Category Archives: Spring 2019

Reading in French Lit: The Modern Era (In French) (FREN-UA 9121)

In this course students read masterpieces of French literature from the French Revolution to the end of the twentieth century. Works are considered from various historical, aesthetic and theoretical perspectives. Texts include: Le Père Goriot (Balzac); Madame Bovary (Flaubert); Les Faux-Monnayeurs (Gide); La Nausée (Sartre); Le Ravissement de Lol V. Stein (Duras), and Du côté de chez Swan I (Proust), which will be the subject of a final essay. Conducted in French.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


FREN-UA 9121-000 (10584)
02/04/2019 – 05/16/2019 Tue,Thu
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Nanoelectronic devices and circuits (ECE-UY 4513)

Concepts of nanoelectronic materials, devices, and circuits. Fundamental and practical limits on the performance and energy dissipation of nanoelectronic devices. Physical, electrical and optical properties of semiconductor materials and how they are used in circuits. Relation of the properties of semiconductors to the fundamental limits at various levels of design hierarchy. Connections between the physical design and circuit-level performance of nanoelectronic circuits. | Prerequisites: MA-UY 2114 and PH-UY 2023 and EE-UY 3114

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


ECE-UY 4513-000 (21245)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Computer Networks (CS-UH 3012)

Have you ever wondered how the internet or Facebook is able to support a billion simultaneous users? This course teaches students the design and implementation of such Internet-scale networks and networked systems. Students learn about the principles and techniques used to construct large-scale networks and systems. Topics in this course include routing protocols, network congestion control, wireless networking, network security, and peer-to-peer systems. Upon completing this course, students are able to initiate and critique research ideas, implement their own working systems, and evaluate such systems. To make the issues more concrete, the class includes several multi-week projects requiring significant design and implementation. The goal is for students to learn not only what computer networks are and how they work today, but also why they are designed the way they are and how they are likely to evolve in the future. Examples are drawn primarily from the internet.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 3012-000 (3752)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zaki, Yasir


CS-UH 3012-000 (3791)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zaki, Yasir · Ahmed, Dena

Discrete Mathematics (CS-UH 1002)

Discrete mathematics concerns the study of mathematical structures that are discrete rather than continuous, and provides a powerful language for investigating many areas of computer science. Discrete structures are characterized by distinct elements, which are often represented by integers. Continuous mathematics on the other hand deals with real numbers. Topics in this course include: sets, counting techniques, logic, proof techniques, solving recurrence relations, number theory, probability, statistics, graph theory, and discrete geometry. These mathematical tools are illustrated with applications in computer science.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 1002-000 (3526)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fernandes, Joao Paulo · Ahmad, Liza


CS-UH 1002-000 (3624)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Mumtaz, Sara


CS-UH 1002-000 (3917)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Ahmed, Dena


CS-UH 1002-000 (19983)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 1002-000 (19984)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 1002-000 (19985)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Capstone Project in Computer Science 2 (CS-UH 4002)

Continuation of CS-UH 4001

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 4002-000 (3856)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 4002-000 (4027)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Park, Minsu


CS-UH 4002-000 (3860)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Abouzied, Azza


CS-UH 4002-000 (3861)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Eid, Mohamad


CS-UH 4002-000 (4104)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Kaufman, Aaron


CS-UH 4002-000 (4105)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi


CS-UH 4002-000 (4348)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Difallah, Djellel


CS-UH 4002-000 (4349)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rahwan, Talal


CS-UH 4002-000 (3862)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zaki, Yasir


CS-UH 4002-000 (4350)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Puccetti, Goffredo


CS-UH 4002-000 (4470)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Pöpper, Christina


CS-UH 4002-000 (3857)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Habash, Nizar


CS-UH 4002-000 (3858)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Baghdadi, Mohamed Riyadh


CS-UH 4002-000 (4101)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rokers, Bas


CS-UH 4002-000 (4344)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Shafique, Muhammad


CS-UH 4002-000 (4345)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Salam, Hanan


CS-UH 4002-000 (4346)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Pöpper, Christina


CS-UH 4002-000 (4347)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mourad, Azzam

Capstone Project in Computer Science 1 (CS-UH 4001)

The capstone experience in Computer Science requires students to engage in a long-term, mentored learning experience that culminates in a piece of original work. The specific project is developed during the Research Seminar in Computer Science. During the Capstone Project, the proposed work comes to fruition in the form of a research paper along the lines of those in a scholarly computer science journal. Students also participate in a capstone research symposium during which they present their work orally.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 4001-000 (3841)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 4001-000 (3842)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Park, Minsu


CS-UH 4001-000 (3850)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Abouzied, Azza


CS-UH 4001-000 (3851)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Eid, Mohamad


CS-UH 4001-000 (3852)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Kaufman, Aaron


CS-UH 4001-000 (4033)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi


CS-UH 4001-000 (3853)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zaki, Yasir


CS-UH 4001-000 (3854)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Habash, Nizar


CS-UH 4001-000 (3855)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Baghdadi, Mohamed Riyadh


CS-UH 4001-000 (4034)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rokers, Bas


CS-UH 4001-000 (3843)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Shafique, Muhammad


CS-UH 4001-000 (4102)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Salam, Hanan


CS-UH 4001-000 (4103)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Pöpper, Christina


CS-UH 4001-000 (3844)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mourad, Azzam


CS-UH 4001-000 (3845)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Difallah, Djellel


CS-UH 4001-000 (3846)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rahwan, Talal


CS-UH 4001-000 (3847)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Puccetti, Goffredo


CS-UH 4001-000 (3848)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Oudah, Mai


CS-UH 4001-000 (3849)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 4001-000 (4125)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Introduction to Computer Science (CS-UH 1001)

Computer Science is an innovative and exciting field that focuses on producing efficient solutions for solving problems in any field. This course introduces students to the foundations of computer science. Students learn how to design algorithms to solve problems and how to translate these algorithms into working computer programs using a high-level programming language. The course covers core programming concepts including basic computation, data structures, decision structures, iterative structures, file input/output, and recursion. Students also learn the elements of Object Oriented Programming (OOP), such as objects, classes, inheritance, abstraction, and polymorphism. A final project allows students to combine these concepts to produce a large program of their design.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 1001-000 (3489)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Pötsch, Thomas · Zeeshan, Faisal


CS-UH 1001-000 (3512)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Pötsch, Thomas · Mumtaz, Sara


CS-UH 1001-000 (3587)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Mumtaz, Sara

Software Art: ASCII to Algorithm (IM-UH 2321)

ASCII to Algorithm is an introduction to the history, theory and practice of computer-based artistic endeavors in the field of visual arts. It traces the path of early encounters with the computer as a tool for artists and surveys the computational foundation that positions contemporary software art as more system than object. We will be elaborating and discussing concepts and paradigms specific to computing platforms, such as data representation, generative art, image processing and computational creativity. Drawing on those, students will explore their own artistic practice through the exclusive use of their computers. This computational playground will highlight and reflect upon the broader impact of digital technologies on our relationship to art, and on our understanding of the artistic process. Programming experience in JavaScript is preferred but not required.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Network Everything (IM-UH 2112)

This course explores the possibilities and challenges of designing alternate physical network interfaces. Through weekly readings, class discussions, and a series of projects, students will create physical objects that talk to each other over distance. Various wireless communication mechanisms such as radio (Bluetooth, Zigbee, WiFi, and raw), infrared, and ultrasonic are used in the context of creating novel “smart” devices. Topics of discussion in this course include networking protocols and network topologies; network time versus physical time; mobile objects; and wireless networks. Opportunities to build collaborative and creative campus-wide networked projects and systems will also be explored.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


IM-UH 2112-000 (24975)
01/29/2019 – 05/16/2019 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


IM-UH 2112-000 (18392)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


IM-UH 2112-000 (24976)
01/29/2019 – 05/16/2019 Thu
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


IM-UH 2112-000 (18550)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Temporary Expert: Developing a Research-based Art Practice (IM-UH 1513)

What does it mean to become a “temporary expert?” How does one develop one’s own creative research-based practice? This course will address these questions by engaging with Abu Dhabi’s environmental and social dimensions as a subject for research, context and imaginative art and design opportunities. Students will adopt a wide variety of tools and strategies in order to lay the foundations for a research-based art practice that considers materials, media, context, and audience, as well as one’s personal strengths and desires. Over the course of the semester, students will develop art and design projects that interface with a multiplicity of other disciplines, and engage in idea exchange with experts in the field. Through hands-on practice, case studies, and readings on systems thinking, communication, and the idea of “the public,” we will explore method, documentation and presentation of research, as well as the merits of both success and failure.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


IM-UH 1513-000 (24971)
01/29/2019 – 05/16/2019 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


IM-UH 1513-000 (18534)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


IM-UH 1513-000 (24972)
01/29/2019 – 05/16/2019 Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


IM-UH 1513-000 (18535)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Lab in Human Cognition (PSYCH-UA 46)

Students experience current thinking in hypothesis formulation, experimental design, data analysis and research communication. Experiments are performed in the fields of Cognition and Perception and can include visual processing, auditory processing, learning, memory, and decision making. Students complete research projects and gain experience in writing research reports that conform to APA guidelines.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


PSYCH-UA 46-000 (9749)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Lab in Clinical Research (PSYCH-UA 43)

The course provides instruction in methods and concepts employed in research in the area of clinical psychology. Students learn about these methods and concepts in a hands-on manner by completing a set of research exercises. Methods covered include correlational and experimental designs and observational procedures. Topics include psychotherapy process research, case formulation approaches to psychopathology and therapy, and several theoretical perspectives that are employed in both research and clinical practice. Prerequisites: PSYCH-UA 1 AND PSYCH-UA 10 AND (PSYCH-UA 30 OR PSYCH-UA 51 OR PSYCH-UA 81)

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

History of Modern Philosophy (PHIL-UA 21)

Examines some of the most important philosophical ideas and developments in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe. Covers some of the major writings of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, and Hume, and concludes with a brief examination of some aspects of Kant’s philosophy. (Kant is examined in more detail in PHIL-UA 30.) May also include writings of Hobbes, Malebranche, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Conway, Berkeley, and Shepherd, among others.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


PHIL-UA 21-000 (8744)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 21-000 (8745)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 21-000 (8746)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 21-000 (8747)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 21-000 (8748)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Consciousness (PHIL-UA 7)

Examines conceptual and empirical issues about consciousness. Issues covered may include the explanatory gap, the hard and harder problems of consciousness, concepts of consciousness, phenomenal concepts, the mind-body problem and neural correlates of consciousness, higher-order thought theories of consciousness, the inverted spectrum, views of phenomenality as representation, and arguments for dualism.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


PHIL-UA 7-000 (19756)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 7-000 (19771)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 7-000 (19772)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 7-000 (19773)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 7-000 (19774)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Vector Analysis (MATH-UA 224)

Brief review of multivariate calculus: partial derivatives, chain rule, Riemann integral, change of variables, line integrals. Lagrange multipliers. Inverse and implicit function theorems and their applications. Introduction to calculus on manifolds: definition and examples of manifolds, tangent vectors and vector fields, differential forms, exterior derivative, line integrals and integration of forms. Gauss’ and Stokes’ theorems on manifolds.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


MATH-UA 224-000 (8661)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 224-000 (8662)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Shakespeare (MEDI-UA 410)

Medieval & Renaissance Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


MEDI-UA 410-000 (10578)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MEDI-UA 410-000 (10579)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MEDI-UA 410-000 (10580)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Language Change (LING-UA 14)

The methods of genealogical classification and subgrouping of languages. Examines patterns of replacement in phonology, morphology, and syntax. Focuses on internal and comparative phonological, morphological, and syntactic reconstruction. Considers phonological developments such as Grimm’s, Grassmann’s, and Verner’s Laws.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


LING-UA 14-000 (10088)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Journalistic Inquiry (JOUR-UA 101)

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


JOUR-UA 101-000 (8499)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


JOUR-UA 101-000 (8500)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


JOUR-UA 101-000 (8501)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


JOUR-UA 101-000 (9497)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


JOUR-UA 101-000 (24012)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


JOUR-UA 101-000 (25389)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


JOUR-UA 101-000 (25832)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

The Irish Renaissance (ENGL-UA 621)

Covers the tumultuous period from the fall of Charles Stuart Parnell, through the Easter Rising in 1916, and into the early years of national government in the 1930s. Readings in various genres (poetry, short story, novel, drama). Writers may include Oscar Wilde, W.B. Yeats, James Joyce, Lady Gregory, John Millington Synge, Sean O’Casey, Samuel Beckett, and Flann O’Brien.

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


ENGL-UA 621-000 (10748)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Early American Literature (ENGL-UA 548)

Examines the large variety of writing produced in North America between 1600 and 1800, from indigenous/European encounters through the American Revolution and its aftermath. Genres discussed in their cultural contexts include colonization, captivity, slave, and travel narratives; sermons; familiar correspondence; autobiographies; poetry; drama; and the novel.

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


ENGL-UA 548-000 (10617)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Dante and His World (ENGL-UA 143)

Interdisciplinary introduction to late medieval culture, using Dante, its foremost literary artist, as a focus. Attention is directed at literature, art, and music, in addition to political, religious, and social developments of the time. Emphasizes the continuity of Western tradition, especially the classical background of medieval culture and its transmission to the modern world.

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


ENGL-UA 143-000 (23616)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Behavioral & Integrative Neuroscience (BIOL-UA 202)

Lecture and laboratory course that focuses on how the brain uses both sensory and stored information to generate behavior. Lectures and laboratories cover four main areas: sensory process, learning and memory, motivational and attentional mechanisms, and the motor system. Laboratories employ a range of electrophysiological techniques, lesions and pharmacological manipulations, and various behavioral techniques to examine the integrative processes by which the brain governs behavior.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


BIOL-UA 202-000 (7896)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 202-000 (7897)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 202-000 (7898)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 202-000 (7899)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 202-000 (7900)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Gothic Art in North Eur (ARTH-UA 203)

Art of the “age of the cathedrals”—including architecture, sculpture, stained glass, manuscript illumination, wall painting, luxury arts, and tapestry—from origins of the Gothic style in the 12th-century Ile-de-France through the early 15th century. Considers artistic developments in light of religious, historical, political, social, and cultural contexts of their creation. Topics include: Gothic patrons, artists, builders, and art-making; lay literacy and the patronage and reception of art; the cult of the Virgin and the arts; the Gothic image as bearer of religious, political, and social values and ideologies; arts of chivalry and courtly love; naturalism and developments in portraiture; the roles of art in devotional and mystical experience; Gothic art and late medieval notions of vision and the self.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Topical Seminar in Biological Anthropology I (ANTH-UA 511)

Only open to majors in anthropology who have the permission of the director of undergraduate studies or the instructor. This seminar explores, theoretically and methodologically, selected key current issues and problems in biological anthropology. See the department?s internal catalog.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


ANTH-UA 511-000 (18726)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Archaeology: Early Societies & Culture (ANTH-UA 3)

Introduces contemporary archaeology, its theories, practices, and early societies and cultures. Examines current methodological and theoretical viewpoints of archaeological scholarship within the discipline of anthropology. Focuses on key transformations in cultural evolution, such as the origins of modern humans, the emergence of food production, and the development of complex societies, urbanism, and early states. Explores gender roles, landscapes and settlements, technologies, art, cognitive systems, urbanism, and state formation.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


ANTH-UA 3-000 (7811)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ANTH-UA 3-000 (7812)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ANTH-UA 3-000 (7813)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Human Ecology (ANTH-UA 90)

This course seeks to assess the degree to which variations in human biology and culture can be understood as adaptations to varying external conditions. We examine the relationship of human systems of action and the natural world in order to understand the various forms of human adaptation. Case studies of several living peoples, contemporary and past biological communities, and prehistoric cultures provide the material for interpretation and evaluation of theoretical positions.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


ANTH-UA 90-000 (22566)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Assessing Epidemiological Literature Public Health: What AELs you?” (AHSEM-UA 247)

In this age of ‘non-facts’ sufficing as the basis for populist resistance to scientific ‘facts’, the ‘citizen skills’ needed to be able to read, understand and make reasonable ‘action decisions’—both for personal health as well as community health issues—are ever more important to acquire within a liberal arts education. The overall goal of this course is to provide the student with fundamental ‘citizen skills’ in assessing epidemiologic original research articles. The fundamental concepts which underpin the range of epidemiologic research designs will be presented first, followed by skill-building exercises that culminates in assessing published epidemiologic original research articles. Both lecture and seminar-of-the whole formats will be utilized. At the end of the course the students should be able to: understand the basic concepts of epidemiologic research design; critically evaluate published epidemiology research article using the Literature Analysis Form-for Epidemiologic Research (LAF-fER); contribute to their future communities as an informed member; and savor and reflect upon the description of epidemiologic outbreaks in literature, esp. in short story and ‘novel-like’ formats.

Advanced Honors Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

History and the Novel (AHSEM-UA 235)

What can novels based on historic events tell us? What sorts of insights can they provide that journalism and works of pure history cannot? How much imaginative leeway should the author of a historic novel be allowed – and how closely should she stick to “true” events? In this course we’ll read a wide range of novels-looking at them both as literature and as keys to history-on topics that include slavery in the U.S., post-apartheid South Africa, McCarthyism, the 9/11 terror attacks, and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Advanced Honors Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


AHSEM-UA 235-000 (24462)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Wed
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Theory of the Digital (MCC-UE 1339)

This course introduces students to the intertwined histories of philosophy and the digital, from cybernetics and German Idealism to postmodernism, Machine Learning, and the platform economy. We will read Claude Shannon, George Boole, and Immanuel Kant; John von Neumann, Karl Marx, and Ada Lovelace. While the seminar aspect of the course builds this theoretical-historical understanding of the digital, the lab component will serve as ompetenceoriented illustrations and live engagements with the theoretical materials. To live in the digital world is to engage both practically and theoretically with the processes and effects of ubiquitous computing. This course thematizes both and cultivates digital citizenry.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1339-000 (20992)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Discrete Mathematics (MA-UY 2314)

Logic, proofs, set theory, functions, relations, asymptotic notation, recurrences, modeling computation, graph theory. | Prerequisite: Math Diagnostic Exam or MA-UY 912 or MA-UY 914 (minimum calculus level required) | Prerequisite for Shanghai students: MATH-SHU 110. Note: This course and CS-GY 6003 cannot both be taken for credit.

Mathematics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MA-UY 2314-000 (18495)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Malcom, Alekzander


MA-UY 2314-000 (18496)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


MA-UY 2314-000 (18497)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Cereste, Ken


MA-UY 2314-000 (18498)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Cereste, Ken

Culture, Media and Globalization (MCC-UE 9400)

A veritable buzzword globalization refers to several newly emerged trends. To name the three most visible ones these are the economy, culture and politics. Media do not only describe and interpret globalization but also are its important part. A study of globalization is inherently diverse and eclectic. So is this course. Students will read, watch, analyze and discuss. In class discussions and writings they are expected to engage questions connected to globalization, culture and the media. Through a series of lectures and discussions the course explores how the process of globalization transforms the media and examines the impact of new technologies on global communications. Emphasizing the transnational context of media and culture the course approaches global media and cultural production from a wide range of theoretical frameworks relevant to contemporary condition.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


MCC-UE 9400-000 (12588)
02/04/2019 – 05/16/2019 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


MCC-UE 9400-000 (25657)
02/04/2019 – 05/16/2019 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by

Rise of Internet Media (MCC-UE 1571)

This course examines the emergence of the Internet as a commercial business. It pays particular attention to the various business models and practices employed in media-related enterprises, tracing their development from the late 1990s to the most recent strategies and trends. Case studies include the Internet Service Providers (ISPs), portals, search engines, early game platforms, the Internet presence of traditional media organizations, social network platforms.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1571-000 (14032)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Govindarajan, Padmapriya

Media, Technology and Society (MCC-UE 1034)

An inquiry into the ways that technology — mechanical, electronic, analog, and digital — shapes and is shaped by cultural, political, and social values. Students become acquainted with key concepts and approaches to understanding the interplay of technology and society (e.g. technological determinism, social construction of technology, actor networks, affordances) and how these have been applied to such cases as the clock, the automobile, the assembly line, household technology, the telephone, and more recent communication technology.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


MCC-UE 1034-000 (21952)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Media and Global Communication (MCC-UE 1300)

This course examines the broad range of activities associated with the globalization of media production, distribution, and reception. Issues include: the relationship between local and national identities and the emergence of a ’global culture’ and the impact of technological innovations on the media themselves and their use and reception in a variety of settings.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Video Games: Culture and Industry (MCC-UE 1008)

The course approaches video games through the lens of political economy. This means examining games foremost as commodities, transactional goods through which various modes of economic life occur. This course is designed to introduce students to the structure and economics of the game industry since its emergence in the 1970s, particularly across the United States, China, and Japan. Special attention is brought to the dramatic industry changes catalyzed by digital distribution, mobile gaming, live streaming, and other contemporary developments.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks