Category Archives: Spring 2020

Global Media Seminar: Media Activism and Democracy (ITAL-UA 9513)

The course on “Media, Activism & Democracy” aims at, first, introducing students to the complex and fascinating topic of civil society activism; second, at illustrating them the linkages between activism and media; third, at showing them the impact of civil society’s advocacy on contemporary political systems. In a nutshell, the course aims at providing students with a closer understanding of the civil society activism-media-politics conundrums at the national and global levels.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITAL-UA 9513-000 (2451)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Masrani, Rahoul

The Future of the Music Streaming Economy (REMU-UT 1231)

Streaming Economy represents a great paradigm shift in the music industry and its monetization. In 2013, digital streaming of music replaced the CD as the main source of music sales and has provided economic hope to a – commercially speaking – weakening industry. However, with artists such as Thom Yorke, The Black Keys, David Byrne and many others speaking out against the royalty of streaming services like Spotify, streaming, in its current structure, as a permanent replacement for CD and digital download sales remains a controversial subject. Through this course the student will be guided through the history of streaming, the controversies surrounding its business model, and the technology that made it possible. Students will be introduced to the new storefront of online music and be shown how the digital marketplace is changing music marketing and artist development. Streaming offers exciting new opportunities along with serious and complex challenges. This course will examine the pros and cons of the current streaming status quo. The student will practice techniques of releasing music online through a hands-on workshop, which will lead them through the beginning steps of registering, and releasing their own project via Phonofile and WiMP on all major platforms and services.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 3 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


REMU-UT 1231-000 (3303)
07/03/2024 – 07/23/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Bjelland, Stein

BioDesigning the Future of Food (ITPG-GT 3030)

For centuries, food production practices such as permaculture fostered ecosystems intended to be sustainable and self-sufficient, while producing nutrient-dense food. Modern farming has introduced harmful monoculture practices proven to cause collateral destruction of biodiversity and seasonal harvesting, distancing us from our food ecosystems. The future of food can be regenerative or continue to contribute to massive health and environmental issues. How can we challenge ourselves to regain connection to our food system? How might we use innovation, personal prowess, design, and biotechnology to reimagine healthier ecosystems? This course examines the historical context of the food ecosystems and encourages students to identify with these systems that we (in urban settings) are disconnected with. Students will build a project around exploring innovative approaches to the future of food and our relationships with it. These projects will incorporate design, technology, science, and research elements.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3030-000 (15738)
09/06/2024 – 12/11/2024 Fri
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Huggins, Nikita

Electronic Rituals, Oracles and Fortune-Telling (IMNY-UT 289)

According to anthropologists Filip de Boeck and René Devisch, divination “constitutes a space in which cognitive structures are transformed and new relations are generated in and between the human body, the social body and the cosmos.” In this class, students will learn the history of divination, engage in the practice of divination, and speculate on what forms divination might take in a world where the human body, the social body, and even the cosmos(!) are digitally mediated. Starting with an understanding of ritual and folk culture, we will track the history of fortune-telling from the casting of lots to computer-generated randomness to the contemporary revival of Tarot; from reading entrails to astrology to data science; from glossolalia to surrealist writing practices to the “ghost in the machine” of artificial intelligence. Weekly readings and assignments culminate in a final project.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


IMNY-UT 289-000 (21942)
09/07/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Parrish, Allison

Advertising and Consumer Society (MCC-UE 9015)

This course will examine the emergence of advertising as a form of communication, its influence upon other forms of mediated communication and its impact upon culture and society.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9015-000 (2561)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Murad, Salim

Social Media Practicum (MCC-UE 9032)

In this workshop-based course, students will become well versed in contemporary debates on social media and its impact on self and society, share their own experiences and observations in this area, design an original research project (using methods such as discourse analysis, virtual ethnography, and interviewing), and write a long-form analysis paper.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9032-000 (2831)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Druker, Jeremy

Video Game Economies (MCC-UE 9008)

The course approaches video games through the lens of political economy. This means examining games foremost as commodities, transactional goods through which various modes of economic life occur. This course introduces students to the structure and economics of the game industry since its emergence in the 1970s, particularly across the United States, China, and Japan. Special attention is brought to the dramatic industry changes catalyzed by digital distribution, mobile gaming, live streaming, and other contemporary developments. Examines the emergence of video games as sites of contemporary cultural production & practice. Special attention is given to the symbolic & aesthetic dimensions of video games, including their various narratives forms and sub-genres, & concentrates on their interactive dimensions. The course provides insight into the emerging trends in the interface between humans & media technologies. The course also situates video games within the business practices of the entertainment industries.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9008-000 (2834)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Krobova, Tereza

DIGITAL LOGIC AND STATE MACHINE DESIGN (ECE-UY 2204)

This course covers combinational and sequential digital circuits. Topics: Introduction to digital systems. Number systems and binary arithmetic. Switching algebra and logic design. Error detection and correction. Combinational integrated circuits, including adders. Timing hazards. Sequential circuits, flipflops, state diagrams and synchronous machine synthesis. Programmable Logic Devices, PLA, PAL and FPGA. Finite-state machine design. Memory elements. A grade of C or better is required of undergraduate computer-engineering majors. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 1114 (C- or better) or CS-UY 1133 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UH 1001 (C- or better) or ENGR-UH 1000 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 101 (C- or better)

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11545)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11546)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11547)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11548)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11549)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Reagen, Brandon

Info Technology in Business & Society (TECH-UB 9001)

Provides the background necessary to make decisions about computer-based information systems and to be an “end-user”. Two major parts of the course are hands-on experience with personal computers and information systems management. Group and individual computer assignments expose students to electronic spreadsheet analysis and database management on a personal computer. Management aspects focus on understanding computer technology, systems analysis and design, and control of information processing by managers.

Computing and Data Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


TECH-UB 9001-000 (18394)
08/31/2023 – 12/12/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Sarasua, Asier


TECH-UB 9001-000 (18374)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by

Computational Social Science (CS-UH 2219E)

This course introduces students to various techniques and concepts that are essential for data scientists. It also provides an in-depth survey of the latest research methodology and topics that prepare the students to produce high quality research in Data Science. This seminar-based course will cover applications from different fields, such as sociology, psychology, network analysis, and artificial intelligence. In this context, the course will cover the use of computational techniques to model and predict various phenomena using real data. Students will be required to complete a course project, and to write up the results in a short article.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 2219E-000 (4282)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rahwan, Talal

Industrial Organizat’L Psychology (PSYCH-UA 62)

Personal, social, and environmental factors related to people?s attitudes and performance in industry and other organizations. Topics include personnel selection and evaluation, training and development, attitudes and motivation, leadership, group dynamics, organizational structure and climate, and job design and working conditions.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


PSYCH-UA 62-000 (9065)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldenberg, Liz

The Politics of Administrative Law (POL-UA 354)

Offered every other year. 4 points. Examines legal, political, and economic issues in government regulation. Covers such classic debates and issues as the historical origins of regulation, the legal philosophy of administrative regulation, the relationship between courts and agencies, the political and social conflicts surrounding regulatory politics, and the role of law in state formation.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


POL-UA 354-000 (20278)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harrington, Christine · Madson, Nathan

The Election Process (POL-UA 344)

Provides an understanding of election processes in the United States through different theoretical approaches to the study of campaigns and elections and the testing of empirical hypotheses. Analyzes campaign strategies of political candidates, the use of polls and media in campaigns, and the effects of issues and personalities on election outcomes. Evaluates the role of presidential primaries and elections in the functioning of a democracy.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


POL-UA 344-000 (20604)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nagler, Jonathan

Philosophy of Physics (PHIL-UA 94)

We will investigate different approaches to understanding space and time, and how the account of space-time structure has evolved in physics. One of the main objectives is to have a clear and accurate understanding of the Special Theory of Relativity, detailed enough to allow the student to solve some physics problems. This will require a bit of mathematics, but not more than algebra. We will discuss the General Theory of Relativity in a more qualitative way, including an account of the structure of black holes. Philosophy students do not need any further background in physics or mathematics, and physics students will not benefit from greater mathematical sophistication. We will also study the relevant history of physics and philosophy, particularly the debate between Newton and Leibniz about the nature of space and time. There will be two lectures each week and a recitation section.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


PHIL-UA 94-000 (19175)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Maudlin, Tim


PHIL-UA 94-000 (19176)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher


PHIL-UA 94-000 (19177)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher

Introduction to Computer Simulation (MATH-UA 144)

Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in Calculus I (MATH-UA 121) or Math for Economics II (MATH-UA 212) (for economics majors), and General Physics (PHYS-UA 11). Simulations of such phenomena as orbits (Kepler problem and N-body problem), epidemic and endemic disease (including evolution in response to the selective pressure of malaria), musical stringed instruments (piano, guitar, and violin), and traffic flow in a city (with lights, breakdowns, and gridlock). Simulations are based on mathematical models, numerical methods, and Matlab programming techniques taught in class. Emphasizes use of animation (and sound where appropriate) to present the results of simulations.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 144-000 (8767)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sprinkle, Brennan


MATH-UA 144-000 (8771)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Guanchun

Readings in Modern Italian Literature (ITAL-UA 116)

Introductory-level literature course that, through a close reading of authors such as Alfieri, Foscolo, Leopardi, Manzoni, Verga, D?Annunzio, Moravia, and Calvino, focuses on how to understand a literary text in Italian. Covers Italian literature from the 17th century to the contemporary period.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITAL-UA 116-000 (20014)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Perna, Joseph

Advertising (MKTG-UB 3)

This course provides students with a comprehensive framework and tools to understand the advertising process and to appreciate managerial and theoretical perspectives in advertising. It tackles the stages in developing an advertising plan- from analyzing the situation and defining clear advertising objectives to execution. Students learn tools related to various skill areas in advertising, including account planning, media planning and buying, and copywriting/art direction, while developing a broader appreciation of how each skill area fits into the overall structure of the advertising process. Coursework involves a comprehensive group project that utilizes learning in all functional areas of advertising, while simulating the development of an advertising campaign.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MKTG-UB 3-000 (10504)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cohen, Daniel

Theatre in The French Tradition (FREN-UA 829)

Study of the theatrical genre in France including the Golden Age playwrights (Corneille, Racine, and Moli?re); 18th-century irony and sentiment; and the 19th-century theatrical revolution. Topics: theories of comedy and tragedy, development of stagecraft, romanticism and realism, the theatre as a public genre, its relationship to taste and fashion, and its sociopolitical function.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


FREN-UA 829-000 (10201)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Miller, Judith

Science Fiction (ENGL-UA 728)

Considers contemporary science fiction as literature, social commentary, prophecy, and a reflection of recent and possible future trends in technology and society. Writers considered include such authors as Isaac Asimov, J. G. Ballard, Octavia Butler, Arthur C. Clark, Samuel Delany, Philip K. Dick, William Gibson, Robert Heinlein, Frank Herbert, Ursula K. Le Guin, Neal Stephenson, and Bruce Sterling.

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Biochemistry II (CHEM-UA 882)

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 882-000 (7949)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lupoli, Tania


CHEM-UA 882-000 (21011)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 882-000 (9236)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qamra, Rohini


CHEM-UA 882-000 (9949)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qamra, Rohini

Software Engineering (CSCI-UA 474)

An intense hands-on study of practical techniques and methods of software engineering. Topics include advanced object-oriented design, design patterns, refactoring, code optimization, universal modeling language, threading, user interface design, enterprise application development, and development tools. All topics are integrated and applied during the semester-long group project. The aim of the project is to prepare students for dynamics in a real workplace. Members of the group meet on a regular basis to discuss the project and to assign individual tasks. Students are judged primarily on the final project presentations.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CSCI-UA 474-000 (21436)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bloomberg, Amos

Object Oriented Programming (CSCI-UA 470)

Object-oriented programming has emerged as a significant software development methodology. This course introduces the important concepts of object-oriented design and languages, including code reuse, data abstraction, inheritance, and dynamic overloading. It covers in depth those features of Java and C that support object-oriented programming and gives an overview of other object-oriented languages of interest. Significant programming assignments, stressing object-oriented design.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

ATB: Applied Cell Biology (BIOL-UA 37)

Introduction to the methodology used to study cell structure and function. In the laboratory, students study the fundamentals of cell biology and the experimental approaches used to examine the cell. Experimental topics cover cellular, subcellular, and macromolecule localization; biochemical analysis of the cell; and cell culture techniques.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


BIOL-UA 37-000 (9087)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tan, Ignatius


BIOL-UA 37-000 (24196)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tan, Ignatius

Art in Spain from El Greco to Goya (ARTH-UA 315)

Begins with El Greco in Italy and Toledo, Velázquez, Zurbarán, Murillo, Ribera, and Valdés Leal before moving to the 18th century (the Tiepolo family, Meléndez). Defines Spain in the 16th and 17th century as a global power by considering colonial-era art in such New World centers as Mexico City and Lima. The focus then shifts to the art of Francisco de Goya and the projection of Spanish art into the modern era.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ARTH-UA 315-000 (19817)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sullivan, Edward

South Asian Art II: 1200 to The Present (ARTH-UA 531)

As in ARTH-UA 91, students examine artistic centers from two vast adjoining regions, in this case South and Southeast Asia, both of which include a wide variety of cultures. Includes monuments of Pakistan, India, Cambodia, and Indonesia. Although the two courses use the same approach and are designed to be complementary, either one may be taken without the other.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ARTH-UA 531-000 (9038)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Khera, Dipti

Medieval Art (ARTH-UA 4)

Art of Western civilization between Constantine and the Renaissance (300 to 1500 in northern Europe, 1400 in Italy). Topics: Christian beliefs underlying medieval art; acceptance and rejection of classical tradition and the roles of non-classical traditions in medieval art; stylistic transformations in medieval art in the context of medieval society; development of abbey and cathedral, monumental sculpture and painting, mosaics, stained glass, and fresco, as well as manuscript illumination, ivories, metalwork, and panel painting.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Art and Architecture in The Age of Giotto (ARTH-UA 204)

Traces the evolution of the painted altarpiece in relation to its liturgical, devotional, and cultic functions, with consideration of artistic personalities such as Duccio, Simone Martini, and the Lorenzetti. Studies great fresco cycles in churches and chapels from the point of view of artists (including Giotto and Taddeo Gaddi), patron(s), and program. Surveys key monuments of religious and civic architecture and their painted and sculpted decoration within the historical and political contexts of the emerging Italian city-states. Topics include: mendicant orders and the arts; Black Death and art; status of the artist; gender and social class in representation and patronage.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Gender, Violence, and The Law (ANTH-UA 330)

Examines the global prevalence of gender violence and the varied meanings of violence against women and changes in terminology over time. Examines ways of theorizing gender and violence including performative ideas of gender. The creation of gender violence as a social problem is a product of social movements in the United States, Europe, India, and many other parts of the world. It is now understood globally as an important human rights violation. Also examines the forms of intervention that have been developed in the United States and globally for diminishing violence against women, including policing, prosecution, and punishment.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Religion and Media (ANTH-UA 220)

This course introduces the long-standing and complex connection between religious practices and various media. We’ll analyze how human hearing, vision, and the performing body have been used historically to express and maintain religious life through music, voice, images, words, and rituals. Time will then be spent on more recent electronic media such as radio, film, television, video, and the Internet. An anthropological/ historical perspective on studying religion is pursued.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ANTH-UA 220-000 (20043)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zito, Angela · Momin, Shayan

Animal Minds (ANST-UA 410)

This course examines the philosophy of cognitive ethology and comparative psychology. We begin by discussing the nature of animal minds. Are animals conscious? Do they experience pain? Do they have beliefs? Do they use language? Are they self-conscious? How can we know? This involves applying concepts from metaphysics and epistemology to research in cognitive ethology and comparative psychology. We then discuss more general questions like: Are animals agents? Do they have free will? Do they live meaningful lives? Do they have moral rights? This involves applying concepts from ethics, existentialism, and other areas of philosophy to our conclusions about animal minds. Finally, we also ask, along the way, how research on animal minds can affect our philosophical theories. For example, should we revise our theories of consciousness, language, agency, morality, and so on if they seem to have implausible implications about animals?

Animal Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ANST-UA 410-000 (23049)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Franks, Becca

Bioart Practices (IM-UH 2514E)

In this course we will take a tour of the materials and techniques utilized by artists in the emerging field of biological art – that is art which uses life itself as a medium. This hybrid art and science class will introduce concepts in genetic engineering, personal genomics, the microbiome, epigenetics, microscopic imaging, tissue culture/bioprinting, biopolitics, and bioethics as sites for artistic exploration. Organized in thematic modules students will learn basic lab techniques while studying the work of artists in this interdisciplinary field. The three core areas are: Input/Output (imaging and printing with biology, tissue culture), identity after the genome (genetics, personal genomics, microbiome, epigenetics, portraiture), and final projects. Weekly readings and written responses will supplement lab activities. The course will culminate in the creation of original biological artworks by each student, which will be exhibited in the Interactive Media Showcase at the end of the semester.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


IM-UH 2514E-000 (20014)

Cell Phone Cinema (OART-GT 2566)

Hollywood in your palm. That is what this combination of lectures, screenings, demonstrations and practical production workshop will offer to the students in this course. There will be several professional guests making presentations and Q&A sessions from the mobile phone filmmaking industry. In addition to the historical and critical overview of the emergence and exponential growth of global cell phone cinema, students will shoot all footage on cell phones and download them for computerized editing. The final project will be under three minute shorts. Projects will include all genres of film and television: news, mini-documentaries, animation, music videos and narrative shorts. Completed student projects will be suitable to be posted on the Internet and entered into domestic and international mobile phone film festivals. For example, two minute long improvisations of Bollywood Style Music Videos shot on Cell Phones by the students have been projected at the Tribeca Cinemas as part of the New York Indian Film Festival. It is suggested but not compulsory that students bring to the class a cell phone capable of recording video.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


OART-GT 2566-000 (17833)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bardosh, Karoly

Web Design (PHTI-UT 1238)

Prerequisite: Photography II or permission from the department. This course combines theory and practice as it pertains to making art projects for the World Wide Web. The course will investigate what it means to work in this new environment and how the medium might influence the work made. The course will investigate a variety of approaches such as conceptual, experimental, documentary and diaristic. Special consideration will be given to the ways in which structure (nonlinear vs. linear), interactivity and metaphor influence meaning. Formal design elements such as color, typography, scale and sequencing will also be examined. In addition, the nuance of html tags, hexadecimal colors and image compression will be explored. There will be several short projects as we get up-to-speed on the technical side. Two larger projects will comprise the remainder of the semester: a portfolio project that focuses on graphic and interface design; and a web project that uses “web space” as a medium for its own sake. Students should be prepared to exercise both sides of their brain. This course requires a nonrefundable lab fee.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2021)


PHTI-UT 1238-000 (6640)
05/24/2021 – 07/05/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kilroy, Elizabeth

Internship (MCC-UE 1100)

The internship program promotes the integration of academic theory with practical experience. Internships expand student understandings of the dynamics of the ever-changing field of communication.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
1-4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1100-000 (13988)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Battinelli, Olivia


MCC-UE 1100-000 (13989)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Battinelli, Olivia

Fame (MCC-UE 1346)

Fame, notoriety, renown – the desire to be recognized & immortalized is the most enduring & perhaps the most desirable form of power. Culture, commerce, politics, & religion all proffer promises of fame – whether for fifteen minutes or fifteen centuries. This course will investigate this subject by asking, what is fame? Why do people want it? How do they get it? What can they do with it? In other words, what kind of good is fame? Drawing on texts from history, ethnography, theory, literature, philosophy, & contemporary media, this course will reflect on the ethics, erotics, pragmatics & pathologies of fame.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1346-000 (11421)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fallica, Salvatore

Applied Cryptography (CS-GY 6903)

This course examines Modern Cryptography from a both theoretical and applied perspective, with emphasis on “provable security” and “application case studies”. The course looks particularly at cryptographic primitives that are building blocks of various cryptographic applications. The course studies notions of security for a given cryptographic primitive, its various constructions and respective security analysis based on the security notion. The cryptographic primitives covered include pseudorandom functions, symmetric encryption (block ciphers), hash functions and random oracles, message authentication codes, asymmetric encryption, digital signatures and authenticated key exchange. The course covers how to build provably secure cryptographic protocols (e.g., secure message transmission, identification schemes, secure function evaluation, etc.), and various number-theoretic assumptions upon which cryptography is based. Also covered: implementation issues (e.g., key lengths, key management, standards, etc.) and, as application case studies, a number of real-life scenarios currently using solutions from modern cryptography. | Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6903-000 (15957)
at ePoly
Instructed by Chen, Zhixiong


CS-GY 6903-000 (15958)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Di Crescenzo, Giovanni


CS-GY 6903-000 (15959)
at ePoly
Instructed by Di Crescenzo, Giovanni

Application Security (CS-GY 9163)

This course addresses the design and implementation of secure applications. Concentration is on writing software programs that make it difficult for intruders to exploit security holes. The course emphasizes writing secure distributed programs in Java. The security ramifications of class, field and method visibility are emphasized. | Knowledge of Information, Security and Privacy equivalent to CS-GY 6813. Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 9163-000 (15952)
at ePoly
Instructed by


CS-GY 9163-000 (15953)
at ePoly
Instructed by


CS-GY 9163-000 (15954)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Satt, Mo

Big Data (CS-GY 6513)

Big Data requires the storage, organization, and processing of data at a scale and efficiency that go well beyond the capabilities of conventional information technologies. In this course, we will study the state of art in big data management: we will learn about algorithms, techniques and tools needed to support big data processing. In addition, we will examine real applications that require massive data analysis and how they can be implemented on Big Data platforms. The course will consist of lectures based both on textbook material and scientific papers. It will include programming assignments that will provide students with hands-on experience on building data-intensive applications using existing Big Data platforms, including Amazon AWS. Besides lectures given by the instructor, we will also have guest lectures by experts in some of the topics we will cover. Students should have experience in programming: Java, C, C , Python, or similar languages, equivalent to two introductory courses in programming, such as “Introduction to Programming” and “Data Structures and Algorithms. | Knowledge of Python. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6513-000 (16126)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rodriguez, Juan


CS-GY 6513-000 (16128)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rodriguez, Juan


CS-GY 6513-000 (16127)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Sat
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Patel, Amit


CS-GY 6513-000 (16129)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Computer Networking (CS-GY 6843)

This course takes a top-down approach to computer networking. After an overview of computer networks and the Internet, the course covers the application layer, transport layer, network layer and link layers. Topics at the application layer include client-server architectures, P2P architectures, DNS and HTTP and Web applications. Topics at the transport layer include multiplexing, connectionless transport and UDP, principles or reliable data transfer, connection-oriented transport and TCP and TCP congestion control. Topics at the network layer include forwarding, router architecture, the IP protocol and routing protocols including OSPF and BGP. Topics at the link layer include multiple-access protocols, ALOHA, CSMA/CD, Ethernet, CSMA/CA, wireless 802.11 networks and linklayer switches. The course includes simple quantitative delay and throughput modeling, socket programming and network application development and Ethereal labs. | Knowledge of Python and/or C. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6843-000 (16008)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Reddington, Thomas


CS-GY 6843-000 (16009)
at ePoly
Instructed by Portnoy, Rafail


CS-GY 6843-000 (16010)
at ePoly
Instructed by Portnoy, Rafail


CS-GY 6843-000 (16011)
at ePoly
Instructed by Zhao, John

Tackling Representation in Games (OART-UT 1618)

Identity and representation are two of the most pressing and complex issues for contemporary video games, that without recognizing them an artist or critic would be missing a large part of how games are important in culture. With growing art and activist communities, video games are diversifying and grappling with a wide range of topics rarely seen before in the genre, and with it a greater need for informed perspectives on the topic of how marginalized people are depicted in media. This course discusses foundational theories of identity and encourages students to contribute their own ideas towards the design and interpretation of representation in games.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


OART-UT 1618-000 (15424)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Brice, Mattie

Live Video Performance Art (OART-GT 2567)

This course will combine a history of video art and experimental film with practical training in the use of live video performance art technology. Students will explore new ways to create and edit films and videos using VJ software, projections, and multi-channel video surfaces. Workshops will demonstrate concepts and software that can be integrated into the creative process of video performance art and video art installations. COURSE OBJECTIVES At the completion of this course, the student will be able to: Draw inspiration from the recent history of incredible video and multi-media artists. Develop an understanding of audio and visual hardware used by VJ’s. Use live VJ software to manipulate digital media in real time to create Video Performance Art. Use Projection Mapping techniques to project video art onto 3D surfaces. Create original video performance art, video installations, and other performance pieces. Utilize skills to make video art in the professional market.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


OART-GT 2567-000 (7246)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nova, Max

Urban Arts Workshop: New York (OART-GT 2925)

Urban Arts Workshop–New York is composed of lectures, presentations, screenings, readings, discussions, and visits from painters, photographers, filmmakers, writers, designers, architects, planners, restaurateurs, curators and critics designed to expose students to the key concepts and fundamental theories of urban studies, public art and the urban-inspired works of many great artists and writers based in New York City and around the world. Outside of class time, students will do readings, conduct research, watch movies, post reactions and do various assignments that engage the core course subject matter and themes. Each class will explore another form of urban art, including discussions about and encounters with graffiti, street photography, sculpture, installation art, architecture, music, dance, performance, theater, fashion, urban sound projects, large-scale projections, poetry, essays and short stories with an aim to understand how such art forms came into being and how they express a distinctly urban message to the inhabitants and visitors of New York City and cities across the planet. The instructor seeks to combine the critical and theoretical with the experiential and personal in order to lead students to a deeper and more fruitful relationship with cities, the arts and themselves. Further exploration will be conducted into the phenomenon of connectivity in the 21st century city providing a deeper perspective on globalism, the networked environment, and emerging technology’s role in the future of art, culture and urban living. Field trips may include: The Whitney, The High Line and Hudson Yards, Tiny Island, MoMA, Guggenheim, PS1, Museum of the City of New York, The New Museum, Transit Museum, Noguchi Museum, Governors Island and others based upon availability. Students will need a MetroCard for traveling around the city as well as approximately $50.00 to cover meals and museum tickets (this price varies depending on course itinerary).

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Intro to Digital Tools (OART-GT 2823)

This course will explore the basic tools of digital imaging. We will cover the three main Adobe products for creative imaging – Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. Through a series of short assignments we will look at various graphic design and layout ideas using Illustrator and InDesign and will touch on the wealth of image enhancement techniques afforded by Photoshop. The short assignments introduce the basics of design, typography and compositing images. Students have the opportunity to complete a small project of their own for the end of the term. Class time will be divided between lectures, critiques, and work in class sessions. This course is not intended to completely cover the software listed, but will give students a fundamental understanding of the possibilities of digital imaging. While the majority of the class focuses on print media (images, books and magazines), we discuss the growing importance of screen output. We do not have time to cover specific web or media projects, but will address transferable skills and understanding. We will incorporate some Adobe apps to augment the desktop applications. Additional reading materials will be distributed during the semester. Students should have access to the Adobe Creative Suite through the NYU license.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


OART-GT 2823-000 (7363)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fallon, Catherine


OART-GT 2823-000 (7364)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fallon, Catherine

The Code of Music (ITPG-GT 2653)

This course explores music through the lenses of computation and interactivity. The first part of the semester consists of a structured exploration of rhythm, melody, timbre, and harmony, from the perspectives of code, design, and music theory. For each musical element, we will hold listening sessions, represent and manipulate the element in code, and create an interactive study around it. During the second half of the semester we will cover algorithmic composition techniques such as Markov Chains, Neural Networks and L-systems. As students work toward their final projects, assignments will take a more self-directed approach. Professional practitioners will come in to share their work in the field and give students feedback on their projects. In-class coding and assignments will be done in P5.js Tone.js, but students will be free to use other languages and frameworks for their final projects. ICM or equivalent programming experience is required. This class is a good fit for students who are interested in: – Creating interactive music pieces and digital instruments – Deepening their understanding of how music works – Continuing to develop coding skills acquired in ICM Prerequisites: Introduction to Computational Media (ICM) or equivalent programming experience is required. About Luisa Hors: https://www.luisapereira.net/

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2653-000 (14753)
01/25/2024 – 05/02/2024 Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pereira Hors Renner, Luisa

Carpe Datum: Data Science for Life’s Big Questions (APSTA-UE 25)

How many types of people are there? When and how will you die? Will you make money? Is the system fair? This fully online course introduces students to topics in data science, probability, and statistics through big life questions. Students learn to code in the R language and use simulation-based methods rather than equations for inference. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equiv – Satisfies Quantitative Reasoning for some programs; check with your Academic Advisor

Applied Statistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


APSTA-UE 25-000 (12866)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Intro to Programming for Games (GAMES-UT 180)

Introduction to Programming for Games is a course that introduces students to the concepts, problems, and methods of computer programming, and how these apply to the creation of video games. The course assumes no prior programming knowledge, and is designed to touch on the basic principles of digital design in the form of computer code. There will be an emphasis on programming fundamentals; they will be motivated through the lens of designing and producing video games.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


GAMES-UT 180-000 (14736)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pratt, Charles

Games 101 (GAMES-UT 101)

Games 101 is the foundational course for the NYU Game Center. The focus of Games 101 is game literacy – a shared understanding of games as complex cultural and aesthetic objects. The class will incorporate lectures, discussion, readings, and writing assignments, but the primary activity of the class is critical play – playing games in order to better understand and appreciate them. The class will cover games on and off the computer, including classic and contemporary board and card games, sports, and games on the PC, internet, and consoles.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14339)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Clark, Naomi


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14340)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Jones-Brewster, Jordan


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14342)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Porter, Caroline


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14341)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Boyer, Chapin


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14343)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Jones-Brewster, Jordan


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14344)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sorensen, Samuel


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14723)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Croasdill, D

Creative Coding Lab (INTM-SHU 103)

In this foundation course students will learn the fundamentals of computation, software design, and web technologies, through a series of creative projects. The course is intended to equip students with the skills to develop artistic and business projects that include a significant computational component. Topics such as variables, functions, components, and functional and reactive programming will be brought together to create interactive applications, generative art, data visualization, and other domains. Within the framework of these creative projects students will develop a greater understanding of how computer programs operate, be exposed to various concepts used to create experiences and interactions, and become more familiar with some of the technologies that constitute the internet. This course is intended for students with no prior programming background. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: CORE AT; IMA Major Other Foundation; IMB Major Emerging Media Foundation.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 103-000 (17271)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 103-000 (17272)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 103-000 (17273)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue,Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 103-000 (17274)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 103-000 (17276)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 103-000 (17277)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 103-000 (17278)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Fri
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 103-000 (17279)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by

After Us: Post-human Media (INTM-SHU 195)

What is the place of human creativity, agency and intelligence in complex technical networks? This class aims to build a foundation for studying how automation, artificial intelligence, robotics, digital image production, predictive software, and eco-technologies signal the ascent of a posthuman society. It provides a selection of texts and case studies that introduce basic philosophical and sociological questions about posthuman technologies and support creators, writers and thinkers in conceptualizing the posthuman nature of new media. The class is a combination of lectures and writing workshops. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: IMA/IMB elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


INTM-SHU 195-000 (19665)
01/24/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Konior, Bogna

Creative Coding (MCC-UE 1585)

“Creative Coding” is a practice-based course designed to teach basic programming skills in the context of critical & cultural media studies & the digital humanities. The course requires no prior programming experience, simply a willingness to explore code at a more technical level with the aim of using computation as an expressive, analytical, critical & visualizing medium. Students will learn basic coding techniques such as variables, loops, graphics, & networking, all within a larger conversation on the social, cultural, & historical nature of code & coding practices.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1585-000 (14057)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Galloway, Alexander

Ethical Questions in Literature (EN-UY 3194W)

This course examines the implications of ethical questions posed in works of poetry, drama, and fiction. Attention will be paid to historical context. This course satisfies HUSS elective requirements and 3000-level writing intensive requirements for all Poly majors. | Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


EN-UY 3194W-000 (17686)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Marks, Sylvia

Machines made of Words II: Designing Poetry (EN-UY 3434W)

In this seminar/workshop, students read a wide range of poetic forms or structures and practice making poems, focusing on the reading and composition of poems as forms of design. | Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements.

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


EN-UY 3434W-000 (24090)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Felsenthal, Alan

Analytical Approaches to Poetry and Art (EN-UY 3144W)

The poems of John Ashbery and the art of Richard Serra confront the respective reader/viewer: find a methodology based upon the structural configuration of the poem and sculpture to enable a “reading” of the work. The works that will be addressed reject impressionistic, subjective commentary. The beauty of word or artifact is not applicable. Post-1900 non-referential sculptures and paintings will be juxtaposed with poems that disassociate themselves from narrative content, poems whose only subject matter is language configuration – even when there is apparent thematic material – poems of Robert Creeley, John Ashbery, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, Amy Clampitt, Susan Howe, Michael Palmer, Clark Coolidge, and Louis Zukofsky. The poets so listed complement preoccupations of artists such as Mark di Suvero, David Smith, Richard Serra, Anthony Caro, Donald Judd, Carl Andre, Vito Acconci, Robert Smithson, and Marcel Duchamp. | Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2021)


EN-UY 3144W-000 (4036)
05/24/2021 – 07/05/2021 Mon,Tue,Wed
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Nadler, Alan

Introduction to Embedded Systems Design (ECE-UY 4144)

The course covers architecture and operation of embedded microprocessors; microprocessor assembly language programming; address decoding; interfacing to static and dynamic RAM; Serial I/O, Parallel I/O, analog I/O; interrupts and direct memory access; A/D and D/A converters; sensors; microcontrollers. Alternate-week laboratory. Objectives: to provide foundations of embedded systems design and analysis techniques; expose students to system level design; and teach integration of analog sensors with digital embedded microprocessors. | Prerequisites: CS-UY 2204 (C- or better) and EE-UY 2024 or EE-UY 2004 (C- or better). ABET competencies: a, c, d, e, g, j, k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 4144-000 (11565)


ECE-UY 4144-000 (11566)


ECE-UY 4144-000 (11567)


ECE-UY 4144-000 (11568)


ECE-UY 4144-000 (11569)


ECE-UY 4144-000 (11570)


ECE-UY 4144-000 (11571)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Campisi, Matthew

Signals and Systems (ECE-UY 3054)

This course centers on linear system theory for analog and digital systems; linearity, causality and time invariance; impulse response, convolution and stability; the Laplace, z- transforms and applications to Linear Time Invariant (LTI) systems; frequency response, analog and digital filter design. Topics also include Fourier Series, Fourier Transforms and the sampling theorem. Weekly computer-laboratory projects use analysis- and design-computer packages. The course establishes foundations of linear systems theory needed in future courses; use of math packages to solve problems and simulate systems; and analog and digital filter design. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: MA-UY 2012/2132, MA-UY 2034 or MA-UY 3044. | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: MATH-AD 116 and MATH-AD 121. | Prerequisites for Shanghai Students: MATH-SHU 124 and MATH-SHU 140. ABET competencies a, b, c, e, k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 3054-000 (11559)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Marzetta, Thomas


ECE-UY 3054-000 (11560)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Marzetta, Thomas

Fundamentals of Electronics I (ECE-UY 3114)

This course focuses on circuit models and amplifier frequency response, op-amps, difference amplifier, voltage-to-current converter, slew rate, full-power bandwidth, common-mode rejection, frequency response of closed-loop amplifier, gain-bandwidth product rule, diodes, limiters, clamps and semiconductor physics. Other topics include Bipolar Junction Transistors; small-signal models, cut-off, saturation and active regions; common emitter, common base and emitter-follower amplifier configurations; Field-Effect Transistors (MOSFET and JFET); biasing; small-signal models; common-source and common gate amplifiers; and integrated circuit MOS amplifiers. The alternate-week laboratory experiments on OP-AMP applications, BJT biasing, large signal operation and FET characteristics. The course studies design and analysis of operational amplifiers; small-signal bipolar junction transistor and field-effect transistor amplifiers; diode circuits; differential pair amplifiers and semiconductor device- physics fundamentals. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: EE-UY 2024 or EE-UY 2004 (C- or better) and PH-UY 2023 | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 214 and SCIEN-AD 110. | Prerequisites for Shanghai Students: EENG-SHU 251 (C- or better) and PHYS-SHU 93 or CCSC-SHU 51. ABET competencies a, b, c, e, k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 3114-000 (11561)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3114-000 (11562)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3114-000 (11563)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3114-000 (11564)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Communication Networks (ECE-UY 3613)

This course develops basic techniques used in communication networks. After protocol layering is introduced, algorithms and protocols are discussed for use in each of the five layers: physical, data link, network, transport and application. Specific protocols such as TCP/IP, ATM, SS7 are included. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Engineering Students: Junior status in electrical engineering, computer engineering, or computer science. Co-requisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: ECE-UY 2233 (EE majors) or MA-UY 2224 (CompE/CS majors) | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 194 (or co-req of MA-UY 3113) and ENGR-AD 195 (or co-req of ECE-UY 2233) . ABET competencies: a, c, e.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ECE-UY 3613-000 (17937)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Liu, Yong

INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING (ECE-UY 1002)

This course introduces numerous subject areas in Electrical and Computer Engineering (power systems, electronics, computer networking, microprocessors, digital logic, embedded systems, communications, feedback control, and signal processing). Through a series of case studies and examples, the course demonstrates how each subject area applies to practical, real-world systems and devices and discusses how the areas interact with each other to implement a complete functioning system or device. Students make presentations in teams on case studies based on articles from the IEEE Spectrum Magazine and other sources. The IEEE Code of Ethics and ethics-related issues are discussed. | ABET criteria: i, h. | Prerequisites: First-year standing

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ECE-UY 1002-000 (17982)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 1002-000 (17983)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rappaport, Theodore (Ted) S.

INTRO TO COMPUTER ENGINEERING (ECE-UY 1012)

This course helps students to understand computer engineering as a balance among hardware, software, applications and theory, the notion of abstraction, computer layers and how they relate to various aspects of computer engineering, implementation of abstract and physical computer layers: Number systems, digital logic, basic processor structure, instruction set architecture, machine languages, assembly languages and high-level programming in C. Other computer concepts, including compilers, operating systems and algorithms, are presented, along with the simulator concept and its usage for understanding computer design, testing and analysis. Experts present special topics in the area. Also discussed are invention, innovation, entrepreneurship and ethics in these topics and in Computer Engineering. Cross listed as CS-UY 1012. | ABET competencies: e, h, j | Prerequisite: Only first-year students are permitted to enrol in this course.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

FUND. OF ELECTRIC CIRCUITS (ECE-UY 2004)

Fundamentals of Circuits includes circuit modeling and analysis techniques for AC, DC and transient responses. Independent and dependent sources, resistors, inductors and capacitors are modeled. Analysis techniques include Kirchhoff’s current and voltage laws, current and voltage division. Thevenin and Norton theorems, nodal and mesh analysis, and superposition. Natural and forced responses for RLC circuits, sinusoidal steady-state response and complex voltage and current (phasors) are analyzed. Alternate-week laboratory. A minimum of C- is required for students majoring in EE. Objective: fundamental knowledge of DC and AC circuit analysis. | Co-requisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: (MA-UY 2034 or MA-UY 3044) and PH-UY 2023 | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: SCIEN-AD 110, MATH-AD 116, and MATH-AD 121. ABET competencies a, c, e, k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 2004-000 (11550)


ECE-UY 2004-000 (11551)


ECE-UY 2004-000 (11552)


ECE-UY 2004-000 (11553)


ECE-UY 2004-000 (11554)


ECE-UY 2004-000 (11555)


ECE-UY 2004-000 (11556)


ECE-UY 2004-000 (11557)


ECE-UY 2004-000 (11558)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Knox, Michael

FUND OF ELEC PWR ENG FOR NON EE STUDENTS (ECE-UY 2613)

Introduction to electricity: current, voltage and electrical power. Ohm’s Law. Kirchhoff’s Laws. Electrical materials. Electrical energy generation process. Principles of AC. Bulk electrical power generation: hydroelectricity and thermoelectricity. Alternative generation sources. Synchronous Generators. Induction Motors. Transmission and distribution systems. Substations and transformers. Low-voltage networks. Industrial, commercial and residential networks and loads. Short-circuit and protection equipment. Relays and circuit breakers. Power quality. Reliability and blackouts. Physiological effects of electric currents in the human body. Exposure to low-frequency magnetic fields. National Electric Code (NEC). ANSI-IEEE Standards. IEC standards. Certification of electrical products compliance. | Prerequisite(s): MA-UY 1024/1054/1324, and MA-UY 1124/1154/1424; and PH-UY 1004 or PH-UY 1013; and PH-UY 2004 or PH-UY 2023.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


ECE-UY 2613-000 (17003)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Bochynski, Zdzislaw

Fundamentals of Communication Theory (ECE-UY 3404)

The course covers bandpass signal representation and quadrature receivers; noise in communication systems; Digital Modulation Schemes, coherent and noncoherent receivers; coding fundamentals, block and convolutional codes; higher-order modulation schemes, QAM, M-PSK; intersymbol interference and equalization techniques; and carrier and symbol synchronization. Alternate-week computer laboratory projects analyze and design computer packages. The course teaches principles of various modulation and coding techniques and their relative effectiveness under transmission-environments constraints and uses math packages to analyze and simulate communication systems. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: ECE-UY 3054 (C- or better); computer engineering students may register with instructor’s approval. Co-requisite: ECE-UY 2233 (Note: Abu Dhabi students may waive ECE-UY 2233 co-requisite if they have successfully completed ENGR-AD 195 as a prerequisite) | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: EENG-SHU 2054 (C- or better) and co-requisite of MA-UY 3012 or ECE-UY 2223. ABET competencies a, c, e, k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ECE-UY 3404-000 (17987)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pillai, Unnikrishna


ECE-UY 3404-000 (17988)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pillai, Unnikrishna

Electromagnetic Waves (ECE-UY 3604)

Electromagnetic wave propagation in free space and in dielectrics, starting from a consideration of distributed inductance and capacitance on transmission lines. Electromagnetic plane waves are obtained as a special case. Reflection and transmission at discontinuities are discussed for pulsed sources, while impedance transformation and matching are presented for harmonic time dependence. Snell’s law and the reflection and transmission coefficients at dielectric interfaces are derived for obliquely propagation plane waves. Guiding of waves by dielectrics and by metal waveguides is demonstrated. Alternate-week laboratory. Objectives: Establish foundations of electromagnetic wave theory applicable to antennas, transmissions lines and materials; increase appreciation for properties of materials through physical experiments. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: EE-UY 2024 or EE-UY 2004 (C- or better). | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 214. | Prerequisites for Shanghai Students: EENG-SHU 251 (C- or better). ABET competencies: a, b, c, e, k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 3604-000 (11593)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3604-000 (11594)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3604-000 (11595)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3604-000 (11596)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Das, Nirod

Wireless Information Systems Laboratory II (ECE-UY 4283)

This course includes hands-on experience with a combination of laboratory experiments, lectures and projects relating to basic and advanced topics in wireless communications. Specific topics include mixers, IQ modulation, phase locked loops, receiver design, PN code acquisition, smart antennas and RFID. | Prerequisite: EE-UY 4183

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ECE-UY 4283-000 (18002)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 4283-000 (18003)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 4283-000 (18004)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Knox, Michael

Introduction to Machine Learning (ECE-UY 4563)

This course provides a hands on approach to machine learning and statistical pattern recognition. The course describes fundamental algorithms for linear regression, classification, model selection, support vector machines, neural networks, dimensionality reduction and clustering. The course includes computer exercises on real and synthetic data using current software tools. A number of applications are demonstrated on audio and image processing, text classification, and more. Students should have competency in computer programming. | Prerequisites: ECE-UY 2233, MA-UY 2233, MA-UY 3012, MA-UY 2224 or MA-UY 2222, MA-UY 3514

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 4563-000 (11607)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Fundamentals of Electronics II (ECE-UY 3124)

The course concentrates on differential and multistage amplifier, current mirrors, current sources, active loads; frequency response of MOSFET, JFET and BJT amplifiers: Bode plots; feedback amplifiers, gain-bandwidth rule and feedback effect on frequency response; Class A, B and AB output stages; op-amp analog integrated circuits; piecewise-linear transient response; determination of state of transistors; wave-shaping circuits; MOS and bipolar digital design: noise margin, fan-out, propagation delay; CMOS, TTL, ECL; and an alternate week laboratory. The course studies design and analysis of analog integrated circuits, frequency response of amplifiers, feedback amplifiers, TTL and CMOS digital integrated circuits. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Engineering Students: EE-UY 3114. | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: EENG-SHU 322. ABET competencies a, c, e, g, k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 3124-000 (11588)


ECE-UY 3124-000 (11589)


ECE-UY 3124-000 (11590)


ECE-UY 3124-000 (11591)


ECE-UY 3124-000 (11592)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Knox, Michael

Software Engineering (CS-UY 4513)

Focusing on software engineering, the course introduces techniques to specify, design, test and document medium and large software systems. Design techniques include information engineering, object orientation and complexity measures. Also covered are testing methods, such as path testing, exhaustive test models and construction of test data. An introduction to software tools and project management techniques is presented. Student projects involve team software development and tracking. | Prerequisites: Juniors or higher majoring in Computer Science, Computer Engineering or Electrical and Computer Engineering. Co-requisite: CS-UY 3224

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4513-000 (12271)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred


CS-UY 4513-000 (12272)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred


CS-UY 4513-000 (12273)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at ePoly
Instructed by Callahan, Eugene

DESIGN & ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS (CS-UY 2413)

This course covers fundamental principles of the design and analysis of algorithms. Topics include asymptotic notation, recurrences, randomized algorithms, sorting and selection, balanced binary search trees, augmented data structures, advanced data structures, algorithms on strings, graph algorithms, geometric algorithms, greedy algorithms, dynamic programming and NP completeness. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and MA-UY 2314; Corequisite: EX-UY 1 | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: (ENGR-UH 3510 or CS-UH 1050) (C- or better) and CS-UH 1002 | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 210 (C- or better) and CSCI-SHU 2314

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 2413-000 (12269)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hellerstein, Lisa


CS-UY 2413-000 (12270)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hellerstein, Lisa

INTRO TO GAME PROGRAMMING (CS-UY 3113)

A programming intensive introduction to the creation of computer games. Using mostly two-dimensional sprite-based programming, we examine and experiment with animation, physics, artificial intelligence and audio. In addition, the course explores the mathematics of transformations (both 2D and 3D) and the ways they may be represented. | Prerequisite: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better).

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 3113-000 (12268)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Romero Cruz, Sebastian

INTRO TO PROGRAMMING & PROBLEM SOLVING (CS-UY 1114)

This course introduces problem solving and computer programming and is for undergraduate Computer Science and Computer Engineering majors who have limited prior experience in programming in any language. The course covers fundamentals of computer programming and its underlying principles using the Python programming language. Concepts and methods introduced in the course are illustrated by examples from various disciplines. ABET competencies: a,b,c, e, f, g, k | Corequisite: EX-UY 1; Anti-requisite: CS-UY 1113

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 1114-000 (12244)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Arfaoui, Salim


CS-UY 1114-000 (12245)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Arfaoui, Salim


CS-UY 1114-000 (12246)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Arfaoui, Salim


CS-UY 1114-000 (12247)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Arfaoui, Salim


CS-UY 1114-000 (12248)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Arfaoui, Salim


CS-UY 1114-000 (12249)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Arfaoui, Salim


CS-UY 1114-000 (12250)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Arfaoui, Salim


CS-UY 1114-000 (12251)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Arfaoui, Salim


CS-UY 1114-000 (12252)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Katz-Braunschweig, Daniel


CS-UY 1114-000 (12253)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Arfaoui, Salim


CS-UY 1114-000 (12254)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Arfaoui, Salim


CS-UY 1114-000 (12255)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1114-000 (12256)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Katz-Braunschweig, Daniel

Engineering Problem Solving and Programming (CS-UY 1133)

This introductory course in engineering problem solving and computer programming is for all undergraduate engineering students without prior programming experience in any language. The course covers the fundamentals of computer programming and its underlying principles using the MATLAB programming language. Concepts and methods are illustrated by examples from various engineering disciplines. Useful numerical techniques and their applications to real-world problems in science and engineering are also discussed. ABET competencies: a, e, k. | Corequisite: EX-UY 1.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


CS-UY 1133-000 (17100)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


CS-UY 1133-000 (17101)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


CS-UY 1133-000 (17102)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


CS-UY 1133-000 (17103)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


CS-UY 1133-000 (16932)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

DIGITAL LOGIC AND STATE MACHINE DESIGN (CS-UY 2204)

This course covers combinational and sequential digital circuits. Topics: Introduction to digital systems. Number systems and binary arithmetic. Switching algebra and logic design. Error detection and correction. Combinational integrated circuits, including adders. Timing hazards. Sequential circuits, flipflops, state diagrams and synchronous machine synthesis. Programmable Logic Devices, PLA, PAL and FPGA. Finite-state machine design. Memory elements. A grade of C or better is required of undergraduate computer-engineering majors. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 1114 (C- or better) or CS-UY 1133 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UH 1001 (C- or better) or ENGR-UH 1000 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 101 (C- or better)

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 2204-000 (11540)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


CS-UY 2204-000 (11541)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


CS-UY 2204-000 (11542)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


CS-UY 2204-000 (11543)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


CS-UY 2204-000 (11544)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Reagen, Brandon

COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE AND ORGANIZATION (CS-UY 2214)

This course covers a top-down approach to computer design. Topics: Computer architecture, introduction to assembly language programming and machine language set design. Computer organization, logical modules; CPU, memory and I/O units. Instruction cycles, the datapath and control unit. Hardwiring and microprogramming. The memory subsystem and timing. I/O interface, interrupts, programmed I/O and DMA. Introduction to pipelining and memory hierarchies. Fundamentals of computer networks. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Engineering Students: CS-UY 2204 (C- or better) for computer engineering majors; (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and MA-UY 2314 for computer science majors. Students who are neither computer engineering majors nor computer science majors must take either CS-UY 2204 (C- or better) OR (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and MA-UY 2314.| Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 121. | Prerequisites for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 2314 and CSCI-SHU 210 (C- or better) or CENG-SHU 201. ABET competencies: a, c, e.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 2214-000 (12257)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dey, Ratan


CS-UY 2214-000 (12258)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dey, Ratan


CS-UY 2214-000 (12259)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dey, Ratan


CS-UY 2214-000 (12260)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dey, Ratan


CS-UY 2214-000 (12261)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dey, Ratan


CS-UY 2214-000 (12262)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dey, Ratan


CS-UY 2214-000 (12263)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dey, Ratan


CS-UY 2214-000 (12264)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dey, Ratan


CS-UY 2214-000 (12265)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dey, Ratan

Data Structures and Algorithms (CS-UY 1134)

This course covers abstract data types and the implementation and use of standard data structures along with fundamental algorithms and the basics of algorithm analysis. Not open to students who have taken CS-UY 2134. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 1114 or CS-UY 1121 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UH 1001 or ENGR-UH 1000 | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 101 | Corequisite for all Students: EX-UY 1

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 1134-000 (12279)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Tal, Itay


CS-UY 1134-000 (12280)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Tal, Itay


CS-UY 1134-000 (12281)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Tal, Itay


CS-UY 1134-000 (12282)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Reeves, Darryl


CS-UY 1134-000 (12283)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Tal, Itay


CS-UY 1134-000 (12284)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Tal, Itay


CS-UY 1134-000 (12285)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Tal, Itay


CS-UY 1134-000 (12286)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Tal, Itay


CS-UY 1134-000 (12287)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Tal, Itay


CS-UY 1134-000 (12288)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Tal, Itay


CS-UY 1134-000 (12289)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Tal, Itay

Object Oriented Programming (CS-UY 2124)

This intermediate-level programming course teaches object-oriented programming in C . Topics: Pointers, dynamic memory allocation and recursion. Classes and objects including constructors, destructors, methods (member functions) and data members. Access and the interface to relationships of classes including composition, association and inheritance. Polymorphism through function overloading operators. Inheritance and templates. Use of the standard template library containers and algorithms. | Prerequisite: CS-UY 1134 (C- or better); Corequisite: EX-UY 1

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 2124-000 (12290)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sterling, John


CS-UY 2124-000 (12291)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mansour, Omar


CS-UY 2124-000 (12292)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sterling, John


CS-UY 2124-000 (12293)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mansour, Omar


CS-UY 2124-000 (12294)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sterling, John


CS-UY 2124-000 (12295)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sterling, John


CS-UY 2124-000 (12296)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sterling, John


CS-UY 2124-000 (12297)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sterling, John


CS-UY 2124-000 (12298)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sterling, John


CS-UY 2124-000 (12299)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sterling, John


CS-UY 2124-000 (12300)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sterling, John


CS-UY 2124-000 (12301)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sterling, John


CS-UY 2124-000 (12302)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sterling, John

Introduction to Machine Learning (CS-UY 4563)

This course provides a hands on approach to machine learning and statistical pattern recognition. The course describes fundamental algorithms for linear regression, classification, model selection, support vector machines, neural networks, dimensionality reduction and clustering. The course includes computer exercises on real and synthetic data using current software tools. A number of applications are demonstrated on audio and image processing, text classification, and more. Students should have competency in computer programming. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 1134 AND (MA-UY 2034, MA-UY 2034G, MA-UY 3044 or MA-UY 3054) AND (MA-UY 2224, MA-UY 2222, MA-UY 2233, ECE-UY 2233, MA-UY 3012, MA-UY 3014, or MA-UY 3514) | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: (ENGR-UH 3510 or CS-UH 1050) (C- or better) AND (MATH-UH 1022 or MATH-UH 1023) AND (MATH-UH 2011Q or ENGR-UH 2010Q) | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 210 (C- or better) AND (MATH-SHU 140 or MATH-SHU 141) AND MATH-SHU 235

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4563-000 (12303)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sellie, Linda

Application Security (CS-UY 4753)

This course addresses the design and implementation of secure applications. Concentration is on writing software programs that make it difficult for intruders to exploit security holes. The course emphasizes writing secure distributed programs in Java. The security ramifications of class, field and method visibility are emphasized. | Prerequisite: CS-UY 3923

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4753-000 (16115)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Satt, Mo

Applied Cryptography (CS-UY 4783)

This course examines Modern Cryptography from a both theoretical and applied perspective, with emphasis on “provable security” and “application case studies”. The course looks particularly at cryptographic primitives that are building blocks of various cryptographic applications. The course studies notions of security for a given cryptographic primitive, its various constructions and respective security analysis based on the security notion. The cryptographic primitives covered include pseudorandom functions, symmetric encryption (block ciphers), hash functions and random oracles, message authentication codes, asymmetric encryption, digital signatures and authenticated key exchange. The course covers how to build provably secure cryptographic protocols (e.g., secure message transmission, identification schemes, secure function evaluation, etc.), and various number-theoretic assumptions upon which cryptography is based. Also covered: implementation issues (e.g., key lengths, key management, standards, etc.) and, as application case studies, a number of real-life scenarios currently using solutions from modern cryptography. | Prerequisite: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and MA-UY 2314.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4783-000 (16117)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Di Crescenzo, Giovanni

Computer Networking (CS-UY 4793)

This course takes a top-down approach to computer networking. After an overview of computer networks and the Internet, the course covers the application layer, transport layer, network layer and link layers. Topics at the application layer include client-server architectures, P2P architectures, DNS and HTTP and Web applications. Topics at the transport layer include multiplexing, connectionless transport and UDP, principles or reliable data transfer, connection-oriented transport and TCP and TCP congestion control. Topics at the network layer include forwarding, router architecture, the IP protocol and routing protocols including OSPF and BGP. Topics at the link layer include multiple-access protocols, ALOHA, CSMA/CD, Ethernet, CSMA/CA, wireless 802.11 networks and link-layer switches. The course includes simple quantitative delay and throughput modeling, socket programming and network application development and Ethereal labs. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-UH 3510 or CS-UH 1050 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 210 (C- or better)

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4793-000 (12278)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by O’Rourke, Lucas


CS-UY 4793G-000 (2816)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


CS-UY 4793G-000 (2588)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

COMPUTER SECURITY (CS-UY 3923)

This course covers cryptographic systems. Topics: Capability and access control mechanisms, authentication models, protection models. Database and operating system security issues, mobile code, security kernels. Malicious code, Trojan horses and computer viruses. Security policy formation and enforcement enforcement, legal aspects and ethical aspects. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 2214 | Prerequisite for CAS Students: CSCI-UA 201 | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UH 2010 or ENGR-AD 3511 | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CENG-SHU 202 | Co-requisite for ALL Students: CS-UY 3224

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 3923-000 (15976)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Cappos, Justin

NETWORK SECURITY (CS-UY 3933)

This course covers reviews networking. Topics: Basic notations of confidentiality, integrity, availability; cryptographic systems, coding and decoding messages. Cryptographic protocols for privacy, integrity, key exchange and access control. TCP/IP security; Firewalls, IPSec; secure ecommerce. Intrusion detection, prevention, response. Advanced topics are included. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 4793 or ECE-UY 3613 or ECE-GY 5373 |Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UH 3012 or ENGR-UH 3512 | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 308

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 3933-000 (15977)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Satt, Mo

INTRO TO OPERATING SYSTM (CS-UY 3224)

This course studies the fundamental concepts and principles of operating systems. Batch, spooling and multiprogramming systems are introduced. The parts of an operating system are described in terms of their functions, structure and implementation. Basic policies for allocating resources are discussed. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 2214 AND (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) AND (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better). | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: (ENGR-UH 3510 or CS-UH 1050) (C- or better) AND (CS-UH 2010 or ENGR-UH 3511) | Prerequisites for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 210 (C- or better) AND CENG-SHU 202

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 3224-000 (12276)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sandoval, Gustavo


CS-UY 3224G-000 (2553)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


CS-UY 3224G-000 (2811)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Interactive Computer Graphics (CS-UY 4533)

An introduction to the field of computer graphics: displays, image formation, visual perception, images, transformations (viewing and projection), programmable pipelines (vertex and fragment programs), modeling (primitives, polygon meshes, smooth curves and surfaces), animation (keyframing, procedural), rendering and realism (visibility, lighting, shading, shadows, texturing, ray tracing). | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and (MA-UY 2034 or MA-UY 3044 or MA-UY 3054) | Prerequisites for CAS Students: CSCI-UA 201 (C- or better) and (MATH-UA 140 or MATH-UA 148) | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: (ENGR-UH 3510 or CS-UH 1050) (C- or better) and (MATH-UH 1022 or MATH-UH 1023) | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 210 (C- or better) AND (MATH-SHU 140 or MATH-SHU 141)

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CS-UY 4533-000 (9966)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chiang, Yi-Jen

Introduction to Databases (CS-UY 3083)

This course introduces database systems and their approach as a mechanism to model the real world. The course covers data models (relational, object-oriented), physical database design, query languages, query processing and optimization, as well as transaction management techniques. Implementation issues, object oriented and distributed databases also are introduced. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Students: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and MA-UY 2314 | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: (ENGR-UH 3510 or CS-UH 1050) (C- or better) and CS-UH 1002 | Prerequisites for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 210 (C- or better) and CSCI-SHU 2314

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 3083-000 (12274)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dey, Ratan


CS-UY 3083-000 (12275)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Arfaoui, Salim

Biochemistry I (CM-UY 3314)

This course surveys modern biochemistry and emphasizes current areas of research. Also covered are structure-function relationships in proteins; enzymes and their mechanisms of action; bioenergetics principles and energy production; and biochemical theories and techniques. | Prerequisites: CM-UY 2213 or CM-UY 2214 or CM-UY 2234 or instructor’s permission.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CM-UY 3314-000 (11407)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Delker, Rebecca

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II (CM-UY 2221)

This laboratory stresses complex preparation, purification, characterization and identification of organic compounds by chemical and physical means. It introduces instrumental methods of analysis and identification. Lab fee required. | Prerequisite: CM-UY 2211, Co/prerequisite: CM-UY 2223.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
1 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CM-UY 2221-000 (14080)


CM-UY 2221-000 (8987)


CM-UY 2221-000 (8988)


CM-UY 2221-000 (8989)


CM-UY 2221-000 (8990)


CM-UY 2221-000 (8991)


CM-UY 2221-000 (8992)


CM-UY 2221-000 (8993)

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (CM-UY 2223)

This course continues CM-UY 2213 and emphasizes finding the principles of organic chemistry in industrial practice and biochemical mechanisms. It introduces instrumental methods of analysis and identification. | Prerequisite: CM-UY 2213. Co-requisite EX-UY 1

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CM-UY 2223-000 (8994)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Robinson-Surry, Julia

Physical Chemistry I (CM-UY 2614)

This course covers chemical thermodynamics with applications to solutions, phase and chemical equilibria. Molecular motion and transport properties are also covered. | Prerequisites: CM-UY 1004 or CM-UY 1024 and MA-UY 1124 or MA-UY 1154 and PH-UY 1013.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


CM-UY 2614-000 (17703)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Garetz, Bruce


CM-UY 2614-000 (17090)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sun, Donghong

General Chemistry for Engineers (CM-UY 1004)

This is a one-semester introductory course in general chemistry. It covers chemical equations, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, gases, atomic and molecular structure, periodic table, chemical bonding, states of matter, chemical equilibrium, organic, inorganic and polymeric materials and electrochemistry. | Corequisite: EX-UY 1

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


CM-UY 1004-000 (16847)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chigirinskaya, Lyubov


CM-UY 1004-000 (16848)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chigirinskaya, Lyubov


CM-UY 1004-000 (16849)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Roy, Debasish


CM-UY 1004-000 (16850)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Roy, Debasish


CM-UY 1004-000 (16851)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chigirinskaya, Lyubov


CM-UY 1004-000 (16852)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chigirinskaya, Lyubov


CM-UY 1004-000 (16968)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnick, Suzanne


CM-UY 1004-000 (16969)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnick, Suzanne


CM-UY 1004-000 (24919)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mishiyev, Robert


CM-UY 1004-000 (24918)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mishiyev, Robert


CM-UY 1004-000 (16853)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hagver, Rena


CM-UY 1004-000 (16854)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pollack, Myron


CM-UY 1004-000 (16855)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Thu
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pollack, Myron


CM-UY 1004-000 (16856)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chigirinskaya, Lyubov


CM-UY 1004-000 (16857)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chigirinskaya, Lyubov


CM-UY 1004-000 (20330)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnick, Suzanne


CM-UY 1004-000 (20331)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnick, Suzanne


CM-UY 1004-000 (17125)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnick, Suzanne


CM-UY 1004-000 (17124)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
6:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnick, Suzanne


CM-UY 1004-000 (16858)

INTRODUCTION TO BIOMOLECULAR SCIENCE (CM-UY 1032)

This is a one-semester overview course in chemistry, providing examples of important discoveries and important chemical innovators, with a strong emphasis on cutting-edge research. Field opportunities are developed to allow students to contribute to the discipline. | Prerequisite: Only first-year students are permitted to enroll in this introductory level course.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (CM-UY 2213)

This course covers chemistry of organic molecules: structure, nomenclature, properties and reactions of carbon compounds with emphasis on aliphatic compounds. It also introduces reaction mechanisms and stereochemistry. | Prerequisite: CM-UY 1004 or CM-UY 1024

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CM-UY 2213-000 (11439)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Robinson-Surry, Julia


CM-UY 2213-000 (11440)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Robinson-Surry, Julia

General Chemistry II (CM-UY 1024)

This course covers states of matter, chemical thermodynamics and equilibria, kinetics, acid-base chemistry, electrochemistry, introduction to organic chemistry, natural and synthetic polymers. The course is required for students in the Biomolecular Science Program. | Prerequisite: CM-UY 1004 or CM-UY 1014. Corequisite: EX-UY 1.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


CM-UY 1024-000 (19120)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pollack, Myron


CM-UY 1024-000 (19121)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pollack, Myron


CM-UY 1024-000 (19122)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mishiyev, Robert


CM-UY 1024-000 (19123)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon
5:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mishiyev, Robert


CM-UY 1024-000 (19124)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Fri
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Roy, Debasish


CM-UY 1024-000 (19125)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Roy, Debasish


CM-UY 1024-000 (19126)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Fri
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Roy, Debasish


CM-UY 1024-000 (19127)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Roy, Debasish


CM-UY 1024-000 (19128)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sun, Donghong

Biochemistry II (CM-UY 3324)

This course continues Biochemistry I. It covers principles of intermediary metabolism: energetic membrane structure and transport; structure and function of DNA and RNA; principles of molecular biology; the immune system; and hormonal regulation and cancer. | Prerequisite: CM-UY 3314 or instructor’s permission.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


CM-UY 3324-000 (16938)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mitra, Somdeb


CM-UY 3324-000 (22918)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mitra, Somdeb

Dynamic Web Applications (DM-UY 3193)

In this course, students focus on client and server side programming, as well as the web design and development process. Students are also introduced to databases for the web. Examples of dynamic web applications include content management systems, registration systems, and social media solutions. | Pre-requisite: DM-UY.2193

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 3193-000 (12665)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Ayres, James

Contemporary Techniques in Digital Photography and Imaging (DM-UY 2183)

This course will cover basic camera use as well as the more sophisticated skills of image editing. Developing sensitivity to the aesthetics of image making through the use of the camera’s technical controls and composition are the central goals of the class. The course will provide a background in the history, theory, and contemporary issues of photography through lectures and visits to museums and galleries. By the end of the semester students will have the know-how to make images that convey their aesthetic and conceptual ideas effectively.

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 2183-000 (12648)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Toolin, Jack Craig

The New Arcade (ITPG-GT 2063)

With platforms like Steam and Itch.io making independent games more accessible to the public, we’re starting to see a movement toward physical installations of indie games as well. The New Arcade pays tribute to arcade cabinet designs of the 80’s and 90’s, but infuses them with new interfaces and digitally fabricated components. In this class, students will learn how to use the Unity game engine to design a simple arcade game. They’ll learn about aspects that separate an arcade game from other types of games, and interface their game with different kinds of hardware using microcontrollers. In the second half of the class, students will use Fusion360 to construct a new arcade experience using digital fabrication tools like laser cutters, and CNC machines. The class will culminate in a physical installation that showcases their game in a public gallery. Prerequisites: Physical Computing About Mark Kleback: https://wonderville.nyc

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2063-000 (14777)
01/25/2024 – 05/02/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kleback, Mark

Intro to Game Design (GAMES-UT 150)

This class is an intensive, hands-on workshop addressing the complex challenges of game design. The premise of the class is that all games, digital and non-digital, share common fundamental principles, and that under- standing these principles is an essential part of designing successful games. Learning how to create successful non-digital games provides a solid foundation for the development of digital games. In this workshop, students will: analyze existing digital and non-digital games, taking them apart to understand how they work as interactive systems; create a number of non-digital games in order to master the basic design principles that apply to all games regardless of format; critique each other’s work, developing communication skills necessary for thriving in a collaborative field; explore the creative possibilities of this emerging field from formal, social, and cultural perspectives; develop techniques for fast-prototyping and iterative design that can be successfully applied to all types of interactive projects.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


GAMES-UT 150-000 (14707)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Intro to Game Studies (GAMES-UT 110)

This class is an overview of the field of games that approaches them from several theoretical and critical perspectives. No special theoretical background or prior training is needed to take the course, but to have had a broad practical experience with and basic knowledge of games is a distinct advantage. Also, an interest in theoretical and analytical issues will help. You are expected to actively participate in the lectures, which are dialogic in form, with ample room for discussion. The course will prepare the student to: Understand and discuss games from a theoretical perspective, as well as the components of a game; Apply new theories and evaluate them critically; Assess and discuss game concepts and the use of games in various contexts; Analyze games, and understand and apply a range of analytical methods.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


GAMES-UT 110-000 (14536)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pratt, Charles


GAMES-UT 110-000 (14532)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pratt, Charles


GAMES-UT 110-000 (14533)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pratt, Charles

Popular Music in Germany: History (REMU-UT 9811)

From Karlheinz Stockhausen and Kraftwerk to D.A.F. and the Euro disco of Snap! – the first seven weeks of class considers the history of German electronic music prior to the Fall of the Wall. We will particularly look at how electronic music developed in Germany before the advent of house and techno in the late 1980s. One focus will be on regional scenes such as the Düsseldorf school of electronic in the 1970s with music groups such as Cluster, Neu! And Can, the Berlin school of synthesizer pioneers like Tangerine Dream, Klaus Schulze and Manuel Göttsching or Giorgio Moroder’s Sound of Munich. Visits will be made to experience Oskar Sala’s Trautonium – an early proto-synthesizer with which he created the sounds for Hitchcock’s The Birds – at the Musikinstrumenten Museum and the location of the Zodiak Free Arts Lab, an experimental club founded by Conrad Schnitzler and Hans-Joachim Roedelius. Students will be expected to competently identify key musicians and recordings of this creative period. The second half of the course looks more specifically at the arrival of Techno, a new musical movement, and new technology in Berlin and Germany in the turbulent years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall, up to the contemporary moment. Indeed, Post-Wall East Berlin, full of abandoned spaces and buildings and deserted office blocks, was the perfect breeding ground for the youth culture that would dominate the 90s and led Techno pioneers and artists from the East and the West to take over and set up shop. Within a short space of time Berlin became the focal point of a new culture, attracting enthusiastic followers from all over the world to clubs such as ‘Tresor’ and ‘E-Werk’. Among those early techno aficionados were writers, artists, photographers, musicians and fashion designers. Techno quickly developed into a lifestyle and mass movement, finding its most exhilarating expression in the Love Parade and, recently, the club/movement Berghain. As students consider Berlin’s slow transformation from divided city in those anarchic and pioneering days of the early 90s into the bustling, world-class nightlife capital it is today, they will also consider the changing and controversial cultural and socio-economic landscape of the city, and how Berlin continues to retain its uncompromising, avant-garde ethos. Students will be expected to write final research paper drawing on issues discussed in class and in the readings.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Marx, Nietzsche, & Freud (GERM-UA 9240)

This interdisciplinary course examines the works of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud, three German-speaking writers who pioneered radically different and influential interpretations of modern life, which continue to shape our contemporary understanding of society and individuality. The seminar not only delves into the origins of these prominent traditions of modern Western thought, but also underscores their relevance in modern social theories and poetics. Hence, the course will also include references to the writings of their contemporaries, as well as explications of the direct and indirect influences of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud on other writers.

German (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


GERM-UA 9240-000 (9424)
02/03/2020 – 05/14/2020 Mon
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by Steilen, Felix

Introduction to US Education (HSED-UE 1005)

This course introduces students to the central themes, issues, & controversies in American education. What is the purpose of “school”? How did schools begin, in the United States, & how have they evolved across time? How do children learn? How are they different from each other, & why & when should that matter? How should we teach them? & how should we structure schools & classrooms to promote learning? Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Society & Social Sciences

History of Education (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


HSED-UE 1005-000 (14673)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by Brewer, Dominic

Interactive Narrative (MD-UY 2314)

This course introduces students to the complex relationship between interactivity and storytelling. Students analyze how an interactive structure creates narrative. Works explored in this course range from nonlinear novels, experimental literature, audio narratives, theater/performance to film as narrative databases and games. The study of the structural properties of narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time, space, and storyline is complemented by theoretical texts about authorship/readership, plot/story, and characteristics of interactive media. | Prerequisite: Completion of first year writing requirements. Note: Satisfies HuSS elective.

Media Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MD-UY 2314-000 (8923)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dahnke, Sarah


MD-UY 2314-000 (8924)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dahnke, Sarah


MD-UY 2314G-000 (4279)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by Farmer, Mia

Pro Capture (ITPG-GT 2065)

This advanced experiential production course will introduce students to the latest techniques for stereoscopic 360 video, manual 360 video stitching and depth map creation, camera-paired Depthkit volumetric video, and mixed-format photogrammetry. Techniques introduced in the class will presume some working knowledge of more basic forms of these capture methods as well as how to integrate them into Unity. Alongside an intense technical focus, the course will also deconstruct recent groundbreaking experiential works that utilize similar experimental production designs. The format of each class will combine lectures and workshops with the ultimate goal of introducing students to the expectations demanded by professional productions. All of the techniques introduced are being employed by top experiential creators and creative studios. The course will try to show viable paths for students to engage with immersive media pipelines, at an expert level, with an expanded sense of possibility and inspiration. Topics heavily examined throughout the course include: surveillance, race, socioeconomics, carceral capitalism and technoscience, algorithmic bias and oppression, and post-work societal structures.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 5 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2065-000 (23513)
03/25/2020 – 04/29/2020 Wed
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Niederhauser, Matthew

Math for Artists (ITPG-GT 2058)

In this class students will learn math tools to boost their digital practice, fix common problems, and understand the math behind our human perception of the physical world. This course spans different branches of math including geometry, linear algebra, logarithmic thinking, and statistics as they relate to a programmer making digital art with our contemporary media ecosystem. The aim of this course isn’t to become calculators, rather strengthen our intuition through historical and ethnomathematics perspectives and foster a new relationship to math. The prerequisites to this class are basic arithmetic skills and an introduction to programming. We will create applications using free and open-source software, including Python and p5.js.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2058-000 (23070)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kraft, Robert

Intangible Interaction (ITPG-GT 2055)

Touchless devices and systems have become an essential part of our built environment—for example, automatic doors, automatic toilets, faucets, hand sanitizer dispensers, thermometers, and even paper towel dispensers have sensors that allow them to detect when they are needed. You might have experienced interactive artwork or exhibits that are activated responding to your presence and body movement—for example, interfaces where people can type with different body postures, musical instruments that you can play by waving your arms in the air, or mechanical systems that respond to your breath. Intangible interactions are those that we engage in without involving direct physical contact. Intangible interfaces don’t have a tangible form that explicitly instructs us how to interact with them, and these interactions utilize other forms of feedback than those we feel through touch. While technologies used for intangible interaction such as sensors and computer vision are now more available and accessible, philosophy and knowledge around the design and implementation of effective intangible interactions is a much less documented subject.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2055-000 (14768)
01/23/2024 – 04/30/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Song, Yeseul

Tangible Interaction & Device Design (ITPG-GT 2061)

Tangible interfaces are interfaces that you touch. You control them with your hands, feet, and other body parts. Their shape, feel, and arrangement provide feedback. This is where interaction design meets industrial design. In this class, you’ll design, program, and build devices with tangible controls in order to better understand how humans understand and control technical systems through our sense of touch. We’ll discuss physical interaction concepts such as expressive interfaces and utilitarian ones, real-time control vs. delayed control, and implicit vs. explicit interactions. You’ll learn programming and electronic techniques to sense state change, thresholds, peaks, and other signs of user action. You’ll also learn how to design, shop for, and construct housings for the devices you build. On the electronics side, the primary tools will be the microcontroller and common tangible controls: pushbuttons, switches, rotary encoders, rotary and slide potentiometers, force sensors and touch sensors. The class will also cover on-device feedback through LEDs, speakers, and force-feedback actuators. On the fabrication side, you’ll work with the tools of the shop and XXX CAD program. You’ll design and build four projects in the course of the semester. Projects will be designed (and parts specified). Projects will build on the skills learned in Intro to Physical Computing and Intro to Fabrication. Prerequisites: Intro to Physical Computing and Intro to Computational Media, or a working knowledge of microcontroller programming in Arduino; Intro to Fabrication or basic knowledge of laser cutter.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2061-000 (23076)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Igoe, Thomas · Light, Benjamin

Intro to Design for Diversity: The Future of Design is Equitable Design (ITPG-GT 2062)

As demographics in consumer markets and the global labor forces shift rapidly, diverse, equitable and inclusive (DEI) designers are necessary in all facets of business, from product and service design, to organizational and business design. In this multimedia and interactive Intro to Design for Diversity™(D4D), students will be provided with critical thinking skills to begin viewing diversity, equity and inclusion as design processes necessary for the future wellbeing of humans. D4D is a design framework that marries design thinking with diversity, equity and inclusion best practices and frameworks to illuminate cultural and racial biases. D4D is not only a means to harm reduction, but also a way-finding tool for better business. Students will be provided with historical context and case studies of racially biased practices that are now prevalent in biased algorithms in tech, as well as the lineage of culturally biased media narratives and how that plays a central part in today’s design practices, as well as their negative impacts. Students will be provided with a shared language and the outline of the D4D framework’s 5 Key Areas to enable them to design away from dominant culture, and instead, design for all people.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
1 credits – 2 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2062-000 (23284)
02/20/2020 – 03/05/2020 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Gao, Boyuan · Mantin, Jahan

The Revolution Will Be Digitized (ITPG-GT 2064)

What is the relationship between American musician and poet, Gill Scott-Heron and cybernetics? Heron’s “The Revolution Will Not be Televised” was created in hopes to wake-up 1970’s America from complicity in societal oppression to then realize the revolution begins in your mind and something created through active participation, not passive media consumption. While, iterated forms of cybernetics also challenge the notion that “technology [or society] is self-correcting”, through fostering design thinking and systems theory through a meta-scale analysis of computational practices, essentially promoting being an observer of systems through conversation with process and feedback loops. Both ideologies center intention and holistic design within innovation — concepts vital to the equitable well-being of society in a technocratic era. In this course, students will explore the origins and history of the internet and HCI technologies as stemming from hippie communes, counterculture and warfare; survey historical and current social relations in the U.S.; study how these social relations have been replicated and embedded into everyday technologies; and consider potential futures in tandem with rapid technological advancements. We will study the works of pioneering designers and thought-leaders from Norbert Wiener, Stewart Brand, and Victor Papanek to Alondra Nelson and Ruha Benjamin. Phenomena discussed throughout the course range from the power of Black Twitter, the social media revolution of Egypt’s Tahrir Square, to cryptocurrency being used in bail reform. After in-depth historical analysis of societal structures, geo-political dissent, and algorithmic patterns, students will engage with futurism and speculative practices, techno-culture manifestos, and design and systems theory to develop a variety of research-driven projects. We will conclude with using both second-wave cybernetics as a design framework, and an anthropological lens to imagine, innovate and design more equitable technocratic futures. Topics heavily examined throughout the course include: surveillance, race, socioeconomics, carceral capitalism and technoscience, algorithmic bias and oppression, and post-work societal structures.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2064-000 (23447)
01/27/2020 – 03/23/2020 Mon
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Melenciano, Ari

In and Out of Reality: Integrative Mixed-Reality (XR) Studio (ITPG-GT 2060)

There is a substantial gap between what AR/VR is capable of today and the future that enthusiasts envision. The hardware is progressing, yet there are lack of design tools and methodologies. Effective augmented and virtual reality games and experience require good storytelling, animation, production and solid graphics. Students will learn a myriad of processes including spatial interface design, volumetric capture, working with spatial audio, porting animations and game programming. This course presumes no prior knowledge and is intended to jump start a career in AR/VR development and interaction design. The goal is to have relevant portfolio projects for entering industry. Students will create content in Unity 3D to agnostically deploy on headsets, mobile phones or tablets. Students will have access to a wide range of available hardware. In the beginning of the course, students will learn to implement the most important AR/VR interaction concepts – concepts such as selection, manipulation, travel, wayfinding, menus and inputting text in Unity3D. In the latter part of the course, students will implement prototypes that will be periodically critiqued by experts at Oculus, Magic Leap, Google, and other top companies. *You do not need to be a programmer. This is intended for students interested in 3D art, interaction design, sound design and game development. All are important for immersive development*

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Designing the Absurd (ITPG-GT 2052)

Inspired by the Japanese art of Chindōgu, this class will introduce a playful and whimsical approach to learn industrial design. In this 14-week studio format class, students will develop gadgets, inventions, and electronic devices that present absurd solutions to problems, while learning concepts and techniques of design ideation, prototyping, model making, CMF (color, material, and finishes), and manufacturing. This is a production heavy four-credit course, where students will learn about industrial design and tangible interactions. Prerequisite: Intro to Phys. Comp. (ITPG-GT 2301)

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2052-000 (15716)
09/05/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Galvao Cesar de Oliveira, Pedro

Artist’s Life (ITPG-GT 2057)

This class will introduce the basic skills and resources required to pursue a career as an artist. Students will learn the day to day tasks of working artists, such as writing critically about their own work, drafting grant proposals, and planning the business administration of their studios. They will also learn how to balance commercial and experimental projects, collaboration and community work, and teaching and studio practice. They will engage in the critical text about ethical dilemmas of working with art institutions, corporations and academia. By the end of class, students will write a personal statement, update an art portfolio, and apply for an artist residency. While the class will focus on contemporary art and artists, students who are interested in other disciplines may benefit from learning about entrepreneurship, authorship and cultural industry.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 12 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2057-000 (23266)
01/30/2020 – 04/23/2020 Thu
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Choi, Taeyoon

Data and Publics (ITPG-GT 2053)

In this course, we’ll investigate two closely related ideas: public data and data publics. We’ll learn how to access and represent data from an assortment of existing public data sources, how to liberate currently obfuscated data sets, and how to create our own useful/whimsical/critical APIs from scratch. We’ll also investigate the act of putting data into public space – through sculpture, projections, performance, and participatory interventions. Particular attention will be paid to methods which bring data back to communities from which it was collected, and to tactics which build grassroots literacies, respect local ways of knowing and reinforce capabilities for stewardship and sovereignty.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 12 Weeks

Introduction to Synthetic Media (ITPG-GT 2054)

Generative machine learning models open new possibilities for creating images, videos, and text. This class explores the idea of how artists, designers and creators can use machine learning in their own design process. The goal of this class is to learn and understand some common machine learning techniques and use them to generate creative outputs. Students will learn to use pre-trained models, and train their own models in the cloud using Runway. For each week, we will discuss the history, theory, datasets, application of the machine learning models, and build experiments based on the model. In addition to Runway, we will be using JavaScript libraries like the p5.js, ml5.js, and TensorFlow.js, and software like Photoshop, Unity and Figma. Students are expected to have taken ICM (Introduction to Computational Media), or have equivalent programming experience with Python or JavaScript. A list of ML models we will be covering: Image generation: StylanGAN: https://github.com/NVlabs/stylegan BigGAN: https://github.com/ajbrock/BigGAN-PyTorch Style Transfer Fast-style-transfer: https://github.com/lengstrom/fast-style-transfer Arbitrary-Image-Stylization: https://github.com/tensorflow/magenta/tree/master/magenta/models/arbitrary_image_stylization Semantic Image Segmentation/Synthesis Deeplab: https://github.com/tensorflow/models/tree/master/research/deeplab Sapde-coco: https://github.com/NVlabs/SPADE Image-to-Image Translation: pix2pix: https://phillipi.github.io/pix2pix/ pix2pixHD: https://github.com/NVIDIA/pix2pixHD Text Generation LSTM gpt-2: https://github.com/openai/gpt-2

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2054-000 (23367)
01/31/2020 – 03/13/2020 Fri
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Shi, Yining

Critical Communications (ITPG-GT 2056)

The ways in which we communicate has changed radically in the last 100 years. As the communication systems we use have increased in complexity, so has the effort it takes to understand how they work. Most of us use protocols like LTE, HTTP, TCP/IP, and BLE every day. We take them for granted, almost like we do the laws of nature. But there are more than the laws of physics, more than techniques of engineering, embedded in the design and implementation of our protocols of communication. To understand their role in our lives, we need to look into the societal and economic contexts in which they came to be. In this class, we will examine communication protocols using Raspberry Pi’s, Arduinos, Software Defined Radios, and other connected devices. We will look closer at organizations like iSOC, ICANN and IEEE to better understand how protocol designs are implemented and standardized. Through readings, research and hands-on work we will build an understanding of how these protocols work, how their designs incorporate the physical, technical, cultural, corporate and political assumptions of the actors behind them. In the first half of the class readings and assignments will help familiarize students with some of the different protocols we rely on every day. In the second half, students will work in groups to investigate a communications protocol and consider its impact from a technical, societal and environmental perspective. Final projects will communicate their findings in whatever form students deem appropriate – explanatory blog posts, physical or digital installations, or even videos and podcasts.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2056-000 (22886)
03/30/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mattu, Surya

Machine Learning for Physical Computing (ITPG-GT 2050)

With Machine Learning models are getting smaller, and microcontrollers are getting more computing power, Machine Learning is moving towards edge devices. This class explores the idea of how machine learning algorithms can be used on microcontrollers along with sensor data to build Physical Computing projects. In this class, we will learn about TensorFlow Lite, a library that allows you to run machine learning algorithms on microcontrollers. We will talk about common machine learning algorithms and techniques and apply them to build hands-on interactive projects that enrich our daily lives. Students will learn to use pre-trained models, and re-train the models with sensor data. We are going to talk about Image Classification, Transfer Learning, Gesture and Speech Detection. For each topic, we will first discuss its history, theory, datasets, and applications, and then build simple experiments based on the topic. Prospective students are expected to have taken Introduction to Physical Computing and Introduction to Computational Media course, or have equivalent programming experience with Arduino and JavaScript.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2050-000 (22889)
03/24/2020 – 05/05/2020 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Shi, Yining

Material of Language (ITPG-GT 2051)

Language is more than just words and meanings: it’s paper and ink, pixels and screens, fingertips on keyboards, voices speaking out loud. Language is, in a word, material. In this course, students will gain an understanding of how the material of language is represented digitally, and learn computational techniques for manipulating this material in order to create speculative technologies that challenge conventional reading and writing practices. Topics include asemic writing, concrete poetry, markup languages, keyboard layouts, interactive and generative typography, printing technologies and bots (alongside other forms of radical publishing). Students will complete a series of weekly readings and production-oriented assignments leading up to a final project. In addition to critique, sessions will feature lectures, class discussions and technical tutorials. Prerequisites: Introduction to Computational Media or equivalent programming experience.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2051-000 (22895)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Parrish, Allison

Critical Objects (ITPG-GT 2496)

Art, design and experimental electronics can be great tools for inciting discussions of complex issues such as privacy, sexism, racism, economic inequality and climate change. This course aims to provoke thoughtful discussions of pressing issues through the combination of Art, Industrial Design and Embedded Electronics (sensors, actuators, wifi enabled microcontrollers – ESP32, raspberry pis). Topics will include technological disobedience, adversarial design and critical engineering. In this 14 week class, students will combine technology, design, and critical theory to build Art Objects / Interactive Sculptures that are aesthetically intriguing while socially relevant. This is a production heavy four-credit course, where students will learn about new-media critical theory, design and electronics. Prerequisites include an open mind, the drive to make, and physical computing.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2496-000 (23064)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Galvao Cesar de Oliveira, Pedro

Experiments in Augmented Reality (ITPG-GT 2037)

Is augmented reality technology about to enter the mainstream? AR platforms have finally become widely accessible to artists, designers, and technologists thanks to recent advances in mobile performance and a new collection of powerful computer vision techniques. As such, the medium offers rich possibilities for experimentation and a chance to rethink how we experience the intersection of the physical and digital. In this course, students will acquire an understanding of basic concepts and techniques necessary to prototype and build simple AR experiences – with a consideration of not just visual but also aural AR. We’ll supplement practical exercises with an overview of the history of AR, and discuss the ethical, legal, and societal considerations cropping up around this topic. Our tool of choice will be Unity, but we will go over prototyping techniques outside of the platform to speed up the design process. If there is interest, we will cover how to get started building projects in openFrameworks, mobile, or web AR – and discuss why or when you might want to work within other platforms. Even though code samples will be provided, students are highly encouraged to have a basic understanding of Unity or at least have taken an introductory programming course. A working knowledge of Unity can be gained through Unity tutorials (https://unity3d.com/learn/tutorials) or Lynda (https://www.nyu.edu/lynda).

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2037-000 (22657)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Online
Instructed by

Motion Design for User Feedback (ITPG-GT 2059)

Microinteractions are everywhere, you interact with them on a regular basis. Animated emojis, heart buttons that burst with love when you tap them or password fields that shake when you type in the wrong password – these are the tiny animations that produce delightful moments while providing users with valuable feedback. They can intuitively guide your users without having to explicitly write a set of descriptive rules. They are the soul and character of your interface, and if crafted well they can turn every interaction to a joyful moment while improving the user experience. Using Adobe After Effects and Lottie as our primary tool, we’ll learn how to design, animate and export playful SVG animations as interactive components. We’ll examine the basic principles of UI motion, cover how to create loopable animated states with fluid transitions between them.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
1 credits – 1 Day

All Maps Lie (ITPG-GT 2049)

Introduction to Critical Mapping and Open Source Geospatial Web Analysis and Visualization is an introduction to critical perspectives in cartography and geospatial information systems and web technologies. This course will introduce students to the foundations of geographic data analysis and visualization, grounding practical studio based exercises and projects with critical readings and theory. Students taking this course will gain an appreciation for geographic thinking, learn to ask geographic questions, and apply basic methodologies to “make sense” of geographic data. The course will be conducted with open source geographic information systems and web technologies. Students are not expected to enter the class with knowledge of these tools, but will be expected to learn and apply them through studio exercises and project briefings.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2049-000 (22872)
03/30/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Lee, Joseph K

Music Interaction Design (ITPG-GT 2475)

This class is a project development studio for interactive music projects —that is, pieces of music that are not linear, but rather offer multiple dimensions for listeners to explore (on their phones in a crowded subway, at an abandoned factory in Palermo, back on their couches after a long day, at a classical concert hall). Students will take a project from concept to execution over several iterations, applying Interaction Design principles and techniques. During the first half of the semester, they will gather aural and visual references, compose graphic notations, and create interactive studies to explore specific elements of their composition. This work will lead to the implementation of the midterm project: a functional, high-fidelity prototype. For their final projects, students will evaluate their midterm pieces from the perspectives of music, visual design and interaction design, and refine them to produce an expressive piece of interactive music. ICM or equivalent experience is required. Some experience in making or producing music will be useful, but is not required.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2475-000 (22929)
01/28/2020 – 05/05/2020 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pereira Hors, Luisa

Autonomous Artificial Artists (ITPG-GT 2497)

Autonomous Artificial Artists (AAA) is a class to explore ways of making artworks “autonomous.” In this context, “autonomy” brings together three independent but related criteria: 1) artificial intelligence being a primary determinant in an artwork’s aesthetics 2) autonomous software principles culled from peer-to-peer network design, blockchain and decentralization technology, serverless and federated machine learning, cryptoeconomics, and agent-based multiplayer simulation. 3) crowd-sourced art where mass, unbounded cooperation of many participants creates novel artworks which represent the “hive mind” or collective input. The goal of this class is to learn a little bit about each of these seemingly disparate fields, and see how they may interact in interesting new ways. The idea of autonomous artworks is very new, and is being actively discussed by a small group of interdisciplinary researchers and artists since 2016/2017. Although the topic is highly experimental, it is nevertheless based on concrete technologies, making simultaneous use of several techniques which are under active development and have potentially far-reaching ramifications well outside the domain of art. The time is ripe for people within more design-oriented fields to begin thinking about how they might be used in a broader context. The class has both a theoretical component (learning about each of the individual technologies and their interplay) as well as a practical component: training and deploying generative models on computational environments that are as close to decentralized or autonomous as possible. In addition, we will explore prior notions of crowd-sourced or mass-collaborative art, touching on older principles and strategies such as Oulipo, exquisite corpse, and crowd-sourced computational artworks like Electric Sheep, Exhausting a Crowd, and others.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 5 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2497-000 (22882)
04/06/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kogan, Gennady

Escape Room (ITPG-GT 2491)

Over 7 weeks students in this course will explore different game mechanics, puzzle mechanics, group dynamics, and narrative structures and work in groups to design and build a room sized escape game. We will explore how to design immersive and participatory experiences through play and problem solving. Students will construct weekly puzzles and narratives and in the final week build and operate an “escape room” experience. Prerequisites: Physical Computing and ICM. Comfort with fabrication strongly encouraged.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2491-000 (22864)
01/28/2020 – 03/10/2020 Tue
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rios, David


ITPG-GT 2491-000 (22865)
03/24/2020 – 05/05/2020 Tue
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rios, David

Big LEDs (ITPG-GT 2481)

Light Emitting Diodes or LEDs are used creatively all around us. They have the ability to emit light at different colors and intensities instantly and from very tiny points. How can we make creative visual works out of these amazing devices? What construction methods can we use to make those works reliable? Big LEDs will cover the process of designing large LED systems. We will cover LED array hardware and how to map pixels from computer generated media onto them. We will go through every major part of the hardware – different styles of LED arrays, drivers and gateways, cables, data protocols, and how to safely power all of them. We will learn to use the pixel mapping softwares Enttec ELM and Madmapper. We will also cover the paperwork needed to furnish a professional LED installation, including drafting riser diagrams, plan, section, and elevation views, creating a bill of materials, and writing instructions for users and installers. This year’s final project will be a site-specific LED sculpture installed in a public space at 375 Jay St. The installations will be able to display student chosen media that can be viewed for one minute. Students will work either in groups or alone and can choose from one of four installation options to present on: – A prepared square section of 2.0mm pitch LED video tiles (approx 256px x 256px, 2’-6” x 2’-6”) – A prepared low-resolution sculpture with diffused linear elements (approx 500px, 2’-6” x 5’-0” overall) – A student conceptualized LED video tile project – A student conceptualized low-resolution project Because of this year’s pandemic, unprecedented changes have come to the professional world of LED installations. As a result, we will be using remote tools such as networked-based cameras, remote desktop applications, and virtual private network connections to watch and operate the final projects. We will spend class time setting these tools up together. The two prepared options for the final project will be installed and maintained by the instructor.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2481-000 (14766)
03/12/2024 – 04/30/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Parsekian, Aaron

Resist! Intro to Technology Political Activism [A Product Design Perspective] (ITPG-GT 2483)

This class will apply a product and service design lens to the rapidly evolving role of technology in politics, government services, and human rights, with a dual focus on the use of technology to advance the public good, and the threats that technology can pose to various aspects of civil society. On the one hand, there has been an explosion of technology tools that aim to promote healthy and peaceful democracies, provide more efficient government services, and promote human rights. This course will survey those efforts and the product design methodologies that guide them. On the other hand, 2018 has been a reckoning year for technology all over the world. The post-mortem of the 2016 US Presidential election shined a light on technology’s role in a promulgating a deeply polarized electorate, enabling election-meddling from foreign actors, and profiligating fake news, while also raising deep concerns about data privacy and security for everyday citizens. Meanwhile, new technologies like AI and Blockchain are poised to have deeply transformative effects on multiple aspects of society – from policing to education to financial services. This course will also explore the risks various technologies can pose to privacy, safety, liberty, and well-being. The course will feature guest speakers from leading practitioners in the space. Potentially including the ACLU, Higher Ground Labs, Elucd (YC17), NYU Better Policing Initiative, Microsoft, and more.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2483-000 (23099)01/29/2020 – 03/11/2020 Wed6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by Resner, Lyel

Sound in Space (ITPG-GT 2485)

Stereo (2-speaker) sound is the default way we produce and distribute most audio. This class challenges the stereophonic-centricity of digital sound and instead focuses on the context of listening, interfacing and interacting with audio beyond 2 speakers. We will take a novel approach to spatialization by interfacing web technologies (Javascript, Web Audio, WebRTC) with multichannel audio to create room-scale interactive music and sonic spaces, and then make our findings publicly available through musical artifacts, open source tools, and documentation. We will explore conventional and unconventional loudspeaker arrangements ranging from 3 to 40 channels and how distribution and context affects music. Together, we will participate in a semester-long project examining the affordances of spatial and multichannel sound, designing and build open source tools to interface Tone.js, Higher-Order Ambisonics (HOA) and other multichannel techniques. Students will perform/install their final on the 40-channel speaker array at Dave&Gabe’s studio in Bushwick. Topics include 3D sound, open source, space and listening. Prerequisites: willingness to listen critically, some programming experience. No formal music training required.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 12 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2485-000 (22868)
01/27/2020 – 04/20/2020 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mann, Yotam

Product Design: Designing for People (ITPG-GT 2479)

In this course, students will learn the process of developing products that address user needs. Students will go through the process of identifying a user need, developing a product prototype, evaluating the product with the target user, and outlining the next development steps. Topics will include such elements as need finding, archetype development, user journey maps, ideation, prototyping, user evaluation and validation.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 5 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2479-000 (22859)01/30/2020 – 03/05/2020 Thu9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by Lobel, Inna

Video Sculpture (ITPG-GT 2193)

Sculpture is defined as a three-dimensional form of artistic expression concerned with space: occupying it, relating to it, and influencing the perception of it. In this class we will look at new ways of implementing video mapping, interactive time based media and augmented reality as a medium for creating engaging interactive physical and virtual sculptures. How do we create video sculptures that move, emote and react to our presence? The course will focus on taking video off the screen and into three-dimensional space in the form of site-specific and or physical installation. Through a series of weekly experiments and assignments, students will work with projection, video mapping, mixed reality and physical sensors to hack video into meaningful works of art. Class will be divided between lectures, guest speakers and critical discussion/presentation of work.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ITPG-GT 2193-000 (22290)
01/25/2023 – 05/03/2023 Wed
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Colombo, Gabriel

Playful Experiences (ITPG-GT 2467)

Forget the screen. People want to be part of the action. They don’t want to watch detectives and control superhero avatars. They want to solve the mystery and be the hero. They want to experience it. We see this craving for playful experience in everything from immersive theater to escape rooms to the Tough Mudder to gamified vacation packages. Designing live experiences for large audiences that demand agency offers a distinct set of challenges, from how much choice you give each participant to how many people you can through the experience. We’ll look at examples from pervasive games to amusement parks to immersive theater, examining both the design choices and technology that make the experiences possible. Along the way we’ll create large, playful experiences that put the participant at the center of the action.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2467-000 (14765)
01/25/2024 – 05/02/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Trefry, Gregory

Veillance (ITPG-GT 2469)

he course title, “Veillance” is a reference to the root of “surveillance” and “sousveillance”, watching from above and watching from below respectively. As digital media becomes a greater part of our everyday lives, it is important to understand the new forms of surveillance that it enables as well as to harness these capabilities and perhaps to create systems of sousveillance. Through the course, we’ll critically examine technologies that have become integral part of our lives; the technologies that drive the internet, the capabilities of web browsers, mobile phones, and the emerging class of networked devices such as IP cameras and Amazon’s Alexa and Google Home. Through the course of this examination, we’ll look at how this technology works, the policies that govern their use, what their benefits are, and finally look at what we are giving up by embracing them. This will be a hands-on endeavor; we’ll develop software to illustrate their use and misuse as well as looking for ways that we can harness their “veillance” capabilities for creative, educational, and possibly subversive purposes. Of course, in this process, we’ll pay particular attention to ethical and moral concerns. The course will have weekly reading and technical assignments, encompasses group work, and will culminate final projects.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2469-000 (23068)
01/29/2020 – 05/06/2020 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Van Every, Shawn

Device to Database (ITPG-GT 2473)

How do you process data from connected devices? This class examines how to build systems to collect, process, store, and visualize data from connected devices. The class will review and discuss real world IoT systems using case studies and actual projects. We will build system using Arduino hardware and open source software. We will discuss how to IoT systems are built on commercial cloud infrastructure. Students will learn about IoT devices and the data pipelines for processing data. They will build an Arduino based device to send and receive data over WiFi via MQTT. Students will write code to move data from MQTT into a database. Students will learn how to query the database and present data as tabular data and graphs. To gain an understanding of an entire IoT system from device to application, we will start at a high level and then drill into each of the pieces — we will: * Discuss sensor hardware and wireless options (WiFi, Cellular, LoRaWAN, LTE-M, etc) for moving data to the server * Discuss transport options MQTT, CoAP, AMQP, HTTPS, etc. * Examine SQL, NoSQL, and Time Series Database * Look at tools and techniques for querying and visualizing data. Prerequisite: * Introduction to Physical Computing * Introduction to Computational Media (suggested) The class will be a mix of lecture, discussion, and building IoT systems. Real world examples and case studies will be used to demonstrate how IoT can be built.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2473-000 (22887)
01/30/2020 – 03/12/2020 Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Coleman, Don

Technology, Media and Democracy: Addressing the Threats to an Informed Electorate (ITPG-GT 2184)

Across the City’s universities, the Technology, Media and Democracy program will bring together journalism, design, and technical disciplines to understand the various threats to journalism and media, and attempt to address these challenges using technical and computational methods and techniques. The free press, journalism and the media are some of the most critical elements of our democracy, but have been increasingly under attack by political and market forces. These challenges include: dwindling resources and support for deep investigative journalism; smear, law and technical and even physical assaults of media organizations and journalists; challenges to credibility and reliability including fake news and discrediting campaigns; and shifting business models and income sources that threaten both local and national news organizations and coverage. This course will include various elements that will help frame the problem and build/prototype solutions.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2184-000 (14759)

Paper Engineering 101 and Designing for Children (ITPG-GT 2187)

The class will focus on the many overlooked aspects of paper, and how it can be used as a three-dimensional material. We will learn the disciplines of making Pop-Ups, Origami, Paper Crafting, and Visual Design. Using these methods as a starting point, students will build prototypes to explore new ways to tell stories, inform, interact, play with, engage, and challenge a younger audience. Most classes are hands – on. The rest, dedicated to criticism (including from children), analysis, and refinement, technical and conceptual. We will discuss how they could be mass produced and distributed. Students will build three prototypes, during the semester. From these, each student will select a favorite to fully develop as the final.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Digital Security and Human Rights (ITPG-GT 2188)

What do WhatsApp and Nelson Mandela have in common? How about Mr. Robot and the UN Council for Human Rights? When most people think “digital security”, they rarely think of these connections; but the connections are there. Digital security is much more than an industry buzzword— it encompasses techno-social idealism, open source development, and symbiotic coordination between sectors in tech, the humanities, and civic society. Certainly, we’re going to talk about Signal, Tor, VPNs, and OTR. But let’s dig even deeper. In this course, students will learn the principals of digital security; from end-to-end encryption, to circumvention technology, resilient communications, and beyond. Part lab exploration, part oral history, and part prototyping workshop, students will come away with the tools they need to undertake development projects with end-user security in mind; and foster an appreciation for digital security’s integral, timely, and often life-saving role in human rights struggles across the globe.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2188-000 (22879)
01/27/2020 – 03/23/2020 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Holmes, Harlo

Intro to Wearables (ITPG-GT 2189)

With emerging research and development with soft circuit technologies and its integration into textile and clothing design, the garment as a reactive interface opens up new possibilities in engendering self-expressions, sensory experiences and more. This 14-week class is to introduce students to this realm by creating connections between hardware engineering and textile crafting. The class is for students with basic physical computing knowledge to explore the possibility of wearables, and arouse discussion about the potential in re-imagining our relationship with personal devices, textiles and garment design as an interactive media.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2189-000 (23074)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Zhu, Jingwen

Choreographic Interventions (ITPG-GT 2175)

This course re-conceives interactive media as a form of choreographic intervention. Instead of asking how moving bodies can control media, we will ask how interactive systems can influence movement. How do you make someone feel soft inside? How do you shake an entire room? How do you orchestrate duets between strangers? To accomplish this, the class facilitates a semester-long collaboration between ITP students and dancers from the Barnard/Columbia Dance Department. Choreographers will learn to apply computational thinking to choreography and creative coders will learn to apply choreographic thinking to computation. To whatever extent possible, we will attempt to embody code. Using computer vision and visual media, we will look at directing both how people move (quality of movement) as well as where they move (pathways and spatial relationships). We will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the various sensing technologies available to us today. How wide is the gulf between what we can see and feel (strength, hardness, contortion) and what a computer can see and interpret (locations, contours, velocity, acceleration)? Class time will be split between movement exercises, playing with examples and deconstructing code. The class will culminate in a final showing of student work. All classes will take place at NYU with a separate weekly technical lab for ITP students.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 12 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2175-000 (22932)
01/31/2020 – 04/24/2020 Fri
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Yin, Yue

Collective Play (ITPG-GT 2176)

Rules of play shape competitive games from checkers to football. But how do rules of interaction shape everyday life? And what happens when there are no established conventions and the rules are being made up as we go along as they have been for the past 6 months of living almost exclusively online? In this course, we will explore, code and test design strategies for playful, serious and bizarre group interactions while at the same time interrogating both what it means to play and how individual identities and group behaviors emerge. (The interactions we create in this class will be designed specifically for synchronous, in-person, embodied experiences.) Some of the questions we will ask and attempt to answer: What motivates participation? What hinders it? When does participation become oppressive? What’s the difference between self-consciousness and self-awareness? Who has power? Who doesn’t? Are leaders necessary? What’s the difference between taking turns and engaging in conversation? What happens when the slowest person sets the pace? And most importantly, what happens when there are no rules? Interaction inputs we will play with will include: mouse, keyboard, mobile device sensors, and microphone. Outputs can include visuals, text and sound. We will use p5, websockets and node.js for real-time interaction. Class time will be split between group improvisation exercises, playing with and critiquing examples and translating design strategies into code and logic.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2176-000 (14757)
01/24/2024 – 05/01/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Yin, Yue

Synthetic Architectures (ITPG-GT 2177)

For better or worse humanity is heading down the virtual rabbit hole. We’re trading an increasingly hostile natural environment for a socially networked and commercially driven artificial one. Whether it’s the bedrooms of YouTube streaming stars, the augmented Pokestops of Pokemon Go, the breakout rooms of a Zoom meeting, or even the “airspace” of Airbnb; we are witnessing a dramatic transformation of what occupying space means. The socially distanced measures as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic have only accelerated this societal embrace of the virtual. So where are these dramatic spatial paradigm shifts occurring? Who owns and occupies these spaces? Who are the architects and what historical and ethical foundations are they working from? What world do they want to build for humanity and where does the creative individual fit into it? Will it be a walled garden, a role-playing adventure or a tool for creating more worlds? The course will ask students to embrace the role of virtual architect, not in the traditional brick-and-mortar sense of constructing shelter, but in terms of the engagement with the raw concept of space. However this virtual space must be considered and evaluated as a “site,” that is activated and occupied by real people and all the limitations of physical space that they bring with them from the real world. This is the foundation of synthetic architecture; simulated space met with biological perception. This conceptual architecture is free from the confines of physics but host to a whole new set of questions: How do we embrace the human factors of a dimensionless environment? How do we make or encourage meaningful interactions within the limits of current technology? New models of interaction must inform and shape the architecture of virtual space – what does that look like? How can architecture and aesthetics inform the creation of virtual environments and immersive narratives? How do we acutely consider the psychological and social impacts of the worlds we design and what is the metaphorical ground plane to make sense of this virtual world, unbound by physics? About Jonathan Turner: http://www.jonathanwilliamturner.com/about/

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 5 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


ITPG-GT 2177-000 (5561)
07/09/2024 – 08/15/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Turner, Jonathan

Mobile Lab (ITPG-GT 2180)

One of the most transformative consumer products in history, the iPhone remains the standard bearer for great design and user experience. With the latest version of iOS and the introduction of the iPhone X, Apple puts depth sensing and augmented reality in our pockets. How do we take advantage of this incredible platform to produce our own compelling experiences? This course will be a hands-on workshop where we explore the world beyond generic apps and push the boundaries of what’s possible on iOS hardware. We will cover both the design and technical elements that pertain to end-to-end mobile app development. Topics will include augmented reality, the Internet of Things, new interfaces for musical expression, voice interaction, wearables, and others… While the class will involve iOS programming instruction, the instructors will help facilitate coding using an established code base to ensure technical skills are not a bottleneck to implementation. Students should expect to spend additional time outside of class learning Swift and other related programming concepts. Full-time access to an iOS device and a Mac laptop running the latest operating systems are required. As part of the design process, we’ll host workshops and guest critiques with designers from top studios around New York City. At the end of the class, students will have a working app to add to their portfolios and a strong basis for future mobile application work.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2180-000 (23066)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Lam, Nien · Buys, Sebastian

Magic Windows and Mixed-Up Realities (ITPG-GT 2122)

Magic windows that allow us to peek into different realities without leaving our physical space, lenses that reveal hidden layers of objects or navigating new universes within the same room. More than ever, mobile devices are getting a human-scale understanding of space and motion allowing us to create more intimate interactions with our surrounding spaces, leveraging them as a canvas to experience other realities. We now have the potential to give life to inanimate objects, tell stories through space, customizing private views of public spaces and recognize places we’ve never been. We’ll question what it means and how can we blend reality exploring themes such as: augmented space and new paradigms in social interaction, public space and privacy; storytelling and navigating the physical space like turning pages in a book; tangible interfaces, mixed objects and animism; Magic windows, x-ray vision, time-machines and impossible universes; Far away so close: telepresence and remote collaboration. The course will survey the past, current and up and coming technologies and experiences in Mixed Reality including environmental augmented reality and interactive projection mapping, handheld devices while fostering a strong user experience perspective on the affordances and constraints of each. We’ll research and discuss the design principles and guidelines for creating mixed reality experiences focusing on the links between real and virtual objects, interaction space and asymmetries between physical and digital worlds, environmental semantics and multimodal and tangible interaction. Technologies explored will be focusing on mobile platforms (phones, tablets) including Vuforia, SLAM, image and object recognition, depth sensing, projection mapping. Unity3D will be the development platform: students must have previous working knowledge of Unity3D and feel comfortable with independently developing using this platform. A working knowledge of Unity3D may be gained by going through the Unity 5 3D Essential Training Lynda Course prior to the course (log in to Lynda for free via https://www.nyu.edu/lynda).

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2122-000 (23437)
01/30/2020 – 03/12/2020 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pereira, Rui

Exploring Concepts From Soft Robotics (ITPG-GT 2125)

Because the full potential of the emerging field of soft systems is unrealized, there are countless opportunities for curious innovators to discover or develop novel soft systems. Soft robotic skills and techniques also open up a world of possibilities for large scale or surprising artwork. This course teaches hands-on fabrication techniques for constructing simple pneumatic actuators from cast silicone and heat-sealed mylar, and challenges participants to design and build their own. Lectures and discussion center on concepts from soft innovation history, the current state-of-the-art, and sister disciplines of bio-inspired and hybrid (soft/hard) robotics. Consideration of both brand new soft materials, from a class visit to Material ConneXion library, and everyday overlooked soft mechanisms, found in average retail stores, will require participants to look at softness through a new lens. Final projects will be the development of an original soft/flexible/hybrid research or artistic concept presented with context, material swatches with justifications for choices, and physical or modeled proof-of-concept. About Kari Love: http://www.karimakes.com

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2125-000 (14756)
01/26/2024 – 05/03/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Love, Kari

BioDesigning the Future of Food (ITPG-GT 2131)

We’ve been tinkering with the living systems that generate our foodstuffs for millennia. But climate change is radically and rapidly shifting these food landscapes, and the impacts include the extinction of many of the foods we love: chocolate, wine, beer, coffee and more importantly starvation for those in the world who are already food insecure. In this class, we’ll explore biotechnologies and bioengineering along with microbes and mushrooms to design and create pathways for the restoration of some of the damage we’ve wrought on our food system. We’ll also use art and design and systems thinking to build speculative and actionable projects that will focus not just on the future of food but the future of our planet and all of its inhabitants. This class is part of the Biodesign Challenge.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2021)


ITPG-GT 2131-000 (6365)
05/24/2021 – 07/05/2021 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Online
Instructed by Bardin, Stefani R

Light and Interactivity (ITPG-GT 2133)

We use light in all aspects of our lives, yet we seldom notice it. Most of the time, that’s no accident. Lighting in everyday life, well-designed, doesn’t call attention to itself. Instead it draws focus to the subjects and activities which it supports. In this class, you’ll learn how lighting is used for utilitarian, expressive, and informational purposes. We’ll consider the intersection of lighting design and interaction design, paying attention to how people interact with light. We’ll practice both analyzing lighting and describing its effects, in order to use it more effectively. On the technical side, you’ll learn the basics of the physics of light, its transmission and perception. We’ll talk about sources of light, both current and historical. We’ll work with computerized control systems for lighting and modern light sources, and we’ll create a number of lighting designs for different purposes. You’ll get practice building AC and DC electronic circuits, programming microcontrollers for physical interaction, and learning digital communications protocols such as DMX512 and HTTP and REST. Projects in this class will range from indicator lighting on devices to task and wayfinding lighting in everyday environments to stage and environmental lighting. We won’t spend time on projection or light used for purely expressive purposes, but will look at how to put light to work instead. We’ll focus our attention on lighting the subject at hand, whether that subject is a person, a living environment, or a workspace. This class will be production-intensive throughout the course of the spring semester. Second-year students will not be able to combine the assignments in this class with their thesis projects, though some of the skills may be complementary.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ITPG-GT 2133-000 (22287)
01/25/2023 – 05/03/2023 Wed
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Igoe, Thomas

Hacking the Browser (ITPG-GT 2811)

Web browsers were originally used only for displaying simple HTML pages, but over the years they have become supercharged all-powerful web execution machines. In this class we’ll explore experimental new features and HTML5 APIs that allow browsers to communicate with the OS and their environment. APIs that will be covered may include: Battery Status, Geolocation, notifications, accelerometer usage, video access, speech recognition, and text-to-speech. We’ll cover the mechanics of bookmarklets and Chrome extensions, with a sustained multi-week focus on building extensions and exploring Chrome’s extensions APIs. Class workshops will include projects such as building an ad blocker, programmatically replacing text and images on a website, and making sites that respond to external events. Students will give weekly in-class presentations on web capabilities, complete small weekly assignments, and present a final project. This class leans heavily on web technologies, and experience with HTML, CSS and modern JavaScript (ICM with p5.js or Commlab Web/Networked Media) is required.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 5 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2811-000 (22881)
01/28/2020 – 03/03/2020 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Forsyth, Cory

Open Source Cinema (ITPG-GT 2865)

The medium of motion pictures will be will be transformed by virtual reality technologies. But the emerging hybrid form will likely have less to do with the iconic VR headset and immersion, than in the newly possible flow of expression in the other direction, out of the participant. This class looks at the true potential of virtual reality as its mutability, to put ordinary users in the role of director of visual media as they already are in their dreams and fantasies. Democratizing media by breaking it down into discrete more easily remixable parts has historically, from DNA to alphabets to movable type led to an explosion of expression and knowledge creation. Motion pictures, perhaps our most convincing medium, is now undergoing such a transformation thanks to virtual reality technologies. Specifically, we will look at how tools like depth cameras, motion capture, and machine learning can treat a scene as a collection of elements instead of a collection of pixels. We will work with the real-time 3D rendering capabilities available, even in your phone, for the instant contrivance of visual reality using compositing, the transformation of images and models as well as virtual camera moves. The class will also consider how the more conceptual dissection of film by cinema scholars and psychologist into things like plots and character types might be templated into reusable formulas for non-experts to create an emotionally satisfying dramatic arcs.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2865-000 (22861)
03/25/2020 – 05/06/2020 Wed
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by O’Sullivan, Daniel

Electronic Rituals, Oracles and Fortune-Telling (ITPG-GT 2120)

According to anthropologists Filip de Boeck and René Devisch, divination “constitutes a space in which cognitive structures are transformed and new relations are generated in and between the human body, the social body and the cosmos.” In this class, students will learn the history of divination, engage in the practice of divination, and speculate on what forms divination might take in a world where the human body, the social body, and even the cosmos(!) are digitally mediated. Starting with an understanding of ritual and folk culture, we will track the history of fortune-telling from the casting of lots to computer-generated randomness to the contemporary revival of Tarot; from reading entrails to astrology to data science; from glossolalia to surrealist writing practices to the “ghost in the machine” of artificial intelligence. Weekly readings and assignments culminate in a final project.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2120-000 (22892)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Parrish, Allison

Subtraction (ITPG-GT 2719)

Subtractive fabrication is a common manufacturing process that produces durable and functional objects. This class will cover multiple techniques on machining and milling raw material into custom parts. We will focus on both traditional and digital fabrication tools: lathe, CNC router, 4 axis mill, etc. We will cover CAD, CAM, and machine setups as well as research affordable desktop milling solutions for personal shops. The class will be hands on and fabrication heavy, paying close attention to precision, accuracy, and craftsmanship. There will be weekly fabrication exercises, a midterm, and a final project. It’s mill-er time.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2719-000 (22906)
01/30/2020 – 05/07/2020 Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Light, Benjamin

Homemade Hardware (ITPG-GT 2767)

Hardware is not hard, and rapidly prototyping circuit boards is easier than ever with new tools available at ITP. Students will learn how to grow from a breadboard to a custom surface mount board, all without leaving the floor. This class is about artists and designers taking control of their hardware, and exploring the potential of embedding their projects into the world around them. Students will learn the multitude of tools and processes required to make a DIY circuit board. These include Eagle CAD, micro-milling machines, drawing schematics, ordering parts, surface-mount components, acid etching, solder paste and stenciling, reflow, pick-and-place, and others. In-class demonstrations will be done for each of the above, and students will complete assignments using online reference notes and videos. Two smaller projects and one final project will be assigned (3 total), each a circuit of the student’s’ choosing. These three assignments will be designed to work off the most recently taught subjects, and to get the students to fail early. It’s a lot of new material to be learning across multiple domains, so the students will need the entire semester to iterate.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2767-000 (14754)
01/26/2024 – 05/03/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sigler, Andrew

100 Days of Making (ITPG-GT 2793)

Iteration and its impact on your creative process is the theme of this class. The format of the course turns its head on the traditional class structure and instead of focusing on syllabus that builds to a final project, the course is focused on a daily, iterative practice. Students will identify a theme, idea or topic they would like to explore over the course of 100 days and must commit to making or producing a variation on that idea and posting social evidence of their work every day for 100 days. Projects can focus on building, writing, drawing, programming, photographing, designing, composing or any creative expression. In parallel to the making, in-class lectures will examine the work of artists whose work has been defined by iteration and discuss the role of discipline and routine in the creative process.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2793-000 (14755)
01/23/2024 – 04/23/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Lathrop, Karalyn

Playful Communication of Serious Research (ITPG-GT 2974)

Exhibition design is the art of marrying experience and information. The best do so seamlessly; the very best surprise and delight you along the way. In this class you will explore the craft of interactive exhibition design through practice. Working in small groups, you will select an NYU researcher whose work is of interest to you and create an interactive experience that presents this research to a broader, public audience. In the process, you will learn to interrogate content and form, audience and environment, medium and message to create a meaningful and playful exhibit experience.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2974-000 (14748)
01/24/2024 – 05/01/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Peterson, Brett

Rest of You (ITPG-GT 2975)

You live with illusions. The nature of these illusions has long been described in mystical practices but is now increasing corroborated by modern research such as neuroscience, behavioral economics, social psychology, embodied cognition, and evolutionary psychology. What does this have to do with computational media? With technology, we have the ability to revisit some of these vestigial illusions that made sense in ancient environments but that might limit our personal happiness or the overall functioning of modern society. Will the computer’s ability to run more objective statistical analysis on data gathered tirelessly over time, across individuals and locations allow us to more accurately see ourselves and the world as it is. Can we build computer interfaces that give a fuller expression of our experience when we are not limited by an illusory view of ourselves? The insights into how into how to reach people more fully comes with a responsibility to then ask what should say to them. As the computers are able to understand us better than we understand ourselves will we relinquish control to them? At a practical level, the class looks at interfaces for digitizing signals from the less consciously controlled parts of your body using things like biosensors and cameras. It then moves on to opportunities for finding insights in from patterns in the mounds of already digitized expression you have produced every day for years, for instance in your email. Then we look at the possibility of bypassing consciousness with techniques like subliminal priming to affect behavior. Finally, we will look at how we can use things like browser extensions to manipulate shared media in an attempt to counter some filter bubble effects that emerge at a group level based on the illusions discussed in this class. This class will use skills from Physical Computing and ICM.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2975-000 (22862)
01/27/2020 – 03/23/2020 Mon
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by O’Sullivan, Daniel

Dynamic Web Development (ITPG-GT 2577)

This 7-week, 2-point course will provide a framework for learning how to develop and program web applications. It will focus on server side development using JavaScript, Node.js with the Express framework, and persistent databases on cloud based infrastructure. Additional topics will include login and session management, web services and APIs, and will lightly touch on front-end web development. The course will be a mixture of lecture and in-class collaborative coding, with weekly programming and reading homework.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2577-000 (14749)
03/15/2024 – 05/03/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Arshad, Ahmad

Connected Devices and Networked Interaction (ITPG-GT 2565)

The World Wide Web no longer stops at the edge of your screen. When it comes to products, if it powers up, it talks to another device. This class provides an overview of methods for connecting the physical world to web-based applications. We’ll consider what the emerging interaction patterns are, if any, and we’ll develop some of our own as needed. This class can be seen as a narrower and more interaction design-based complement to Understanding Networks. The latter class provides a broader overview of the dynamics of communications networks, while this class focuses specifically on the challenges of connecting embedded devices to web-based services. Neither class is a prerequisite for the other, however. This class will introduce network connection techniques for devices using microcontrollers like the Nano 33 IoT and MKR series or ESP8266 and processors running an embedded operating system like the Raspberry Pi. Prerequisites: Intro to Physical Computing and Intro to Computational Media, or equivalent experience with the topics covered in those classes. Learning Objectives: Students will gain an understanding of the basics of network programming for devices with limited computing power. They will learn about current protocols for communication between devices and networked servers, and about the rudiments of security for that communication. Reading: There will be an article or two to read each week, to foster discussion about the design of connected things. Assignments: There will be several one-week software and hardware assignments to get familiar with different technologies and communications protocols, and one hardware and software final application project.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2565-000 (14750)
01/24/2024 – 05/01/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rozin, Yonatan

The Nature of Code (ITPG-GT 2480)

Can we capture the unpredictable evolutionary and emergent properties of nature in software? Can understanding the mathematical principles behind our physical world world help us to create digital worlds? This class focuses on the programming strategies and techniques behind computer simulations of natural systems. We explore topics ranging from basic mathematics and physics concepts to more advanced simulations of complex systems. Subjects covered include physics simulation, trigonometry, self-organization, genetic algorithms, and neural networks. Examples are demonstrated in JavaScript using p5.js (https://p5js.org). Much of the class time will be dedicated to in-class exercises and self-study as the course is available online through a video series (https://www.youtube.com/user/shiffman/playlists) and textbook (http://natureofcode.com/book).

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2480-000 (14744)
01/25/2024 – 05/02/2024 Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Shiffman, Daniel

Project Development Stu (ITPG-GT 2564)

This is an environment for students to work on their existing project ideas that may fall outside the topic areas of existing classes. It is basically like an independent study with more structure and the opportunity for peer learning. This particular studio is appropriate for projects in the area of interactive art, programing and physical computing. There are required weekly meetings to share project development and obtain critique. Students must devise and then complete their own weekly assignments updating the class wiki regularly. They also must present to the class every few weeks. When topics of general interest emerge, a member of the class or the instructor takes class time to cover them in depth. The rest of the meeting time is spent in breakout sessions with students working individually or in groups of students working on related projects.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2564-000 (22897)
01/29/2020 – 05/06/2020 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rozin, Daniel

Recurring Concepts in Art (ITPG-GT 2586)

As a response to developing technologies, artists working in areas of new/digital media are continually inventing new concepts for self-expression – interactivity, the passage of time and resolution, just to name a few. Yet these concepts are new only in the sense that they are being adapted to new media. For example, the notion of interactivity, frequently observed as original and specific to the user-interaction component of computer-mediated works, was equally, if differently, specific to Gianlorenzo Bernini’s 17th-century Baroque sculpture and architecture. Indeed the very concept of new media, and the concomitant implication of critically significant artistic development, applies throughout history. Oil revolutionized painting in the Renaissance, as did house-paint (on canvas) in the 1950s; in the 1910s, the found object indelibly altered definitions of art, the importance of the object being subsumed by that of the concept in the 1960s. This course examines how artists working before the boom of digital technology utilized other media, techniques and approaches to effect formal, conceptual and experiential dynamics comparable to those being investigated by new media artists today. The objective of the course is to provide students with not only knowledge of the immensely rich history of artistic creativity, but also a platform through which that knowledge might be utilized to reconsider new media strategies of artistic expression. It is the goal that through observation, discussion, reading and projects (both written and hands-on), students acquire mental tools to approach their own work with an expanded understanding of artistic possibility. Organized thematically, each class focuses on a different concept derived from the field of new media production and examined with regard to artistic precedents. The course focus primarily, though not exclusively, is on 20th/21st-century art. It is conducted as a combination lecture/discussion class. Critical theory is incorporated into the readings and discussions, but this is not strictly a theory course. The course has been conceptualized and designed to enhance understanding through a variety of means, from basic observation, to exploratory conversations, to more rigorous thinking informed by lectures, readings and focused discussions.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 5 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2586-000 (23425)
01/31/2020 – 03/06/2020 Fri
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Krantz, Georgia

Comics (ITPG-GT 2925)

Code without content gets boring fast. This seven week course will show you how to create stories around which you can weave the technology learned in other classes. When content comes first, interesting problems arise to solve. Participants will get solid grounding in how to tell a visual story using words and images in a traditional format, so then they can take that format and reimagine it in entirely new and unique ways. The first few classes are devoted to getting basic comic skills. The remaining classes will hone and expand these abilities while posing the question: what can be done differently, and how can technology add to what we have created? At the end of the semester you will have a something that sets you apart; – original content AND technological know how. Students will combine words and images, look at each other’s work, look at examples of published works. Reimagine how these stories can be told in new and unique ways. This a demanding course. There is a lot of work involved, they will end up with a lot of original content. During the first half we look at and make traditional comics. Second half we experiment with comic format WHILE honing storytelling skills. Relevant speakers will come in to discuss what they do and how they work etc.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2925-000 (22870)01/28/2020 – 03/10/2020 Tue9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by White, Tracy

The World, Pixel By Pixel (ITPG-GT 2273)

This class focuses on the art of computer graphics and image processing. We explore the concepts of pixilation, image representation and granularity and the tension between reality and image. Students are introduced to the tools and techniques of creating dynamic and interactive computer images from scratch, manipulating and processing existing images and videos, compositing and transitioning multiple images, tracking and masking live video, compositing and manipulating live video as well as manipulating depth information from Kinect. The class uses Processing.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Live Image Processing & Performance (ITPG-GT 2422)

This course teaches the ins and outs of using image processing software with an aim towards some type of real-time use (e.g. a performance or installation). The class looks at ways to manipulate different visual media (time-based, still, vector, and rendered) in real-time to allow students to develop interesting real-time performance systems. While the focus of this class is on using Max for visual work (through a software package called Jitter), it also looks at how to integrate interactive elements (sound, physical interfaces, etc.) into the work. Class time is spent on interface design and software development issues as well. The class explores some interesting capabilities of the software in terms of real-time camera input and tracking, generative graphics systems, and media transcoding. Throughout the class students develop and share ideas on live performance as a medium for visual expression, and learn the software tools necessary to put these ideas into practice in the form of idiosyncratic performance systems. A final presentation in the form of a group performance will be arranged. Students should have some working knowledge of Max/MSP before taking this class.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2422-000 (22920)
01/29/2020 – 05/06/2020 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Romein, Matt

Cabinets of Wonder (ITPG-GT 2470)

If you were inventing a museum today, what would it look like? Who would be there? What would its main purpose be? What would the audience experience? The first museums were called Cabinets of Wonder. Usually, a viewer with a guide, often the collector, would open doors and drawers to see what was inside–amazing things from different parts of the world, different times. They were windows on the world to places the visitors would probably never be able to go; to see things they would never otherwise be able to see. And now there’s television, movies, the internet, and travel. Why do people go to museums now? Will they in the future? Today, most museums seek to educate and to include more and more diverse visitors than they used to. How do people learn in public spaces? How do we know that they do? How can they make use of the new interactive technologies to support the experience and not lose what’s special about them? The class is an exploration, observation, theory, and design class for you to imagine the future of museums and exhibits. Museum and exhibit visits are your primary assignments for the first half of the course—usually accompanied by a reading. You will also make some record of your visit (including a sketchbook, a diorama, reviews). There will be guest speakers from Museums and exhibit design firms, and several field trips. In the second half of the course, you begin to imagine how you might reinvent a museum and develop a full-scale presentation of your own Cabinet of Wonder. About Emily Conrad: https://www.linkedin.com/in/emily/

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2470-000 (14743)
01/24/2024 – 05/01/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Conrad, Emily

Interdisciplinary Proj: Photo/Video, Performance/Installation (ART-UE 1995)

Course ​will provide a forum in which to explore & engage the relationship between photography, performance & contemporary art. Through class assignments & readings in contemporary theory we will develop a critical vocabulary for an understanding of the relationship between photography & performance & a forum in which to challenge & push our individual art practice to the next level.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 1995-000 (11650)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harris, Lyle

4D Fundamentals (ART-UE 314)

Course introduces student artists to the 4th dimensional concepts of TIME & MOVEMENT as the necessary building blocks of Art created by Photography, Video, Digital & Performance medias. Students will explore the attributes of TIME & MOVEMENT through project assignments that use the methods of photography, video, digital, & performance art. The course also includes a brief art history of 4D concepts spanning a wide array of subject matter from cave painting to contemporary art.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ART-UE 314-000 (12755)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dasgupta, Priyanka


ART-UE 314-000 (12756)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McQuilkin, Alexandra

Digital Fabrication: Exploring the Fab Lab (ART-UE 1346)

This course will introduce student to digital fabrication techniques within the context of contemporary art. Students will complete a series of projects exploring fabrication technologies such as 3D printing, 3D Scanning, CNC milling and Laser cutting. In addition, student will question the machines’ raw output by fusing these processes with traditional sculptures techniques. Student will produce a series of works following project prompts. Although the course will process-heavy, student will maintain a rigorous conceptual grounding in their completed works.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 1346-000 (9720)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Torimitsu, Momoyo

Digital Art II for Non-Majors (ART-UE 304)

Assignments, critiques & demonstrations for the more advanced digital art student. The use of the computer to augment and expand conceptualization and expression has provided the artist with some of the most important new means for visual thinking since the Renaissance invention of perspective. Students learn how to use the computer as an extension of the visualization process and its specific applications in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional art.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ART-UE 304-000 (12835)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carideo, Gregory

Video Art I for Non-Majors (ART-UE 305)

Video art has become one of the most widely used media art forms because it allows both the artistic concentration of photography & the free flowing imagery of movement. Students acquire rudimentary skills in shooting & editing while working toward a personal statement in video.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ART-UE 305-000 (12392)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ART-UE 305-000 (12860)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pryor, Gerald

Art & Ideas: Art World Today – Berlin & Beyond (ARTCR-UE 9153)

The contemporary art world is a convoluted interplay of aesthetics & economics; ego & idealism. How can an emerging artist navigate its layers & idiosyncrasies? Through readings of theory & criticism, lectures, discussions, site visits, guest speakers, & student responses in the form of multimedia projects and art writing, this course explores contemporary art’s mechanisms & current discourse, always keeping Berlin’s local context in mind.

Art Theory & Critical Studies (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTCR-UE 9153-000 (2377)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by Segebre Salazar, Jose B.

Art: Practice & Ideas (ARTCR-UE 10)

’Art: Practice and Ideas’ examines key developments in the visual arts from modernity to the present. Focusing on the ways in which representations both create and reflect the values of a society, the course introduces students to the full range of expressive possibilities within the visual arts, covering painting and sculpture, as well as photography, film, video, conceptual art, and computer media. Topics to be covered include classical, modern, and postmodern relationships to politics, vision, the mind, the body, psychology, gender, difference, and technological innovation. Students will see and understand how artists have integrated perceptions of their historical moment, as well as physical and social space, into creative practices that have, in turn, had a significant impact on the culture of the time. Liberal Arts Core/MAP Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Expressive Cultures

Art Theory & Critical Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ARTCR-UE 10-000 (12834)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gookin, Kirby

Capstone (IMNY-UT 400)

The interactive project will illustrate students’ unique interests as well as evidence of competency within the field of interactive media production. Students are encouraged to develop their project around a theme previously explored in their work. Projects will be presented and critiqued repeatedly throughout the capstone process to peers, faculty, and industry professionals. A final presentation of the interactive project will be delivered late in the semester. The research paper (4000-5000 words) will focus on at least one aspect of the interactive project: e.g. culture, theory, philosophy, or history, the project context, and/or production methods. For example, students may write about their project’s reception by a set of specific users, or by users who are part of a larger culture, society, or market. It is important that students think beyond the project itself and situate it in a broader context accessible through research. The research paper will include an annotated bibliography of the books and other resources they used for their research. Students will also be guided in the production of an online portfolio to showcase their work and accomplishments to the outside world. Graduates will be evaluated by their portfolio when applying for jobs, graduate school, artist residencies, grants, and the like. Portfolios will be tailored to the demands of each student’s future goals and target audience.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IMNY-UT 400-000 (22294)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Parrish, Allison


IMNY-UT 400-000 (22295)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Vasudevan, Roopa

Topics in Computation and Data: Front end web (IMNY-UT 220)

This course is designed to provide students with hands-on experience working with computational media (programming, creative coding, etc.) and data. The forms and uses of computational media and its application are explored in a laboratory context of experimentation and discussion.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


IMNY-UT 220-000 (23514)01/28/2020 – 05/07/2020 Tue,Thu6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by Higgins, Colleen

This course will provide a foundation for understanding modern web development with a focus on front end technologies and accessing public data. The forms and uses of these technologies are explored in a laboratory context of experimentation and discussion.

Students will create two well-designed single-page web applications, including one that leverages public APIs and digital services from a wide range of existing web products. The goal of the course is for students to learn how to think holistically about an application, both by designing a clear user experience and understanding the algorithmic steps required to build it.

Creative Approaches to Emerging Media (IMNY-UT 205)

We live in a world where we have more data, computational power, and access to digital connectivity than ever before. But how do we make sense of the promise inherent in this reality while holding space for the challenges that it presents for different groups and communities? How do we situate the technologies that we have come to take for granted? And more importantly, how do we leverage an artist’s perspective to creating active responses that interrogate and hint at the potential for different futures? This course examines emergent technological fields, spanning topics like data collection/representation, digital archives, artificial intelligence, social algorithms, and automation and asks how the technologies inherent to each can be leveraged for artistic response, creation, and critique. While this course is primarily conceptual and art theory-based, the content covered will be technical in nature and students will be tasked with making three creative responses to the content in the tradition of the new media, digital, and conceptual art worlds.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


IMNY-UT 205-000 (23270)
01/28/2020 – 05/07/2020 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Onuoha, Chisom

Designing Interfaces for Live Performance (IMNY-UT 243)

This course is designed to provide students with hands-on experience working with sensors and other electronics to design interfaces for a live multimedia performance. Students will explore the expressive properties of sensors to control a variety of outputs such as light, sound, projection, and/or other media. The forms and uses of physical computing, computational media, and its application are explored weekly in both a hands on laboratory context, as well as weekly discussions of readings and existing performances. Prerequisites: Creative Computing or similar coursework with microcontrollers and coding.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Immersive Experiences (IMNY-UT 282)

This course is designed to provide students with hands-on experience working with interactive and emerging applications for creating immersive experiences, with a focus on designing for virtual reality headsets. The class will also touch on related technologies, methods, and fields including experience design, virtual painting, augmented reality, interactive installation, and 360 video/audio. The course materials will also include readings and discussions on prior art/relevant critical texts.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IMNY-UT 282-000 (22290)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dawkins, Dylan

The Code of Music (IMNY-UT 222)

This course explores the elements of music through the lenses of computation and interactive design. Each of the five course units focuses on one element of music (rhythm, melody, timbre, harmony, and structure), approaching it from the perspective of music theory, computation, and design. For each element, students listen to examples from different periods and styles, represent and manipulate the element in code, and create an interactive study around it. As students work toward their final projects, the class takes a more self-directed approach. Final projects can take the form of digital applications, spatial installations, or physical devices. In-class coding and assignments will be done in P5.js, but students will be free to use other languages and frameworks for their final projects. Creative Computing or equivalent programming experience is required.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IMNY-UT 222-000 (22285)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pereira Hors, Luisa

Networked Media (IMNY-UT 223)

The network is a fundamental medium for interactivity. It makes possible our interaction with machines, data, and, most importantly, other people. Though the base interaction it supports is simple, a client sends a request to a server, which replies; an incredible variety of systems can be and have been built on top of it. An equally impressive body of media theory has also arisen around its use. This hybrid theory and technology course will be 50% project driven technical work and 50% theory and discussion. The technical work will will utilize JavaScript as both a client and server side programming language to build creative systems on the web. Technical topics will include server and client web frameworks, such as Express, HTML, CSS, templating, and databases. The theory portion of the course will include reading and discussion of past and current media theory texts that relate to the networks of today; included in this will be works by Marshall McLuhan, Wendy Chun, Lev Manovich, Philip Agre, Tiziana Terranova, and more. In short, this course will be about developing full-stack web applications (such as anything from the beginnings of Google, YouTube, and Twitter to class registration systems and other purpose built system) as well as thinking, reading, and discussing the implications with a culture and media theory perspective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Introduction to Assistive Technology (IMNY-UT 241)

Assistive technology is a term that includes a wide variety of technologies for people with disabilities. This two-point survey course is designed to provide students with an overview of the field of assistive technology. Field trips, readings, and guest speakers will provide students with an understanding of current research and development as well as processes used in determining appropriate technologies. Weekly assignments and a final research project. This course satisfies 2 credits of the Experimental Interfaces and Physical Computing Courses category for the IMA major. Prereq: Creative Computing. This course meets once per week.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IMNY-UT 241-000 (22287)
01/24/2022 – 03/21/2022 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Eldi, Holly

Introduction to Fabrication (IMNY-UT 242)

An introductory course designed to familiarize students with all the IMA prototyping shop has to offer. We will cover everything from basic hand tools to the beginnings of digital fabrication. You will learn to use the right tool for the job. There will be weekly assignments, created to develop your fabrication techniques. There will be in class lectures, demos, and building assignments. Emphasis will be put on good design practices, material choice, and craftsmanship.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IMNY-UT 242-000 (22288)
01/24/2022 – 03/21/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Ritmiller, Molly

Big Ideas in the History and Future of Technology (IMNY-UT 203)

“Big Ideas in the History and Future of Technology” is designed to provide students with a critical perspective on current issues in technology in the context of the history, controversies, consequences, and ethical questions in emerging media. This first course in the series includes: in the first half –some seminal early works that imagine a future in which technology enhances/augments human intelligence and capabilities and how that might affect society; in the second half–2 classic works of fiction and some podcasts/ audio lectures that address questions relating to “What is Human.”

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IMNY-UT 203-000 (22284)
01/24/2022 – 03/21/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Lim, Jennifer

Augmenting the Gallery (IMNY-UT 9001)

Wall labels, audio guides and informative maps are just some of the ways galleries and museums convey additional information about an art collection. How can we utilize new interactive mixed reality tools to design and deliver immersive experiences that breathe new life into an exhibit. Augmented and virtual reality are powerful tools for new media production and storytelling, but how can these tools serve to enhance our Wall labels, audio guides and informative maps are just some of the ways galleries and museums convey additional information about an art collection. How can we utilize new interactive mixed reality tools to design and deliver immersive experiences that breathe new life into an exhibit. Augmented and virtual reality are powerful tools for new media production and storytelling, but how can these tools serve to enhance our gallery experience without distracting from the power and importance of a pre-existing collection? This production course seeks to experiment with new ways to experience a museum collection through mixed reality. Topics covered include exhibition installation and curation, mixed reality production in Unity, mobile development for Augmented Reality.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IMNY-UT 9001-000 (2389)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by

Processing Big Data for Analytics Applications (CSCI-UA 476)

This course introduces platforms, tools, and the architectures that facilitate scalable management and processing of vast quantities of data. We will explore open source tools enabling the efficient acquisition, storage, and processing of Big Data. Students will learn about distributed storage solutions such as the Apache Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS), which supports storage of Big Data. Students will gain hands-on experience with distributed processing Apache solutions such as Hadoop MapReduce, HBase, Hive, Impala, Pig, core Spark, Spark SQL, and Spark Streaming. Other Apache big data tools covered are Sqoop, Oozie, Zookeeper, Flume, and Kafka

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


CSCI-UA 476-000 (10054)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Malavet, Ann

Theory of Computation (CSCI-UA 453)

This course takes a mathematical approach in studying topics in computer science, such as: regular languages and some of their representations (deterministic finite automata, non-deterministic finite automata, regular expressions); proof of non-regularity. Context free languages and pushdown automata; proofs that languages are not context free. Elements of computability theory. Brief introduction to NP-completeness.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CSCI-UA 453-000 (9017)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Khot, Subhash

Numerical Computing (CSCI-UA 421)

Introduction to numerical computation: the need for floating-point arithmetic, the IEEE floating-point standard. Importance of numerical computing in a wide variety of scientific applications. Fundamental types of numerical algorithms: direct methods (e.g., for systems of linear equations), iterative methods (e.g., for a nonlinear equation), and discretization methods (e.g., for a differential equation). Numerical errors: How can you tell if you can trust your answers? The use of graphics and software packages such as Matlab. Programming assignments.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CSCI-UA 421-000 (7822)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Overton, Michael

Causal Inference (DS-UA 201)

Causal Inference provides students with the tools for understanding causation, i.e., the relationship between cause and effect. We will start with the situation in which you are able to design and implement the data gathering process, called the experiment. We will then define causation, identify preconditions required for A to cause B, show how to design perfect experiments, and discuss how to understand threats to the validity of less-than-perfect experiments. In this course, we will cover experimental design and then turn to those careful approaches, where we will consider such approaches as quasi-experiments, regression discontinuities, differences in differences, and contemporary advanced approaches.

Data Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


DS-UA 201-000 (20565)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Strezhnev, Anton


DS-UA 201-000 (20567)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon
2:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


DS-UA 201-000 (20568)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
11:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Machine Learning for Language Understanding (DS-UA 203)

This course covers widely-used machine learning methods for language understanding—with a special focus on machine learning methods based on artificial neural networks—and culminates in a substantial final project in which students write an original research paper in AI or computational linguistics. If you take this class, you’ll be exposed only to a fraction of the many approaches that researchers have used to teach language to computers. However, you’ll get training and practice with all the research skills that you’ll need to explore the field further on your own. This includes not only the skills to design and build computational models, but also to design experiments to test those models, to write and present your results, and to read and evaluate results from the scientific literature.

Data Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


DS-UA 203-000 (9643)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bowman, Samuel


DS-UA 203-000 (9644)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Machine Lab (IM-UH 2113)

The saying goes, “If all you have is a hammer, then every problem looks like a nail.” What if all you have is a 3D Printer? In this course, students will be introduced to, and engage critically with, a range of contemporary machines inside and around the Interactive Media Lab. Leveraging historical perspectives, current use-cases, and hands-on making, the course will explore how machines enhance, or limit, our creative processes. Readings and discussion will be paired with practical designing, prototyping, and making of creative computer controlled devices, such as drawing machines, musical instruments, and a collaborative Rube Goldberg contraption. Over the course of the semester, students will be exposed to a variety of tools, materials, and fabrication techniques as well as learn how to use micro-controllers and software to give their machines unique behaviors and abilities. By thinking about machines, using machines, and making machines, the course will offer insight into our creative relationships with our tools.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IM-UH 2113-000 (4489)

Understanding Interactive Media – Critical Questions & Theories (IM-UH 1013)

This seminar course is an introduction to the theories, questions, and conditions that encompass interactive media. Students will engage in readings that critically examine both the impact that interactive media and technology have on culture and societies as well as the ways in which social contexts shape the development and application of these technologies. The contexts become apparent by examining interactive media and interactivity through the lenses of relevant perspectives including politics, ethics, race, gender, and cybernetics. Throughout the semester students will leverage theory to analyze interactive media works and build a vocabulary for making sense of our increasingly mediated world. The course thus serves to lay a conceptual foundation for students to inform and direct their own creative practice. Readings, discussions, research, and writing constitute the body of this course.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IM-UH 1013-000 (19986)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Riad, Aya Mohamed Salaheldin

Future Punk (IM-UH 2513)

The future: let’s patch it together from scraps. Future studies and strategic foresight are methods of guiding businesses and politics. Punk means to take the master’s tools apart, repurpose them to serve our own goals, to outsmart our adversaries, and to prevail. The compound of the words future and punk, just like in cyberpunk or steampunk, indicates that in the case of future punk, future itself would be setting the stage for the narrative, provide the condition against which the human beings in the world of the story would have to struggle: So in the good old punk tradition, we, too, want to take futurism and use it for our own creations. This class introduces speculative fiction and the more scientific forms of speculation as a means to students to envision, draft, and draw and paint their own images and imaginations of alternative worlds. Students will apply the futurist methods to creative projects and in addition, discuss and critique the field.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IM-UH 2513-000 (19550)

Introduction to Digital Humanities (IM-UH 1511)

What happens when the arts and humanities are represented in digital form? What kind of new insights can we have when by looking at the data of the humanities? This course will look at intersections between computers and the humanities, a form of inquiry known as “digital humanities.” The course is structured around a broad examination of concepts important in today’s society (computational thinking, digital identity, text as data, dataset, pattern, algorithm, network, location). Students will discuss these concepts critically, explore real-life examples and put them into practice in hands-on activities. Examples of such hands on work might include, but are not limited to, creating accessible web design, analyzing text digitally, building and visualizing a dataset, curating an open bibliography, thinking about art as data, building a Twitter bot, teaching a computer to recognize human handwriting, visualizing social networks or making digital maps. The course assumes no prior technical skills, but a willingness to explore new technologies is essential for success.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


IM-UH 1511-000 (23335)

Politics of Code (IM-UH 3310)

While our relationships between ourselves, our environment, and other people are inherently political, computer technologies and technology companies consistently claim to remain “neutral”. This course will assume the opposite – software is political – and focus on how software applications share commonalities with political systems, how they affect their users as political actors and how we can build alternatives to those systems. This course is aimed at deconstructing the design and implementation of software as a political medium, such as Facebook’s timeline algorithm, city officials’ use of computer simulations to orchestrate urban life, blockchain-backed proof of ownership and algorithmic criminal assessment. Along with an introduction to political theory and media studies, coupled with an exploration of the underlying political impacts of those systems, students will work on several hands-on projects to offer functioning alternatives to those systems. To that end, this course will include several workshops in JavaScript and Python.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IM-UH 3310-000 (18389)


IM-UH 3310-000 (21644)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Blumtritt, Joerg

Alternate Realities (IM-UH 3311)

This course will introduce students to the design and development of Virtual Reality experiences. We will examine these increasingly popular means of delivering content and social interactions and identify their unique affordances over existing platforms. Students will be challenged to harness the specific advantages of VR from conception through functional prototype. The class will also cover case studies of effective use of VR in information delivery, as well as social and artistic experiences.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IM-UH 3311-000 (23471)
01/24/2022 – 05/17/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Allison, Michael · Sherwood, Aaron


IM-UH 3311-000 (24132)
01/24/2022 – 05/17/2022 Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Allison, Michael · Sherwood, Aaron

Introduction to Interactive Media (IM-UH 1010)

With the advent of digital computation, humans have found a variety of new tools for self-expression and communication. Thinking about how we interface with these tools beyond the mouse and key-board, we can approach software and electronics as artists and designers, exploring new interactions with machines and each other. This introductory course will provide students hands-on experience with screen and physical interaction design through programming and electronics using microcontrollers, electronics, and software development. Weekly exercises encourage students to experiment freely, creating their own novel interfaces and controls for working with machines. The course culminates with a final projects exhibited at the program’s end-of-semester showcase.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IM-UH 1010-000 (3694)


IM-UH 1010-000 (4043)

Make Believe (INTM-SHU 217T)

We live in an era of information where the information can be written, accessed, shared, and also eliminated with a single stroke. As a result, the objective “truth” is brought to a question. In the last decade, artists have been experimenting with the fakeness of the truth and the truthfulness of the fake by creating fake documents, staged marriages, an arguably authentic artifact, imaginary advertisements both historical and contemporary. What does it mean to tell the truth in the context of art? How does art cross the boundaries between the real and the fake, truthfulness and misrepresentation? This course will examine social engagement of art and how “truth” is treated, interpreted, and presented. The class will take a field trip to a propaganda museum, have readings and discussions, and analyze artists working with fiction as a medium in art making. Students will work on projects to construct believable reality through object making (3D fabrication) and narrative construction (audiovisual material). Prerequisites: Interaction Lab or Communication Lab or Application Lab

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


INTM-SHU 217T-000 (23355)
02/03/2020 – 05/15/2020 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by

Nature of Code (INTM-SHU 254)

The Nature of Code is an intermediate course based on Daniel Shiffman’s The Nature of Code course at NYU ITP and was adjusted for undergraduate students. This course explores the fundamentals of programming, such as Object-Oriented Programming, and the application of simple principles of mathematics and physics in order to recreate natural behaviors in a digital environment. Prerequisites: This class uses p5(p5js.org) and requires Interaction Lab, Communication Lab, Application Lab, or similar programming background. Knowledge of other languages, such as Processing, three.js and OpenFrameworks, is also encouraged.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


INTM-SHU 254-000 (23412)
02/03/2020 – 05/15/2020 Wed
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Moon, Jung Hyun

Creative Coding Lab (INTM-SHU 135T)

In this course students will learn the fundamentals of computation, software design, and web technologies, through a series of creative projects. The course is intended to equip students with the skills to develop artistic and business projects that include a significant computational component. Topics such as variables, functions, components, and functional and reactive programming will be brought together to create interactive applications, generative art, data visualization, and other domains. Within the framework of these creative projects students will develop a greater understanding of how computer programs operate, be exposed to various concepts used to create experiences and interactions, and become more familiar with some of the technologies that constitute the internet. This course is intended for students with no prior programming background. Prerequisites: None

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


INTM-SHU 135T-000 (23244)
02/03/2020 – 05/15/2020 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Steele, Oliver

Extended Perception (INTM-SHU 138T)

Utilizing technological and scientific research / case studies / artifacts, this class introduces students to the topic of enhanced / extended perception and how technological augmentation allow us to sense and perceive alternative layers of our surrounding world, reconfiguring our understanding of what reality really is. Students will be asked to develop their own prototypes that demonstrate a conceptual or functional outcome on how perception can be extended, enhanced, or even hacked.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


INTM-SHU 138T-000 (23245)
02/03/2020 – 05/15/2020 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Didakis, Stavros

After Us: Post-human Media (INTM-SHU 139T)

Ours is a time of unceasing image production. CCTV cameras wrap around the planet, machines make visual learning sets for other machines, hundreds of billions of hours of video material is livestreamed online every year, artists speculate about the possibility of making virtual reality for animals, and seemingly natural phenomena such as climate change can only be apprehended through risk simulations and data visualisations. Simultaneously, from deep fakes to computergenerated influencers and webcam models, digital images without real-life referents are set to become a part of social life, posing questions about the agency of media makers and consumers in an increasingly simulated world. Contemporary visual culture is not made by humans alone and sometimes not even meant for human eyes. What are we to make of aesthetics when they become automated? How can human collectives be thought from the perspective, or collaborate with, the semi-autonomous technological systems around us? What kind of conceptual capacities do we need to be able to think about the future of such media globally, and in specific geographical locations? In this class, we will explore the shi< that media theory and philosophy of technology have made towards the inhuman. From biometrics, insect media, and eco-media to so<ware art, augmented reality, and satellite imagery, we are witnessing a paradigm change in how we think about the relationship between human, animal, and machine agency in visual culture. Looking at a variety of contemporary media objects, we will read state-of-the-art theory, write a research paper, and collaborate on a post-human media studies syllabus spanning texts and objects from across the globe.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


INTM-SHU 139T-000 (23410)
02/03/2020 – 05/15/2020 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by

Movement Practices and Computing (INTM-SHU 134)

People use their bodies in the workplace whether they are dancers or athletes, managers or engineers. Physical wellbeing, social teamwork, and cognition may be affected by our movement practices. How do people use physicality and motion to think? What is the interaction between body, motion, place, and goals? We will explore these questions by building physical-computing-based systems that encourage us to bring movement into new times and places in daily life, that coach users and develop learning environments for movement practices, and that test our understanding of ways that we “think with the body”. In this course we will bring practices such as fitness, dance, sports, and martial arts into a series of interactive installations, movement learning projects, and workspace modifications built on computing, sensing and actuator technologies. In this course we will also explore these questions through review of existing creative projects in this area, readings, presentations, and knowledge-sharing sessions. Prerequisites: Creative Coding Lab, Interaction Lab or equivalent programming experience Fulfillment: IMA/IMB elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


INTM-SHU 134-000 (18340)
01/25/2021 – 05/14/2021 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Minsky, Margaret

Topic: Media Past and Future (INTM-SHU 206T)

An attempt to better understand and participate in the communications revolution we are undergoing through an investigation of the nature and consequences of previous communications revolutions. Using readings ranging from Plato to Sontag to Kundera, the course will look closely at the history of spoken language, images, writing, printing, photography, film, radio and television. How were they understood? How were they initially used or misused? What were their effects upon social patterns, politics and thought? How did innovations occur? What can that tell us about the potential and potential influence of digital communication? Students will be asked to undertake innovative experiments of their own in forms of new media. Prerequisites: None

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


INTM-SHU 206T-000 (23250)
02/03/2020 – 05/15/2020 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Stephens, Mitchell

Topic: AI and Culture: Paths of Definition, Paths of Development (INTM-SHU 207T)

As no two cultures define “artificial” the same way, and no two define “intelligence” the same way, so too they will not define and imagine “artificial intelligence” in the same way. As China and the West engage in what is sometimes called a new scientific and technological race, the fundamental terms of a shared conversation across cultures may be missing or contested. As planetary-scale economies shift toward increasing automation, AI moves out of the laboratory and into the fabric of supply-chains, urban infrastructures, and everyday life. This research seminar will allow students to explore different ways that different cultural connotations of “face”, “city”, and “governance”, for example, imply different paths for the development of this fundamental technology. NYU Shanghai will host an international conference in the Spring 2020 that examine these same topics. Prerequisites: Interaction Lab / Application Lab / Communication Lab / What’s New Media

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


INTM-SHU 207T-000 (23411)
02/03/2020 – 03/20/2020 Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by

Critical Data and Visualization (INTM-SHU 204)

Data is at the heart of the increasing role technology has in our lives. Data collection and algorithmic processing are not only central to recent technical breakthroughs such as in AI and automation but have created new economic paradigms where data equals value and shape political approaches to power and control. Decisions based on algorithms affect society at large whether it’s changing the way we transport and distribute goods, or influencing the things we buy, the news we read or even the people we date. The world that algorithms see is data. For the average person, however, data is seldom more than an abstract idea. So what exactly is data? How is value extracted from it? And why should we care? How can we ethically balance the positive uses of data-driven systems with the threats they pose to discriminate and infringe basic human rights? This class seeks to untangle some of these issues practically and theoretically. Prerequisite: Creative Coding Lab or equivalent programming experience. Fulfillment: CORE AT; IMA/IMB elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


INTM-SHU 204-000 (17718)
01/24/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Eckert, Leon

Toy Design and Prototyping (INTM-SHU 238)

Toys are not only for kids. Toys are part of our culture and an important medium to develop essential skills like creativity, problem-solving, and socialization. They can also be a great contribution in education, medicine, and business, and can improve the quality of life for children and adults alike. The emphasis in this class is on designing for play and entertainment. Students will be introduced to the underlying essential concepts in designing toys and they will create their own utilizing hand-making craft skills and new technologies. This course will equip the students with a basic knowledge about various design topics including: brainstorming, sketching, graphic design, concept development, basic mechanisms, 3D modeling, rendering, and rapid prototyping. This is a hands-on class and students are required to bring their imagination in addition to a willingness to experiment and explore creative solutions for class assignments. Prerequisites: Interaction lab / Communication lab Fulfillment: IMA/IMB elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Application Lab (INTM-SHU 110)

Application Lab is an intensive project-driven course where students explore current challenges and opportunities at the intersections of emerging media and innovation through the lenses of design, prototyping and innovation. The course seeks to help students understand how these high-level concepts intersect with skills to form the basis for new applications of technology and human industrial art. At the end of this course, students will be able to think critically and holistically about not only what makes innovations possible but will also how to utilize emerging media technologies and ideas to bring innovations into the world that respect and acknowledge the values of design, iteration and innovation. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: IMA Major Other Foundation/Electives; IMB Major Emerging Media Foundation/ Interactive Media Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 110-000 (17280)09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Wed9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)at ShanghaiInstructed by


INTM-SHU 110-000 (17282)09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Wed11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)at ShanghaiInstructed by

Exhibition: Next (INTM-SHU 242)

Exhibition: Next class is an exploration and observation of the fields of exhibition design and museum studies. This class will explore how emerging and interactive technologies can be applied to museum and exhibition design to enhance visitors’ experiences. What is an exhibition in a museum of today and how should it be experienced? What is the role of a museum in contemporary society? How does it engage the audiences of tomorrow? The class discusses curatorial practices, various exhibition concepts and forms, museum visitor experience, and exhibitions’ social values. Students will visit and immerse themselves in many museums and exhibitions as a professional observer who will be asked to write reflections of their observations as an essay for each museum visit. Students will choose a research topic at the beginning of the class and they will start collecting materials, building objects, designing experiences, and writing a statement for their final exhibition based on this topic. Students’ design work will be frequently reviewed and given feedback by the instructor, classmates, and guest speakers/critics. After the midterm, the instructor will initiate a collaboration with a local museum or art space. Based on the specific circumstances, students will face a design challenge to propose an exhibition proposal or provide a creative solution to the partner organization. By the end of the course, students will install and present their work as a group art show in the student art gallery. Prerequisites: Interaction Lab or Creative Coding Lab Fulfillment: IMA Major Electives; IMB Major Interactive Media Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


INTM-SHU 242-000 (19659)
01/24/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Liu, Chang

Interaction Lab (INTM-SHU 101)

In this foundation course students will be asked to think beyond the conventional forms of human computer interaction (i.e. the keyboard and mouse) to develop interfaces that consider the entire human body, the body’s capacity for gesture, as well as the relationship between the body and its environment. Students will learn the fundamentals of electronics and programming as they build projects using the Arduino microcontroller platform. Arduino is a small computer based on open source hardware and software. When used in conjunction with various sensors and actuators, Arduino is capable of gathering information about and acting upon the physical world. In addition to these physical computing techniques, students will also learn to harness the methods of traditional computation. The fundamentals of programming will be explored using the Processing programming language. Processing has a simplified syntax and an approachable computer graphics programming model, making it an ideal platform for first-time programmers. Students will gain a deeper appreciation of the expressive possibilities of computation as they learn to author their own software and systems and not simply use off-the-shelf solutions. Additional topics will include algorithmic drawing and animation techniques, digital modeling and fabrication, data exchange, manipulation, and presentation, as well as control of images, audio and video, including computer vision techniques. Structured weekly exercises are aimed at building specific skills, however students are free to pursue their own diverse interests in their midterm and final projects. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: CORE AT; IMA Major Other Foundation; IMB Major Emerging Media Foundation.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 101-000 (17258)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 101-000 (17259)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 101-000 (17266)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue,Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 101-000 (17267)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 101-000 (17269)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 101-000 (17270)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Fri
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by

VR / AR Fundamentals (INTM-SHU 280C)

Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality represent, respectively, visions of “being” somewhere else or augmenting your present environment. These visions are not new, but new technologies have made it possible to produce experiences unlike anything before, particularly through the use of headsets, spatial audio, touch sensors, and custom location-based installations. These new technologies are becoming small, powerful, and inexpensive, and as a result we are witnessing the birth of a powerful new medium, new art form, and new industry – all very quickly. The speed of VR and AR growth has created both opportunity and confusion. “VR / AR Fundamentals” takes a long, deep perspective. We will overview such basic elements as audiovisual resolution and fidelity; spatiality and immersion; other senses such as touch, smell, taste (and even mind); input and interactivity; and live and social. We’ll look at distinctions such as cinema versus games, movies versus models, public versus personal, real world versus fantasy worlds, linear versus interactive, and narrative versus ambient. These elements and distinctions will be presented partially as technical but in an understandable way for general liberal arts students, and will rely heavily on experiencing content and keeping up with current events. That’s the first half-semester. The second half-semester we’ll concentrate on collectively producing a series of timely and relevant projects, all short, entertaining, and useful to others exploring the world of VR / AR. Prerequisites: None Fulfillment: IMA Major Electives; IMB Major Interactive Media Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Communications Lab (INTM-SHU 120)

In this foundation course students will explore the possibilities of emerging media by successively producing projects that make use of digital images, graphics, audio, and video. The course is designed to provide students with a framework to effectively communicate and tell stories through digital means. Students learn through hands-on experimentation in a laboratory context and the principles of interpersonal communication, media theory, and human factors will be introduced in readings and investigated through discussion. Adobe Creative Cloud and other relevant software applications will be examined to establish a diverse digital toolkit. Both traditional and experimental outputs will be explored. Weekly assignments, group and independent projects, as well as documentation of projects will be assigned in each of the core areas of study. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: IMA Major Other Foundation; IMB Major Emerging Media Foundation.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 120-000 (17284)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 120-000 (17285)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 120-000 (17286)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 120-000 (17287)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 120-000 (17289)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 120-000 (17291)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 120-000 (17292)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 120-000 (17293)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by

Board Game Design (GAMES-UT 352)

Board game design is a one-semester course for students who want to dig deeper into table-top games, from design to history to manufacturing. The first half of the course looks at the world of mass market games, which focus heavily on commercials, trends, plastics, licenses, low prices, and casual rules. The second half focuses on hobby games, designed for the dedicated game player, and the different styles of games in that world. The course is hands-on with at least one published game played in every class. There are multiple assignments where students bring these concepts to life through their own designs. Throughout the course, there is a focus on understanding players and designing games for a target audience.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


GAMES-UT 352-000 (20568)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Games and Players (GAMES-UT 312)

Game and Players gives students an overview of player-focused approaches to understanding game play, from a variety of methodological and theoretical frameworks. The class combines readings and analysis with exercises that give students hands-on experience with the methods discussed.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


GAMES-UT 312-000 (14777)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Clark, Naomi

Intermediate Game Design (GAMES-UT 151)

Intermediate Game Design builds on the foundation of Introduction to Game Design to help build students’ understanding of how game design works in a practical context. While Introduction to Game Design acquaints students with basic foundational concepts and ideas, Intermediate Game Design puts those ideas into action across four very different kinds of projects. These projects emphasize the professional context of digital game design.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


GAMES-UT 151-000 (14813)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


GAMES-UT 151-000 (22278)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Modern Tabletop Games Literacy (GAMES-UT 404)

Modern Tabletop Games are undergoing a renaissance, with designers building upon each other’s innovations at a bewildering rate. The cornucopia of concepts in modern boardgaming can be daunting to a newcomer, yet any digital game designer is well advised to familiarize themselves with this parallel world, both to expand their “bag of tricks” and their notion of what a game can be. This class aims to familiarize students with a wide variety of “gateway games”: relatively straightforward exemplars that will give the student a solid foothold when further exploring their respective genre in our extensive library of boardgames. While doing so, we will be discussing related short readings in Characteristics of Games, in order to give the design strategies being engaged a broader context.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


GAMES-UT 404-000 (21194)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Intro to Games Development (GAMES-UT 120)

Introduction to Game Development is a practical course that introduces students to the methods, tools and principles used in developing digital games. Over the course of the semester, students will work alone to create a two digital prototypes or ‘sketches’, before building on them to produce a final polished game, using the lessons learned in the earlier prototypes. This is a hands­-on, primarily lab­-based course, and so the focus is on learning ­by ­doing rather than on reading and discussion.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


GAMES-UT 120-000 (14740)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


GAMES-UT 120-000 (14741)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


GAMES-UT 120-000 (14742)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


GAMES-UT 120-000 (14766)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed,Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Tackling Representation in Games (GAMES-UT 112)

Identity and representation are two of the most pressing and complex issues for contemporary video games, that without recognizing them an artist or critic would be missing a large part of how games are important in culture. With growing art and activist communities, video games are diversifying and grappling with a wide range of topics rarely seen before in the genre, and with it a greater need for informed perspectives on the topic of how marginalized people are depicted in media. This course discusses foundational theories of identity and encourages students to contribute their own ideas towards the design and interpretation of representation in games.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


GAMES-UT 112-000 (14735)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Introduction to Narrative Design (GAMES-UT 161)

Narrative Design is an advanced game design course where students learn a variety of strategies to bring together game design and storytelling, both in table-top and digital games. Every assignment covers a different challenge when it comes to integrating systems design with storytelling. Students will also learn some of the basics of storytelling, such as character development, dramatic action, generating conflict, and world-building.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


GAMES-UT 161-000 (16034)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Intermediate Game Development (GAMES-UT 121)

This course reflects the various skills and disciplines that are brought together in modern game development: game design, programming, asset creation, and critical analysis. Classroom lectures and lab time will all be used to bring these different educational vectors together into a coherent whole; the workshop will be organized around a single, long-term, hands-on, game creation project. At the completion of this course, the student will be able to: 1) Describe typical work practice in game development. 2) Demonstrate competency through actual implementation of code and assets. 3) Work with a game engine, and understand the basics of how to build a game in the engine.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


GAMES-UT 121-000 (14865)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Game Design: Professional Practice (GAMES-UT 152)

Advanced Game Design focuses on the practical skills that working game designers need to get a job – and what they do at a company once they are there. Over the course of the semester, students will work on two full project proposals – each proposal including design documentation, production and schedule planning, and a prototype specification. In addition, students will take a handful of “game design tests” – based on actual game industry tests that are part of the hiring process. Along the way, we will be visiting a few NYC-based game companies, as well as discussing issues relevant to working game designers today. The goal of the course is to work on our communication, design, and planning skills, and get a sense for what it means to be a working game designer. Required: Intermediate Game Design.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


GAMES-UT 152-000 (14814)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Zimmerman, Eric

Fame (MCC-UE 9346)

Fame—celebrity, notoriety, renown—confers both recognition and immortality. It is the most enduring and desirable form of social power; a uniquely human ambition and a central force in social life. Culture, commerce, politics, and religion all proffer promises of fame, whether for fifteen minutes or fifteen centuries. Drawing on texts from history, anthropology, sociology, literature, philosophy, and contemporary media, this course will reflect on the ethics, erotics, pragmatics and pathologies of fame. We will compare fame to other forms of recognition (reputation, honor, charisma, infamy, etc.), and look at how fame operates in various social and historical circumstances, from small agricultural communities to enormous, hyper-mediated societies such as our own. How does the fame of the oral epic differ from the fame of the printed book or the fame of the photograph? We’ll consider the enduring question of fame as it transforms across space, time, social boundaries, and technological conditions.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 9346-000 (4283)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by Kolodezh, Samuel

Copyright, Commerce and Culture (MCC-UE 9405)

Examines the basic tenets and operative principles of the global copyright system. Considers the ways in which media industries, artists, and consumers interact with the copyright system and assesses how well it serves its stated purposes: to encourage art and creativity. Special emphasis on the social, cultural, legal, and political issues that have arisen in recent years as a reult of new communicative technologies.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 9405-000 (4280)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by Du Bois, Nathalie

Critical Video: Theory & Practice (MCC-UE 1142)

This course will introduce students to critical video—the use of documentary, ethnographic, and research-based video to investigate and critique contemporary culture. The class offers students a theoretical overview of documentary video, a set of conceptual tools to analyze video, and an introduction to the practice of video production for small and mobile screens. Students will apply texts on video’s history, culture and distribution, as well as on the ethical challenges of video production, to their own research-based video project. No prior experience in video production is required.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1142-000 (14062)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bianco, Jamie

Crime, Violence and Media (MCC-UE 9012)

Debates about the role of crime in the media have been among the most sustained and divisive in the field of communications, and they are dependent on a foundation of equally divisive debates about “media influence.” This course will broaden this discussion to consider the culture of crime in relation to conventions of news and entertainment in the mass media, and its larger social and political context. Topics will include crime reporting, the role of place in crime stories, the aesthetics of crime, moral panics and fears, crime and consumer culture, and the social construction of different kinds of crimes and criminals.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MCC-UE 9012-000 (12446)
01/26/2023 – 05/05/2023 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by Wallace, Aurora

The Psychic Life of Media (MCC-UE 1105)

This seminar develops themes addressed in “MCC-UE 1009 Psychoanalysis: Desire and Culture.” The course expands and deepen understanding of core Freudian and post-Freudian concepts via texts by Melanie Klein, W.R. Bion, Jacques Lacan, Jean Laplanche, and others. These texts will be considered alongside a series of media-cultural artifacts selected for study by seminar participants.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MCC-UE 1105-000 (21640)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wolk, Shari

Forensic Media (MCC-UE 1035)

What are the distinctions between facts, data, information, opinion, and understanding? Through what techniques of argumentation are these concepts discovered and/or achieved? Course introduces students to rhetoric—the art of persuasion. We explore techniques of rhetoric related to truth telling and opinion formation. We consider the significance of these activities to the city (polis) and matters held in common (res publica). Activities include participant observations of persuasion in courtroom settings. Optimal for students considering law careers.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1035-000 (14060)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moore, Kelli

Cultural Memory (MCC-UE 1413)

This course examines how cultural memory is enacted through visual culture in a comparative global context. It looks at the rise of a memory culture over the last few decades, in particular in the United States, Europe & Latin America, & how this engagement with memory demonstrates how the politics of memory can reveal aspects of nationalism & national identity, ethnic conflict & strife, the legacies of state terrorism, & the deployment of memory as a means for further continued conflict.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1413-000 (14058)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by De Silva, Weligama

Hollywood Films and American Life (MCC-UE 1141)

This course examines the vast & rich myth-making power of Hollywood film narratives that influence dominant cultural views of American identity. Students view films that explore problems & promises of American culture & society such as equality, democracy, justice, class, gender, sexual orientation, & race/ethnicity. Students analyze films while considering the work of historians, sociologists, film critics, media studies scholars, anthropologists & journalists. Students will screen films outside of class. Assignments include creating a short film that explores the city where myths are both lived out & refuted on a daily basis.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


MCC-UE 1141-000 (21565)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gary, Brett · Demissie, Yemane

Social Media Practicum (MCC-UE 1032)

In this workshop-based course, students will become well versed in contemporary debates on social media and its impact on self and society, share their own experiences and observations in this area, design an original research project (using methods such as discourse analysis, virtual ethnography, and interviewing), and write a long-form analysis paper.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1032-000 (14048)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ali, Isra

Fashion and Power (MCC-UE 9345)

This course examines fashion both from its diffusion in a globalized society, and as a form of communication and culture. We will examine how fashion has been valued through social sciences – history and sociology on the one hand, and economy on the other hand, from its production to its consumption. The course will address fashion in terms of issues of consumerism and sustainability in a post-industrialized society.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MCC-UE 9345-000 (11838)
01/26/2023 – 05/05/2023 Mon
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by Fennetaux, Ariane


MCC-UE 9345-000 (23337)
01/26/2023 – 05/05/2023 Mon
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by Fennetaux, Ariane


MCC-UE 9345-000 (23341)
01/26/2023 – 05/05/2023 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by Fennetaux, Ariane

Disability, Technology and media (MCC-UE 1026)

In this course, we will examine the significance of technology to the definition and experience of disability; the relationship between disability and the development of new media; the politics of representation; and current debates between the fields of disability studies and media studies. Specific topics will include: biomedical technology and the establishment of norms; the category of “assistive technology”; cyborgs and prostheses as fact and as metaphor; inclusive architecture and design; visual rhetorics of disability in film and photography; staring and other practices of looking; medical and counter-medical performance; media advocacy, tactical media, and direct action.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1026-000 (14047)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultural History of The Screen: (MCC-UE 1347)

Whether large, small, wide, high-definition, public, personal, shared, or handheld, screens are one of the most pervasive technologies in everyday life. From spaces of work to spaces of leisure, screens are sites for collaboration, performance, surveillance, and resistance. This course traces the cultural history of screens from a range of forms – from the panorama to the cinema, from the radar system to the television, and from the terminal to the mobile device – to provide a way of thinking about the development of the screen as simultaneously architectural, material, representational and computational.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


MCC-UE 1347-000 (21568)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lariviere, Jason

Organizational Comm (MCC-UE 1745)

This course is designed especially for students entering business, health care, and educational settings who are assuming or aspiring to positions of leadership. Through case studies and class discussion, course work focuses on strengthening communication competency in presentation skills, persuasive ability (i.e., marketing and sales), leadership in meetings, and problem-solving skills.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1745-000 (11384)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Borisoff, Deborah

Communicating Gender and Identity (MCC-UE 1700)

This course explores the ways people create, maintain, and augment the meaning of gender, developing insight into understanding gender ideology and the media representation of gender. The course examines how ideas about gender shape our communication practices, and how our practices of communication produce gender.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1700-000 (14004)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Borisoff, Deborah


MCC-UE 1700-000 (14005)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heard, Elizabeth

Gender, Sex and The Global (MCC-UE 1407)

This course examines how globalization impacts the construction of gender and sexuality. Through discussions of contemporary issues in various global sites, the course addresses the politics of gender as it is shaped by trans-border flows of media, people and cultural products.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1407-000 (11369)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heard, Elizabeth

Media and Globalization (MCC-UE 1300)

This course examines the broad range of activities associated with the globalization of media production, distribution, and reception. Issues include: the relationship between local and national identities and the emergence of a ’global culture’ and the impact of technological innovations on the media themselves and their use and reception in a variety of settings.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1300-000 (13999)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Osman, Osman

Global Media and International Law (MCC-UE 1304)

This course examines public policy issues and institutions of media governance at the international level. It provides an historical overview of the various institutions and actors involved in global media governance, and assesses the various principles and practices that constitute the regime of global media governance, including regulation of broadcasting, telecommunications, the Internet, and trade in media products. Special attention will be paid to current debates within multilateral bodies such as UNESCO, the WTO, and the International Telecommunication Union.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1304-000 (14000)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Muller, Charli

Advertising and Consumer Society (MCC-UE 1015)

This course will examine the emergence of advertising as a form of communication, its influence upon other forms of mediated communication and its impact upon culture and society.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1015-000 (13984)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gilmore, Daniel

Latino Media (MCC-UE 1022)

This course examines the production, representation and cultural meaning of Latino Media in the U.S. This class will provide a general survey of Latino media in the U.S. particular focuses on the cultures of production of Spanish and English language television, radio, film, advertising, newspapers, magazines and internet-based media.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Media and Migration (MCC-UE 1011)

The course examines the role of media in the lives and cultures of transnational immigrant communities. Using a comparative framework and readings drawn from interdisciplinary sources, the course explores how media practices and media representations define and enable new conceptions and practices of national belonging, identity and culture in the context of global migration.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MCC-UE 1011-000 (21621)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pfeifer, Michelle

Crime, Violence & Media (MCC-UE 1012)

The cultural context of crime in relation to conventions of news and entertainment in the mass media. Topics include competing theories of criminogenic behavior, news conventions and crime reporting, the aesthetics and representation of crime in the media, the role of place in crime stories, moral panics and fears, crime and consumer culture, and the social construction of different kinds of crimes and criminals.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MCC-UE 1012-000 (21622)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kay, Philip

Video Game Economies (MCC-UE 1008)

The course approaches video games through the lens of political economy. This means examining games foremost as commodities, transactional goods through which various modes of economic life occur. This course is designed to introduce students to the structure and economics of the game industry since its emergence in the 1970s, particularly across the United States, China, and Japan. Special attention is brought to the dramatic industry changes catalyzed by digital distribution, mobile gaming, live streaming, and other contemporary developments.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Censorship in American Culture (MCC-UE 1010)

An upper level course on the topic of censorship in American culture, from the late 19th century to the present. The course explores many of the areas where debates about obscenity and censorship have been urgently contested, from discussion bout birth control, to literature, film, theatre, art galleries and history museums, to public sidewalks, lecture halls, and the internet. The goal is for the students to have an enhanced understanding of the historical contexts in which important cultural and legal struggles over censorship have taken place, and to bring that understanding to bear on contemporary debates about the arts, sexuality, national security, media technology, privacy, and government involvement in the marketplace of ideas and images.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MCC-UE 1010-000 (22145)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gary, Brett

Introduction to Media Studies (MCC-UE 1)

Introduces students to the study of media, culture, and communication. The course surveys models, theories, and analytical perspectives that form the basis of study in the major. Topics include dialogue, discourse, mass and interpersonal communication, political economy, language, subject-formation, critical theory, experience, and reception.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


MCC-UE 1-000 (11261)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rajagopal, Arvind


MCC-UE 1-000 (11262)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yates, Katie Lane


MCC-UE 1-000 (11263)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yates, Katie Lane


MCC-UE 1-000 (11264)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hytower, Courtney


MCC-UE 1-000 (11265)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hytower, Courtney


MCC-UE 1-000 (11266)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ainomugisha, Mary


MCC-UE 1-000 (11267)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ainomugisha, Mary


MCC-UE 1-000 (11268)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ọládélé, Noah


MCC-UE 1-000 (11269)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ọládélé, Noah


MCC-UE 1-000 (11270)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cilman, Eva


MCC-UE 1-000 (11271)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cilman, Eva


MCC-UE 1-000 (11272)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Procter, Alice


MCC-UE 1-000 (11273)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Procter, Alice


MCC-UE 1-000 (11302)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fattaleh, Nadine


MCC-UE 1-000 (11303)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fattaleh, Nadine


MCC-UE 1-000 (11615)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Fotsch, Paul

Methods in Media Studies (MCC-UE 14)

Introduces students to several methods of analyzing the content, production, and contexts of media in society. Students explore the basic approaches of textual analysis, political economy, and ethnography. Students adopt, adapt and employ these methods in their own analyses, survey and data collection, and ethnographies. Students create their work by means of digitally mediated image annotation and manipulation, data collection and visualization, and audio/video production.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Visual Language and Storytelling: Visual Storytelling Through the Ages (OART-UT 290)

An overview of the development of visual storytelling throughout history. From the first creation of early hand drawn cave paintings to modern film production, all the essential elements of visual representation, visual imagery, visual grammar, and visual storytelling are explored. Lectures introduce and explain a variety of methods used to capture a visual image and how visual imagery, both with and without words, is used to convey meaning. Assignments are given for students to create their own visual imagery using these several different artistic formats. In class discussions then analyze the audience reception of the student’s work. The essential nature of visual storytelling is examined by analyzing how images collide to create new meaning, how a multiplicity of visual images are organized into a grammatical system, and how this system is managed in order to tell a visual story. The course examines how the basic tools of traditional narrative storytelling are also used in purely visual storytelling – to create a secondary world and to maintain a suspension of disbelief in order to inform, entertain, and affect the audience.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


OART-UT 290-000 (21135)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


OART-UT 290-000 (21136)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Art and Social Change (OART-UT 1018)

This course challenges us to foster a tactile understanding of the relationship between art and social change. How do artists address social issues? Can art transform lives? How can art serve as a force for encouraging ethical dialogue and action within the public sphere? How do we make our ideas and revelations actually matter within our collective place and space? To better facilitate our understanding of this relationship, and in an effort to get inside these key questions and others, this course will unfold in two parts. Part I (Conversations on Art and Social Change) will be run as an interactive seminar in which we will explore how the desire to change the world has led some artists to align themselves with wider social movements. Through lectures, discussions and presentations, we will set about to engage ourselves with the work of contemporary artists who have addressed issues related to the environment, racial and cultural identity, human rights, healthcare, and social justice. We will assume that understanding the work of others is necessary if we are to appreciate the potentiality of our own impact on the world. Part II of this course (A Collective Gesture Toward) will entail challenging ourselves to participate more fully in our immediate surroundings vis-à-vis the development and implementation of a work (or works) of art.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OART-UT 1018-000 (13646)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Live Video Performance Art (OART-UT 567)

This course will combine a history of video art and experimental film with practical training in the use of live video performance art technology. Students will explore new ways to create and edit films and videos using VJ software, projections, and multi-channel video surfaces. Workshops will demonstrate concepts and software that can be integrated into the creative process of video performance art and video art installations. COURSE OBJECTIVES At the completion of this course, the student will be able to: Draw inspiration from the recent history of incredible video and multi-media artists. Develop an understanding of audio and visual hardware used by VJ’s. Use live VJ software to manipulate digital media in real time to create Video Performance Art. Use Projection Mapping techniques to project video art onto 3D surfaces. Create original video performance art, video installations, and other performance pieces. Utilize skills to make video art in the professional market.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


OART-UT 567-000 (23531)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nova, Max

Urban Arts Workshop: New York (OART-UT 1925)

Urban Arts Workshop–New York is composed of lectures, presentations, screenings, readings, discussions, and visits from painters, photographers, filmmakers, writers, designers, architects, planners, restaurateurs, curators and critics designed to expose students to the key concepts and fundamental theories of urban studies, public art and the urban-inspired works of many great artists and writers based in New York City and around the world. Outside of class time, students will do readings, conduct research, watch movies, post reactions and do various assignments that engage the core course subject matter and themes. Each class will explore another form of urban art, including discussions about and encounters with graffiti, street photography, sculpture, installation art, architecture, music, dance, performance, theater, fashion, urban sound projects, large-scale projections, poetry, essays and short stories with an aim to understand how such art forms came into being and how they express a distinctly urban message to the inhabitants and visitors of New York City and cities across the planet. The instructor seeks to combine the critical and theoretical with the experiential and personal in order to lead students to a deeper and more fruitful relationship with cities, the arts and themselves. Further exploration will be conducted into the phenomenon of connectivity in the 21st century city providing a deeper perspective on globalism, the networked environment, and emerging technology’s role in the future of art, culture and urban living. Field trips may include: The Whitney, The High Line and Hudson Yards, Tiny Island, MoMA, Guggenheim, PS1, Museum of the City of New York, The New Museum, Transit Museum, Noguchi Museum, Governors Island and others based upon availability. Students will need a MetroCard for traveling around the city as well as approximately $50.00 to cover meals and museum tickets (this price varies depending on course itinerary).

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


OART-UT 1925-000 (3375)
05/20/2024 – 07/02/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bankert, Scott

Producing Essentials (OART-UT 1006)

The role of the creative producer in the entertainment industry is integral to bringing a project to fruition. This introductory course covers both the creative and physical production time-line and provides students with an understanding of the producer’s role through a semester-long team-based pitch project, which culminates in written and verbal pitch presentations. Students are encouraged to work on a project that best suits their area of interest: feature film, episodic/streaming, theatre, performance, podcasts, VR/AR or individualized multi-media. The course focuses on the dynamics of producing, including producer skill sets, tasks and responsibilities necessary to effectively and efficiently develop a project.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


OART-UT 1006-000 (17802)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badal, Sharon


OART-UT 1006-000 (17803)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Working with Groups in Community Settings (OART-UT 1017)

This course provides students interested in exploring their artistic field of study in community settings or providing community service through the arts, with a foundation for working with small and large group structures in community settings. Students will gain an understanding of group theory and stages of group development as they impact the visiting artist’s work with community groups. Overview of social, political and cultural contexts for creating community-based work will be discussed in relation to entering into and engaging community groups in the creative process. Students will work in small groups to practice concepts and skills of working with groups in community settings and will prepare and present an individual project design for a visiting artist’s work with a community group, drawing on specific fields of artistic study and taking into consideration material covered in class lectures and discussions.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 3 Weeks

Sections (January 2021)


OART-UT 1017-000 (1396)
01/04/2021 – 01/22/2021 Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bitel, Mary

Creative Fundraising (OART-UT 1093)

This course will cover both traditional and non-traditional financing and fundraising in the worlds of entertainment and the arts. Although our focus will be on the film world (with an emphasis on feature films), we will take occasional forays into the worlds of television, theatre, and music. We will also look at product financing. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the dynamics (as well as the specific routes) to raising funds for artistic endeavors. Many entertainment projects require significant capital before they can be realized. The negotiation and structuring of these deals may be a humbling experience, fraught with compromises that affect creative control over the final product. Producers need knowledge of financing tools and structures, an understanding of current economics driving the business, and skills in understanding new technologies and trends in funding. At its core, the course will help students develop a general understanding of fundraising and financing in the world of entertainment and refine the skills necessary to develop proposals that allow them to one day realize a creative vision.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


OART-UT 1093-000 (14068)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sondervan, Sofia

Intro to Game Development (OART-UT 1601)

Introduction to Game Development is a practical course that introduces students to the methods, tools and principles used in developing digital games. Over the course of the semester, students will work alone to create a two digital prototypes or ‘sketches’, before building on them to produce a final polished game, using the lessons learned in the earlier prototypes. This is a hands­-on, primarily lab­-based course, and so the focus is on learning ­by ­doing rather than on reading and discussion.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 1601-000 (14382)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Media in Game Design and Development (DM-UY 3153)

This class continues from DM-UY 2153, moving into advanced technological implementations of 2D games. Taking designs from DM-UY 2153 and working in teams, students create a complete game. Students, based on abilities and individual goals, are assigned individually to work in production areas ranging from sprite creation, mapping and level design to engine coding and interaction scripting. Students are responsible for completing their assignments as if they were members of a professional game-development team. | Prerequisite: DM-UY 2153

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


DM-UY 3153-000 (16555)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Clark, Lawra

Experimental Cinema (DM-UY 4123)

This course provides an overview of experimental film and video history and theory, centered on hands-on production. The course will include readings, workshops, screenings, discussions, assignments, critiques, and technical instruction around cinema as a radical practice, and the ways in which computing techniques can be leveraged for new forms of expression in the moving image. Students will study and experiment with cutting-edge techniques in cinematic production such as motion capture, 3D (stereo, depth) filmmaking, and interactive / performative cinema. | Prerequisite: DM-UY 2263

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


DM-UY 4123-000 (9247)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Panzarino, Monica

Sound Design for Media (DM-UY 2113)

This course explores sound design, primarily within visual contexts. The course will focus on the use of sound within visual and interactive media, including film, video production, interactive user experience, web design, and gaming. Students will create weekly studio assignments in all of these areas, with an emphasis on developing a strong competence in integrating digital audio techniques into other media. Final projects could include novel sound design developed for film, video, web, applications, or games. | Prerequisite(s): DM-UY 1113 or MPATE-UE 1001

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


DM-UY 2113-000 (9213)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kato, Hideki

Professional Practices for Creatives (DM-UY 4173)

This course introduces students to the fundamental skills and professional practices vital to pursuing a career within a range of creative fields and industries. Students will explore strategies for effective documentation and presentation of their creative work, the art of self-promotion and exhibiting work publicly in various forms and environments, as well as networking and career preparation. | Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 4173-000 (12679)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mirza, Touseef


DM-UY 4173-000 (12680)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Henriques, Piper


DM-UY 4173-000 (12681)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at ePoly
Instructed by Eng, Angelina

Emerging Media Studio: Intro to Post-Photographic Imaging (PHTI-UT 1018)

The Emerging Media Studio courses explore methods to creatively think through and hybridize artistic photographic practice with emerging media technologies from medicine, the military, archaeology, urban planning, environmental science and other industries. Projects may take open-ended forms such as video, virtual reality environments, site-based performance, spatial imaging, 3D fabrication and photographic documentation. Critical readings and ideas drawn from artists as well as professionals in other fields are discussed. Our practice is learning how to adapt to and position ourselves as artists making unique contributions to the social dynamics of culture and a constantly shifting universe of media.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


Topic: Intro to Post-Photographic Imaging.

PHTI-UT 1018-000 (22312)09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Mon2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Fu, Yunxue

Course Repeatable for Credit. Prerequisite: Photography & Imaging: Digital, Analog, and Multimedia (can be taken concurrently) or permission of the Department. Interested non-majors should complete the non-major request form: https://goo.gl/forms/oaRPT3aeCeMT7KYL2 The paradigm of the indexical photographic image has come into a new era – a computer generated one. Maya 3D software, typically used to create commercial games and animations, will be used to introduce experimental computer imaging as a visual art form. Students will solve a series of formal problems, introduced in increasing levels of complexity, and examine the broad cultural, philosophical, and theoretical implications of CG imaging. Moving from the 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional and ultimately to the four-dimensional or time-based, students will evolve their abilities to utilize aspects of light and dark, form, rhythm, color, proportion and volume but in terms of a post photographic discourse.

3D Animation (DM-UY 3133)

Students will learn advanced techniques of 3D computer animation, along with the theories and principles of motion including motion capture. Students will become comfortable utilizing cameras, lights, dynamics, motion, and effects in an industry-standard software. Comprehensive critiques will be conducted regularly to encourage good design for time-based animation. | Prerequisites: DM-UY 2133

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 3133-000 (12637)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Skwarek, Mark

Intro to 3D Computer Animation (FMTV-UT 1110)

This is an introductory course to the fundamentals of 3D computer animation. Through in-depth discussions and hands-on assignments, students will gain a thorough beginner’s understanding of the 3D production process. Using industry-leading Autodesk Maya running on high-end Mac Pro workstations, students will learn the basics of modeling and proceed through UV layout, texturing, rigging, animation, lighting and final render. At the end of the class students will have completed a series of exercises that will culminate in a final scene that showcases all they learned.This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


FMTV-UT 1110-000 (14326)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McNagny, Phil


FMTV-UT 1110-000 (14165)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

The Western History of Madness from the Bible to DSM-V (IDSEM-UG 1961)

Viewed as a natural kind or socially constructed, “madness” was defined and treated, examined and controlled, diagnosed and cured according to the spirit of the time. This course follows the varied social imageries of “madness” throughout Western history, from the Hebrew Bible to the contemporary and controversial Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM), also known as “the bible of psychiatry”, in its most recent 5th edition. Students read primary and secondary texts by philosophers, physicians, theologians, jurists, tragedians, novelists, psychologists, social reformers, policy makers, journalists, historians and individuals who suffered madness, also known as “experts from experience.” They also observe art and watch films that portray different aspects of madness. Reading includes: the Bible, Plato, Hippocrates, Ibn Sina, Margery Kempe, Erasmus, Robert Burton, Freud, George Canguilhem, Foucault, Ian Hacking, Elaine Showalter, Ruth Leys among others. The course explores the interaction between the social, cultural, scientific, political as well as economic factors that have shaped the views of “madness” and its treatment while paying ample attention to the history of ideas that informed and, often, framed them.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


IDSEM-UG 1961-000 (14205)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ophir, Orna

Media and Fashion (IDSEM-UG 1618)

This course will examine the roles fashion plays in film, television and digital media and their cultural and economic significance. As a signifying system in its own right, fashion contributes to the semiotics of popular forms. It can also operate as a means of authentication (especially in period films and TV) or reveal a variety of ways in which media plays with space and time, purposeful or not. Besides evoking specific temporalities and narrative tone, fashion plays an important role in the construction of gender, both in terms of representation and address. This course will examine the history of the intersection of the fashion and media industries from the free distribution of film-related dress patterns in movie theaters of the 1910s to the current trend for make-over TV, networks like the Style network, the increasing proliferation of fashion blogs and the construction of specifically feminine video games. How does fashion’s specific configuration of consumerism, signification and visual pleasure lend itself to the articulation of modern/postmodern cultures and their presentation of the self? Texts will include Stella Bruzzi and Pamela Church Gibson, Fashion Cultures: Theories, Explanations and Analysis ; selections from Roland Barthes, The Fashion System ; Elizabeth Wilson, Adorned in Dreams: Fashion and Modernity ; assorted articles and selected clips from films and television shows including Marie Antoinette , What Not To Wear , The New York Hat, Fashions of 1934, Now, Voyager and Sex and the City .

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IDSEM-UG 1618-000 (16948)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Luckett, Moya

Art of Now (ARTCR-UE 55)

This course examines the current developments in contemporary art over the past decade – the art of ‘now’ – from the viewpoint of an artist’s practice & working ideas, looking at current global art production in aesthetic, economic, & social contexts. The major movements in painting, photography, sculpture, installation & performance are examined. Readings will be drawn from first hand interviews & point-of-view accounts, reviews, & critique; a major emphasis on interviews & online studio visits will accompany the texts. Guest artist lectures & off-site museum & gallery viewings will complement the weekly visual presentations & theory conversations. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Expressive Cultures

Art Theory & Critical Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ARTCR-UE 55-000 (12147)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Weiner, Andrew