-UH 1016)

Design seems to be omnipresent, but what is it? This course (whose title is Latin for usage, beauty, and stability) explores how design influences our life and investigates the fundamentals of “good design.” It takes a look at the status quo of the use of design in media, objects, and architecture, and observe its influence on art and technology from past to present. Design tools and processes will be highlighted. Based on the fusion of readings, study, discussion, and experiences, over the course of the semester students will develop an understanding of how mutually reinforcing and beneficiary a mix of Arts, Design, and Technology can be. Lecture and discussion will help develop the design of a bricolage: Every student will realize a product prototype to be displayed in an exhibition and a personal philosophy of about Arts, Design, and Technology.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


CADT-UH 1016-000 (17217)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alawadi, Khulood


CADT-UH 1016-000 (17243)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alawadi, Khulood

Bioinspiration (CADT-UH 1033)

In the 3.8 billion years since life began on Earth, nature has evolved. Inspired by this process, humans have replicated key design features to develop novel materials, devices, and structures in fields such as the arts, design, engineering, and the social sciences by replicating key design principles and features. This course asks how biology has inspired human design and thinking across different cultures and fields. Students will examine various examples in engineering, art, architecture, music, and social science to discuss how the human capacity for analogical reasoning has enabled the transfer of properties, mechanisms, and ideas from biology to design principles such as shape, surface, structure, making, information-processing, and social behavior. Using bio-inspired products such as gecko tape, Velcro, self-cleaning surfaces, and neuromorphic chips for inspiration, students will develop their own designs to address some of the 21st century’s most pressing issues, such as energy, water, environment, food, and health.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CADT-UH 1033-000 (3918)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Song, Yong-Ak (Rafael)

Creativity and Innovation (CADT-UH 1005)

Is creativity a gift or a skill? Can creativity be learned? Because creativity is deeply personal, this course will address these questions through individual and collective experiences. The heart of this course is the Personal Creativity Project – an opportunity for students to practice creativity by designing and executing a project of their choice. The project may be on any topic, from art and music to computer programs and business model development. The project will be complemented by reading assignments (completed prior to class), class discussions, and one-on-one meetings with the instructor. Students will leave the course with a completed project and a personal philosophy of creativity, based on the fusion of readings, study, discussion, and experience. The course provides a great deal of freedom for learning and does not provide step-by-step instructions. As a result, the successful completion of this course will require a significant amount of self-motivation.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CADT-UH 1005-000 (3626)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Julias, Margaret

Computational Social Science (CS-UH 2219E)

This course introduces students to various techniques and concepts that are essential for data scientists. It also provides an in-depth survey of the latest research methodology and topics that prepare the students to produce high quality research in Data Science. This seminar-based course will cover applications from different fields, such as sociology, psychology, network analysis, and artificial intelligence. In this context, the course will cover the use of computational techniques to model and predict various phenomena using real data. Students will be required to complete a course project, and to write up the results in a short article.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 2219E-000 (4282)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rahwan, Talal

Computer Systems Organization (CS-UH 2010)

The course focuses on understanding lower-level issues in computer design and programming. The course starts with the C programming language, moves down to assembly and machine-level code, and concludes with basic operating systems and architectural concepts. Students learn to read assembly code and reverse-engineer programs in binary. Topics in this course include the C programming language, data representation, machine-level code, memory organization and management, performance evaluation and optimization, and concurrency.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 2010-000 (3495)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ali, Karim · Mengal, Khalid


CS-UH 2010-000 (3933)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mengal, Khalid

Discrete Mathematics (CS-UH 1002)

Discrete mathematics concerns the study of mathematical structures that are discrete rather than continuous, and provides a powerful language for investigating many areas of computer science. Discrete structures are characterized by distinct elements, which are often represented by integers. Continuous mathematics on the other hand deals with real numbers. Topics in this course include: sets, counting techniques, logic, proof techniques, solving recurrence relations, number theory, probability, statistics, graph theory, and discrete geometry. These mathematical tools are illustrated with applications in computer science.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 1002-000 (3526)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fernandes, Joao Paulo · Ahmad, Liza


CS-UH 1002-000 (3624)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Mumtaz, Sara


CS-UH 1002-000 (3917)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Ahmed, Dena


CS-UH 1002-000 (19983)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 1002-000 (19984)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 1002-000 (19985)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Computer Networks (CS-UH 3012)

Have you ever wondered how the internet or Facebook is able to support a billion simultaneous users? This course teaches students the design and implementation of such Internet-scale networks and networked systems. Students learn about the principles and techniques used to construct large-scale networks and systems. Topics in this course include routing protocols, network congestion control, wireless networking, network security, and peer-to-peer systems. Upon completing this course, students are able to initiate and critique research ideas, implement their own working systems, and evaluate such systems. To make the issues more concrete, the class includes several multi-week projects requiring significant design and implementation. The goal is for students to learn not only what computer networks are and how they work today, but also why they are designed the way they are and how they are likely to evolve in the future. Examples are drawn primarily from the internet.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 3012-000 (3752)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zaki, Yasir


CS-UH 3012-000 (3791)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zaki, Yasir · Ahmed, Dena

Capstone Project in Computer Science 1 (CS-UH 4001)

The capstone experience in Computer Science requires students to engage in a long-term, mentored learning experience that culminates in a piece of original work. The specific project is developed during the Research Seminar in Computer Science. During the Capstone Project, the proposed work comes to fruition in the form of a research paper along the lines of those in a scholarly computer science journal. Students also participate in a capstone research symposium during which they present their work orally.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 4001-000 (3841)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 4001-000 (3842)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Park, Minsu


CS-UH 4001-000 (3850)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Abouzied, Azza


CS-UH 4001-000 (3851)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Eid, Mohamad


CS-UH 4001-000 (3852)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Kaufman, Aaron


CS-UH 4001-000 (4033)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi


CS-UH 4001-000 (3853)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zaki, Yasir


CS-UH 4001-000 (3854)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Habash, Nizar


CS-UH 4001-000 (3855)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Baghdadi, Mohamed Riyadh


CS-UH 4001-000 (4034)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rokers, Bas


CS-UH 4001-000 (3843)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Shafique, Muhammad


CS-UH 4001-000 (4102)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Salam, Hanan


CS-UH 4001-000 (4103)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Pöpper, Christina


CS-UH 4001-000 (3844)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mourad, Azzam


CS-UH 4001-000 (3845)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Difallah, Djellel


CS-UH 4001-000 (3846)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rahwan, Talal


CS-UH 4001-000 (3847)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Puccetti, Goffredo


CS-UH 4001-000 (3848)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Oudah, Mai


CS-UH 4001-000 (3849)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 4001-000 (4125)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Capstone Project in Computer Science 2 (CS-UH 4002)

Continuation of CS-UH 4001

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 4002-000 (3856)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 4002-000 (4027)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Park, Minsu


CS-UH 4002-000 (3860)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Abouzied, Azza


CS-UH 4002-000 (3861)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Eid, Mohamad


CS-UH 4002-000 (4104)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Kaufman, Aaron


CS-UH 4002-000 (4105)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi


CS-UH 4002-000 (4348)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Difallah, Djellel


CS-UH 4002-000 (4349)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rahwan, Talal


CS-UH 4002-000 (3862)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zaki, Yasir


CS-UH 4002-000 (4350)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Puccetti, Goffredo


CS-UH 4002-000 (4470)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Pöpper, Christina


CS-UH 4002-000 (3857)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Habash, Nizar


CS-UH 4002-000 (3858)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Baghdadi, Mohamed Riyadh


CS-UH 4002-000 (4101)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rokers, Bas


CS-UH 4002-000 (4344)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Shafique, Muhammad


CS-UH 4002-000 (4345)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Salam, Hanan


CS-UH 4002-000 (4346)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Pöpper, Christina


CS-UH 4002-000 (4347)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mourad, Azzam

Introduction to Computer Science (CS-UH 1001)

Computer Science is an innovative and exciting field that focuses on producing efficient solutions for solving problems in any field. This course introduces students to the foundations of computer science. Students learn how to design algorithms to solve problems and how to translate these algorithms into working computer programs using a high-level programming language. The course covers core programming concepts including basic computation, data structures, decision structures, iterative structures, file input/output, and recursion. Students also learn the elements of Object Oriented Programming (OOP), such as objects, classes, inheritance, abstraction, and polymorphism. A final project allows students to combine these concepts to produce a large program of their design.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 1001-000 (3489)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Pötsch, Thomas · Zeeshan, Faisal


CS-UH 1001-000 (3512)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Pötsch, Thomas · Mumtaz, Sara


CS-UH 1001-000 (3587)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Mumtaz, Sara

Desert Media Art (IM-UH 3315)

How does bringing an artwork outside change its interaction with people and the environment? What new possibilities exist if we create an electronic artwork that can travel with us and be installed anywhere? Desert Media Art is a production-based course where students research, propose, produce, install, and document an electronic artwork designed for Abu Dhabi’s desert. The desert is an iconic landscape with a rich history of use by artists as an alternative to the white box of the gallery. We will study historical and contemporary outdoor art practices as well as local ecology and culture. Students will work in groups to create an Arduino-based project that is battery powered and ready to be taken into the field. The project will be installed in the desert, documented, and then presented in an indoor exhibition. Technologies used will include Arduino, 3D printing for enclosure design, rapid prototyping using laser cutting, battery power, and video production. Students will not just build a project and install it in the field, but also learn how to communicate their work to the public using video documentation and indoor exhibition.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IM-UH 3315-000 (4008)

Design Project (CS-UY 4523)

Students or several students work with a faculty member and/or graduate students on a current topic in computer science. Each term, a project course with a particular theme is offered by the Department of Computer and Information Science. A faculty member assigns individual or group projects. The project course is highly structured and supervised closely by faculty. Students are expected to use the design and project-management skills they learned in CS-UY 4513 Software Engineering. Alternatively, students may work with a faculty member on an individual project of mutual interest. A written report and oral presentation are required. | Prerequisite: CS-UY 4513 or CS-UY 3513.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4523-000 (12266)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred


CS-UY 4523-000 (12267)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred

Penetration Testing and Vulnerability Analysis (CS-UY 4773)

The course will start off with an in-depth review of the exploitation mitigations introduced in modern operating systems. The instructors will demonstrate their limitations through simple examples and gradually develop the basic exploitation techniques into more complicated methods applicable to real-world exploitation. Unlike most other exploitation courses, we will focus on approaching exploitation as a creative problem-solving process rather than an exercise of applying cookbook techniques to common types of vulnerabilities. Most of the course will focus on the hands-on application of the material through exercises and leading the students through the development of reliable exploits for recently patched vulnerabilities in widely used software. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: CS-UY 3933 and (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better). | Prerequisites for CAS Students: CS-UY 3933 and CSCI-UA 201. | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UY 3933 and CS-AD 103

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4773-000 (16116)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at ePoly
Instructed by Rajpal, Mantej

PROBLEM SOLVING AND PROGRAMMING I (CS-UY 1113)

This course introduces problem solving and computer programming and is for undergraduate engineering students who do not have prior experience in programming in any language. The course covers fundamentals of computer programming and its underlying principles using the Python programming language. Concepts and methods introduced in the course are illustrated by examples from engineering and other disciplines. | Co-requisite: EX-UY 1; Anti-requisite: CS-UY 1114

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 1113-000 (12329)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Romero Cruz, Sebastian


CS-UY 1113-000 (12330)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Romero Cruz, Sebastian


CS-UY 1113-000 (12331)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12332)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12333)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12334)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12335)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12336)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12337)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter

Design Projects (PHTI-UT 1020)

Prerequisite: Photography & Imaging: Multimedia or permission by the department. This is an intense design class for the crossover creature who yearns to design their own exhibit, create a street poster, develop an ad campaign, design titles for a film, invent a visual identity for a musical score, etc. This will be a hands-on process-driven class that will push you to imagine, create, and produce. Students must know InDesign.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


PHTI-UT 1020-000 (13240)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cuomo, Yolanda

French/African Relations (SCA-UA 9914)

A historical and political inquiry into the French system of relations with Francophone Africa from the ‘race to Empire’ in the 19th century to the current day. The main goals of the course are: to describe the historical development of French-African relations from the colonial to the post-independence era; to investigate the political, economic and cultural mechanisms of French influence in contemporary Francophone Africa; to understand the consequences for France of complex developments subsequent to colonialism, such as African immigration in France. Conducted in French.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


SCA-UA 9914-000 (18471)
09/01/2023 – 12/06/2023 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by Taraud, Christelle

Elementary Czech I (RUSSN-UA 9201)

Students work on pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary enrichment. Emphasis is placed on developing and enhancing listening, comprehension and oral skills. Additional hours are offered to improve pronunciation. Written and oral examinations required.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RUSSN-UA 9201-000 (18092)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by

Intermediate Russian I (RUSSN-UA 9003)

The course combines the traditional grammatical approach with a communicational, interactive method. Since the size of the classes is usually small we can put a great emphasis on oral drills and improving speaking in Russian on various subjects. Students will be given short topics to talk about at the beginning of every lesson and most written essays will have to be presented orally in class. The class also focuses on improving your writing skills and broadening your vocabulary. That is why the students are expected to keep a diary in Russian and write several compositions during the course. The students will also read several Russian short stories which will be discussed in class. We will review familiar grammar and study some advanced grammatical structures. The students will do considerable amount of grammar and vocabulary exercises in the Workbook as part of the home assignments. Several short lectures on various aspects of Russian culture and history will be given during the course and we will watch two Russian films that would be followed by the discussions.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RUSSN-UA 9003-000 (18088)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by

Advanced Russian I (RUSSN-UA 9107)

The course combines the traditional grammatical approach with a communicational, interactive method. Since the size of the classes is usually small we can put a great emphasis on improving speaking in Russian on various subjects. Students will be given short topics to talk about at the beginning of every lesson and most written essays will have to be presented orally in class. The class also focuses on improving your writing skills. That is why the students are expected to keep a diary in Russian and write several compositions during the course. The students will also read several Russian short stories in original which will be discussed in class. We will review familiar grammar and study some advanced grammatical structures. The greater emphasis is also put on and broadening your vocabulary and the students will do considerable amount of vocabulary exercises as part of the home assignments. Several short lectures on various aspects of Russian culture and history will be given during the course and we will watch two Russian films that would be followed by the discussions.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RUSSN-UA 9107-000 (18090)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by

Elementary Russian I (RUSSN-UA 9001)

The course combines the traditional grammatical approach with a communicational, interactive method. Since the size of the classes is usually small we can put a great emphasis on oral drills and getting the pronunciation right from the beginning. This course is tailored for students who have never taken Russian but some linguistic awareness about Slavic languages is welcome. Students will be introduced to the grammatical complexity of the Russian language and will have the opportunity to master enough Russian to cope with everyday situations in Russian. The students will do considerable amount of grammar and vocabulary exercises in the Workbook as part of the home assignments.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RUSSN-UA 9001-000 (18086)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by

Abnormal Psychology (PSYCH-UA 9051)

The kinds, dynamics, causes, and treatment of psychopathology. Topics include early concepts of abnormal behavior; affective disorders, anxiety disorders, psychosis, and personality disorders; the nature and effectiveness of traditional and modern methods of psychotherapy; and viewpoints of major psychologists past and present.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


PSYCH-UA 9051-000 (9950)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by

Western European Politics (POL-UA 9510)

Study of the politics of Britain, Ireland, France, and Germany. Compares the historical origins of these systems and analyzes their institutions as manifestations of their social and political culture and traditions. Treats each country’s current politics and political trends. Attempts to introduce the basic concepts of comparative political analysis in developing cross-cultural theory.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


POL-UA 9510-000 (3989)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Harmon, Josephine

Politics of Near & Middle East (POL-UA 9540)

The course description for this Topics in Politics course varies depending on the topic taught. Please view the course descriptions in the course notes section below.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


POL-UA 9540-000 (3992)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Tue,Thu
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Segal, Hagai


POL-UA 9540-000 (20920)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Segal, Hagai

Strategies for Independent Producing (FMTV-UT 1092)

Today’s content creators must be entrepreneurs, navigating dynamically changing industry. How does emerging talent gain traction in a ’tsunami wave’ of independent films, episodics, webisodes and podcasts? This class explores development, funding, and legal strategies to make, market and distribute DIY low and ultra-low budget projects. Ones you can make now. Students will develop core competencies, culminating in a pitch deck for a viable indie feature film.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1092-000 (19479)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pichirallo, Joe

Choreography: A Field Guide for Dance (ARTS-UG 1220)

This class is a guide through the works of choreographers who can teach us the elements of making dance and enable us to create our own movement identity. The psychological storytelling of Martha Graham, George Balanchine’s blazing neo-classicism, the chance field dances of Merce Cunningham, Twyla Tharp’s humorous inversions, the deconstructions of William Forsythe, Mathew Bourne’s gay Swan Lake, and the powerful Black gospel songs of Alvin Ailey are observed through video and readings. After a warmup of technique and improvisation, the student begins with small movement studies, leading to group studies of increasing complexity, with teacher and students responding with supportive feedback. New this semester will be a section, “Dance as Protest,” which explores texts such as Hot Feet and Social Change: African Dance and Diaspora Communities. We will study the movie In the Heights, where Afro-Caribbean dance, ballet, contemporary and hip hop convey ideas about community and representation. Texts include The Intimate Art of Choreography and “Dance in the Age of Black Lives Matter.” Students can have studied dance or simply wish to move and compose using their body and imagination. Student works in a final performance in the theater will be recorded.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1220-000 (17011)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Posin, Kathryn

Issues & Ideas: (JOUR-UA 9505)

This course aims to bring together diverse issues and perspectives in the rapidly evolving and changing area of international/global communication. Through a historical perspective, a framework will be established for the appreciation of the development of the immense scope, disparity, and complexity of this rapidly evolving field. Students will be encouraged to critically assess shifts in national, regional, and international media patterns of production, distribution, and consumption over time, leading to a critical analysis of the tumultuous contemporary global communication environment. Essential concepts of international communication will be examined, including trends in national and global media consolidation, cultural implications of globalization, international broadcasting, information flows, international communication law and regulation, and trends in communication and information technologies. The focus of the course will be international, with attention being paid both to Western-based multimedia conglomerates, as well as to the increasing global prominence of media corporations based in other regions, contributing to the reversal of international media flows and challenging the global hegemony of the Western media producers. Particular emphasis will be on the Czech Republic, as an empirical example of a national media system affected by global media flows.

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


JOUR-UA 9505-000 (3457)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Klvana, Tomas

Modern Italy (ITAL-UA 9868)

This course introduces contemporary Italy in all its complexity and fascination. Reviewing politics, economics, society, and culture over the past two centuries, the course has a primary goal — to consider how developments since the 1800s have influenced the lives and formed the outlook of today’s Italians. In other words, we are engaged in the historical search for something quite elusive: Italian “identity”. Topics will include the unification of the country, national identity in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the First World War, and Italian fascism, World War Two and the resistance, the post-war Italian Republic, the economic “miracle”, the South, the Mafia, terrorism, popular culture, and the most recent political and social developments, including Italy and the European Union. Lectures combine with readings and films (taking advantage of Italy’s magnificent post-war cinema).

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITAL-UA 9868-000 (2402)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Lombardo, Davide

Conversations in Italian (ITAL-UA 9101)

Students entering the course should have mastered the fundamental structure of Italian. The course is designed to help students gain confidence and increase their effectiveness in speaking present-day Italian. Through discussions, oral reports, and readings, students develop vocabulary in a variety of topics, improve pronunciation, and learn an extensive range of idiomatic expressions. Conducted in Italian.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


ITAL-UA 9101-000 (2594)
05/21/2024 – 07/01/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by

Financial Accounting (MG-UY 2204)

This course provides a solid foundation in constructing and interpreting financial statements. Topics include: accounting terminology, financial-statement preparation and analysis, liquidity and credit-risk ratios, depreciation calculations, revenue recognition, accrued liabilities and asset valuation. Also covered are the effects of equity transactions, cash flows and various accounting methods on financial statements.

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 2204-000 (14066)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by TALISSE, EDWARD


MG-UY 2204-000 (14067)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kohli, Ashish

HUMAN-CENTERED PRODUCT DESIGN STUDIO (MG-UY 3724)

This course is an industrial design overview for non-designers. It explores the industrial design process from researching and establishing user and client needs to developing product specifications, prototyping and iterating. It also covers conceptual and visual design, detail design, design for manufacturing, and design for environmental sustainability. It includes skills such as sketching, model making, 3 D printing techniques. The course is formulated as two short exercises and one semester-long project in which teams choose from several product design categories and develop their ideas from concept to prototype. Probable Tandon MakerSpace related material fees. | Prerequisite: MakerSpace Safety Course

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 3724-000 (14096)

Environmental Social Movements (ENVST-UA 9481)

How do social movements form in response to environmental concerns? What makes them effective or ineffective? This course analyses the various social movements that organized in response to environmental concerns. Both historical and sociological dimensions of environmental movements are covered, with particular attention given to how issues of environmental protection and social justice intersect. At NYU Berlin, the course includes American (I), European, and in particular German (II), as well as global movements (III).

Environmental Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENVST-UA 9481-000 (2369)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by

Dynamics (ME-UY 3223)

The course explores three-dimensional treatment of the kinematics of particles and rigid bodies using various coordinate systems, Newton’s laws, work, energy, impulse, momentum, conservative force fields, impact and rotation and plane motion of rigid bodies. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: ME-UY 2213 | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-UH 2011

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ME-UY 3223-000 (14918)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ME-UY 3223-000 (15064)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

THERMODYNAMICS (ME-UY 3333)

The course centers on properties of pure substances; concepts of work and heat; closed and open systems. Topics: Fundamental laws of thermodynamics. Carnot and Clasius statements of the 2nd law; entropy and entropy production; heat engines, refrigerators, heat pumps; efficiencies, coefficients of performance.| Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: MA-UY 1124 | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: MATH-UH 1020

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 3333-000 (12720)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Haverkamp, Sven


ME-UY 3333-000 (12721)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at ePoly
Instructed by Thorsen, Richard

Statics (ME-UY 2213)

The course covers three-dimensional vector treatment of the static equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies. Topics: Equivalent force and couple systems. Distributed force systems. Static analysis of trusses, frames and machines. Friction, impending motion. Methods of virtual work. | Prerequisite: PH-UY 1013 and MA-UY 1024

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 2213-000 (12689)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Benbelkacem, Ghania


ME-UY 2213-000 (12690)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hajesfandiari, Arezoo

Introduction to Materials Science (ME-UY 2813)

Students in this course become familiar with atomic structure and bonding, atomic arrangement in crystals, crystal imperfections, mechanical behavior and failure of materials and binary phase diagrams. | Brooklyn Students: Co-requisite PH-UY 1013 | Abu Dhabi Students: Prerequisite ENGR-UH 2012

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 2813-000 (12715)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Behera, Rakesh

Composition/Conversation (GERM-UA 9111)

Composition & Conversation is designed for post-intermediate students of German who have a solid grasp of German grammar and vocabulary and wish to extend their knowledge of the German language, history, and culture through reading, watching films, discussions, and writing. Conversation & Composition is a reading- and writing-intensive course. Emphasis will be placed on refining written expression and developing the ability to express, discuss, and argue opinions.This course will give you an overview of recent German political, social and cultural history after 1945 and onwards. Focus will be placed on moments of social criticism and changes – from the youth cultures in the 50s and 80s to the women’s movement and ecological protests, from love happenings and terrorism to mass demonstrations and the fall of the wall. During the course, we will explore narratives that are related to our topics from a variety of genres: newspaper/magazine articles, TV/radio documentaries, music, film, photography, and other visual material. The class is taught entirely in German and emphasizes the language skills necessary to communicate effectively in a foreign language speaking, reading, viewing, writing, and listening.

German (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


GERM-UA 9111-000 (2334)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by

A History of London (HIST-UA 9127)

This course examines the growth and importance of London from the Roman invasion of 43 AD to the present day. Students will learn about London’s changing economic and political role, and will understand how London grew to dominate the commerce, industry and culture of England. They will find out how London became the biggest city the world had ever known, and how it coped (or failed to cope) with the social and environmental problems created by its enormous size. The classroom sessions will be divided between a lecture and a class discussion. From week two onwards the class will begin with a discussion of the topic or period covered in the previous week‚s lecture, in which students will be expected to use knowledge and ideas gathered from lectures and from their weekly reading. There will also be four walking tours of parts of London which relate to the period we are studying at a particular time.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


HIST-UA 9127-000 (2426)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by

Are Friends Electric? Music, Science, & Futurism in the 21st Century (REMU-UT 1229)

Historically, the music business has generally relinquished the most significant inventions and innovations to third parties. And while many can recite the contemporary Pavlovian catch phrases of the moment, what about the next wave of science and thinking that will impact music? This class will seek to identify, understand and predict the latest advancements in science that will serve to influence and transform music consumption in the next 20 years.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


REMU-UT 1229-000 (13182)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kolosine, Errol

Social Media Strategy (MKTG-UB 9045)

This course will introduce students to social media marketing. Through case studies, interactive sessions, and class exercises, students will learn best practices and develop the skills to connect business objectives with social media strategy, platforms and tactics. We will study how to develop a strategy for a product or service in social media, how to execute that strategy and how to assess the results. Topics will include choosing appropriate platforms, creating effective and engaging social media content, content management, social listening and creating a social media plan. The course also has a practical component, for which students work in small groups and individually.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MKTG-UB 9045-000 (4955)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Grazzini, Laura

Digital Business Strategy (MKTG-UB 9056)

This course covers the digital technology industry (e.g. consumer electronics, software) from a strategic and marketing perspective. The objectives are to understand how these industries function, the unique challenges they face, and how digital technology companies can leverage their strengths to achieve success in the marketplace. The focus is on understanding the interactions between competition, technology evolution, and firm capabilities.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MKTG-UB 9056-000 (4852)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by

Digital Business Strategy (MKTG-UB 56)

This course covers the digital technology industry (e.g. consumer electronics, software) from a strategic and marketing perspective. The objectives are to understand how these industries function, the unique challenges they face, and how digital technology companies can leverage their strengths to achieve success in the marketplace. The focus is on understanding the interactions between competition, technology evolution, and firm capabilities.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Spoken Contemporary French (FREN-UA 9101)

This course is designed to help students to develop vocabulary, learn new idiomatic expressions, and improve fluency and pronunciation. The emphasis is on the understanding and production of contemporary spoken French through a study of authentic documents such as radio and television interviews, advertisements, and spontaneous oral productions.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FREN-UA 9101-000 (2808)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


FREN-UA 9101-000 (2538)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Arts and Cultures of Modernity (ACM-UF 201)

This course explores the arts from the late17th/early18th-century to the post-World War II era, examining how they define and reflect both local cultural views and rapidly shifting global understandings of the world. The course considers how the diverse conceptions and conditions of modernity both shaped and were shaped by the arts around the world. Many of the issues pertinent to the course — industrialization/urbanization; the dislocations, disasters, and opportunities that followed cross-cultural contact; colonialism, decolonization, conflicts of political ideology, and liberation struggles; fundamental redefinitions of mind, language, gender, and sexual identity — have had very different effects in various parts of the world; instructors encourage students to explore what it means to study the arts from global perspectives and what “globalization” itself has meant and means in the context of the arts.

Art and Cultures of Modernity (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ACM-UF 201-000 (19000)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nickowitz, Peter


ACM-UF 201-000 (19001)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Culver, Brian


ACM-UF 201-000 (19002)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nickowitz, Peter


ACM-UF 201-000 (19003)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hatcher, Jessamyn


ACM-UF 201-000 (19004)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hatcher, Jessamyn


ACM-UF 201-000 (19005)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Thomas


ACM-UF 201-000 (19006)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Culver, Brian


ACM-UF 201-000 (19007)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yearous-Algozin, Joseph


ACM-UF 201-000 (19008)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hussein, Linnea


ACM-UF 201-000 (19009)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tharoor, Tilottama


ACM-UF 201-000 (19010)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yearous-Algozin, Joseph


ACM-UF 201-000 (19011)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Squillace, Robert


ACM-UF 201-000 (19012)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schwarzbach, Fredric


ACM-UF 201-000 (19013)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Matos Martin, Eduardo


ACM-UF 201-000 (19014)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Matos Martin, Eduardo


ACM-UF 201-000 (19015)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hatcher, Jessamyn


ACM-UF 201-000 (19016)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hussein, Linnea


ACM-UF 201-000 (19017)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Thomas


ACM-UF 201-000 (19018)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Thomas


ACM-UF 201-000 (19019)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Newman, Roberta


ACM-UF 201-000 (19020)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Matos Martin, Eduardo


ACM-UF 201-000 (19021)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Newman, Roberta


ACM-UF 201-000 (19022)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Paliwoda, Daniel


ACM-UF 201-000 (19023)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tharoor, Tilottama


ACM-UF 201-000 (19024)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Paliwoda, Daniel


ACM-UF 201-000 (19025)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Deutsch, Katherine


ACM-UF 201-000 (19026)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Deutsch, Katherine

English Novel in The 19th Century (ENGL-UA 9530)

The nineteenth century was the great age of the English novel. This course charts the evolution of the form during this period, exploring texts by major authors including Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, George Eliot and Thomas Hardy. Close attention to narrative, questions of mimesis and publishing practices will combine with the exploration of a range of significant contemporary discourses relating to shifting conceptions of gender, sexuality, religion, science, class, and race. These varied contexts will help us to consider formal, stylistic and thematic continuities as well as discontinuities and innovations. Taking advantage of our local surroundings, we will also explore changing representations of London and trace the enduring legacy of this period in the twenty-first-century city.

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGL-UA 9530-000 (2721)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by

Unruly Images: Centering the (In)visible and (Im)possible (OART-UT 833)

This course explores unruly images, bodies, and even feelings that exist at the margins of categorization, making them powerful subjects for artistic work. We will manipulate image-making tools and give form to expressions that reveal the hidden structures of power. Through lectures, discussions, workshops, and readings, we will look at images previously deemed unimaginable due to material affordance and bias (Rosa Menkman); illegitimate emotions that fall outside western standards of empathy (Xine Yao); liminal bodies, faces, and spaces that exist between conventional categories. We will pay particular attention to selected writings from Legacy Russel, Catherine D’Ignazio, Lauren Klein, Peter Galison, Hito Steyerl, Ursula K. Le Guin, etc and apply these critiques to emerging perceptual technologies that the students will use to create their projects. This class is also designed for students who look to explore emerging photo techniques (volumetric capturing, simulations, AR/VR, video games, animations, WebGL) as their creative toolkit, have interests in the theory and pedagogy of photography and participatory processes, and seek to reimagine new forms of representation through the study of intersectional mappings of the face, body, and spatial dimensions.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OART-UT 833-000 (13615)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Thu1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by

Japanese Animation & New Media (EAST-UA 708)

This course looks at the terms and conditions of Japanese animation (primarily, though not exclusively, anime) as, in many ways, a new and unique mode of expression. The course is framed in which anime might, or might not, shift earlier modes of expression (both literary and animated): the prevalence of mythology in animation and the tension between mythology and ideology; the importance of genre; and the impact of ?old? and ?new? media on narrative structure and reception. Implications of these conditions for thinking about ?Japanese? culture are also considered.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


EAST-UA 708-000 (19320)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Looser, Thomas

Sonic Utopia: Unconventional Applications for Sound (OART-UT 1096)

Sound is physical. It can move objects, vibrate surfaces, perceptually alter our emotions, and shape the way viewers engage with spaces. As artists, we are conditioned to aspire to situate our work within traditional settings. How can we reposition sound as a main element of a work within unconventional contexts? This course will use the question of a sonic utopia as a platform to create interdisciplinary projects that exist between installation, sculpture, video, performance, movement, and music. Students will learn sound theories through lectures and in-class workshops and are encouraged to incorporate their individual interests into each of the four main projects that aim to position sound as a primary element of a work in order to expand the possibilities of working with sound.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OART-UT 1096-000 (13635)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Life Drawing: The Figure (FMTV-UT 1112)

Reccomended for students studying both animation and live action. This course is designed to train animation students to think visually, and to strengthen their overall drafting and design skills. The focus of the course is drawing humans and animals from live subjects, thereby learning to translate the three-dimensional world into two-dimensional terms. Drafting skills are important to all animators, regardless of their chosen media or focus. In particular, strong drafting skills are essential for character animators. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1112-000 (19493)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Camhy, Sherry

Impressionism to Post-Impressionism (ARTH-UA 9412)

Beginning by considering how impressionism refined and redirected the artistic aims of 19th-century realism, follows the development of progressive art to the brink of cubism and pure abstraction in the first years of the 20th century. Following impressionism and post-impressionism, close attention is paid to symbolism, aestheticism, art nouveau, the Arts and Crafts movement, fauvism, and expressionism. The aesthetic aims of these movements are analyzed in tandem with the social and cultural conditions that generated them.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTH-UA 9412-000 (2799)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Anthropology of Indigenous Australia (ANTH-UA 9037)

This course offers an introduction to some of the classical and current issues in the anthropology of Indigenous Australia. The role of anthropology in the representation and governance of Indigenous life is itself an important subject for anthropological inquiry, considering that Indigenous people of Australia have long been the objects of interest and imagination by outsiders for their cultural formulations of kinship, ritual, art, gender, and politics. These representations—in feature films about them (such as Rabbit-Proof Fence and Australia), New Age Literature (such as Mutant Message Down Under), or museum exhibitions (such as in the Museum of Sydney or the Australian Museum)—are now also in dialogue with Indigenous forms of cultural production, in genres as diverse as film, television, drama, dance, art and writing. The course will explore how Aboriginal people have struggled to reproduce themselves and their traditions on their own terms, asserting their right to forms of cultural autonomy and self-determination. Through the examination of ethnographic and historical texts, films, archives and Indigenous life-writing accounts, we will consider the ways in which Aboriginalities are being challenged and constructed in contemporary Australia. The course will consist of lectures interspersed with discussions, student presentations, and films/other media; we may also have guest presenters.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ANTH-UA 9037-000 (2844)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by

Animal Minds (ANST-UA 410)

This course examines the philosophy of cognitive ethology and comparative psychology. We begin by discussing the nature of animal minds. Are animals conscious? Do they experience pain? Do they have beliefs? Do they use language? Are they self-conscious? How can we know? This involves applying concepts from metaphysics and epistemology to research in cognitive ethology and comparative psychology. We then discuss more general questions like: Are animals agents? Do they have free will? Do they live meaningful lives? Do they have moral rights? This involves applying concepts from ethics, existentialism, and other areas of philosophy to our conclusions about animal minds. Finally, we also ask, along the way, how research on animal minds can affect our philosophical theories. For example, should we revise our theories of consciousness, language, agency, morality, and so on if they seem to have implausible implications about animals?

Animal Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ANST-UA 410-000 (23049)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Franks, Becca

ENTREPRENEURSHIP (MG-UY 4404)

This course focuses on key aspects of entrepreneurship as a critical engine for innovation. It also treats entrepreneurship as a state of mind that is not limited to small firms. Students discuss current theories and practices related to starting and managing entrepreneurial enterprises, emphasizing firms in technology- , information- and knowledge-intensive environments. Particular attention is paid to the critical issues of (1) identifying opportunities that provide competitive advantage; (2) the development of a solid business plan; (3) the marketing of new ventures; (4) entrepreneurial business operations, including human-resource and process management; (5) ethical and social issues in entrepreneurial firms; and (6) financial management and fund raising for entrepreneurial firms. | Prerequisites: Junior or senior student status.

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 4404-000 (14073)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Husain, Badrul


MG-UY 4404-000 (14074)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Jimenez Leon, Bertha

Disability Studies (CAM-UY 2204)

This course dynamically engages students in the world of disability. As a member of a team including a guest consultant with a disability, students will discover that person’s interests, abilities, and desires and portray them with digital storytelling. This active learning approach, carefully guided by the instructor, is enhanced with readings, guest lectures, videos and field trips. Students will learn about disability history, assistive technology and universal design. The end-of-semester is celebrated with a formal presentation of the person-centered projects. The aim is to show the individual, making the “invisible visible.” Satisfies a HuSS Elective.

Culture, Arts, and Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CAM-UY 2204-000 (16608)


CAM-UY 2204-000 (16609)


CAM-UY 2204-000 (16610)


CAM-UY 2204-000 (16611)

Jazz History (MPAJZ-UE 1121)

This course surveys the history and development of jazz music in America from the mid 1800s to current trends in popular music. Through a historical timeline, student will study jazz music’s range of styles as informed by social, regional, cultural, technological, and political trends. Realizing that all music is a reflection of historical events and the cultures they are informed by, students will analyze the close connection between jazz music and why it is known as America’s true original artform.

Music Instrumental: Jazz (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPAJZ-UE 1121-000 (9959)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Drummond, Willis

Dance as an Art Form (MPADE-UE 1278)

Dance is an integral & defining component of cultures throughout the world & throughout history. This course introduces students to dance as a live & performing art through a variety of experiences including attendance at live performances, examination of videos & theoretical texts, & physical participation in the practice & performance of dance. Through discussions, written assignments, & the creation of original dance compositions, students will explore the history & cultural relevance of a variety of forms of dance within their own lives, larger society, & the global community beyond. Liberal Arts Core/CORE-MAP Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Expressive Cultures

Dance Education (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPADE-UE 1278-000 (14664)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gallace, Carmela


MPADE-UE 1278-000 (14665)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gallace, Carmela

Screening History: (MCC-UE 1140)

This course explores the ways in which popular Hollywood films construct the historical past, the ensuing battles among historians and the public over Hollywood’s version of American history, and the ways such films can be utilized as historical documents themselves. We will consider films as products of the culture industry; as visions of popularly understood history and national mythology; as evidence for how social conflicts have been depicted; and as evidence of how popular understanding and interpretations of the past have been revised from earlier eras to the present.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1140-000 (14041)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Miller, Mark


MCC-UE 1140-000 (14042)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Loven, Hillevi

From Polenta to Marinara: History of Italian Food (FOOD-UE 1052)

In this course we will cover the varieties of Italian food in their past and present forms. First, we will explore the history of food from past civilizations, leading up to World War I, just after the great immigration to the New World. Time periods examined will be ancient Rome, Medieval, Renaissance, Risorgimento, leading to the modern era. This course includes topics ranging from Pellegrino Artusi’s famous cookbook in the contest of Italian unification to the relationship between Italian Futurism and food. The second part of the course will introduce students to the regional diversity of Italian food using mediums such as TV, art, and film. We will examine the ways in which food shapes contemporary Italian society, from the more intimate family kitchen to the most elegant Italian restaurant in New York City.

Food Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FOOD-UE 1052-000 (10587)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scarcella Perino, Roberto

Fashion in Context (ARCS-UE 1088)

Why do fashion designers and brands exert such influence in contemporary society? What explains the trajectory from The House of Worth to Chanel to this season’s hottest label? This course investigates the interlocking forces shaping fashion: the designer system, celebrities, technology, politics, the arts and media. Through lectures and film viewings, readings, discussions, and individual research, students explore fashion as a crucial aspect of culture and how the fashion system evolved from roots in Parisian couture to become a global phenomenon. Liberal Arts Core/MAP Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Expressive Cultures

Art and Costume Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARCS-UE 1088-000 (9717)
at Online
Instructed by Cole, Daniel


ARCS-UE 1088-000 (9718)
at Online
Instructed by Cole, Daniel

The Art and Craft of Poetry (WRTNG-UG 1560)

In this workshop (practicum), poets will focus on the foundations and intricate dynamics of poetry as a writer’s process. A weekly reading of a new poem by each poet in the circle will serve as point of departure for discussion of the relationships of craft and expression. A final portfolio of polished poems is required at the end of the course.

Advanced Writing Courses (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


WRTNG-UG 1560-000 (12069)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hightower, Scott

Writing Cross-Culturally (WRTNG-UG 1230)

In this course, students will create writing that traverses identities, borders and cultures, as well as genres, as they explore and deepen their understanding of issues of form, craft and ethics. The class will read and discuss a variety of texts that center around various modes of culture crossing, such as travel and study abroad; third culture and diaspora identities; immigration and escape, and historical and/or political clashes and conflicts. Through an ongoing examination of structural and craft issues in the exemplary texts, students will make creative decisions to help write three main assignments dealing with themes of Memory, Identity and Conflict. We’ll use our discussions of Memory to help focus on expository and reflective rhetorical strategies, Identity as a way to experiment with point of view and character development, and Conflict as a method for exploring structure and dramatic tension. In order to write cross-culturally about personal experiences, students will be encouraged to create texts along the spectrum between creative nonfiction and autobiographical fiction. Theoretical essays will help inform how we ethically position ourselves as writers observing cultures not (necessarily) our own in order to inform audiences and to challenge our own prejudices. Through it all, we’ll consider how formal experiments across genres may help illuminate experiences and confront perceptions. Authors to be read include Gloria Anzaldua, Edwidge Danticat, Randa Jarrar, Salman Rushdie, Amy Tan, and Ocean Vuong.

Advanced Writing Courses (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


WRTNG-UG 1230-000 (19855)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Agabian, Nancy

History of British Fashion (IDSEM-UG 9252)

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON. This course offers a survey of key aspects of British fashion from 1500 to the present day, including womenswear, menswear, accessories, and more. We will examine selected features of producing, consuming, and representing dress, relating important shifts in fashion to historical developments in areas such as trade, economics, politics, and visual culture. Students will study examples of historical clothing as well as depictions of it, and become familiar with a variety of methodological approaches to its study. The majority of classes will take place in Bedford Square, London, and be formed of illustrative lectures, class activities, discussion of set readings, and student presentations. Each lecture is described in the syllabus and includes discussion questions, required as well as recommended readings, and recommended films. Several classes will take place on location, at museums and archives, and will explore important collections of British dress and of British everyday life and fashionable consumption.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IDSEM-UG 9252-000 (2740)
09/02/2024 – 12/06/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Li, Leren

History of Italian Fashion (IDSEM-UG 9200)

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-FLORENCE. The aim of this course is to explore the history of Italian fashion with an interdisciplinary approach focused on social, cultural, economic and political aspects. By focusing on select topics of key interest students will acquire a basic knowledge of the history of Italian fashion from the Renaissance to the present, understand the complex and multivalent clothing codes that help to order social interaction and learn to decode it. These abilities will provide students with a useful basis for understanding the capital role of the fashion of the past both as the origin of a ‘language’ of clothes still in use and as a boundless source of inspiration for contemporary designers. Conducted in English.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IDSEM-UG 9200-000 (2458)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Lurati, Patricia


IDSEM-UG 9200-000 (19675)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Thu
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Lurati, Patricia

Creative Music Entrepreneurs in Historical Context (REMU-UT 1201)

This 14-week class introduces students to the history of innovative entrepreneurs and institutions in American recorded music. We recount the stories and make arguments about famous executives, managers, producers, performers, DJs, and journalists/publishers from the dawn of the music business until the present day. We study how and why the fields, fiefdoms, and empires built by these impressive and sometimes controversial icons have transformed the course of popular music. Along the way, students become well versed in the history of 20th and 21st century recorded music, and in various music genres and styles; and we place the art and business of creating and selling recorded music in historical, political, cultural and social context. Throughout, we look at approaches to crafting successful oral and written arguments about popular music with clear, compelling writing about sound.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


REMU-UT 1201-000 (17715)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnas, Daniel


REMU-UT 1201-000 (17716)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnas, Daniel

Topics: Led Zeppelin (REMU-UT 1115)

In name alone, Led Zeppelin carries mountains of meaning: the most successful and arguably the most influential rock band of all time. The creators of a mythic, mystical, guitar-based style that gave birth to the sounds and iconography of heavy metal. Song-crafters whose studio mastery, utilizing recording technology of the day, generated some of the most enduring rock recordings of their era, establishing standards that still define a stylistic and emotional extreme of popular music. The four British musicians who came out of the electric blues scene of the late ‘60s, recording and touring as a unit for a mere twelve years, together achieved a legendary stature that requires much study to fully appreciate more than thirty years after their demise. This course will consider the history of Led Zeppelin from a variety of perspectives: social and stylistic context; the nuts and bolts of their music—live and in the studio; the hows and whys of the band as a business. Using books, articles, videos, and a generous sampling of music, the course will follow their arrival in the final, psychedelic heyday of swingin’ London of the ‘60s; through their roots in folk and acoustic blues and later experimentations with Indian and North African music, and their rise in an era that was hungry for a heavier, more bombastic sound. The course will include special focus on the group’s technical leader and visionary, guitarist Jimmy Page, who came with prior credits as a sessionman and guitarist in the blues-rock band the Yardbirds, as well as other major players in the Zeppelin story—engineer Glyn Johns, manager Pater Grant—who helped build the sonic and popular juggernaut that the band became. In-class guest speakers will be featured, many who participated or witnessed the Led Zeppelin phenomenon, as well as a screening of the group’s concert film The Song Remains The Same.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


REMU-UT 1115-000 (21549)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kahn, Ashley

Revolution and Media (MCC-UE 1352)

This course examines the role of media in the history of empires and revolutions and the history of media empires. It focuses on the investment in media forces by both empires and revolutions, and the tendency of media to form empires that are subject to periodic ’revolution’ in the marketplace with the contexts of colonization, decolonization and globalization. Media discussed include prints, paintings, photography, journalism, fiction, cinema, the Internet and digital media.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1352-000 (11392)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Raza, Sara

Human Computer Interaction (CS-UY 4543)

Designing a successful interactive experience or software system takes more than technical savvy and vision–it also requires a deep understanding of how to serve people’s needs and desires through the experience of the system, and knowledge about how to weave this understanding into the development process. This course introduces key topics and methods for creating and evaluating human-computer interfaces/digital user experiences. Students apply these practices to a system of their choosing (I encourage application to prototype systems that students are currently working on in other contexts, at any stage of development). The course builds toward a final write-up and presentation in which students detail how they tackled HCI/user experience design and evaluation of their system, and results from their investigations. Some experience creating/participating in the production of interactive experiences/software is recommended.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4543-000 (16119)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Goyal, Nitesh


CS-UY 4543-000 (16120)
at ePoly
Instructed by Lutzky, Raymond

Performing Voice and Talking Machines (OART-UT 25)

This course will introduce students to technologies for speech synthesis and speech recognition from the point of view of performance art. Through weekly assignments and in class lectures, we will explore voice interfaces and their role in technology, design, art, and culture. We will begin with understanding human speech, and then delve into computer speech. We will learn how to program existing technologies such as p5.js to create our own talking machines. The class will research the current limitations and biases of these technologies and models, and respond by leveraging these constraints as ground for performative expression. Students will be required to develop a performative piece as their final project, this could be a live performance, an interactive installation piece, or a performative object or tool. Students are encouraged to bring their interests into the classroom and apply the course into their practice. Prior knowledge of computer programming will be helpful, however, it is not required. NYU is a global community. You are welcome to bring your own language, your accent, and your spoken identity into the class.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OART-UT 25-000 (13600)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kananuruk, Tiriree

Auto Fictions (ITPG-GT 2066)

Auto Fictions is a studio class focusing on the creation of immersive, multi-path and interactive experiences based on personal narrative. Documentary art has included the art of installation for decades, but new technologies have given artists affordable tools that allow them to rapidly prototype and then refine immersive media experiences. Auto Fictions is an interdepartmental course that may include students from Film, ITP and Theater disciplines. Students will create production teams. Each team will make a project and each student will help the other create their work through intensive collaboration. The intention here is to practice collaboration across disciplines, methods, values, and artistic cultures to create a work of immersive fiction based on materials gathered from the past, captured or created in the present and/or imagined for the future. We will look at several possible approaches to the creation of immersive media works. Including multiplexing software programs. Students with the requisite knowledge in these tools or gaming engines with similar capabilities may use them for the creation of their works. But it is not required. There may be an opportunity for building intuitive interactivity into some of the experiences. In response to the Covid-19 pandemic we will be exploring how to adapt our working methods and our work itself to these conditions as they develop. The goal of the course will be to physically realize the works but to do that we will go through a detailed comprehensive design, planning and budgeting process so that if conditions permit all aspects of the work will be fully created or planned and ready to build. If conditions permit, we will meet one day at the beginning of the semester to install and introduce the platform, create teams, and review the assignment. Otherwise we will meet online and begin work there. Students will be provided with access to online tutorials for relevant software and systems.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2066-000 (15717)
09/09/2024 – 12/09/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Cunningham, Kevin · Dysinger, Carol

Place-Building-Time:The Architecture of Berlin (ARTH-UA 9651)

Berlin is a unique modern Metropolis. Its alternating history with often drastic changes offers a comprehensive background to explore and investigate the nature of architecture in correlation to the various developmental processes of urban life and culture. Architecture is embedded in the urban fabric in which place and time serve as the main threads, constantly changing their multifaceted and layered relationships. This urban fabric provides the fertile soil for urban life and culture, which literally takes place in various scales between the public and the private realm, two further threads intertwined in the urban fabric. Experiencing the city through walking is essential for learning how to observe, see and read “Place, Building and Time” in Berlin. Tours will alternate with classroom discussions and workshops.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTH-UA 9651-000 (2322)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by Sigel, Paul

Theory of the Digital (MCC-UE 1339)

This course introduces students to the intertwined histories of philosophy and the digital, from cybernetics and German Idealism to postmodernism, Machine Learning, and the platform economy. We will read Claude Shannon, George Boole, and Immanuel Kant; John von Neumann, Karl Marx, and Ada Lovelace. While the seminar aspect of the course builds this theoretical-historical understanding of the digital, the lab component will serve as ompetenceoriented illustrations and live engagements with the theoretical materials. To live in the digital world is to engage both practically and theoretically with the processes and effects of ubiquitous computing. This course thematizes both and cultivates digital citizenry.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1339-000 (20992)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Queer and Trans Identity (MCC-UE 1408)

In this course, we explore queer and transgender identity through practice, theory, and politics. Approaching media from queer, trans, and intersectional lenses can inform the way we understand the circulation of power around media technologies, and enable us to better understand their histories and cultural contexts. Our approach is grounded in theories, case studies, and readings from communication and media studies. Students are equipped to bring tools from queer theory & trans studies to their everyday encounters with media, technology, and culture.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1408-000 (14051)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heard, Elizabeth

Advertising Campaigns in Context (MCC-UE 1780)

This course teaches students who have a basic understanding of advertising techniques how to develop a complete advertising campaign across a range of media for a product, service or nonprofit organization.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1780-000 (14012)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Railla, Jean

The Berlin Music Tech Start-Up Scene (REMU-UT 9813)

After its reunification, Berlin gained a well-deserved reputation as an ‘anything-goes’ cultural playground. But just as radical cultural experimentation was leading to the city’s techno Renaissance, the same urban frontier was quietly transforming into a hotbed for new business ideas around tech. Companies like Ableton, Native Instruments, and SoundCloud started in the city and grew from headquarters there into leaders in the field of music technology. They join other world leaders in music tech around Europe, like Spotify, Deezer, Mixcloud, Focusrite/Novation, and Propellerhead. Berlin is quickly becoming known as a world-class hub for innovative tech start-ups and progressive developments in emergent media. This class, open to all students, shines a light on key Berlin-based entrepreneurial figures and innovators in music technology, with a focus on those successful individuals who have launched recognized or profitable music-focused startups. The idea is for students, many of whom are aspiring entrepreneurs, to hear directly from, and ask questions directly to, established Berlin based tech entrepreneurs, in moderated conversation. In anticipation for a guest class visit, students may be required to investigate websites, read biographical or contextual material, or attend events outside of class time. Students will be expected to ask informed questions of the guests and to develop responses throughout the course of the class. All events and speakers are subject to change.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


REMU-UT 9813-000 (13439)
08/31/2023 – 10/18/2023 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by Strobel, Matthias

Emerging Media Studio: (PHTI-UT 1018)

The Emerging Media Studio courses explore methods to creatively think through and hybridize artistic photographic practice with emerging media technologies from medicine, the military, archaeology, urban planning, environmental science and other industries. Projects may take open-ended forms such as video, virtual reality environments, site-based performance, spatial imaging, 3D fabrication and photographic documentation. Critical readings and ideas drawn from artists as well as professionals in other fields are discussed. Our practice is learning how to adapt to and position ourselves as artists making unique contributions to the social dynamics of culture and a constantly shifting universe of media.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PHTI-UT 1018-000 (18655)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fu, Snow Yunxue


PHTI-UT 1018-000 (18656)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fu, Snow Yunxue

Political Economy of Education: Why Does College Cost So Much? (EDST-UE 1321)

Why do so many high school students apply to study at expensive institutions when there are cheaper alternatives available? Who is able to attend, and who is excluded? Why do college costs keep rising so fast? Shouldn’t college be free? Students explore answers to these kinds of questions in this course. Students explore a range of economic concepts and empirical evidence that speaks to the value of Field available for additional information in footerhigher education for individuals and societies; state and institutional financial aid policies; and university budgets and spending priorities.

Education Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


EDST-UE 1321-000 (11588)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by Brewer, Dominic

Art on the Edge (OART-UT 1019)

Taking off from the practices of medium-based art categories, this course is structured across key topics in contemporary art – “art of today, produced by artists who are living in the twenty-first century”. During the semester, via the framework of readings, projects and assignments, we will consider the importance of the visual arts in the larger context of society. Each week we will look at a different topic, which will be organized around key concepts, artists and artwork examples. The main goal is to allow us to contemplate the process of interaction between visual art, history, cultural, socio-economical, and technological forces. The stress of our gatherings will be on the artist as a thinker and a maker.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OART-UT 1019-000 (13644)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aguilar, Gustavo

Vertically Integrated Projects (VIP-UY 3000)

The Vertically Integrated Projects courses are designed to allow select students to participate in ongoing research, innovation, design, and entrepreneurial projects within student teams, under the direction of faculty from within Tandon, and other schools of NYU. This is the zero-credit version of the course. These courses are open to students from the first to senior years, and students must apply to engage in a specific project in a given semester. Decisions on acceptance will be made by the faculty advisors for the project, in consultation with the Director of the VIP Program. Students must commit to at least three semesters of participation in VIP, either enrolling in VIP-UY 300X or VIP-UY 3000.

Vertically Integrated Projects (Undergraduate)
0 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15545)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Jin, Weihua


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15561)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Loianno, Giuseppe


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15562)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dickey, Chris


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15563)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Milkis, Mark


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15564)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chiarelli, Lawrence · Pennella, Ronald


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15573)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dimauro, Christopher · Togelius, Julian


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15574)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Atashzar, Seyed Farokh


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15584)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Perlin, Kenneth


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15585)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pahle, Robert


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15587)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Huang, Danny


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15592)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Liu, Shizhu


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15712)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Samsonau, Sergey


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15713)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Porfiri, Maurizio


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15714)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Laefer, Debra


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15760)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sahin, Iskender


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15814)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Ghandehari, Masoud


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15815)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Ergan, Semiha · Feng, Chen


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15816)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15546)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15817)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15872)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Haverkamp, Sven


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15873)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15888)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Gilbert, Regine


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15889)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Bringardner, Jack


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15890)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Berberian, Marygrace


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15892)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Silverman, Andrea · Hoar, Catherine


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15895)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Leopold, Rebecca · Ptak, Lauren


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15897)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Luong, Dung Dinh


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15908)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rodriguez, Patricia


VIP-UY 3000-000 (19666)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Epstein, Jeff


VIP-UY 3000-000 (19667)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Levicky, Rastislav · Wang, Xin


VIP-UY 3000-000 (19668)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Joyce, Noel · Caridi, Phil


VIP-UY 3000-000 (19669)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred


VIP-UY 3000-000 (19670)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


VIP-UY 3000-000 (19671)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Shin, Jennifer


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15547)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Luong, Dung Dinh


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15548)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Silverman, Andrea


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15549)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Laefer, Debra


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15550)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Bill, Victoria G


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15551)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Behera, Rakesh


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15552)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Borowiec, Joseph


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15553)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hajesfandiari, Arezoo


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15554)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kim, Jin


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15555)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Feng, Chen


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15556)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15557)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Emara, Hebah


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15558)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DesPortes, Kayla · Piantella, Benedetta


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15559)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Youngerman, Ethan


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15560)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hurst, Amy

Contemporary Techniques in Sound Art (DM-UY 3113)

This course explores sound as an art form and technical practice in its own right. Topics include contemporary techniques in composition, sound art, and interactive installation. Students will produce sound with narrative elements that evoke social, cultural & critical-thinking. Their final projects can be experimental podcasts, music (performance and/or recordings), multi-channel audio installations, or multimedia projects. | Prerequisite: DM-UY 1113 or MPATE-UE 1001

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 3113-000 (12650)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by O’Keefe, Timothy

INTRODUCTION TO HAPTICS AND TELEROBOTICS IN MEDICINE (ROB-UY 3404)

In this course, the theoretical bases and applications, of haptics technologies with a particular focus on medical applications (specifically surgical, and neurorehabilitative) are taught. Basic technological aspects, such as instrumentation, actuation, control and mechanisms, are introduced. Also, some theoretical aspects related to telerobotic systems are discussed. Students are expected to have basic knowledge of programming. As part of this course, students will participate in experimental and simulation labs to acquire hands-on expertise in haptics implementation and programming. | Prerequisite: CS-UY 1114 and MA-UY 2034 and PH-UY 1013 or equivalents (see Minor in Robotics)

Robotics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ROB-UY 3404-000 (15568)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Atashzar, Seyed Farokh


ROB-UY 3404-000 (15569)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Atashzar, Seyed Farokh


ROB-UY 3404-000 (15570)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Atashzar, Seyed Farokh


ROB-UY 3404-000 (15567)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Atashzar, Seyed Farokh

ROBOT MOTION AND PLANNING (ROB-UY 3303)

This course covers the concepts, techniques, algorithms, and state-of-the-art approaches for robot localization, mapping, and planning. The course starts from basic concepts in 2D kinematics and probability and then introduces probabilistic approaches for data fusion. Then, the course introduces the trajectory planning problem in the time domain and free space. The motion planning problem is defined in a canonical version of the problem and the concept of configuration space is introduced. A selection of representative planning techniques is covered from probabilistic to heuristic techniques. Finally, some mapping representations and algorithms are presented. | Prerequisite: CS-UY 1114 and MA-UY 2034 and PH-UY 1013 or equivalents (see Minor in Robotics)

Robotics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ROB-UY 3303-000 (19176)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Loianno, Giuseppe

Data and Society (MCC-UE 1349)

Data is often considered the domain of scientists and statisticians, but its increasing dominance across nearly all aspects of life – from political and advertising campaigns to social media, dating, education, and public health — has social, political, and ethical consequences, presenting both new possibilities and new hazards. In this course we think critically about how collecting, aggregating, and analyzing data affects individual and social life, with a focus on the ways in which it reproduces and creates new structural inequalities and power asymmetries.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1349-000 (14055)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kang, Edward (Byungkwon)

Design Studio for Non-Majors (ART-UE 1421)

A continuing exploration of graphic design to help students refine their skills & develop more personally expressive ways to solving problems through visual communication. Assignments, readings, & research projects will allow students to consider the complex nature of graphic design. Both traditional & digital approaches to typography & layout will be incorporated with a wide range of assignment. A priority is placed on the use of concepts to dictate design techniques & on the pursuit of a genuinely creative vision.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 1421-000 (9687)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Darts, David


ART-UE 1421-000 (9689)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rader, Michael