Category Archives: Spring 2022

Global Media Seminar: Media Activism and Democracy (ITAL-UA 9513)

The course on “Media, Activism & Democracy” aims at, first, introducing students to the complex and fascinating topic of civil society activism; second, at illustrating them the linkages between activism and media; third, at showing them the impact of civil society’s advocacy on contemporary political systems. In a nutshell, the course aims at providing students with a closer understanding of the civil society activism-media-politics conundrums at the national and global levels.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITAL-UA 9513-000 (2451)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Masrani, Rahoul

Principles of Macroeconomics (ECI-UF 101)

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental topics in macroeconomics, the analysis of the economy as a whole. After an overview of introductory economic concepts, such as comparative advantage, opportunity costs, and supply and demand, the course focuses on the determinants of aggregate income, employment, and prices. Other topics include the study of long-run economic growth, the business cycle, the financial system, as well as monetary and fiscal policy. *ECI-UF 101 and ECII-UF 102 may meet some of the equivalent course requirements for the College of Arts and Science. Students may take ECI-UF 101 and ECII-UF 102 in any order; neither course is a pre-requisite for the other.

Economics I (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECI-UF 101-000 (19798)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mejorado, Ascension


ECI-UF 101-000 (13426)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mejorado, Ascension


ECI-UF 101-000 (13352)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mejorado, Ascension


ECI-UF 101-000 (19799)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ECI-UF 101-000 (19800)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Monsters and Their Humans (RELST-UA 649)

Humanity has long imagined monstrous transformations of ourselves. What do these creatures mean to us, historically and today? What do we think we are becoming? Investigates the supernatural in popular culture through vampires and zombies. Places them in the context of our imagination of the divine through history and ethnography, and also alongside our intimate problems of managing sex, gender, race, and class. The archives of religions, psychologies, philosophy, film, TA, and novels provide rich source material, Requires a short midterm essay and a longer final project, while posting to a forum most weeks.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


RELST-UA 649-000 (20380)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zito, Angela · Rubino, Rena

Disability Justice and Radical Inclusion (OT-UE 1403)

Explores the implications and meaning of having a disability in global contexts by introducing students to experts’ voices, especially disabled activists, as they seek to advance disability justice and inclusion and demand systemic change in spheres of influence including education, politics, healthcare, the arts, culture, social welfare, and everyday life. Examines how public (government) and private (outside of the government) policies and practices in these sectors affect the inclusion of persons with disabilities. Students explore and identify how international trends in disability and inclusion, local cultural beliefs, and biases influence inclusion.

Occupational Therapy (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OT-UE 1403-000 (11793)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patten, Kristie

American Cinema: 1960 to Present (FMTV-UT 324)

Offered in the spring semester only. Course level: Intermediate. 4 points. No prerequisite. Over the last 50 years the American Cinema has produced a remarkably rich abundance of entertaining, exciting, and challenging films. This course is designed to provide a survey of the wealth of styles, forms, purposes, and approaches to filmmaking that developed and emerged in this era. While Hollywood has obviously served as the dominant mode of filmmaking in this country, a significant of other filmmaking practices have continued to operate and sometimes thrive outside of it. Beyond the attention paid to Hollywood narrative cinema as it has changed and evolved over this half-century, we will also consider documentaries, avant-garde and experimental works, independent narraive cinema, and “cult” films. Consequently, we will be screening a variety of films, including works by such notable American filmmakers as Steven Spielberg, Francis Ford Coppola, Quentin Tarantino, George Romero, John Singleton, and Michael Moore.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


FMTV-UT 324-000 (23683)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
6:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brasiskis, Lukas


FMTV-UT 324-000 (23684)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Banfi, Ryan


FMTV-UT 324-000 (23685)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Banfi, Ryan


FMTV-UT 324-000 (23686)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Banfi, Ryan

The Black Image in Cinema (FMTV-UT 1216)

This is a critical analysis of the Black image in cinema through film screenings, discussions, and selected readings. Film is an art form whose influence dictates how we see others and ourselves. It shapes our worldview and, yet, it is one of the youngest and most misunderstood art forms. On the surface, film viewing might seem like a passive form of learning, but effective films engage us on emotional, intellectual, spiritual, cultural, and political levels. Film is one of the most powerful mediums ever invented and since it’s invention, the Black image and experience has been distorted, demonized, romanticized, erased, appropriated as well as exalted and reified. So, it is our duty and responsibility to know its history, understand its present effects, so we can dictate its future and participate in how the Black image evolves and is treated over time. This course will survey and critically explore an historical range of the Black image on screen and Black films in relation to inspiration, narrative, a scene, set, and site of production. Screening will include a sampling of important Black independently made, and/or Black cast and narrative feature films. We will discuss and analyze specific technical elements (direction, editing, framing and composition, mise-en-scene, music, etc.) that reinforce and demonstrate these larger themes. Accordingly, our discussions and readings will cover the full range of current issues and debates in Black cinema studies, from independence vs. mainstream filmmaking; gender and sexuality; class and color caste; the ghettoization and upwardly mobile integration of urban zones; cooptation and the rise of the bourgeois story as genre, and so on.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1216-000 (19573)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pollard, Jason

Feminist Filmmakers (FMTV-UT 1156)

Feminist Filmmakers examines gender constructs in narrative film and episodic work. We will explore how gender constructs in film and television influence societal views of gender roles, as well as contextualize gender in the era and cultures specific films were made. The vehicle through which this course will examine gender will be the history and work of female directors around the world. Screenings, critical reading in film and gender studies, articles and interviews on current debates regarding gender and diversity inclusion in the film industry, make this class valuable for everyone.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1156-000 (20466)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zentelis, Enid

Art and Technology (OART-UT 1059)

Thesis: All art uses technology. Technology is not art. Whether a work of art is created to bridge the supernatural, convey experience, thought, or a world view, or something more, art is a three letter verb representing the result of an individual’s desire to create difference. This course is an exploration in technological literacy for all NYU students. Students will create a website, capture, edit, and publish digital media to their sites, use software to create objects through subtractive (laser cutting) and additive (3D printing) machining processes, build circuits, learn to program a microcomputer, and build a functioning computer-controlled object.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Youth and Consumer Culture in China (GCHN-SHU 246)

How can a hamburger symbolize progress, an animated character provide comfort, and rock music define one’s identity? In this course we will study the role of consumer culture in the lives of Chinese youth, both today and in the past. By examining popular commodities including sneakers, coffee, backpacking, and celebrity idols, we will think about how young people use these things to find friendship and love, to seek success and happiness, and to define who they are. As we consider why people like particular commodities, we will learn about class, gender, ethnicity, and modernity in China. Reading about the history of commodities in China, we will consider what is new about consumer culture, and why people’s tastes change over time. Alongside studies of specific commodities, we will read key theoretical texts about shopping, advertising, media, identity, and fantasy: these texts will help us understand how commodities can be imbued with tremendous power to shape our desires and create our identities. During the semester, each student will conduct qualitative research about a commodity, including online research and offline interviews with people who buy and sell this commodity. At the end of the semester, we will gather your research together to produce a handbook of Chinese youth and consumer culture. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Fulfillment: CORE SSPC/IPC; GCS Elective: The Politics, Economy, and Environment of China; Social Science focus Anthropology 200 level.

Global China Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Printmaking in an Expanded Field (ART-SHU 255)

This Praxis course is an exploration of contemporary and traditional artistic printmaking practices, with an emphasis on expanding notions of conventional printmaking techniques and forms. Students will be introduced to various printmaking techniques, and experiment with traditional and non-traditional forms, in conjunction with their histories and consider what constitutes a hand-made print in an artistic framework. Students will gain an understanding of printmaking – its history based in China, development across the globe and inventive contemporary practices which include sculptural forms. They will learn techniques, modes, forms, and applications of printmaking – with an emphasis on relief prints (stamps and wood cuts) – in a conceptual framework of contemporary printmaking practices and global visual culture. Note: attendance in the first class meeting is mandatory, otherwise you will be dropped from the course. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: This course satisfies IMA/IMB elective.

Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ART-SHU 255-000 (19570)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Lin, Monika

Advertising and Consumer Society (MCC-UE 9015)

This course will examine the emergence of advertising as a form of communication, its influence upon other forms of mediated communication and its impact upon culture and society.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9015-000 (2561)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Murad, Salim

Social Media Practicum (MCC-UE 9032)

In this workshop-based course, students will become well versed in contemporary debates on social media and its impact on self and society, share their own experiences and observations in this area, design an original research project (using methods such as discourse analysis, virtual ethnography, and interviewing), and write a long-form analysis paper.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9032-000 (2831)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Druker, Jeremy

Video Game Economies (MCC-UE 9008)

The course approaches video games through the lens of political economy. This means examining games foremost as commodities, transactional goods through which various modes of economic life occur. This course introduces students to the structure and economics of the game industry since its emergence in the 1970s, particularly across the United States, China, and Japan. Special attention is brought to the dramatic industry changes catalyzed by digital distribution, mobile gaming, live streaming, and other contemporary developments. Examines the emergence of video games as sites of contemporary cultural production & practice. Special attention is given to the symbolic & aesthetic dimensions of video games, including their various narratives forms and sub-genres, & concentrates on their interactive dimensions. The course provides insight into the emerging trends in the interface between humans & media technologies. The course also situates video games within the business practices of the entertainment industries.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9008-000 (2834)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Krobova, Tereza

Aesthetic History of Photography (PHTI-UT 1102)

Open only to Photography & Imaging majors. Sophomore Standing. This class will chronicle the history of photography?s complex and symbiotic relationship to the other visual arts: painting, sculpture, architecture, installation and performance, among others. Beginning with the medium?s invention and the early fights of its practitioners to establish themselves as fine artists, the course will describe photographers? unique attempts to negotiate their relationships with both artistic movements and the media culture of which they are a part. Robinson, Cameron, Emerson, F. Holland Day, Stieglitz, Moholy-Nagy, Rodchenko, Weston, Alvarez Bravo, Lartigue, De Carava, Cahun, Robert Frank, Diane Arbus and Cindy Sherman (among others) will be seen within the context of their respective art worlds, so the impact of art movements, cultural attitudes and new technologies on photographers during different historical periods can be assessed.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PHTI-UT 1102-000 (7498)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rice, Shelley

Legal Aspects of The Entertainment Industry (FMTV-UT 1195)

A course that tracks the filmmaking process from its inception, at the idea phase and follows the creative process through development, pre-production, principal photography and post-production. The class will focus on the business and legal issues that arise during every phase of filmmaking. Key topics covered will include: copyright law; option agreements for underlying rights such as books, plays, magazine and newspaper articles; sources of financing; distribution agreements; licensing of music; agreements for actors, directors, producers and writers. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. Students must have Junior or Senior standing. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1195-000 (19505)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lichter, Rosalind

Information Technology in Business & Society (BUSF-SHU 142)

In Information Technology in Business and Society, students learn the fundamental concepts underlying current and future developments in computer-based information technology – including hardware, software, network and database-related technologies. They will also acquire proficiency in the essential tools used by today’s knowledge workers and learn how these can be used to help solve problems of economic, social or personal nature. Throughout the course, they will be exposed to a range of more advanced topics which may include big data, information privacy, information security, digital piracy and digital music. Pre-requisites: not open to freshman. Fulfillment: This course satisfies BUSF/ BUSM Business Elective, Business Analytics Track; IMB Business Flexible Core.

Business and Finance (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


BUSF-SHU 142-000 (17570)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Junque De Fortuny, Enric

History of Theatre Architecture (THEA-UT 722)

This course examines the development of theatre architecture and design from the early formalized drama spaces (the theatre of Dionysus and the theatre of Epidaurus) to the English playhouse (the Globe to Convent Garden). We discuss the significance of the Italians to design, from the first temporary scenic elements to Serlio and Torelli to the Bibiena family. The course continues with the Paris Opera House, Wagner’s Bayreuth theatre; and the American playhouses of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth centuries, and it includes the technological changes during that period. The final aspect of the course focuses on contemporary multiple use and adaptable theatre spaces. Emphasis is placed on how trends in the theatre affect the designs of productions, individuals, and aesthetic and technical innovations. (Theatre Studies C)

Drama (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Art and Architecture: Reinventing the City (VISAR-UH 2121)

This course takes a sculptural approach to exploring and reimagining the city by looking at the existing landscape of Abu Dhabi. Students will visit public parks, streetscapes, the markets, super-blocks, the port, shopping malls, and industrial districts. We will document our observations through field notes, drawings, photography, video and sound recordings. This research will serve as a foundation for creating objects, sculptures, and installations. Students will learn to develop forms of artistic and architectural presentation and representation that reflect the urban design and development of the city. This research and artistic production will be accompanied by selected readings that address theoretical, historical and contemporary perspectives from authors and artists such as: Atelier, Bow Wow, Denise Scott Brown, Homi Baba, Dan Graham, Kevin Mitchell, Robert Venturi, Andrea Zittel.

Visual Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sports Marketing (MKTG-UB 47)

Provides an overview of sports marketing as a component of a fully integrated marketing communication strategy. Studies the history and contemporary application of sports marketing as a method to achieve goals. Considers corporate as well as sporting property use of sports marketing strategies to achieve business objectives. Examines strategies that address critical business constituencies, including consumers, trade factors, employees, and the financial community. Covers sports marketing within the context of special sporting event sponsorships and professional sports teams as well as governing organizations, sports media (broadcast, print, and the Internet), licensing, hospitality, etc.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MKTG-UB 47-000 (10724)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Master, Stephen

Conversations in the Global Music Business Surviving the Future (REMU-UT 9810)

With sales of more than 1.3 billion, the German recorded music market is the third largest in the world: it is larger than the UK music market and behind only the USA and Japan. Beyond just numbers, the Berlin music business is unique: it’s home to hundreds of powerful independent and D.I.Y. record labels; it’s historically been ground zero for innovative electronic and dance music; and it’s a burgeoning tech hub for innovative software/hardware companies like Native Instruments, Ableton and Soundcloud. In this colloquium series, students will meet and hear each week from key creative entrepreneurial figures and innovators in the German and European music business. This course has several purposes. First, students will consider how ongoing economic and technological changes might be impacting the worldwide music business, as speakers discuss controversial trends like the rise of cryptocurrency, block chain and cashless systems, customization technologies like 3D printing and developments in robotics, and radical, disruptive approaches to copyright. Second, students will develop a greater understanding of the chief similarities and differences between the traditional European and US music business operations, particularly with regard to label operations, publishing and copyright, touring and festivals, and nightlife promotion. Third, students will become more informed about the D.I.Y. music business in Berlin itself, as they hear from speakers about the promises and challenges one faces in launching innovative music start ups in Germany. And finally, students will get to meet and network with key movers and shakers in the Berlin scene, past and present. In anticipation for a guest class visit, students may be required to investigate websites, read biographical or contextual material, or attend events outside of class time. Students will be expected to ask informed questions of the guests and to develop responses throughout the course of the class. Students should leave the class with a greater understanding of how the European and German music businesses work and how they themselves might make a business or sales impact on a global scale.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


REMU-UT 9810-000 (13438)
08/31/2023 – 12/07/2023 Mon
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by

Visual Arts Praxis (ART-UE 900)

A studio course that combines theory & artistic practice to examine the development of the arts from a critical perspective. The course will address a range of models from structuralism & semiotics to modern & postmodern paradigms. The class is designed for practicing artists, allowing students to gain the skills & confidence to express their artistic objectives in critical writing, art making, & verbal analysis. Each student is responsible for oral presentations, works of art generated through research, & written statements about their artistic objectives.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Real Time Media: Concepts and Production (IMBX-SHU 9501)

This course explores the disruptions and creative possibilities that realtime emerging media provides through the lens of learning how to design, create, produce and perform in realtime. Students will be learning how to design and produce for realtime interactive audiences, understand the modern streaming media pipeline, the fundamentals of virtual production, digital content creation and the basics of game engines and other software – all in the service of delivering a more engaging and intimate connection between audience and performer. Students will design and perform 2 distinct realtime performances as well as work together with peers to conceptualize, design and produce a short realtime ‘pilot’ using the tools and techniques you’ve learned in the first two projects. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: Interactive Media Business Elective ; Interactive Media Arts Elective

Interactive Media and Business (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IMBX-SHU 9501-000 (24204)
01/25/2022 – 05/10/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by Kumar, Archana


IMBX-SHU 9501-000 (24205)
01/25/2022 – 05/10/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by Kumar, Archana

The Minimum Viable Product: The Lean Launchpad (IMBX-SHU 201)

This class is based on the entrepreneurship methodology of Steve Blank, “The Lean Launchpad” with some changes to adapt it to our specific circumstances. The methodology enables to test and develop business models based on querying and learning from customers. This is a practical class – essentially a lab. Our goal, within the constraints of a limited amount of time, is to help you find a repeatable and scalable business methodology for your startup. This will allow you to build a company with substantially less money and in a shorter amount of time than using traditional methods. Rapidly iterate your product to build something people actually want. You will build minimum viable products (MVPs) weekly to avoid hypotheticals and get real customer feedback that you can use to iterate (small adjustments) or pivot (substantive changes) faster. Prerequisite:‌ ‌Junior to Senior only (exceptions granted on a case by case basis). Fulfillment: IMA/IMB Elective.

Interactive Media and Business (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Thermodynamics (ENGR-UH 3710)

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of thermodynamics and their applications to engineering problems. The following topics are covered in this course: properties of pure substances; concepts of work and heat; closed and open systems; the fundamental laws of thermodynamics; Carnot and Clausius statements of the 2nd law; entropy and entropy production; heat engines, refrigerators, heat pumps; efficiencies, coefficients of performance.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3710-000 (3597)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ryu, Je Ir


ENGR-UH 3710-000 (3598)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Al-Chalabi, Mohammed · Ryu, Je Ir

Silence (CADT-UH 1052)

How does “silence” help to define our sense of being and existence? Across different cultures, various philosophies of art, science, and society have viewed and thought about silence differently. This course invites students to think about and experience silence by asking three fundamental questions: 1) What does it mean to be silent? (Literally and metaphorically); 2) Does silence shape our lives? And if so, how? 3) Can we have an active relationship and recognition with silence just as we do with sound or action? Drawing on multi-disciplinary sources from around the world to explore the philosophical frameworks and thought systems that have engaged in the study and observation of silence, the syllabus will include works of art, literature, theater, films, architecture, and music, which students will engage via a mix of seminar, lecture, and studio methods of teaching, to enable the creations of their own artistic responses to their experience of silence and the material presented in class.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CADT-UH 1052-000 (19965)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Özhabeş, Özlem

Projects in Programming and Data Sciences (TECH-UB 24)

This course is the follow-on course to Introduction to Programming and Data Science, which is offered in the Fall. It is recommended for undergraduate students who 1) are interested in jobs in the rapidly growing fields of data science and data analytics or 2) who are interested in acquiring the technical and data analysis skills that are becoming increasingly relevant in all disciplines. Intro to Programming and Data Science forms the basis for this course, but it is not a pre-requisite. Students with basic knowledge of programming in Python and SQL are welcome to join. This course covers select topics that build on the prior course work and is largely project based. Much of the course will be project-based work, with students working on projects that utilize the skills used in this and the prior Programming and Data Science course.

Computing and Data Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


TECH-UB 24-000 (19343)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


TECH-UB 24-000 (19344)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Social Media & Digital Marketing (TECH-UB 38)

This course examines the major trends in digital marketing using tools from business analytics and data science. While there will be sufficient attention given to top level strategy used by companies adopting digital marketing, the focus of the course is also on business analytics: how to make firms more intelligent in how they conduct business in the digital age. Measurement plays a big role in this space. The course is complemented by cutting-edge projects and various business consulting assignments that the Professor has been involved in with various companies over the last few years. Prof Ghose has consulted in various capacities for Apple, AMD, Berkeley Corporation, Bank of Khartoum, CBS, Dataxu, Facebook, Intel, NBC Universal, Samsung, Showtime, 3TI China, and collaborated with Alibaba, China Mobile, Google, IBM, Indiegogo, Microsoft, Recobell, Travelocity and many other leading Fortune 500 firms on realizing business value from IT investments, internet marketing, business analytics, mobile marketing, digital analytics and other topics.We will learn about statistical issues in data analyses such as selection problem, omitted variables problem, endogeneity, and simultaneity problems, autocorrelation, multi-collinearity, assessing the predictive power of a regression and interpreting various numbers from the output of a statistical package, various econometrics-based tools such as simple and multivariate regressions, linear and non-linear probability models (Logit and Probit), estimating discrete and continuous dependent variables, count data models (Poisson and Negative Binomial), cross-sectional models vs. panel data models (Fixed Effects and Random Effects), and various experimental techniques that help can tease out correlation from causality such as randomized field experiments.

Computing and Data Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


TECH-UB 38-000 (19338)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Introduction to Programming and Data Science (TECH-UB 23)

This course is recommended for undergraduate students without programming experience who are interested in building capabilities in the rapidly growing fields of data science and data analytics. This hands-on coding course does not have any prerequisites and is meant to help students acquire programming and data analysis skills that are becoming increasingly relevant for entrepreneurial, corporate, and research jobs. The course offers an introduction to programming (using Python) and databases (using SQL). We will cover topics related to collection, storage, organization, management, and analysis of data. There is a strong focus on live coding in the classroom, with discussion of examples.

Computing and Data Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


TECH-UB 23-000 (19340)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


TECH-UB 23-000 (19342)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


TECH-UB 23-000 (19345)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Info Tech in Bus & Society (TECH-UB 1)

Provides the background necessary to make decisions about computer-based information systems and to be an “end-user”. Two major parts of the course are hands-on experience with personal computers and information systems management. Group and individual computer assignments expose students to electronic spreadsheet analysis and database management on a personal computer. Management aspects focus on understanding computer technology, systems analysis and design, and control of information processing by managers.

Computing and Data Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


TECH-UB 1-000 (19329)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


TECH-UB 1-000 (19330)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


TECH-UB 1-000 (19331)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


TECH-UB 1-000 (19336)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


TECH-UB 1-000 (19337)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


TECH-UB 1-000 (19339)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Computer Science Senior Project (CSCI-SHU 420)

The purpose of the Senior Project is for the students to apply the theoretical knowledge they acquired during the Computer Science program to a concrete project in a realistic setting. During the semester, students engage in the entire process of solving a real-world computer science project. It requires students to pursue a long-term, mentored learning experience that culminates in a piece of original work. At the end of the semester, the proposed work comes to fruition in the form of a working software prototype, a written technical report, and an oral presentation at a capstone project symposium. Prerequisite: senior standing. Fulfillment: CS Required.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Introduction to Computer Programming (CSCI-SHU 11)

An introduction to the fundamentals of computer programming. Students design, write, and debug computer programs. No prior knowledge of programming is assumed. Students will learn programming using Python, a general purpose, cross-platform programming language with a clear, readable syntax. Most class periods will be part lecture, part lab as you explore ideas and put them into practice. This course is suitable for students not intending in majoring in computer science as well as for students intending to major in computer science but having no programming experience. Students with previous programming experience should instead take Introduction to Computer Science. Prerequisite: Either placed into Calculus or at least a C in Pre-Calculus Fulfillment: Core Curriculum Requirement Algorithmic Thinking; EE Required Major Courses. Note: Students who have taken ICS in NY, Abu Dhabi, and Shanghai cannot take ICP.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (17503)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (17504)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23632)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23633)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Liu, Yijian


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23634)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23767)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Liu, Yijian


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (26252)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
9:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Spathis, Promethee


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (26253)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
9:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Spathis, Promethee

Introduction to Computer and Data Science (CSCI-SHU 101)

This course has three goals. First, the mastering of a modern object-oriented programming language, enough to allow students to tackle real-world problems of important significance. Second, gaining an appreciation of computational thinking, a process that provides the foundations for solving real-world problems. Finally, providing an overview of the very diverse and exciting field of computer science – a field which, arguably more than any other, impacts how we work, live, and play today. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Programming or placement exam. Equivalency: This course counts for CSCI-UA 101. Fulfillment: Core Curriculum Requirement Algorithmic Thinking; Computer Science Major Required Courses; Computer Systems Engineering Major Required Courses; Data Science Major Foundational Courses; Electrical and Systems Engineering Major Required Major Courses.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CSCI-SHU 101-000 (17449)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Gu, Xianbin


CSCI-SHU 101-000 (17509)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yin, Wen


CSCI-SHU 101-000 (17572)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
8:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yin, Wen


CSCI-SHU 101-000 (17596)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Gu, Xianbin


CSCI-SHU 101-000 (17751)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yin, Wen

Discrete Mathematics (CS-UH 1002)

Discrete mathematics concerns the study of mathematical structures that are discrete rather than continuous, and provides a powerful language for investigating many areas of computer science. Discrete structures are characterized by distinct elements, which are often represented by integers. Continuous mathematics on the other hand deals with real numbers. Topics in this course include: sets, counting techniques, logic, proof techniques, solving recurrence relations, number theory, probability, statistics, graph theory, and discrete geometry. These mathematical tools are illustrated with applications in computer science.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 1002-000 (3526)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fernandes, Joao Paulo · Ahmad, Liza


CS-UH 1002-000 (3624)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Mumtaz, Sara


CS-UH 1002-000 (3917)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Ahmed, Dena


CS-UH 1002-000 (19983)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 1002-000 (19984)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 1002-000 (19985)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Connections Lab (IM-UH 2324)

From intelligent chat-bots and video-sharing apps to social media platforms and virtual reality hubs, our world is infused with mediated, networked systems for communication. While these tools were a luxury a couple years ago, today they are almost a necessity. Every day we are knowingly or unknowingly using a handful of connected applications to communicate with people across the world. With this course we want students to be more than participants in these tools, but also become active creators. In this course, students will design and develop their own creative connected web applications. By coding (using JavaScript) and producing original online experiences that bring people together in playful yet purposeful ways, students will gain valuable insight into the inner-workings and implications of our connected world. The course will culminate in students creating their own connected applications that can be used by peers.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Advanced Lab: Open Project (INTM-SHU 301)

This course offers students the opportunity to develop a self-initiated project with close mentorship from a faculty member. Projects undertaken can span the areas of conceptual research, business development, creative practice, and media production. The course includes structured weekly workshop and critique times with peers and special guests. It is expected that students will be invested in the work of their peers by providing feedback and carefully consider the feedback they receive during critiques. In addition to weekly meeting times, students are expected to also participate in regular one-on-one meetings with faculty, peers, and guests. A formal project proposal, weekly assignments and documentation, a final project presentation, and participation in the IMA End of Semester show are all required. Although students are encouraged to continue work they may have initiated in a prior class, they may not combine or in any way double count work from this class in another class taken in the same semester. Group work is allowed assuming all group members are enrolled in this class. Students may take this course in either the first or second 7 weeks for 2 credits or repeated across 14 weeks for 4 credits. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Fulfilment: IMA/IMB elective; IMA advanced elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


INTM-SHU 301-000 (19667)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 301-000 (25298)
03/28/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Parren, Eric

Couture/Culture: Fashion and Globalization (SCA-UA 253)

This course examines fashion as both a product and expression of globalization. It explores fashion’s contested histories; its modes of production, consumption, and address; its relationship to colonial enterprises; its system of meaning-making. In this course, we will tackle such issues as the social uses of fashion; the fashion cycle (use, reuse, discard); the relationship between dress and the body; feminist critiques of fashion; the politicization of clothing (from ethnic dressing to green clothing); and the links between style consumption and garment production–and the relationship of all of these to the processes of globalization.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Latinx Art & Visual Culture (SCA-UA 533)

This course examines the history of Latinx contributions to the artistic vitality of the United States and will introduce students to some of the contemporary artists, debates and institutions that support Latinx art in NYC and beyond. We will pay especial attention to the relationship between Latinx and Latin American art and consider linkages between museums, private and governmental art stakeholders and communities. We will visit studios, speak to artists and also learn about the role of contemporary art markets in shaping Latinx art worlds.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Urban Environmentalism (SCA-UA 631)

Explores environmental issues in urban centers, their causes and impacts, and the rise of a movement that considers the “environment” not just as the term we use to describe the natural world from which most urban residents feel dissociated, but rather as the array of places where we live, work and play. Considers the relationship between society and public policy in the context of environmentalism. Introduces students to public policy analysis, with a focus on policy implementation and decision-making in New York City. Examines the powers of the NYC Council and explains the role of agencies, the private sector, and interest groups as critical parts of a bureaucracy through which environmental issues are shaped, managed and negotiated. Through a variety of case studies, increases students’ understanding of the political, legal, economic and technical and scientific constraints of the policy decision-making process and explores the path towards managing, using and protecting environmental resources in urban centers.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Amer Dilemmas: Race, Ineq, Unful Prm Pub Educ (SCA-UA 755)

Historically, education has been the most accessible and effective means for groups to achieve social mobility in American society. However, access to public education has never been equal for all segments of society, and there continues to be considerable variability in the quality of education provided to students. As a result of both explicit and subtle discrimination, racialized minority groups have at various times been denied access to education or been relegated to inferior schools or classrooms. Yet education has also been the arena where the greatest advances in social justice and racial equality have been achieved. Understanding the contradictions created by the hope and unfulfilled promise of American education is a central theme of this course.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


SCA-UA 755-000 (24950)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Andrea Martínez, Pamela


SCA-UA 755-000 (25163)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Andrea Martínez, Pamela

Social and Cultural Analysis 101 (SCA-UA 101)

Introduces theories, methods, and political trajectories central to the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis (SCA). SCA 101 addresses how individuals and populations structure their worlds and navigate the resulting social, cultural, and political terrain. It privileges scholarly work with an intersectional approach, drawing on theoretical insights from such fields as social geography, feminism and queer studies, ethnic studies, urban and metropolitan studies, critical race theory, labor studies, and cultural studies.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


SCA-UA 101-000 (9221)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patros, Tyson


SCA-UA 101-000 (9222)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grimaldi, Nicole


SCA-UA 101-000 (9223)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grimaldi, Nicole


SCA-UA 101-000 (9224)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ghabin, Tamar


SCA-UA 101-000 (9225)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ghabin, Tamar

New York City in Film (SCA-UA 623)

What are the diverse ways in which New York City has been imagined on the silver screen? How does a cinematic perspective shape our understanding of urban spaces? This course analyzes films that portray New York as a site of local encounter and global exchange in both commercial and documentary films since the 1960s. We will investigate the dramatic mapping and remapping of urban space through works that articulate questions of gentrification, immigrant labor, organized crime, and sexual subcultures. In turn, we will examine how these stories have helped shape and contest the city’s image of itself–as a space of struggle, belonging, illegality, emancipation, and transformation. The goal is to see how each particular film captures a distinct moment both in the city’s history over the past fifty years as well as in the history of filmmaking. In so doing, we will blend the perspectives of urban studies, ethnic studies, and visual culture, placing films within their aesthetic, political, and historical context.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Elementary Czech I (RUSSN-UA 9201)

Students work on pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary enrichment. Emphasis is placed on developing and enhancing listening, comprehension and oral skills. Additional hours are offered to improve pronunciation. Written and oral examinations required.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RUSSN-UA 9201-000 (18092)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by

Intermediate Russian I (RUSSN-UA 9003)

The course combines the traditional grammatical approach with a communicational, interactive method. Since the size of the classes is usually small we can put a great emphasis on oral drills and improving speaking in Russian on various subjects. Students will be given short topics to talk about at the beginning of every lesson and most written essays will have to be presented orally in class. The class also focuses on improving your writing skills and broadening your vocabulary. That is why the students are expected to keep a diary in Russian and write several compositions during the course. The students will also read several Russian short stories which will be discussed in class. We will review familiar grammar and study some advanced grammatical structures. The students will do considerable amount of grammar and vocabulary exercises in the Workbook as part of the home assignments. Several short lectures on various aspects of Russian culture and history will be given during the course and we will watch two Russian films that would be followed by the discussions.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RUSSN-UA 9003-000 (18088)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by

Elementary Russian I (RUSSN-UA 9001)

The course combines the traditional grammatical approach with a communicational, interactive method. Since the size of the classes is usually small we can put a great emphasis on oral drills and getting the pronunciation right from the beginning. This course is tailored for students who have never taken Russian but some linguistic awareness about Slavic languages is welcome. Students will be introduced to the grammatical complexity of the Russian language and will have the opportunity to master enough Russian to cope with everyday situations in Russian. The students will do considerable amount of grammar and vocabulary exercises in the Workbook as part of the home assignments.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RUSSN-UA 9001-000 (18086)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by

Elementary Russian II (RUSSN-UA 2)

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


RUSSN-UA 2-000 (8535)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Korsounskaia, Ekaterina


RUSSN-UA 2-000 (8536)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Korsounskaia, Ekaterina


RUSSN-UA 2-000 (9240)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Danilin, Michael


RUSSN-UA 2-000 (20392)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Efremova, Tatiana

Lab in Developmental Psychology (PSYCH-UA 40)

In depth investigation of the methodological foundations of developmental psychology, in particular, behavioral methods with infants and children. Students will learn how to design experiments, create experimental stimuli, collect quantifiable measures from infant and child behavior, and analyze developmental data. Each week students will read ~3 primary research articles from a variety of domains in developmental psychology, but all focused on one methodological theme. Students will produce a thoroughly researched and creative proposed experiment and analysis plan for the course’s final project.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Lab in Infancy Research (PSYCH-UA 42)

Part of a yearlong research training program. Students learn general methods for studying infant development and specific methods for examining infants’ perceptual-motor development. Students design and conduct laboratory research projects, code and analyze data, and prepare results for presentation and publication (grant proposals, conference submissions, and journal submissions).

Psychology (Undergraduate)
1-4 credits – 15 Weeks

Advanced Psychological Statistics (PSYCH-UA 11)

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9029)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hilford, Andrew


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9030)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sun, Siqi


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9031)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sun, Siqi


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9134)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Judy


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9135)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Judy


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9363)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Qingqing


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9364)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Qingqing

Social Psychology (PSYCH-UA 32)

Gollwitzer, Trope, Uleman. Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduction to theories and research about the social behavior of individuals, such as perception of others and the self, attraction, affiliation, altruism and helping, aggression, moral thought and action, attitudes, influence, conformity, social exchange and bargaining, group decision making, leadership and power, and environmental psychology.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8510)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gollwitzer, Peter


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8511)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Adjei Boateng, Fiona


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8512)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwak, Jasmine


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8513)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tao, Bradley


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8514)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tao, Bradley


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8515)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwak, Jasmine


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8516)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liaquat, Usman


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (25991)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Adjei Boateng, Fiona


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (25995)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liaquat, Usman

Personality (PSYCH-UA 30)

AndersenAndersen. Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduction to research in personality, including such topics as the self-concept; unconscious processes; how we relate to others; and stress, anxiety, and depression.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9269)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Andersen, Susan


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9270)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ganapathy, Rheanna


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9271)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qin, Joyce


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9272)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qin, Joyce


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9273)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ganapathy, Rheanna

Cognitive Neuroscience (PSYCH-UA 25)

Curtis, Davachi. Offered every semester. 4 points. Provides students with a broad understanding of the foundations of cognitive neuroscience, including dominant theories of the neural underpinnings of a variety of cognitive processes and the research that has led to those theories. In doing so, students also learn about the goals of cognitive neuroscience research and the methods that are being employed to reach these goals.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8500)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Curtis, Clayton


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8501)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Babu, Deepika


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8502)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Babu, Deepika


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8503)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yan, Dongni


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8504)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yan, Dongni

Cognition (PSYCH-UA 29)

McElree, Murphy, Rehder. Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduction to theories and research in some major areas of cognitive psychology, including human memory, attention, language production and comprehension, thinking, and reasoning.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8505)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ausch, Robert


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8506)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Muhareb, Samer


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8507)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Muhareb, Samer


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8508)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vaghani, Jhanvi Bharatbhai


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8509)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Muhareb, Samer


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (26096)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vaghani, Jhanvi Bharatbhai


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (26111)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vaghani, Jhanvi Bharatbhai

Intermed Portuguese II (PORT-UA 4)

Portuguese language courses PORT-UA 10, PORT-UA 3, and PORT-UA 4 are oriented toward achieving oral proficiency and are taught in the native language. The elementary-level course stresses the structures and patterns that permit meaningful communication and encourages spontaneous and practical proficiency outside the classroom. The intermediate-level courses aim to promote fluency in speaking, as well as proficiency in reading and writing. They include readings and discussions on contemporary Portuguese and Brazilian texts.

Portuguese (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PORT-UA 4-000 (9058)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kettner, Michele

Introduction to Research Methods for Politics (POL-UA 850)

New research is the most exciting and important aspect of political science: we are able to pose novel questions, construct fresh theories, and provide new evidence about the way the world works. But before we start doing research, we have to learn how it is done. With this in mind, this class will introduce students to quantitative techniques used for research in the study of politics. Part of this task is conceptual: helping students to think sensibly and systematically about research design. To this end, students will learn how data and theory fit together, and how to measure the quantities we care about. But part of the task is practical too: students will learn a `toolbox’ of methods–including statistical software–that enable them to execute their plans.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 850-000 (9156)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harvey, Anna


POL-UA 850-000 (9238)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by López Peceño, Alejandro


POL-UA 850-000 (9157)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by López Peceño, Alejandro


POL-UA 850-000 (9158)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pulejo, Massimo


POL-UA 850-000 (9159)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pulejo, Massimo


POL-UA 850-000 (9734)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Demin, Sasha


POL-UA 850-000 (25687)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Melnick, Justin

Private Influence in Public Policy (POL-UA 9341)

Topics: analysis of mechanisms of influence (selection of sympathetic incumbents, the provision of incentives for public officials, and the provision of information); objects of influence (voter choices, legislative behavior, bureaucratic decisions); collective action; and organizational maintenance.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


POL-UA 9341-000 (4273)
at NYU Washington DC (Global)
Instructed by

Western European Politics (POL-UA 9510)

Study of the politics of Britain, Ireland, France, and Germany. Compares the historical origins of these systems and analyzes their institutions as manifestations of their social and political culture and traditions. Treats each country’s current politics and political trends. Attempts to introduce the basic concepts of comparative political analysis in developing cross-cultural theory.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


POL-UA 9510-000 (3989)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Harmon, Josephine

Politics of Near & Middle East (POL-UA 9540)

The course description for this Topics in Politics course varies depending on the topic taught. Please view the course descriptions in the course notes section below.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


POL-UA 9540-000 (3992)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Tue,Thu
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Segal, Hagai


POL-UA 9540-000 (20920)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Segal, Hagai

Doing Political Economy: Apprs to Public Policy (POL-UA 842)

Political economy is a field of inquiry that has made great strides in recent years in explaining political and economic behavior by characterizing the incentives of actors and the context in which these actors make decisions and influence outcomes. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to these theoretical approaches and show how they can be used to address contemporary policy questions.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 842-000 (8877)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lee, Sukwon

Social Choice & Politics (POL-UA 845)

Introduces students to social choice theory applied to political science. It focuses on (1) individual choice, (2) group choice, (3) collective action, and (4) institutions. It looks at models of individuals’ voting behavior, the incentive structures of interest groups, and the role of institutions. The emphasis is analytical, though students are not expected to have a background in formal mathematics.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 845-000 (20351)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lee, Sukwon

International Relations of Asia (POL-UA 770)

Identical to V33.0770. Prerequisite: V53.0700. Offered every other year. 4 points. The relations of and between the principal Asian national actors (e.g., China, Japan, India) and the relationship of the Asian “subsystem” to the international system. Covers the traditional Asian concepts of transnational order, the impact of external interventions, the modern ideological conflict and technological revolution, the emergent multilateral balance beyond Vietnam, the changing patterns of relations in the Asian subsystem traced to the international evolution from bipolarity to multicentrism, and the U.S. role in Asia.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 770-000 (10196)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hsiung, James

Int’L Political Economy (POL-UA 775)

This course serves as an introduction to the workings of the contemporary international political-economic system and introduces students to some of the main analytical frameworks that political economists use to understand this system. Finally, the course familiarizes students with analytical tools that serve to gain a better understanding of the current problems and opportunities facing actors in today?s international political economy.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

International Politics (POL-UA 700)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Analysis of state behavior and international political relations; how things happen in the international state system and why. Emphasizes the issue of war and how and in what circumstances states engage in violence. Topics include different historical and possible future systems of international relations, imperialism, the Cold War, game theory and deterrents, national interests, and world organization.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 700-000 (8260)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bueno De Mesquita, Bruce


POL-UA 700-000 (8261)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Becker, Michael


POL-UA 700-000 (8262)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Becker, Michael


POL-UA 700-000 (8263)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yildirim, Mikdat


POL-UA 700-000 (8264)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yildirim, Mikdat


POL-UA 700-000 (8265)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schwarz, Christopher


POL-UA 700-000 (8266)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schwarz, Christopher


POL-UA 700-000 (8267)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ge, Zoe


POL-UA 700-000 (9112)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ge, Zoe


POL-UA 700-000 (10194)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by MEDA, Francis William


POL-UA 700-000 (10195)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by MEDA, Francis William

American Constitution (POL-UA 330)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Interpretation of the U.S. Constitution through the reading of Supreme Court opinions. Distribution of constitutional power among Congress, the president, and the federal courts; between the national government and the states; and among the states. Constitutional law and American political and economic development. Cases are read and discussed closely for their legal and philosophical content.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Urban Gov’T & Politics (POL-UA 360)

This course will introduce you to the study of local and urban politics in the U.S. Municipal governments profoundly impact the day-to-day of citizens. Cities have substantial power over policy areas from education and public safety to transportation, and they also address basic needs: making sure the trash gets taken out, the water runs, and that people are safe from crime. And yet, cities are often quite constrained in their policy choices. For example, one of the central challenges facing municipal government is how to attract and maintain a middle class tax base while providing essential services for low-income residents. This course will explore patterns of city politics against the background of American social and cultural history, including the impulse toward reform and the effects of reform efforts on the distribution of power in the community. Additional topics will include issues related to voting, race and ethnicity, gentrification, and the relationship between cities and the federal government.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Comparative Politics (POL-UA 500)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Major concepts, approaches, problems, and literature in the field of comparative politics. Methodology of comparative politics, the classical theories, and the more recent behavioral revolution. Reviews personality, social structure, socialization, political culture, and political parties. Major approaches such as group theory, structural-functionalism, systems analysis, and communications theory and evaluation of the relevance of political ideology; national character; elite and class analysis; and problems of conflict, violence, and internal war.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 500-000 (8257)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Slough, Tara


POL-UA 500-000 (8258)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Mark


POL-UA 500-000 (8259)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Mark


POL-UA 500-000 (10534)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Niu, He


POL-UA 500-000 (9210)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Niu, He


POL-UA 500-000 (9360)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by He, Ning


POL-UA 500-000 (9361)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by He, Ning


POL-UA 500-000 (25686)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cheng, Mengfan

Power & Politics in America (POL-UA 300)

A survey of national political institutions and behavior in the United States, which introduces students to a variety of analytical concepts and approaches useful for the study of domestic politics. Concepts typically covered include public goods and collective action; preference aggregation and the median voter theorem; delegation, representation, and accountability; agenda control; inter-branch bargaining; and the mechanisms of private influence on public policy.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 300-000 (8252)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dawes, Christopher Todd


POL-UA 300-000 (8253)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wirsching, Elisa


POL-UA 300-000 (8254)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, Lexi


POL-UA 300-000 (8255)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, Lexi


POL-UA 300-000 (8256)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wirsching, Elisa


POL-UA 300-000 (8796)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heo, Kun


POL-UA 300-000 (8797)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heo, Kun


POL-UA 300-000 (10192)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McGrath, David

Political Theory (POL-UA 100)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduces students to some outstanding theories of politics. The theories treated offer alternative conceptions of political life, and they are examined from both theoretical and historical perspectives. Among the theorists included are Plato, Aristotle, Locke, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Rousseau, Mill, and Marx.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 100-000 (9202)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pevnick, Ryan


POL-UA 100-000 (9203)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bose, Amartya


POL-UA 100-000 (9204)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bose, Amartya


POL-UA 100-000 (9205)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yi, Sophie


POL-UA 100-000 (9206)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yi, Sophie

Physics II (PHYS-UA 93)

Continuation of PHYS-UA 91. Topics include electrostatics; dielectrics; currents and circuits; the magnetic field and magnetic materials; induction; AC circuits; Maxwell’s equations.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8451)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hogg, David


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8452)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lant, Caspar


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8453)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lant, Caspar


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8454)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Dynamics (PHYS-UA 120)

Topics include conservation laws, central force motion, Lagrange’s and Hamilton’s equations, non-inertial frames, inertia tensor, rigid body dynamics, coupled oscillators and particles, eigenvalues, eigenvectors and normal modes.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHYS-UA 120-000 (9318)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moscatelli, Frank


PHYS-UA 120-000 (9319)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Loizeau, Nicolas


PHYS-UA 120-000 (9503)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Loizeau, Nicolas

General Physics I (PHYS-UA 11)

With PHYS-UA 12, forms a two-semester sequence that must be taken in order. Lecture and laboratory-recitation. Not open to students who have completed PHYS-UA 91 with a grade of C- or better. Offered in the fall. 5 points. Begins a two-semester introduction to physics intended primarily for preprofessional students and for those majoring in a science other than physics, although well-prepared students may wish to take the physics majors sequence PHYS-UA 91, PHYS-UA 93, PHYS-UA 94, PHYS-UA 95, and PHYS-UA 96 instead. Topics include kinematics and dynamics of particles; momentum, work, and energy; gravitation; circular, angular, and harmonic motion; mechanical and thermal properties of solids, liquids, and gases; heat and thermodynamics.

Physics (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

General Physics II (PHYS-UA 12)

Continuation of PHYS-UA 11. Topics include electric charge, field, and potential; magnetic forces and fields; resistive, capacitive, and inductive circuits; electromagnetic induction; wave motion; electromagnetic waves; geometrical optics; interference, diffraction, and polarization of light; relativity; atomic and nuclear structure; elementary particle physics.

Physics (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10171)


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10172)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Somawanshi, Prajwal Prakshep


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10173)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (23490)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10175)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (23495)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10177)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10178)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10179)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10180)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10181)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10182)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10183)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Engstler, Justin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10184)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by La Madrid, Joan


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10185)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by La Madrid, Joan


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10186)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10187)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10188)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10642)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (25702)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Somawanshi, Prajwal Prakshep

Philosophy of Language (PHIL-UA 9085)

Examines various philosophical and psychological approaches to language and meaning, as well as their consequences for traditional philosophical problems in metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics. Discusses primarily 20th-century authors, including Russell, Wittgenstein, and Quine.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PHIL-UA 9085-000 (3665)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Global Ethics (PHIL-UA 6)

This course aims to accomplish two things. The first is to introduce three broad traditions of normative thinking about social issues from around the globe: a Confucian tradition, one based in Islamic legal traditions, and one derived from European liberalism. The second is to address three current areas of normative debate: about global economic inequality, about gender justice and human rights. We shall explore these first-order questions against the background of the three broad traditions. Our aim will be to understand some of differences of approach that shape the global conversation about these issues that concern people around the world.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20339)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Appiah, Kwame Anthony


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20340)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wu, Patrick


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20341)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wu, Patrick


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20342)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zacek, Justin


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20343)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zacek, Justin

Epistemology (PHIL-UA 76)

Considers questions such as the following: Can I have knowledge of anything outside my own mind?for example, physical objects or other minds? Or is the skeptic’s attack on my commonplace claims to know unanswerable? What is knowledge, and how does it differ from belief?

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHIL-UA 76-000 (20336)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Xueyin


PHIL-UA 76-000 (20337)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ballarini, Cristina


PHIL-UA 76-000 (20338)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ballarini, Cristina

Medical Ethics (PHIL-UA 50)

Examines moral issuExamines moral issues in medical practice and research. Topics include euthanasia and quality of life; deception, hope, and paternalism; malpractice and unpredictability; patient rights, virtues, and vices; animal, fetal, and clinical research; criteria for rationing medical care; ethical principles, professional codes, and case analysis (for example, Quinlan, Willowbrook, Baby Jane Doe).

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHIL-UA 50-000 (9403)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beardman, Stephanie


PHIL-UA 50-000 (23793)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wills, David Clinton

Modal Logic (PHIL-UA 74)

Modal logic is the logic of necessity and possibility and other such notions. In recent times, the framework of possible worlds has provided a valuable tool for investigating the formal properties of these notions. This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts, methods, and results of modal logic, with an emphasis on its application to such other fields as philosophy, linguistics, and computer science.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Music Theory II (MUSIC-UA 202)

Music Major Distribution Requirement. Chromatic harmony as developed and practiced by composers of the 19th century and beyond. Introduction to score reading and principles of musical analysis applied to larger musical structures. Continuation of species counterpoint and an introduction to invertible counterpoint and fugue.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MUSIC-UA 202-000 (9126)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beeferman, Gordon


MUSIC-UA 202-000 (9127)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zamcheck, Akiva


MUSIC-UA 202-000 (9128)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zamcheck, Akiva

Elements of Music (MUSIC-UA 20)

Explores the underlying principles and inner workings of the tonal system, a system that has guided all of Western music from the years 1600 to 1900. It includes a discussion of historical background and evolution. Focuses on concepts and notation of key, scale, tonality, and rhythm. Related skills in sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard harmony are stressed in the recitation sections.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MUSIC-UA 20-000 (8415)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ha, Moon Young


MUSIC-UA 20-000 (8416)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rose, Michael


MUSIC-UA 20-000 (8417)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rose, Michael

Music Theory I (MUSIC-UA 201)

Students study principles of tonal music composition including 18th and 19th century harmonic, formal, and contrapuntal practices. Exercises in four-part voice-leading and species counterpoint are supplemented by analyses of music from around the world and from a variety of genres, including concert and popular music. Weekly lab sections are devoted to skills in musicianship and are required throughout the sequence.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MUSIC-UA 201-000 (9130)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hoffman, Elizabeth


MUSIC-UA 201-000 (9132)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vlasis, Konstantine


MUSIC-UA 201-000 (9133)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vlasis, Konstantine

The Art of Listening: (MUSIC-UA 3)

Students acquire a basic vocabulary of musical terms, concepts, and listening skills in order to describe their responses to musical experiences. Considers the structure and style of influential works in the Western art music repertoire, popular music, or other musical cultures, with attention to the wider social, political, and artistic context. Course does not count towards the Music major. Can be counted toward the minor as an elective.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

South Asian Literature (MEIS-UA 717)

Addresses the rich literary product of modern and contemporary South Asia. Offers more advanced undergraduates a window on a rich and culturally varied area of the world, as well as an understanding of aspects of South Asian history and society as represented in translations of modern prose writing (short stories and novels) originally written in South Asian languages.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MEIS-UA 717-000 (9065)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ilieva, Gabriela Nik

Elementary Arabic II (MEIS-UA 102)

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MEIS-UA 102-000 (8421)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badawi, Ghada


MEIS-UA 102-000 (8422)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badawi, Ghada


MEIS-UA 102-000 (8423)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Amani

Elementary Arabic I (MEIS-UA 101)

Builds basic skills in modern standard Arabic, the language read and understood by educated Arabs from Baghdad to Casablanca. Five hours per week of instruction and drills, stressing the proficiency approach, plus work in the language laboratory.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 101-000 (8158)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badawi, Ghada


MEIS-UA 101-000 (8159)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badawi, Ghada


MEIS-UA 101-000 (8160)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Amani


MEIS-UA 101-000 (25871)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Suliman, Anas

Partial Differential Equations (MATH-UA 9263)

Many laws of physics are formulated as partial differential equations. This course discusses the simplest examples of such laws as embodied in the wave equation, the diffusion equation, and Laplace?s equation. Nonlinear conservation laws and the theory of shock waves. Applications to physics, chemistry, biology, and population dynamics. Prerequisite: prerequisite for MATH-UA 263

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MATH-UA 9263-000 (10132)
01/26/2023 – 05/05/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by Lebovits, Joachim


MATH-UA 9263-000 (10310)
01/26/2023 – 05/05/2023 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by Lebovits, Joachim

Honors Linear Algebra (MATH-UA 148)

This honors section of Linear Algebra is a proof-based course intended for well-prepared students who have already developed some mathematical maturity and ease with abstraction. Its scope will include the usual Linear Algebra (MATH-UA 140) syllabus; however this class will be faster, more abstract and proof-based, covering additional topics. Topics covered are: Vector spaces, linear dependence, basis and dimension, matrices, determinants, solving linear equations, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization, inner products, applications.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 148-000 (9196)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cao, Norman


MATH-UA 148-000 (10147)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rilloraza, Paco

Honors Calculus III (MATH-UA 129)

The scope of this honors class will include the usual MATH-UA 123 syllabus; however this class will move faster, covering additional topics and going deeper. Functions of several variables. Vectors in the plane and space. Partial derivatives with applications, especially Lagrange multipliers. Double and triple integrals. Spherical and cylindrical coordinates. Surface and line integrals. Divergence, gradient, and curl. Theorem of Gauss and Stokes.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 129-000 (9309)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Serfaty, Sylvia

Honors Analysis II (MATH-UA 329)

Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in Honors Analysis I (MATH-UA 328), or a grade of A in Analysis (MATH-UA 325) and permission of instructor. Continuation of Honors Analysis I (MATH-UA 328). Topics include: metric spaces, differentiation of functions of several real variables, the implicit and inverse function theorems, Riemann integral on R^n, Lebesgue measure on R^n, the Lebesgue integral.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 329-000 (8889)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gunturk, C Sinan


MATH-UA 329-000 (8890)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mui, Stephanie

Honors Algebra II (MATH-UA 349)

Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in Honors Algebra I (MATH-UA 348), or a grade of A in Algebra (MATH-UA 343) and permission of instructor. Principal ideal domains, polynomial rings in several variables, unique factorization domains. Fields, finite extensions, constructions with ruler and compass, Galois theory, solvability by radicals.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 349-000 (8887)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goodman, Jonathan


MATH-UA 349-000 (8888)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Charyyev, Jumageldi

Introduction to Fluid Dynamics (MATH-UA 230)

Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in Calculus III (MATH-UA 123) or Math for Economics III (MATH-UA 213) (for economics majors). Recommended: Mathematical Physics (PHYS-UA 106). Fluid dynamics is the branch of physics that can describe the flow of blood in the human body, the flight of an insect, or the motions of weather systems. Key concepts include: the formalism of continuum mechanics; the conservation of mass, energy, and momentum in a fluid; the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations; and viscosity and vorticity. These concepts are applied to such classic problems in fluid dynamics as potential flow around a cylinder, the propagation of sound and gravity waves, and the onset of instability in shear flow.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 230-000 (8755)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sreenivasan, Katepalli Raju


MATH-UA 230-000 (8802)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 230-000 (25084)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dsa, Remston

Honors Analysis I (MATH-UA 328)

This is an introduction to the rigorous treatment of the foundations of real analysis in one variable. It is based entirely on proofs. Students are expected to know what a mathematical proof is and are also expected to be able to read a proof before taking this class. Topics include: properties of the real number system, sequences, continuous functions, topology of the real line, compactness, derivatives, the Riemann integral, sequences of functions, uniform convergence, infinite series and Fourier series. Additional topics may include: Lebesgue measure and integral on the real line, metric spaces, and analysis on metric spaces.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Mathematics for Economics III (MATH-UA 213)

Further topics in vector calculus. Vector spaces, matrix analysis. Linear and nonlinear programming with applications to game theory. This course will provide economics students who have taken MATH-UA 211 Mathematics for Economics I and MATH-UA 212 Mathematics for Economics II with the tools to take higher-level mathematics courses.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 213-000 (8764)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Majmudar, Trushant S.


MATH-UA 213-000 (8765)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kreiner, Aaron


MATH-UA 213-000 (8766)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kreiner, Aaron


MATH-UA 213-000 (10146)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 213-000 (25303)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Normand, Raoul


MATH-UA 213-000 (25304)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chen, Zhe


MATH-UA 213-000 (25305)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chen, Zhe

Introduction to Computer Simulation (MATH-UA 144)

Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in Calculus I (MATH-UA 121) or Math for Economics II (MATH-UA 212) (for economics majors), and General Physics (PHYS-UA 11). Simulations of such phenomena as orbits (Kepler problem and N-body problem), epidemic and endemic disease (including evolution in response to the selective pressure of malaria), musical stringed instruments (piano, guitar, and violin), and traffic flow in a city (with lights, breakdowns, and gridlock). Simulations are based on mathematical models, numerical methods, and Matlab programming techniques taught in class. Emphasizes use of animation (and sound where appropriate) to present the results of simulations.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 144-000 (8767)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sprinkle, Brennan


MATH-UA 144-000 (8771)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Guanchun

Algebra (MATH-UA 343)

Introduction to abstract algebraic structures, including groups, rings, and fields. Sets and relations. Congruences and unique factorization of integers. Groups, permutation groups, homomorphisms and quotient groups. Rings and quotient rings, Euclidean rings, polynomial rings. Fields, finite extensions.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 343-000 (8402)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pigati, Alessandro


MATH-UA 343-000 (8403)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cortes, Julian


MATH-UA 343-000 (8756)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chiarelli, John


MATH-UA 343-000 (8757)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cortes, Julian

Differential Geometry (MATH-UA 377)

The differential properties of curves and surfaces. Introduction to manifolds and Riemannian geometry.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 377-000 (9183)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Deane


MATH-UA 377-000 (9184)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Han, Hancya

Functions of a Complex Variable (MATH-UA 282)

Complex numbers and complex functions. Differentiation and the Cauchy-Riemann equations. Cauchy?s theorem and the Cauchy integral formula. Singularities, residues, Taylor and Laurent series. Fractional linear transformations and conformal mapping. Analytic continuation.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 282-000 (8398)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Becker, Simon


MATH-UA 282-000 (8399)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Thoma, Eric


MATH-UA 282-000 (10621)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Thoma, Eric

Analysis (MATH-UA 325)

This course is an introduction to rigorous analysis on the real line. Topics include: the real number system, sequences and series of numbers, functions of a real variable (continuity and differentiability), the Riemann integral, basic topological notions in a metric space, sequences and series of functions including Taylor and Fourier series.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 325-000 (8400)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by De Philippis, Guido


MATH-UA 325-000 (8401)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Peilen, Luke


MATH-UA 325-000 (10138)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Peilen, Luke


MATH-UA 325-000 (10139)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Weilin


MATH-UA 325-000 (10140)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beekie, Raj


MATH-UA 325-000 (10141)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beekie, Raj


MATH-UA 325-000 (10135)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cao, Yu


MATH-UA 325-000 (10136)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hess-Childs, Elias


MATH-UA 325-000 (10137)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hess-Childs, Elias


MATH-UA 325-000 (10627)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Weilin


MATH-UA 325-000 (10628)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Semenov, Vadim


MATH-UA 325-000 (10629)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Semenov, Vadim

Computers in Medicine & Biology (MATH-UA 256)

Introduces the student of biology or mathematics to the use of computers as tools for modeling physiological phenomena. The student constructs two computer models selected from the following list: circulation, gas exchange in the lung, control of cell volume, and the renal countercurrent mechanism. The student then uses the model to conduct simulated physiological experiments.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 256-000 (20798)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Peskin, Charles


MATH-UA 256-000 (20799)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Maxian, Ondrej

Chaos & Dynamical Systems (MATH-UA 264)

Topics include fixed points of one-dimensional maps; linear operators and linear approximations; stability and bifurcation; logistic maps. Cantor set, fractal sets, symbolic dynamics, conjugacy of maps. Dynamics in two dimensions. Introduction for students with little preparation to the recent discovery that, in certain regimes, fully deterministic mechanics can produce chaotic behavior.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 264-000 (8396)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ampatzoglou, Ioakeim


MATH-UA 264-000 (8397)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Guanchun

Numerical Analysis (MATH-UA 252)

In numerical analysis one explores how mathematical problems can be analyzed and solved with a computer. As such, numerical analysis has very broad applications in mathematics, physics, engineering, finance, and the life sciences. This course introduces the subject for mathematics majors. Theory and practical examples using Matlab are combined in the studying of topics ranging from simple root-finding procedures to differential equations and the finite element method.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 252-000 (8390)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 252-000 (8391)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 252-000 (9168)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stadler, Georg


MATH-UA 252-000 (9169)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Toler, Evan


MATH-UA 252-000 (9405)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Potter, Samuel


MATH-UA 252-000 (9406)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Martinez Aguilar, Mariana

Combinatorics (MATH-UA 240)

Techniques for counting and enumeration, including generating functions, the principle of inclusion and exclusion, and Polya counting. Graph theory. Modern algorithms and data structures for graph theoretic problems.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 240-000 (8386)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bogomolov, Fedor


MATH-UA 240-000 (8387)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kazi, Sujay

Theory of Numbers (MATH-UA 248)

Divisibility and prime numbers. Linear and quadratic congruences. The classical number-theoretic functions. Continued fractions. Diophantine equations.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 248-000 (10470)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Staccone, Matteo


MATH-UA 248-000 (10471)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Feuer, Benjamin

Probability & Statistics (MATH-UA 235)

Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in Calculus II (MATH-UA 122) or Math for Economics II (MATH-UA 212) (for economics majors) or equivalent. Not open to students who have taken Theory of Probability (MATH-UA 233) or Mathematical Statistics (MATH-UA 234). Combination of MATH-UA 233 and 234 at a more elementary level to acquaint students with both probability and statistics in a single term. In probability: mathematical treatment of chance; combinatorics; binomial, Poisson, and Gaussian distributions; law of large numbers and the normal distribution; application to coin-tossing; radioactive decay. In statistics: sampling; normal and other useful distributions; testing of hypotheses; confidence intervals; correlation and regression; applications to scientific, industrial, and financial data.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 235-000 (8384)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cerfon, Antoine


MATH-UA 235-000 (8385)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vasantha, Rajashekar


MATH-UA 235-000 (10585)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vasantha, Rajashekar


MATH-UA 235-000 (20795)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Falconet, Hugo


MATH-UA 235-000 (20796)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Sixian


MATH-UA 235-000 (20797)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Sixian


MATH-UA 235-000 (26181)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Doshi, Jash Tejaskumar

Theory of Probability (MATH-UA 233)

Introduction to the mathematical techniques of random phenomena occurring in the natural, physical, and social sciences. Axioms of mathematical probability, combinatorial analysis, binomial distribution, Poisson and normal approximation, random variables and probability distributions, generating functions, Markov chains, applications.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 233-000 (8695)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tanzi, Matteo


MATH-UA 233-000 (8696)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Linfeng


MATH-UA 233-000 (8885)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leibovich, Matan


MATH-UA 233-000 (9078)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Liudeng


MATH-UA 233-000 (10636)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dunlap, Alexander


MATH-UA 233-000 (10638)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Liudeng


MATH-UA 233-000 (19808)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Stepp, Elizabeth


MATH-UA 233-000 (19809)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Zhang, Linfeng


MATH-UA 233-000 (26180)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Doshi, Jash Tejaskumar

Mathematical Statistics (MATH-UA 234)

Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in Theory of Probability (MATH-UA 233) or equivalent. Not open to students who have taken Probability and Statistics (MATH-UA 235). Introduction to the mathematical foundations and techniques of modern statistical analysis used in the interpretation of data in quantitative sciences. Mathematical theory of sampling; normal populations and distributions; chi-square, t, and F distributions; hypothesis testing; estimation; confidence intervals; sequential analysis; correlation, regression, and analysis of variance. Applications to the sciences.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 234-000 (8382)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nitzschner, Maximilian


MATH-UA 234-000 (8383)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Plotkin, Ted


MATH-UA 234-000 (9440)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dies, Erik


MATH-UA 234-000 (9441)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Plotkin, Ted

Calculus III (MATH-UA 123)

Prerequisite: MATH-UA.0122 with a grade of C or better, departmental placement exam, or permission of the department. Functions of several variables. Vectors in the plane and space. Partial derivatives with applications. Double and triple integrals. Spherical and cylindrical coordinates. Surface and line integrals. Divergence, gradient, and curl. Theorem of Gauss and Stokes.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 123-000 (8378)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Normand, Raoul


MATH-UA 123-000 (9179)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ristroph, Leif


MATH-UA 123-000 (9180)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Shizhu


MATH-UA 123-000 (8379)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Shizhu


MATH-UA 123-000 (8380)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leingang, Matthew


MATH-UA 123-000 (24839)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Linear Algebra (MATH-UA 140)

Systems of linear equations. Gaussian elimination, matrices, determinants, and Cramer?s rule. Vectors, vector spaces, basis and dimension, linear transformations. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, quadratic forms.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 140-000 (8381)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hammoud, Naima


MATH-UA 140-000 (10125)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qi, Sihan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10126)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qi, Sihan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10127)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Jiarui


MATH-UA 140-000 (10128)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Jiarui


MATH-UA 140-000 (8986)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sia, Charmaine


MATH-UA 140-000 (10129)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Xuenan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10130)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Xuenan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10131)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kotwal, Adit


MATH-UA 140-000 (10132)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kotwal, Adit


MATH-UA 140-000 (10120)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Shizhu


MATH-UA 140-000 (10121)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yap, Ted


MATH-UA 140-000 (10122)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yap, Ted


MATH-UA 140-000 (10123)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stempel, Jordan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10124)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Frank, Natalie


MATH-UA 140-000 (9777)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hammoud, Naima


MATH-UA 140-000 (10469)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Denis, Evan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10468)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harrington, Jeremiah

Calculus II (MATH-UA 122)

Techniques of integration. Further applications. Plane analytic geometry. Polar coordinates and parametric equations. Infinite series, including power series.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 122-000 (8373)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sondjaja, Mutiara


MATH-UA 122-000 (8374)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 122-000 (8375)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shum, Fanny


MATH-UA 122-000 (8376)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sondjaja, Mutiara


MATH-UA 122-000 (8377)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Feklistova, Mariya


MATH-UA 122-000 (8677)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Feklistova, Mariya


MATH-UA 122-000 (10117)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flek, Ruslan


MATH-UA 122-000 (10118)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shum, Fanny


MATH-UA 122-000 (24841)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kalaycioglu, Selin

Discrete Mathematics (MATH-UA 120)

A first course in discrete mathematics. Sets, algorithms, and induction. Combinatorics. Graphs and trees. Combinatorial circuits. Logic and Boolean algebra.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 120-000 (8370)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sia, Charmaine


MATH-UA 120-000 (8371)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flek, Ruslan


MATH-UA 120-000 (8372)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flek, Ruslan


MATH-UA 120-000 (8694)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chikhany, Ralph


MATH-UA 120-000 (8807)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 120-000 (8985)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leingang, Matthew


MATH-UA 120-000 (9437)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sanfratello, Andrew


MATH-UA 120-000 (9476)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sanfratello, Andrew


MATH-UA 120-000 (10639)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chikhany, Ralph


MATH-UA 120-000 (24840)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Oveys, Hesam


MATH-UA 120-000 (24904)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Oveys, Hesam


MATH-UA 120-000 (26350)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Clarkson, Corrin


MATH-UA 120-000 (26380)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Clarkson, Corrin

Calculus I (MATH-UA 121)

Any one of the following: a score of 670 or higher on the mathematics portion of the SAT, a score of 650 or higher on the SAT Subject Test in Mathematics 1, a score of 650 or higher on the SAT Subject Test in Mathematics 2, an ACT mathematics score of 30 or higher, a score of 3 or higher on the AP Calculus AB exam, an AB subscore of 3 or higher on the AP Calculus BC exam, a score of 3 or higher on the AP Calculus BC exam, a grade of C or higher in Algebra and Calculus (MATH-UA 9), or a passing score on a departmental placement exam. Derivatives, antiderivatives, and integrals of functions of one variable. Applications include graphing, maximizing, and minimizing functions. Definite integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Areas and volumes.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 121-000 (10098)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kalaycioglu, Selin


MATH-UA 121-000 (10099)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saha, Shuvadeep


MATH-UA 121-000 (10100)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saha, Shuvadeep


MATH-UA 121-000 (20793)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patki, Sarvesh


MATH-UA 121-000 (20794)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patki, Sarvesh


MATH-UA 121-000 (10102)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Foster, Joseph


MATH-UA 121-000 (10103)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Agostino, Marina


MATH-UA 121-000 (10104)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Agostino, Marina


MATH-UA 121-000 (10105)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Salha, Fatima


MATH-UA 121-000 (10106)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Salha, Fatima


MATH-UA 121-000 (10107)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sia, Charmaine


MATH-UA 121-000 (10108)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vasantha, Rajashekar


MATH-UA 121-000 (10109)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Star, Zachary


MATH-UA 121-000 (10110)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vasantha, Rajashekar


MATH-UA 121-000 (10111)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Star, Zachary


MATH-UA 121-000 (10112)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Foster, Joseph


MATH-UA 121-000 (10113)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cortes, Julian


MATH-UA 121-000 (10114)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cortes, Julian


MATH-UA 121-000 (10115)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gangan, Pradyuman


MATH-UA 121-000 (10116)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gangan, Pradyuman

Algebra and Calculus (MATH-UA 9)

Prerequisite: Three years of high school math or permission of the department. An intensive course in intermediate algebra and trigonometry. Topics include algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their graphs.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 9-000 (8365)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Foster, Joseph


MATH-UA 9-000 (8366)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Haosheng


MATH-UA 9-000 (8367)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Haosheng


MATH-UA 9-000 (8368)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sivakumar, Pranav Kamesh


MATH-UA 9-000 (8369)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sivakumar, Pranav Kamesh

Shakespeare (MEDI-UA 410)

Medieval & Renaissance Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


MEDI-UA 410-000 (10578)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MEDI-UA 410-000 (10579)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MEDI-UA 410-000 (10580)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Indigenous Languages of the Americas (LING-UA 9)

Focuses on phonology and phonetics (i.e., sound structure), but also addresses the structure of words and phrases. Topics: bilingualism, language contact, language loss, indigenous language education, literacy, orthography, and language policy. Emphasis on the Quechuan languages of the Andes in South America, spoken in Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Intro to Morphology at An Advanced Level (LING-UA 55)

The building blocks of words and sentences: the atomic units of word structure, their hierarchical and linear arrangement, and their phonological realization(s). An introduction to fundamental issues including allomorphy, morpheme order, paradigm structure, blocking, and cyclicity. Interactions of morphology with syntax, phonology, semantics, and variation.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LING-UA 55-000 (20018)

Structure of The Russian Language (LING-UA 10)

An introduction to the morphosyntax of Russian. Students learn how to analyze the underlying structures of this language by using formal tools in syntactic theory. The core areas of Russian grammar: case, aspect, argument structure alternations, topic/ focus structure, negation, binding, control, and wh-movement. No knowledge of Russian required.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LING-UA 10-000 (20310)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harves, Stephanie

Morphology (LING-UA 29)

Introduces rules for composing words and sentences from the smallest units of linguistic combination (morphemes). Why can the same message be expressed in one word in some languages but require an entire sentence in others? Why do the shapes of prefixes, suffixes, and roots change depending on their semantic and phonological context? What rules do different languages use for forming new words? No previous background in linguistics is required.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LING-UA 29-000 (20308)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gouskova, Maria · Tabachnick, Guy

Language in Latin America (LING-UA 30)

How and why American varieties of Spanish and Portuguese differ from European varieties, as well as the distribution and nature of dialect differences throughout the Americas. Examines sociolinguistic issues: class and ethnic differences in language, the origin and development of standard and nonstandard varieties, and the effects of contact with Amerindian and African languages. Considers Spanish- and Portuguese-based creoles and the question of prior creolization.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LING-UA 30-000 (10062)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Guy, Gregory


LING-UA 30-000 (10063)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stuck, Matthew

Advanced Semantics (LING-UA 19)

Builds a solid command of predicate logic and elements of the lambda calculus. Introduces the principles of compositional model theoretic semantics. Analyzes constituent order and a set of specific phenomena, possibly varying from year to year.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LING-UA 19-000 (20307)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Szabolcsi, Anna

Sex, Gender, & Language (LING-UA 21)

How linguistic practices reflect and shape our gender identity. Do women and men talk differently? Are these differences universal or variable across cultures? How does gendered language intersect with race and class-linked language? What impact does gendered language have on social power relationships?

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LING-UA 21-000 (8360)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shapp, Allison


LING-UA 21-000 (8361)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Akanegbu, Anuli

Grammatical Analysis (LING-UA 13)

What determines the sequencing of words in a given language? How can we explain word-order variation within and across languages? Are there universal syntactic properties common to the grammar of all languages? Presents the modern generative approach to the scientific study of language and systematically develops a model that will account for the most basic syntactic constructions of natural language.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LING-UA 13-000 (8358)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Collins, Christopher


LING-UA 13-000 (8359)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gotah, Selikem

Phonological Analysis (LING-UA 12)

How languages organize sounds into highly constrained systems. Topics: What do the sound systems of all languages have in common? How can they differ from each other? What is the nature of phonological processes, and why do they occur?

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LING-UA 12-000 (8357)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stanton, Juliet


LING-UA 12-000 (8963)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mason, Alicia

Language (LING-UA 1)

Language is a social phenomenon, but languages share elaborate and specific structural properties. Speech communities exist, exhibit variation, and change within the strict confines of universal grammar, part of our biological endowment. Universal grammar is discovered through the careful study of the structures of individual languages, by cross-linguistic investigations, and the investigation of the brain. Introduces fundamental properties of the sound system and of the structure and interpretation of words and sentences against this larger context.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LING-UA 1-000 (8354)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Champollion, Lucas


LING-UA 1-000 (8355)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grosu, Ioana


LING-UA 1-000 (8356)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Okon, Thaddeus


LING-UA 1-000 (9146)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Thoms, Gary


LING-UA 1-000 (9147)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Blix, Hagen


LING-UA 1-000 (9148)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhao, Zhuoye

Strategies for Independent Producing (FMTV-UT 1092)

Today’s content creators must be entrepreneurs, navigating dynamically changing industry. How does emerging talent gain traction in a ’tsunami wave’ of independent films, episodics, webisodes and podcasts? This class explores development, funding, and legal strategies to make, market and distribute DIY low and ultra-low budget projects. Ones you can make now. Students will develop core competencies, culminating in a pitch deck for a viable indie feature film.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1092-000 (19479)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pichirallo, Joe

Studies in Shakespeare: (THEA-UT 700)

Focussed each time by genre (comedies, tragedies, romances, histories), or by theme or topic (theatricality, gender, race, politics, religion, etc.), this course explores the works of Shakespeare as text and performance – on stage or on film. Various critical methodologies, including biographical and cultural analysis, are used to reveal the continuing vitality of these plays and their relevance to the theatre of our time. (THEATRE STUDIES C)

Drama (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Elementary Haitian Kreyòl II (LATC-UA 122)

A continuation of Elementary Haitian Kreyòl I, this course develops student’s speaking, reading, and writing skills in Haitian Kreyòl, also called Creole. Haitian Kreyòl is spoken by Haiti’s population of nine million and by about one million Haitians in the U.S. including over 190,000 in the New York City area. In fact, New York City has the second largest population of Kreyòl speakers after Port-au-Prince, Haiti’s capital. We use a communicative approach, balanced with grammatical and phonetic techniques. Classroom and textbook materials are complemented by work with film, radio, and music, as well as with visits to city museums and institutions related to Haiti. At the end of the course, students will be better able to conduct a conversation in Haitian Kreyòl and have a better command of Haitian vocabulary and grammar within a relevant cultural context.

Latin Amer-Caribbean Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LATC-UA 122-000 (9077)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lamour, Wynnie


LATC-UA 122-000 (10249)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lamour, Wynnie

Elementary Haitian Kreyol I (LATC-UA 121)

This course introduces students to the language of Haitian Kreyòl, also called Creole, and is intended for students with little or no prior knowledge of the language. Haitian Kreyòl is spoken by Haiti’s population of nine million and by about one million Haitians in the U.S. Including over 190,000 in the New York City area. In fact, New York City has the second largest population of Kreyòl Speakers after Port–‐au–‐Prince, Haiti’s capital. Through this course, you will develop introductory speaking, reading, and writing skills. We use a communicative approach, balanced with grammatical and phonetic techniques. Classroom and textbook materials are complemented by work with film, radio, and especially music (konpa, rasin, twoubadou, rap, raga, levanjil, vodou tradisyonèl, etc.), as well as with visits to city museums and institutions related to Haiti.

Latin Amer-Caribbean Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LATC-UA 121-000 (9043)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lamour, Wynnie


LATC-UA 121-000 (10248)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lamour, Wynnie

Issues & Ideas: (JOUR-UA 9505)

This course aims to bring together diverse issues and perspectives in the rapidly evolving and changing area of international/global communication. Through a historical perspective, a framework will be established for the appreciation of the development of the immense scope, disparity, and complexity of this rapidly evolving field. Students will be encouraged to critically assess shifts in national, regional, and international media patterns of production, distribution, and consumption over time, leading to a critical analysis of the tumultuous contemporary global communication environment. Essential concepts of international communication will be examined, including trends in national and global media consolidation, cultural implications of globalization, international broadcasting, information flows, international communication law and regulation, and trends in communication and information technologies. The focus of the course will be international, with attention being paid both to Western-based multimedia conglomerates, as well as to the increasing global prominence of media corporations based in other regions, contributing to the reversal of international media flows and challenging the global hegemony of the Western media producers. Particular emphasis will be on the Czech Republic, as an empirical example of a national media system affected by global media flows.

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


JOUR-UA 9505-000 (3457)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Klvana, Tomas

Production & Publication (JOUR-UA 9302)

The course focuses on combining the creative techniques of fiction with the rigor of journalistic travel writing to produce stories about Prague (not only) that move beyond the constraints of the news and feature story: stories that engage, resonate with readers, provide insight – stories which “produce the emotion”. The course proceeds by the reading and analysis of important contemporary journalism and classic travel pieces: examination of the narrative; fictional and literary devices used in travel writing; examination of and practice with various information gathering strategies; humor; point of view; unique voice. Distinguished Czech travel writers/journalists/photographers will be invited as guest lecturers.

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


JOUR-UA 9302-000 (4159)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Bednarova, Veronika

Journalism Ethics & First Amendment Law (JOUR-UA 502)

This 14-week class is divided equally between ethics and the law. Through the weekly lecture and assigned readings, students are exposed to the various ethical and legal issues surrounding the field of journalism and come away with a clear sense of the role of the journalist in society and the issues that affect that mission today.

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Honors Senior Seminar (JOUR-UA 352)

The following semester, honors students are required to take a specially designed honors senior seminar, which culminates in each student?s writing a large (6,000-10,000 word/15-20 minutes for broadcast) feature, completing the capstone. The student has to defend his/her work orally before at least two members of the faculty and perhaps a member of the profession.

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


JOUR-UA 352-000 (9155)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Boynton, Robert


JOUR-UA 352-000 (9160)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Samuels, Jason

Creative Writing in Italian (ITAL-UA 9103)

Students entering the course should have mastered the fundamental structure of Italian. The course is designed to help students gain confidence and increase their effectiveness in writing present-day Italian. Conducted in Italian.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITAL-UA 9103-000 (3883)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by

Conversations in Italian (ITAL-UA 9101)

Students entering the course should have mastered the fundamental structure of Italian. The course is designed to help students gain confidence and increase their effectiveness in speaking present-day Italian. Through discussions, oral reports, and readings, students develop vocabulary in a variety of topics, improve pronunciation, and learn an extensive range of idiomatic expressions. Conducted in Italian.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


ITAL-UA 9101-000 (2594)
05/21/2024 – 07/01/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by

Modern Italy (ITAL-UA 9868)

This course introduces contemporary Italy in all its complexity and fascination. Reviewing politics, economics, society, and culture over the past two centuries, the course has a primary goal — to consider how developments since the 1800s have influenced the lives and formed the outlook of today’s Italians. In other words, we are engaged in the historical search for something quite elusive: Italian “identity”. Topics will include the unification of the country, national identity in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the First World War, and Italian fascism, World War Two and the resistance, the post-war Italian Republic, the economic “miracle”, the South, the Mafia, terrorism, popular culture, and the most recent political and social developments, including Italy and the European Union. Lectures combine with readings and films (taking advantage of Italy’s magnificent post-war cinema).

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITAL-UA 9868-000 (2402)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Lombardo, Davide

Italian-American Life in Literature (ITAL-UA 724)

Identical to V41.0724. Hendin. Offered every two to three years. 4 points. A study of the fiction and poetry by which Italian American writers have expressed their heritage and their engagement in American life. From narratives of immigration to current work by “assimilated” writers, the course explores the depiction of Italian American identity. Challenging stereotypes, it explores changing family relationships, sexual mores, and political and social concerns.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ITAL-UA 724-000 (9388)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hendin, Josephine

Readings in Medieval and Renaissance Literature (ITAL-UA 115)

Introductory-level literature course that, through a close reading of authors such as Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Machiavelli, and Ariosto, focuses on how to understand a literary text in Italian. Covers Italian literature from its origins to the 17th century.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ITAL-UA 115-000 (10043)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ducci, Elena

Machiavelli (ITAL-UA 147)

The inventor of modern political science, Niccolo Machiavelli is one of the most original thinkers in the history of Western civilization. In this course, Machiavelli?s political, historical, and theatrical works are read in the context in which they were conceived?the much tormented and exciting Florence of the 15th and early 16th centuries struggling between republican rule and the magnificent tyranny of the Medici family. The course also aims at dismantling the myth of ?evilness? that has surrounded Machiavelli through the centuries, especially in the Anglo-Saxon world, through a close reading of such masterpieces as The Prince, The Discourses, and The Mandrake Root.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ITAL-UA 147-000 (20636)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Albertini, Stefano · Del Monte, Lorenzo

Advanced Review of Modern Italian (ITAL-UA 30)

This course is a prerequisite for other advanced courses in language, literature, and culture and society. Systematizes and reinforces the language skills presented in earlier-level courses through an intensive review of grammar and composition, lexical enrichment, improvement of speaking ability, and selected readings from contemporary Italian literature.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ITAL-UA 30-000 (9092)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Perna, Joseph


ITAL-UA 30-000 (20635)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Marchelli, Chiara

Italian Through Cinema (ITAL-UA 107)

Students entering this course should have mastered the fundamental structure of Italian. Aims to enrich knowledge of Italian language, culture, and society through screening and discussion of contemporary Italian cinema and detailed analysis of selected film scripts. Students are encouraged to use different idiomatic expressions and recognize regional linguistic variety. Special emphasis is placed on developing a more extensive vocabulary and an expressive range suited to discussion of complex issues and their representation.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ITAL-UA 107-000 (9093)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Paolillo, Costanza

Intermediate Italian II (ITAL-UA 12)

Continuation of ITAL-UA 11. To fulfill MAP requirements and continue on to the postintermediate level, a student must complete both ITAL-UA 11 and ITAL-UA 12. This sequence is equivalent to ITAL-UA 20.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ITAL-UA 12-000 (8347)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sebastiani, Concetta


ITAL-UA 12-000 (9320)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Curtoni, Chiara


ITAL-UA 12-000 (8348)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Perna, Joseph

Intensive Intermediate Italian (ITAL-UA 20)

Completes the equivalent of Intermediate Italian I and II in one semester.

Italian (Undergraduate)
6 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ITAL-UA 20-000 (10042)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zanobi, Marina


ITAL-UA 20-000 (9538)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Di Domenico, Giorgio

Intensive Elementary Italian (ITAL-UA 10)

Open to students with no previous training in Italian and to others on assignment by placement test. Completes the equivalent of Elementary Italian I and II in one semester. Offered every semester. 6 points.

Italian (Undergraduate)
6 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ITAL-UA 10-000 (10041)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by DiGioacchino, Massimo

Intermediate Italian I (ITAL-UA 11)

Not equivalent to ITAL-UAV 20. Only by combining ITAL-UA 11 with ITAL-UA 12 can a student complete the equivalent of ITAL-UA 20 and then continue on to the postintermediate level.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ITAL-UA 11-000 (20634)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gualdi, Greta


ITAL-UA 11-000 (8950)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rinaldi, Tiziana

Elementary Italian II (ITAL-UA 2)

Continuation of ITAL-UA 1. To continue on to the intermediate level, a student must complete both ITAL-UA 1 and ITAL-UA 2. This sequence is equivalent to ITAL-UA 10.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ITAL-UA 2-000 (8948)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Graves, Karen


ITAL-UA 2-000 (9199)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ducci, Elena


ITAL-UA 2-000 (8949)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Graves, Karen


ITAL-UA 2-000 (8623)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rinaldi, Tiziana


ITAL-UA 2-000 (8624)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scarcella Perino, Roberto


ITAL-UA 2-000 (20633)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bresciani, Laura


ITAL-UA 2-000 (9537)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sebastiani, Concetta

Elementary Italian I (ITAL-UA 1)

Open to students with no previous training in Italian and to others on assignment by placement test.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ITAL-UA 1-000 (8344)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gold, Eva


ITAL-UA 1-000 (9090)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Battaglia, Marco


ITAL-UA 1-000 (8345)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stemwedel, Nina Fiona


ITAL-UA 1-000 (8346)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scarcella Perino, Roberto


ITAL-UA 1-000 (25928)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Curtoni, Chiara


ITAL-UA 1-000 (9536)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sebastiani, Concetta

East Asian Cultures (EAGC-UF 101)

This course introduces East Asian cultures, focusing to a greater or lesser extent on China, Japan, and Korea. Aspects of East Asia?s traditional and modern culture are presented by study of some of the area?s Great Books, as well as other literary, political, philosophical, religious and/or artistic works from the traditional, modern, or contemporary periods. Issues raised may include national or cultural This course introduces East Asian cultures, focusing to a greater or lesser extent on China, Japan, and Korea. Aspects of East Asia?s traditional and modern culture are presented by study of some of the area?s Great Books, as well as other literary, political, philosophical, religious and/or artistic works from the traditional, modern, or contemporary periods. Issues raised may include national or cultural identity in relation to colonialism/imperialism, East-West tensions, modernism?s clash with tradition, the persistence of tradition with the modern, the East Asian Diaspora, and the question of East Asian modernities.

East Asian Cultures- Global Cultures (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAGC-UF 101-000 (19791)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chandler, Jeannine


EAGC-UF 101-000 (13268)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chandler, Jeannine


EAGC-UF 101-000 (13269)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chandler, Jeannine

Perception and the Brain (CCEX-SHU 122)

“How do humans and other animals obtain knowledge about the world? It is easy to take perception for granted, but complex processes (only partly understood) underlie our ability to understand the world by seeing, hearing, feeling, tasting, and smelling it. This is not because the scientific study of perception is new. In fact, perception has fascinated philosophers, physicists, and physiologists for centuries. Currently, perception is a central topic in psychology, cognitive science, computer science, and neuroscience. How do scientists approach perception? We seek to discover lawful relations between perceptual experiences and the physical world and to develop models of the processes and mechanisms in the brain that produce these connections. In this course, in the lectures, we will discuss fundamental problems in perception (primarily vision), and in the lab sessions, you will learn about standard experimental methods and their use in the study of perceptual processes and to give you first-hand experience in conducting original research. As part of these activities you will learn to write experimental reports and to think critically about the relation between theory and experiment. You will also be exposed to the use of computers in perception research. Indeed, there will be considerable use of computers in the course, with part of the goal being to provide you with basic computer skills.” Prereq: None Fulfillment: CORE ED

Exper Discovery in Nat World (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CCEX-SHU 122-000 (23960)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Li, Li


CCEX-SHU 122-000 (23961)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Li, Li

Intro to Sociology (SOC-UA 1)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Survey of the field of sociology: its basic concepts, theories, and research orientation. Threshold course that provides the student with insights into the social factors in human life. Topics include social interaction, socialization, culture, social structure, stratification, political power, deviance, social institutions, and social change.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


SOC-UA 1-000 (20398)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Morning, Ann


SOC-UA 1-000 (20399)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martin-Caughey, Ananda


SOC-UA 1-000 (20400)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Um, Sejin


SOC-UA 1-000 (20401)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nelson, Christina


SOC-UA 1-000 (20420)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sieffert, Claire


SOC-UA 1-000 (20403)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martin-Caughey, Ananda


SOC-UA 1-000 (20404)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sieffert, Claire


SOC-UA 1-000 (20405)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cera, Michelle


SOC-UA 1-000 (20406)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Um, Sejin


SOC-UA 1-000 (20407)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nelson, Christina


SOC-UA 1-000 (20408)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cera, Michelle

Logic (PHIL-UA 70)

An introduction to the basic techniques of sentential and predicate logic. Students learn how to put arguments from ordinary language into symbols, how to construct derivations within a formal system, and how to ascertain validity using truth tables or models.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHIL-UA 70-000 (8448)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Peluce, Vincent


PHIL-UA 70-000 (8449)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Peluce, Vincent


PHIL-UA 70-000 (9185)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gomez, Veronica

US Since 1865 (HIST-UA 10)

Course examines developments in U.S. society within a global historical context. Topics: urbanization; industrialization; immigration; American reform movements (populism, progressivism, the New Deal, and the War on Poverty); and foreign policy. Beginning with the post-Civil War expansion of the U.S. into the American West, the course traces U.S expansion and increasing global influence through the Spanish-American War, World Wars I and II, Cold War, Gulf Wars, and the War on Terror. Emphasizes broad themes and main changes in U.S. culture, politics, and society.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Readings in Talmud (in Hebrew) (HBRJD-UA 784)

Studies a selected section of the Hebrew and Aramaic text of the Babylonian Talmud, utilizing both traditional and academic methods of study.‎ Emphasis is on mastering the themes and concepts while studying the text and its commentaries in depth.

Hebrew & Judaic Studies (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


HBRJD-UA 784-000 (7705)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schiffman, Lawrence

Elementary Hebrew II (HBRJD-UA 2)

Continuation of HBRJD-UA 1. Open to students who have completed HBRJD-UA 1 or who have been placed at this level through the placement examination. For description, see Elementary Hebrew I (HBRJD-UA 1).

Hebrew & Judaic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


HBRJD-UA 2-000 (8435)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kamelhar, Rosalie

Intermediate Hebrew II (HBRJD-UA 4)

Continuation of HBRJD-UA 3. Open to students who have completed HBRJD-UA 3 or who have been placed at this level through the placement examination. For description, see Intermediate Hebrew I (HBRJD-UA 3).

Hebrew & Judaic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


HBRJD-UA 4-000 (9371)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mayer, Ganit


HBRJD-UA 4-000 (9069)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ben-Moshe, Ilona

Elementary Hebrew I (HBRJD-UA 1)

Active introduction to modern Hebrew as it is spoken and written in Israel today. Presents the essentials of Hebrew grammar, combining the oral-aural approach with formal grammatical concepts. Reinforces learning by reading of graded texts. Emphasizes the acquisition of idiomatic conversational vocabulary and language patterns.

Hebrew & Judaic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


HBRJD-UA 1-000 (9233)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mayer, Ganit


HBRJD-UA 1-000 (9036)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kamelhar, Rosalie

Dynamics (ME-UY 3223)

The course explores three-dimensional treatment of the kinematics of particles and rigid bodies using various coordinate systems, Newton’s laws, work, energy, impulse, momentum, conservative force fields, impact and rotation and plane motion of rigid bodies. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: ME-UY 2213 | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-UH 2011

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ME-UY 3223-000 (14918)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ME-UY 3223-000 (15064)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

THERMODYNAMICS (ME-UY 3333)

The course centers on properties of pure substances; concepts of work and heat; closed and open systems. Topics: Fundamental laws of thermodynamics. Carnot and Clasius statements of the 2nd law; entropy and entropy production; heat engines, refrigerators, heat pumps; efficiencies, coefficients of performance.| Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: MA-UY 1124 | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: MATH-UH 1020

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 3333-000 (12720)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Haverkamp, Sven


ME-UY 3333-000 (12721)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at ePoly
Instructed by Thorsen, Richard

Introduction to Materials Science (ME-UY 2813)

Students in this course become familiar with atomic structure and bonding, atomic arrangement in crystals, crystal imperfections, mechanical behavior and failure of materials and binary phase diagrams. | Brooklyn Students: Co-requisite PH-UY 1013 | Abu Dhabi Students: Prerequisite ENGR-UH 2012

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 2813-000 (12715)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Behera, Rakesh

Composition/Conversation (GERM-UA 9111)

Composition & Conversation is designed for post-intermediate students of German who have a solid grasp of German grammar and vocabulary and wish to extend their knowledge of the German language, history, and culture through reading, watching films, discussions, and writing. Conversation & Composition is a reading- and writing-intensive course. Emphasis will be placed on refining written expression and developing the ability to express, discuss, and argue opinions.This course will give you an overview of recent German political, social and cultural history after 1945 and onwards. Focus will be placed on moments of social criticism and changes – from the youth cultures in the 50s and 80s to the women’s movement and ecological protests, from love happenings and terrorism to mass demonstrations and the fall of the wall. During the course, we will explore narratives that are related to our topics from a variety of genres: newspaper/magazine articles, TV/radio documentaries, music, film, photography, and other visual material. The class is taught entirely in German and emphasizes the language skills necessary to communicate effectively in a foreign language speaking, reading, viewing, writing, and listening.

German (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


GERM-UA 9111-000 (2334)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by

Intensive Intermediate German (GERM-UA 20)

Completes the equivalent of a year?s intermediate work GERM-UA 3 and GERM-UA 4 in one semester. Continuing emphasis on developing spoken and written communication skills. Students learn more-advanced features of the language and begin to read longer and more-complex texts.

German (Undergraduate)
6 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


GERM-UA 20-000 (20255)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Habbig, Uta

Introduction to German Literature (GERM-UA 152)

Introduction to representative authors and works of German literature, with emphasis on the modern period. Students learn basic conventions of literature and literary interpretation, as well as strategies for the effective reading of shorter and longer prose works, drama, and poetry. Guided writing assignments focus on developing the language skills necessary for effective written analysis and interpretation of literary texts in German.

German (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


GERM-UA 152-000 (8247)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Densky, Doreen

Intensive Elementary German (GERM-UA 10)

Open to students with no previous training in German and to others on assignment by placement examination or with permission of the department. Completes the equivalent of a year’s elementary work GERM-UA 1 and GERM-UA 2 in one semester. Emphasizes spoken and written communication skills. Introduces students to the basic conventions, idioms, and structures of contemporary spoken German.

German (Undergraduate)
6 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


GERM-UA 10-000 (8246)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wagner, James

Elementary German II (GERM-UA 2)

Continuation of GERM-UA 1.

German (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


GERM-UA 2-000 (8240)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hilbig-Bokaer, Aviv


GERM-UA 2-000 (8241)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Landmann, Julia


GERM-UA 2-000 (8242)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ruckdeschel, Manuela

Elementary German I (GERM-UA 1)

Open only to students with no previous training in German; others require permission of the department. Offered every semester. 4 points.

German (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


GERM-UA 1-000 (8238)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Samartzi, Foteini


GERM-UA 1-000 (8239)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kaczmar, Maiken

A History of London (HIST-UA 9127)

This course examines the growth and importance of London from the Roman invasion of 43 AD to the present day. Students will learn about London’s changing economic and political role, and will understand how London grew to dominate the commerce, industry and culture of England. They will find out how London became the biggest city the world had ever known, and how it coped (or failed to cope) with the social and environmental problems created by its enormous size. The classroom sessions will be divided between a lecture and a class discussion. From week two onwards the class will begin with a discussion of the topic or period covered in the previous week‚s lecture, in which students will be expected to use knowledge and ideas gathered from lectures and from their weekly reading. There will also be four walking tours of parts of London which relate to the period we are studying at a particular time.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


HIST-UA 9127-000 (2426)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by

Are Friends Electric? Music, Science, & Futurism in the 21st Century (REMU-UT 1229)

Historically, the music business has generally relinquished the most significant inventions and innovations to third parties. And while many can recite the contemporary Pavlovian catch phrases of the moment, what about the next wave of science and thinking that will impact music? This class will seek to identify, understand and predict the latest advancements in science that will serve to influence and transform music consumption in the next 20 years.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


REMU-UT 1229-000 (13182)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kolosine, Errol

Business of Video Games (MKTG-UB 58)

Video games are now a mainstream form of entertainment. In economic terms, this industry has experienced tremendous growth, despite a grueling recession, growing to an estimated $60 billion worldwide. A key development that has changed the playing field for both the producers and consumers of interactive entertainment is a shift away from physical retail to digital and online game distribution. The audience for games has also shifted—no longer the exclusive practice of hardcore gamers, video games have gained mass appeal in the form of social and casual gaming, on the internet, on consoles, and smartphones. At the same time, the development and publishing of games has become far more accessible. The game behind the game, in a manner of speaking, has changed. In this class, we explore the basic components of the current video game industry. Every week, we review major current events, will hear from people currently working in the industry, examine case studies, and discuss the overall business landscape. Central to each class is the notion that practical business considerations and the design-driven creative process do not have to be in opposition.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MKTG-UB 58-000 (10780)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Advertising (MKTG-UB 3)

This course provides students with a comprehensive framework and tools to understand the advertising process and to appreciate managerial and theoretical perspectives in advertising. It tackles the stages in developing an advertising plan- from analyzing the situation and defining clear advertising objectives to execution. Students learn tools related to various skill areas in advertising, including account planning, media planning and buying, and copywriting/art direction, while developing a broader appreciation of how each skill area fits into the overall structure of the advertising process. Coursework involves a comprehensive group project that utilizes learning in all functional areas of advertising, while simulating the development of an advertising campaign.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MKTG-UB 3-000 (10504)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cohen, Daniel

Spoken Contemporary French (FREN-UA 9101)

This course is designed to help students to develop vocabulary, learn new idiomatic expressions, and improve fluency and pronunciation. The emphasis is on the understanding and production of contemporary spoken French through a study of authentic documents such as radio and television interviews, advertisements, and spontaneous oral productions.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FREN-UA 9101-000 (2808)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


FREN-UA 9101-000 (2538)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Written Contemporary French (FREN-UA 105)

Designed to improve the student’s written French and to provide advanced training in French and comparative grammar. Students are trained to express themselves in a variety of writing situations (for example, diaries, transcriptions, narrations, letters). Focuses on the distinction between spoken and written styles and the problem of contrastive grammar. Emphasis on accuracy and fluency of usage in the written language.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


FREN-UA 105-000 (8228)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed,Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by LaPorta, Kathrina


FREN-UA 105-000 (8229)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by LaPorta, Kathrina


FREN-UA 105-000 (8230)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sánchez-Reyes, María


FREN-UA 105-000 (8231)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baehler, Aline


FREN-UA 105-000 (9669)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by LaPorta, Kathrina


FREN-UA 105-000 (9670)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by LaPorta, Kathrina


FREN-UA 105-000 (9671)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sánchez-Reyes, María


FREN-UA 105-000 (9672)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baehler, Aline

French Thought from Montaigne to Sartre (FREN-UA 562)

Deals with the various currents of ideas and the transformations in values, taste, and feeling that constitute the Enlightenment in France. Particular attention to the personality, writings, and influence of the following authors: Montaigne, Descartes, Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, and Sartre. Significant works by these thinkers and others are closely read and interpreted.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


FREN-UA 562-000 (20871)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kirby, Elizabeth

Intermediate French I (FREN-UA 11)

Not equivalent to FREN-UA 20. Only by combining FREN-UA 11 with FREN-UA 12 can a student complete the equivalent of FREN-UA 20 and then continue on to the post-intermediate level. Offered every semester. 4 points.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


FREN-UA 11-000 (9650)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ait Jafour, Samira


FREN-UA 11-000 (8204)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sellami, Hayet


FREN-UA 11-000 (8205)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krimper, Michael


FREN-UA 11-000 (8206)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Berthe, Olivier


FREN-UA 11-000 (8207)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Berthe, Olivier


FREN-UA 11-000 (8208)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bali, Fatiha

Intermediate French II (FREN-UA 12)

Continuation of FREN-UA 11. In order to fulfill the MAP requirement and continue on to the post-intermediate level, a student must complete both FREN-UA 11 and FREN-UA 12. This sequence is equivalent to FREN-UA 20. Offered every semester. 4 points.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


FREN-UA 12-000 (8209)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Verneret, Nina


FREN-UA 12-000 (8210)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dubois, Stephanie


FREN-UA 12-000 (8211)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dubois, Stephanie


FREN-UA 12-000 (8212)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schwarzer, Pierre


FREN-UA 12-000 (8213)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Root, Jamie


FREN-UA 12-000 (8214)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Root, Jamie

Intens Elementary French (FREN-UA 10)

Open to students with no previous training in French and to others on assignment by placement test. Completes the equivalent of a year’s elementary level in one semester. Offered every semester. 6 points.

French (Undergraduate)
6 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


FREN-UA 10-000 (8201)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Irwin, Jessamine


FREN-UA 10-000 (8202)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bournery, Alex


FREN-UA 10-000 (8203)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rizy, Kathleen M


FREN-UA 10-000 (8706)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bali, Fatiha

Arts and Cultures of Modernity (ACM-UF 201)

This course explores the arts from the late17th/early18th-century to the post-World War II era, examining how they define and reflect both local cultural views and rapidly shifting global understandings of the world. The course considers how the diverse conceptions and conditions of modernity both shaped and were shaped by the arts around the world. Many of the issues pertinent to the course — industrialization/urbanization; the dislocations, disasters, and opportunities that followed cross-cultural contact; colonialism, decolonization, conflicts of political ideology, and liberation struggles; fundamental redefinitions of mind, language, gender, and sexual identity — have had very different effects in various parts of the world; instructors encourage students to explore what it means to study the arts from global perspectives and what “globalization” itself has meant and means in the context of the arts.

Art and Cultures of Modernity (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ACM-UF 201-000 (19000)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nickowitz, Peter


ACM-UF 201-000 (19001)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Culver, Brian


ACM-UF 201-000 (19002)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nickowitz, Peter


ACM-UF 201-000 (19003)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hatcher, Jessamyn


ACM-UF 201-000 (19004)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hatcher, Jessamyn


ACM-UF 201-000 (19005)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Thomas


ACM-UF 201-000 (19006)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Culver, Brian


ACM-UF 201-000 (19007)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yearous-Algozin, Joseph


ACM-UF 201-000 (19008)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hussein, Linnea


ACM-UF 201-000 (19009)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tharoor, Tilottama


ACM-UF 201-000 (19010)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yearous-Algozin, Joseph


ACM-UF 201-000 (19011)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Squillace, Robert


ACM-UF 201-000 (19012)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schwarzbach, Fredric


ACM-UF 201-000 (19013)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Matos Martin, Eduardo


ACM-UF 201-000 (19014)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Matos Martin, Eduardo


ACM-UF 201-000 (19015)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hatcher, Jessamyn


ACM-UF 201-000 (19016)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hussein, Linnea


ACM-UF 201-000 (19017)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Thomas


ACM-UF 201-000 (19018)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Thomas


ACM-UF 201-000 (19019)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Newman, Roberta


ACM-UF 201-000 (19020)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Matos Martin, Eduardo


ACM-UF 201-000 (19021)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Newman, Roberta


ACM-UF 201-000 (19022)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Paliwoda, Daniel


ACM-UF 201-000 (19023)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tharoor, Tilottama


ACM-UF 201-000 (19024)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Paliwoda, Daniel


ACM-UF 201-000 (19025)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Deutsch, Katherine


ACM-UF 201-000 (19026)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Deutsch, Katherine

Arts and Cultures towards the Crossroads (ACC-UF 102)

This course examines the arts produced within diverse cultural traditions across the globe from the rise of Islam at the beginning of the 7th century to the global empire building of the late17th/early 18th century. The course explores the distinctive conventions and traditions of different media, and the development of cultural traditions from their ancient foundations to the early modern period through successive influences and assimilations, both local and external. Diverse cultural traditions are also considered in relation to one another: by direct comparison of works even in the absence of historical cultural contact; by consideration of mutual interactions, exchanges and contestations; by the assertion of cultural dominance; and by resistance to such assertions.

Art and Cultures towards the Crossroads (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ACC-UF 102-000 (12603)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Benninger, Elizabeth


ACC-UF 102-000 (12798)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bishop, Kathleen


ACC-UF 102-000 (12604)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McCannon, Afrodesia


ACC-UF 102-000 (12605)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Newman, Roberta


ACC-UF 102-000 (12606)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reichert, Martin


ACC-UF 102-000 (12821)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Steen, John


ACC-UF 102-000 (12608)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Simard, Jared


ACC-UF 102-000 (12822)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reale, Nancy


ACC-UF 102-000 (12609)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bishop, Kathleen


ACC-UF 102-000 (12610)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Simard, Jared


ACC-UF 102-000 (12612)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Varnum, Joan


ACC-UF 102-000 (12823)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Newman, Roberta


ACC-UF 102-000 (12824)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krimper, Michael


ACC-UF 102-000 (12614)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lee, Elizabeth


ACC-UF 102-000 (12714)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brosh, Liora


ACC-UF 102-000 (12615)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tharoor, Tilottama


ACC-UF 102-000 (12616)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Karbiener, Karen


ACC-UF 102-000 (12617)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Varnum, Joan


ACC-UF 102-000 (12618)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Thomas


ACC-UF 102-000 (12619)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Karbiener, Karen


ACC-UF 102-000 (12825)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Culver, Brian


ACC-UF 102-000 (12621)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Odnopozova, Dina


ACC-UF 102-000 (12700)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Thomas


ACC-UF 102-000 (12623)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Masri, Heather


ACC-UF 102-000 (12624)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brosh, Liora


ACC-UF 102-000 (12625)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McCannon, Afrodesia


ACC-UF 102-000 (12626)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Masri, Heather


ACC-UF 102-000 (12724)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Simard, Jared


ACC-UF 102-000 (12627)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reale, Nancy


ACC-UF 102-000 (12726)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Culver, Brian


ACC-UF 102-000 (12745)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chapin, Peter


ACC-UF 102-000 (12746)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Olivas, Yvonne


ACC-UF 102-000 (12862)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Karbiener, Karen


ACC-UF 102-000 (12863)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Benninger, Elizabeth


ACC-UF 102-000 (12864)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lee, Elizabeth


ACC-UF 102-000 (12607)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McCannon, Afrodesia


ACC-UF 102-000 (12613)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reale, Nancy


ACC-UF 102-000 (12620)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reichert, Martin


ACC-UF 102-000 (12622)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Masri, Heather


ACC-UF 102-000 (12826)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reichert, Martin

Life Science (LISCI-UF 101)

The course examines some of the fundamental principles and processes of biological science. The primary focus is on evolution, genetics, and the physiology and molecular function of the cell, with special emphasis on the human species. Also included is a series of readings and discussions on how our knowledge of the life sciences has been put to practical use, the function and treatment of HIV infection, and other current frontiers and ethical issues in the discipline. The course takes a historical approach to the material: readings include some of the fundamental texts upon which our understanding of life is based, such as works by and about Charles Darwin, Gregor Mendel, Oswald Avery, James Watson, Rosalind Franklin, and Francis Crick. This course satisfies the requirement in Life Science.

Life Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Fundamental Dynamics of Earth’s Atmosphere and Climate (ENVST-UA 360)

Environmental Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ENVST-UA 360-000 (20800)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by ZANNA, LAURE


ENVST-UA 360-000 (20801)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Basinski-Ferris, Aurora

English Novel in The 19th Century (ENGL-UA 9530)

The nineteenth century was the great age of the English novel. This course charts the evolution of the form during this period, exploring texts by major authors including Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, George Eliot and Thomas Hardy. Close attention to narrative, questions of mimesis and publishing practices will combine with the exploration of a range of significant contemporary discourses relating to shifting conceptions of gender, sexuality, religion, science, class, and race. These varied contexts will help us to consider formal, stylistic and thematic continuities as well as discontinuities and innovations. Taking advantage of our local surroundings, we will also explore changing representations of London and trace the enduring legacy of this period in the twenty-first-century city.

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGL-UA 9530-000 (2721)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by

20th Century African- American Literature (ENGL-UA 251)

Prerequisite: V41.0185 or V41.0230. Survey of major texts?fiction, poetry, autobiography, and drama?from Du Bois?s The Souls of Black Folk (1903) to contemporaries such as Amiri Baraka, Alice Walker, and Toni Morrison. Discussion of the Harlem Renaissance and its key figures, including Richard Wright, James Baldwin, Langston Hughes, and Ralph Ellison.

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Experimental Economics (ECON-UA 360)

Experimental economics is predicated on the belief that economics, like other sciences, can be a laboratory science where economic theories are tested, rejected, and revised. This course reviews the methodology of doing such laboratory experiments and investigates the use of experiments in a wide variety of fields. These include competitive markets, auctions, public goods theory, labor economics, game theory, and individual choice theory. The course functions as a research seminar in which students present their work as it progresses during the semester. Students also get exposure to the experimental laboratory in the Department of Economics and the research performed there.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Economic Development (ECON-UA 323)

Prerequisites for students in Policy Concentration: Intermediate Microeconomics (ECON-UA 10) and Intermediate Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 12). Prerequisites for students in Theory Concentration: Microeconomic Analysis (ECON-UA 11) and Macroeconomic Analysis (ECON-UA 13). Economic underdevelopment in Asia, Latin America, and Africa. Macroeconomic topics: economic growth, income distribution, poverty, and underdevelopment as a circular, self-reinforcing trap. Microeconomic topics: markets for land, labor, and credit. Emphasizes market fragmentation, limited information, and incentive problems. Such international issues as trading patterns, capital flows, and global financial crises are studied from the viewpoint of developing countries.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECON-UA 323-000 (9972)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Miller, Ron

Labor Economics (ECON-UA 351)

Analyzes the functioning of the labor market in both theoretical and statistical terms. Examines the determinants of wage and employment levels in perfect and imperfect labor markets, including the concept of education and training as human capital. Models of labor market dynamics are also examined, including those of job search and matching. The role of public policy in the functioning of labor markets is highlighted throughout.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Public Economics (ECON-UA 353)

In alternate years, stresses policy implications and the development of the theory. Analysis of government economic policies and behavior. Normative and positive economics; the fundamental welfare theorems. What goods should the government provide (public goods)? When should the government tax private behavior (externalities)? Income redistribution and the welfare program. Who pays the tax (tax incidence)? The role of debt policy. On what should taxes be levied (optimal taxation)?

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Strategic Decision Theory (ECON-UA 310)

Introduction to noncooperative game theory. Focuses on a rigorous development of the basic theory with economic applications such as competition among oligopolists, how standards are set, auction theory, and bargaining. The formal topics include games in strategic form, Bayesian games, and games in extensive form.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECON-UA 310-000 (20213)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abreu, Dilip · Jibet, Aya


ECON-UA 310-000 (25993)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jibet, Aya


ECON-UA 310-000 (26002)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jibet, Aya

Industrial Organization (ECON-UA 316)

How firms behave in imperfectly-competitive markets. Uses game theory to understand strategic decisions. Topics include price discrimination; peak load pricing; productivity; Bertrand, Cournot, and Hotelling oligopoly models; entry; mergers and merger regulation; monopoly regulation; patents; auctions; and two-sided platforms. Moves from theoretical and mathematical models to real-world data and problem sets.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECON-UA 316-000 (9969)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saini, Viplav · Toledo, Gabriel · Díaz Ferreiras, Víctor


ECON-UA 316-000 (9970)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Díaz Ferreiras, Víctor


ECON-UA 316-000 (9971)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Toledo, Gabriel

International Economics (P) (ECON-UA 238)

Focuses on international trade in goods, services, and capital. It serves as an introduction to international economic issues and as preparation for the department’s more advanced course in ECON-UA 324. The issues discussed include gains from trade and their distribution; analysis of protectionism; strategic trade barriers; the trade deficit; exchange rate determination; and government intervention in foreign exchange markets.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECON-UA 238-000 (8028)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lieberman, Marc · Bhunia, Aakash


ECON-UA 238-000 (8029)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhunia, Aakash


ECON-UA 238-000 (8030)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhunia, Aakash


ECON-UA 238-000 (8031)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lieberman, Marc · Kim, Kyle


ECON-UA 238-000 (9295)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Kyle


ECON-UA 238-000 (9296)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Kyle


ECON-UA 238-000 (20198)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Paizis, Andrew · Wang, Ruikang


ECON-UA 238-000 (20199)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Ruikang


ECON-UA 238-000 (20200)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Ruikang

Intro to Econometrics (ECON-UA 266)

Application of statistics and economic theory to problems of formulating and estimating models of economic behavior. Matrix algebra is developed as the main tool of analysis in regression. Acquaints students with basic estimation theory and techniques in the regression framework and covers extensions such as specification error tests, heteroskedasticity, errors in variables, and simple time series models. An introduction to simultaneous equation modes and the concept of identification is provided.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECON-UA 266-000 (20201)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Paizis, Andrew · Montanari, Giovanni · Zhang, Yansong


ECON-UA 266-000 (20202)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Montanari, Giovanni


ECON-UA 266-000 (20203)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Montanari, Giovanni


ECON-UA 266-000 (20204)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Yansong


ECON-UA 266-000 (20205)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Yansong


ECON-UA 266-000 (20206)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Parsa, Sahar · Baladi, Sirus


ECON-UA 266-000 (20207)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baladi, Sirus


ECON-UA 266-000 (20208)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baladi, Sirus


ECON-UA 266-000 (20209)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Roeper, Timothy · Ozkaya, Ozde · Danza, Facundo


ECON-UA 266-000 (20210)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ozkaya, Ozde


ECON-UA 266-000 (20211)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Danza, Facundo


ECON-UA 266-000 (20215)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ozkaya, Ozde


ECON-UA 266-000 (20212)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Danza, Facundo

Urban Economics (ECON-UA 227)

The city as an economic organization. Urbanization trends, functional specialization, and the nature of growth within the city; organization of economic activity within the city and its outlying areas, the organization of the labor market, and problems of urban poverty; the urban public economy; housing and land-use problems; transportation problems; and special problems within the public sector.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECON-UA 227-000 (8024)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Storchmann, Karl


ECON-UA 227-000 (8629)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Storchmann, Karl

Money and Banking (ECON-UA 231)

Money supply; banking as an industry; banks as suppliers of money; the Federal Reserve System and monetary control; monetary theory; and contemporary monetary policy issues.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECON-UA 231-000 (8025)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhiladwall, Maharukh · Lin, Yuannan · Goyal, Anchit


ECON-UA 231-000 (8026)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lin, Yuannan


ECON-UA 231-000 (8027)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lin, Yuannan


ECON-UA 231-000 (8898)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goyal, Anchit


ECON-UA 231-000 (8897)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhiladwall, Maharukh · Alferova, Aleksandra · Silva, Matheus


ECON-UA 231-000 (8899)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Silva, Matheus


ECON-UA 231-000 (9293)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Alferova, Aleksandra


ECON-UA 231-000 (9294)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Alferova, Aleksandra

Microeconomic Analysis (ECON-UA 11)

Rigorous examination of consumer choice, profit-maximizing behavior on the part of firms, and equilibrium in product markets. Topics include choice under uncertainty, strategic interactions between firms in noncompetitive environments, intertemporal decision making, and investment in public goods.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECON-UA 11-000 (9191)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saini, Viplav


ECON-UA 11-000 (9192)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vravosinos, Orestis


ECON-UA 11-000 (9193)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vravosinos, Orestis


ECON-UA 11-000 (26113)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vravosinos, Orestis

Interm Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 12)

Study of aggregate economic analysis with special attention paid to the determination of the level of income, employment, and inflation. Critically examines both the theories and the policies associated with them.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECON-UA 12-000 (8001)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McIntyre, Gerald · Kim, Jae · Cattelan, Giacomo


ECON-UA 12-000 (8002)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Jae


ECON-UA 12-000 (8003)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Jae


ECON-UA 12-000 (10559)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cattelan, Giacomo


ECON-UA 12-000 (10560)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cattelan, Giacomo


ECON-UA 12-000 (8004)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Boar, Corina · Ghini, Andres


ECON-UA 12-000 (8005)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ghini, Andres


ECON-UA 12-000 (8006)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ghini, Andres


ECON-UA 12-000 (8007)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McIntyre, Gerald · Covarrubias, Matias


ECON-UA 12-000 (8770)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Covarrubias, Matias


ECON-UA 12-000 (8769)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Covarrubias, Matias

Interm Microeconomics (ECON-UA 10)

Examines the manner in which producers, consumers, and resource owners acting through the market determine the prices and output of goods, the allocation of productive resources, and the functional distribution of incomes. The price system is seen as a network of interrelated decisions, with the market process serving to communicate information to decision makers.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECON-UA 10-000 (7998)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saini, Viplav · GUZMAN, LEON · Baumgartner, Aleida · Wu, Xiaotong


ECON-UA 10-000 (7999)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wu, Xiaotong


ECON-UA 10-000 (8000)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baumgartner, Aleida


ECON-UA 10-000 (8656)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by GUZMAN, LEON


ECON-UA 10-000 (8657)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by GUZMAN, LEON


ECON-UA 10-000 (20195)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wu, Xiaotong


ECON-UA 10-000 (20196)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baumgartner, Aleida


ECON-UA 10-000 (8894)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williams, Basil · Li, Peter · Toledo, Gabriel


ECON-UA 10-000 (8895)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Toledo, Gabriel


ECON-UA 10-000 (8896)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Peter


ECON-UA 10-000 (10242)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Peter

Principles of Organic and Biological Chemistry and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 210)

This one-semester course covers topics such as nomenclature, conformations, stereochemistry, chemical reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Fundamentals of biochemistry are introduced, including carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, peptides, and nucleic acids.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 210-000 (8636)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhao, Hong


CHEM-UA 210-000 (8637)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yardumian, Isabelle


CHEM-UA 210-000 (8638)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Soper, Nathan


CHEM-UA 210-000 (8639)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Biochemistry II (CHEM-UA 882)

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 882-000 (7949)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lupoli, Tania


CHEM-UA 882-000 (21011)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 882-000 (9236)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qamra, Rohini


CHEM-UA 882-000 (9949)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qamra, Rohini

Introduction to Modern Chemistry (CHEM-UA 120)

Selected principles and applications of chemistry, with emphasis on the fundamental nature of chemistry. Basic course dealing with concepts of atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, solution chemistry, equilibrium, reaction rates, and properties of gases, liquids, and solids.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 120-000 (8631)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by An, Zhihua


CHEM-UA 120-000 (8632)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ashkenazi, Galit


CHEM-UA 120-000 (8633)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pal, Asit


CHEM-UA 120-000 (8634)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Robledo, Alan


CHEM-UA 120-000 (8678)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 120-000 (8708)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Experimental Biochem & Laboratory (CHEM-UA 885)

Introduction to molecular analysis of biomolecules. Selected experiments and instruction in analytical techniques used in biochemical research, including chromatography, spectrophotometry, and electrophoresis; isolation and characterization of selected biomolecules; kinetic analysis of enzymatic activity; analysis of protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions that direct basic biochemical pathways.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 885-000 (9379)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mitra, Somdeb


CHEM-UA 885-000 (9380)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 885-000 (9381)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 885-000 (21009)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tate, Patrick


CHEM-UA 885-000 (21010)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mitra, Somdeb

Physical Chemistry Laboratory (CHEM-UA 661)

Introduction to the principles and practices of experimental methods widely used in analytical and research laboratories. Emphasizes understanding of background physicochemical theory as well as capabilities and limitations of methods and interpretations of data. Covers instrumental methods, such as UV/visible spectroscopy, FT-IR, NMR, and fluorescence, for the systematic characterization of compounds and the use of interfaced computers for data collection and spreadsheet analysis. Studies also include an introduction to computer modeling of molecular properties. Optional experiments include fluorescence studies of protein denaturation and laser studies of excited state kinetics.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 661-000 (7945)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sabo, Dubravko


CHEM-UA 661-000 (7946)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sabo, Dubravko


CHEM-UA 661-000 (7947)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hopkins, Terrence


CHEM-UA 661-000 (7948)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sabo, Dubravko


CHEM-UA 661-000 (8947)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Katz, Dana

Organic Chemistry II & Laboratory (CHEM-UA 226)

This course constitutes a continuation of the study of chemistry of organic compounds. The material is presented in the functional group framework, incorporating reaction mechanisms. Topics include structure and bonding of organic materials, nomenclature, conformational analysis, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, and reactions of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, amines, and carbonyl compounds. Multifunctional organic compounds are covered, including topics of relevance to biochemistry, such as carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, and nucleic acids. Laboratories provide training in the syntheses of organic precursors in high yields and high purity needed for multistep procedures. An extensive research project involving unknown compounds is conducted. The use of IR and NMR spectroscopy is explored.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7921)


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20984)


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20985)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wlodarczyk, Marek


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20986)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wlodarczyk, Marek


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20987)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwok, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20988)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwok, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20989)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tosovska, Petra


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20990)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tosovska, Petra


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20991)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tosovska, Petra


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20992)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tosovska, Petra


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20993)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwok, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20994)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwok, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20995)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7931)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tosovska, Petra


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7932)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wlodarczyk, Marek


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9570)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Angelo, Nicholas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9943)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Helm, Elena


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20998)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9571)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Burnham, Erica


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7933)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Navarro, Abel


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7934)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwok, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7935)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tosovska, Petra


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9572)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wlodarczyk, Marek


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7936)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ben-Zvi, Benjamin


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7937)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Angelo, Nicholas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7938)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwok, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9944)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7939)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Helm, Elena


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7940)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Paolillo, Joshua


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9573)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Navarro, Abel


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9574)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ben-Zvi, Benjamin


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20999)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kelly, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (21000)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mitchell, Joshua


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7941)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wlodarczyk, Marek


CHEM-UA 226-000 (8957)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kelly, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9575)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Seraydarian, Matthew


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9576)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zang, Shihao


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9577)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Whittaker, St. John


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9945)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Andia, Alexander


CHEM-UA 226-000 (25985)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Whittaker, St. John


CHEM-UA 226-000 (25990)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 226-000 (25994)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 226-000 (26004)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

General Chemistry II & Laboratory (CHEM-UA 126)

See General Chemistry I and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 125), above. Laboratories are a continuation of CHEM-UA 125, with emphasis on the analysis of quantitative data rather than its collection. Experiments are selected to provide illustration and reinforcement of the topics covered in the course, including solution chemistry, kinetics, equilibrium, buffers, solubility, and electrochemistry.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7866)


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7867)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gustafson, Afton


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7868)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gustafson, Afton


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7869)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shtukenberg, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7870)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9505)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tariq, Mehrin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9506)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7871)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7872)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shtukenberg, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9924)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reyes, Rhea-Donna


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7873)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7874)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7875)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gustafson, Afton


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7876)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7877)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7878)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7879)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9925)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7880)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mandziuk, Malgorzata


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7881)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Burt


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9926)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9927)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reyes, Rhea-Donna


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9928)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tariq, Mehrin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (20976)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (20977)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7882)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7883)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Geggier, Stephanie


CHEM-UA 126-000 (20978)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tariq, Mehrin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9930)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9931)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7884)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Singh, Vidya


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7885)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Chengtong


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7886)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ohayon, Yoel


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7887)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dar, Aisha


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7888)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Malwana, Lakshika


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7889)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cuen, Jackie


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7890)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sandler, Sterling


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7891)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Andia, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7892)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reyes, Rhea-Donna


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7893)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Garabaghli, Humay


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7894)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Shengguo


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9932)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shtukenberg, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7895)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Crispell, Gavin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (8935)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Chengtong


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7896)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Andia, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7897)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shtukenberg, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7898)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reyes, Rhea-Donna


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7899)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tariq, Mehrin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7900)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Geggier, Stephanie


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7901)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Shengguo


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9933)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mandziuk, Malgorzata


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9565)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sasazawa, Moeka


CHEM-UA 126-000 (8931)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kurikka Valappil Pallachalil, Muhammed Shafi


CHEM-UA 126-000 (8932)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Savino, Brian


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7902)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reyes, Rhea-Donna


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7903)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sheshova, Mia


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9569)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tariq, Mehrin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7904)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cuen, Jackie


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7905)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Andia, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7906)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tariq, Mehrin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9566)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bae, Jessica


CHEM-UA 126-000 (20979)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Soper, Nathan


CHEM-UA 126-000 (20980)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Organic Chemistry I & Laboratory (CHEM-UA 225)

This course constitutes an introduction to the chemistry of organic compounds. The material is presented in the functional group framework, incorporating reaction mechanisms. Topics include structure and bonding of organic materials, nomenclature, conformational analysis, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, and reactions of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, amines, and carbonyl compounds. Multifunctional organic compounds are covered, including topics of relevance to biochemistry, such as carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, and nucleic acids. Laboratories provide training in the basic techniques of the organic chemistry laboratory, including crystallization, distillation, extraction, and other separation techniques, such as column chromatography. Experiments involving the synthesis of organic compounds are introduced, as well as qualitative organic analysis.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7907)


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7908)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhao, Hong


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7909)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhao, Hong


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7910)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhao, Hong


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7911)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhao, Hong


CHEM-UA 225-000 (20981)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Navarro, Abel


CHEM-UA 225-000 (9234)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Navarro, Abel


CHEM-UA 225-000 (25932)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Navarro, Abel


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7912)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Kenneth


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7913)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sasazawa, Moeka


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7914)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Spencer, Rochelle


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7915)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martinez Zayas, Gabriel


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7916)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Spielvogel, Ethan


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7917)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Crispell, Gavin


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7918)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aguilar, Glen


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7919)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Kenneth


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7920)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tosovska, Petra


CHEM-UA 225-000 (20982)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wlodarczyk, Marek


CHEM-UA 225-000 (20983)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Spencer, Rochelle

Computational Chemistry (CHEM-UA 752)

Provides students with a good basic knowledge of molecular modeling and a computational laboratory workbench for computer-based discovery research. The computer laboratory provides access to cutting-edge molecular modeling techniques and software and a hands-on research experience. From the course, the students would not only develop a practical understanding of computational methods (strengths, limitations, applicability), but also develop competence in applying these computational methods to molecular modeling.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

General Chemistry I & Laboratory (CHEM-UA 125)

This course constitutes an introduction to inorganic and physical chemistry for science majors, engineers, and the prehealth professions. Emphasizes the fundamental principles and theories of chemistry. Topics include the theories of atomic structure; stoichiometry; properties of gases, liquids, solids, and solutions; periodicity of the properties of elements; chemical bonding; equilibrium; kinetics, thermodynamics; acid-base reactions; electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. The underlying unity of chemistry is a basic theme. Laboratories provide an introduction to basic techniques used in experimental chemistry. Many experiments use a computer interface to provide experience in modern methods of data collection and to allow thorough analysis of experimental results. Proper laboratory procedures, chemical safety rules, and environmentally sound methods of chemical disposal and waste minimization are important components of the course. Experiments are selected to provide illustration and reinforcement of course topics, including manual and automated titrations, basic chromatography, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, and colorimetry.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7849)


CHEM-UA 125-000 (9353)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7850)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7851)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7852)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 125-000 (9300)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Klopfenstein, Mia


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7853)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ellis, Stephen


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7854)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ellis, Stephen


CHEM-UA 125-000 (10575)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Klopfenstein, Mia


CHEM-UA 125-000 (25574)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ellis, Stephen


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7855)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7856)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chen, Yizhen


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7857)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McHenry, Trent


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7858)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dar, Aisha


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7859)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mazzaferro, Nicodemo


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7860)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sburlati, Sophia


CHEM-UA 125-000 (10576)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kurikka Valappil Pallachalil, Muhammed Shafi


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7861)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7862)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tiwari, Akash


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7863)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McHenry, Trent


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7864)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chen, Yizhen


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7865)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Epstein, Sam


CHEM-UA 125-000 (25832)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chong, Sarah


CHEM-UA 125-000 (25833)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Klopfenstein, Mia


CHEM-UA 125-000 (25834)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ellis, Stephen


CHEM-UA 125-000 (25835)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yardumian, Isabelle

Thermodynamics & Kinetics (CHEM-UA 652)

Continuation of V25.0651. Develops the close connection between the microscopic world of quantum mechanics and the macroscopic world of thermodynamics. Topics include properties of gases, elementary statistical thermodynamics, and thermodynamics of single and multicomponent systems.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 652-000 (7942)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hocky, Glen


CHEM-UA 652-000 (7943)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Weiss, Philip


CHEM-UA 652-000 (7944)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Weiss, Philip

Quantum Mechanics & Spectroscopy (CHEM-UA 651)

An introduction to quantum mechanics–general principles and applications to important model systems. Covers electronic structure of one- and many-electron atoms, theory of chemical bonding in diatomic and polyatomic molecules. Includes principles and applications of molecular spectroscopy–rotational, vibrational, electronic, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Elements of photochemistry are also included.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 651-000 (8675)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bacic, Zlatko


CHEM-UA 651-000 (20971)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sabo, Dubravko


CHEM-UA 651-000 (8717)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 651-000 (25441)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sabo, Dubravko

Object Oriented Programming (CSCI-UA 470)

Object-oriented programming has emerged as a significant software development methodology. This course introduces the important concepts of object-oriented design and languages, including code reuse, data abstraction, inheritance, and dynamic overloading. It covers in depth those features of Java and C that support object-oriented programming and gives an overview of other object-oriented languages of interest. Significant programming assignments, stressing object-oriented design.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Photography I (OART-UT 11)

A basic black-and-white photography course designed for those with little or no experience in photography. Emphasis is placed on the application of technique in terms of personal expression through the selection and composition of subject matter. Class size is limited, providing for a greater degree of individual critique and classroom participation. The course comprises technical lectures, readings and discussions about critical issues in photography, slide lectures on historical and contemporary work as well as class critiques. Each student must have a camera with manually adjustable aperture and shutter speeds.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 11-000 (14186)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Frocheur, Nichole

Intermediate Korean for Advanced Speakers (EAST-UA 282)

This intensive intermediate course covers the second-year Korean material in a semester. The course is designed for students with intermediate-level speaking proficiency but with reading and writing ability equivalent to a student who has completed elementary level Korean, who can understand, with near-standard pronunciation and without basic major grammatical errors, conversational Korean related to daily-life situations and simple sociocultural topics. It aims to further strengthen students’ correct pronunciation and intonation, grammatical accuracy, ability to understand differences in nuances and overall competence in reading and writing.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Readings in Contemporary Japanese Writings (EAST-UA 266)

Close readings in contemporary Japanese writings in social commentaries, history and literature. Emphasizes furthering reading and writings skills, and to a lesser extent speaking and listening. Students develop further strategies for autonomous learning.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 266-000 (20186)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hanawa, Yukiko

Elementary Korean for Advanced Speakers (EAST-UA 281)

This intensive elementary course covers the first-year Korean material in a single semester. The course is designed for students with some Korean-speaking background, who can understand and speak basic to intermediate conversational Korean but do not have previous formal language training in reading and writing. It aims to develop students’ correct pronunciation, grammatical accuracy and overall competence in reading and writing.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 281-000 (8901)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Cheun Mi

Advanced Korean I (EAST-UA 258)

This course is designed to assist advanced students of Korean language as they continue to learn skills in conversation, reading, and writing. Reading Korean newspapers and visiting Korean Web sites are integrated as part of the course’s instruction.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 258-000 (9074)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ji, Eun-Jung

Elementary Korean I (EAST-UA 254)

First-year Korean designed to introduce the Korean language and alphabet, Hangul. This course provides a solid foundation in all aspects of the language, including speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students study the language’s orthographic and phonetic systems, grammar, syntax, and vocabulary within social and cultural contexts.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 254-000 (9018)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Choi, Yongjun


EAST-UA 254-000 (9045)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jang, Kyungmi


EAST-UA 254-000 (9170)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Park, Jeesun


EAST-UA 254-000 (9426)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Park, Jeesun


EAST-UA 254-000 (9730)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jung, Su

Intermediate Japanese II (EAST-UA 250)

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 250-000 (8048)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kinjo, Masaki


EAST-UA 250-000 (8049)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nonaka, Kayo


EAST-UA 250-000 (9634)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yamamoto, Tsumugi

Elementary Japanese II (EAST-UA 248)

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 248-000 (8046)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kinjo, Masaki


EAST-UA 248-000 (8047)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kinjo, Masaki


EAST-UA 248-000 (9312)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nonaka, Kayo


EAST-UA 248-000 (9044)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yamamoto, Tsumugi


EAST-UA 248-000 (9633)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hanawa, Yukiko

Intermediate Japanese I (EAST-UA 249)

Continuing study of Japanese at the intermediate level. Stresses reading comprehension, spoken fluency, and composition, with materials organized around social and cultural topics; continues to introduce new Kanji characters.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 249-000 (8641)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Matsumoto, Mayumi


EAST-UA 249-000 (8704)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yamamoto, Tsumugi


EAST-UA 249-000 (9724)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hanawa, Yukiko

Advanced Chinese II (EAST-UA 206)

Designed to further develop proficiency in speaking and writing through readings on and discussions of socio-cultural topics relevant to today’s China. Focuses on improving reading comprehension and writing skills. The objectives are: to further improve oral communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages; to acquire vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting semi-formal or formal discussions of socio-cultural topics; to increase reading speed of texts with more advanced syntax; to learn to make context-based guess about the meaning of a new word, conduct sentence analysis and solve textual problems with the aid of dictionaries; to write and present more fully developed narratives or reasoned and structured arguments in length; to learn to employ basic rhetoric methods; to learn to appreciate stylistic usage of Chinese language.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 206-000 (8042)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shao, Wenteng


EAST-UA 206-000 (8043)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shao, Wenteng


EAST-UA 206-000 (9299)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liao, Shiqi

Elementary Japanese I (EAST-UA 247)

Introductory course in modern spoken and written Japanese, designed to develop fundamental skills in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Gives contextualized instructions to develop both communicative and cultural competency. Systematically introduces the Japanese writing system (Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji).

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 247-000 (8045)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kurahara, Kazue


EAST-UA 247-000 (8747)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Matsumoto, Mayumi


EAST-UA 247-000 (9070)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Omori, Toshiko


EAST-UA 247-000 (9072)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Takeda, Shuichiro


EAST-UA 247-000 (9409)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Takeda, Shuichiro


EAST-UA 247-000 (9427)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kurokawa, Kazue


EAST-UA 247-000 (20184)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kurokawa, Kazue


EAST-UA 247-000 (20185)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Omori, Toshiko

Intermediate Chinese I (EAST-UA 203)

Designed to consolidate the student’s overall aural-oral proficiency. Focuses gradually on the written aspect of Chinese. The objectives are: to be able to obtain information from extended conversation; to both express and expound on, in relative length, feelings and opinions on common topics; to expand vocabulary and learn to decipher meaning of compound words; to develop reading comprehension of extended narrative, expository and simple argumentative passages; to solve non-complex textual problems with the aid of dictionaries; to write in relative length personal narratives, informational narratives, comparison and discussion of viewpoints with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 203-000 (8037)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sun, Jing Ying


EAST-UA 203-000 (9311)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Cong


EAST-UA 203-000 (8038)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Cong

Intermediate Chinese II (EAST-UA 204)

Designed to consolidate the student’s overall aural-oral proficiency. Focuses gradually on the written aspect of Chinese. The objectives are: to be able to obtain information from extended conversation; to both express and expound on, in relative length, feelings and opinions on common topics; to expand vocabulary and learn to decipher meaning of compound words; to develop reading comprehension of extended narrative, expository and simple argumentative passages; to solve non-complex textual problems with the aid of dictionaries; to write in relative length personal narratives, informational narratives, comparison and discussion of viewpoints with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 204-000 (8039)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hao, Guangyu


EAST-UA 204-000 (8040)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xu, Jiayi


EAST-UA 204-000 (9578)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xu, Jiayi

Advanced Chinese I (EAST-UA 205)

Designed to further develop proficiency in speaking and writing through readings on and discussions of socio-cultural topics relevant to today’s China. Focuses on improving reading comprehension and writing skills. The objectives are: to further improve oral communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages; to acquire vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting semi-formal or formal discussions of socio-cultural topics; to increase reading speed of texts with more advanced syntax; to learn to make context-based guess about the meaning of a new word, conduct sentence analysis and solve textual problems with the aid of dictionaries; to write and present more fully developed narratives or reasoned and structured arguments in length; to learn to employ basic rhetoric methods; to learn to appreciate stylistic usage of Chinese language.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 205-000 (8041)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Chen


EAST-UA 205-000 (8903)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xu, Jiayi

Elementary Chinese I (EAST-UA 201)

Designed to develop and reinforce language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives are: to master the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones) with satisfactory pronunciation; to understand the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional) and learn to write them correctly; to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; to build up essential vocabulary; to read and write level appropriate passages; to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 201-000 (8748)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Xin


EAST-UA 201-000 (9123)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Xin


EAST-UA 201-000 (9292)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Chen


EAST-UA 201-000 (9568)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Chen

Elementary Chinese II (EAST-UA 202)

Designed to develop and reinforce language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives are: to master the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones) with satisfactory pronunciation; to understand the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional) and learn to write them correctly; to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; to build up essential vocabulary; to read and write level appropriate passages; to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 202-000 (9955)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Wenqian


EAST-UA 202-000 (9956)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Catherine


EAST-UA 202-000 (9957)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Wenqian

Theatre in Asia (DRLIT-UA 294)

This course (different each time) examines different traditions, innovations, representations, and locations of Asian theatre. The influence of major aesthetic texts such as the Natyasastra and the Kadensho is studied in relationship to specific forms of theatre such as Kagura, Bugaku, Noh, Bunraku, Kabuki, Shingeki, Jingxi, Geju, Zaju, Kathakali, Kathak, Odissi, Chau, Manipuri, Krishnattam, Kutiyattam, Raslila, and P?ansori. The dramatization of religious beliefs, myths, and legends is examined in a contemporary context. Different focuses include Middle Eastern performance, Japanese theatre, traditional Asian performances on contemporary stages, religion and drama in Southeast Asia, and traditions of India.

Dramatic Literature (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Drama in Performance (DRLIT-UA 300)

Combines the study of drama as literary text with the study of theatre as its three-dimensional translation, both theoretically and practically. Drawing on the rich theatrical resources of New York City, students see approximately 12 plays, covering classical to contemporary and traditional to experimental theatre. On occasion, films or videotapes of plays are used to supplement live performances. Readings include plays and essays in theory and criticism.

Dramatic Literature (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Shakespeare (DRLIT-UA 225)

Introduction to the reading of Shakespeare. Examines about 10 plays each term, generally in chronological order. First term: the early comedies, tragedies, and histories up to Hamlet. Second term: the later tragedies, the problem plays, and the romances, concluding with The Tempest.

Dramatic Literature (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


DRLIT-UA 225-000 (9682)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Guillory, John


DRLIT-UA 225-000 (9799)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Clark, Katharine


DRLIT-UA 225-000 (9800)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Clark, Katharine

Intermediate Poetry Workshop (CRWRI-UA 817)

The intermediate workshops offer budding fiction writers and poets an opportunity to continue their pursuit of writing through workshops that focus on a specific genre. The workshops also integrate in-depth craft discussions and extensive outside reading to deepen students’ understanding of the genre and broaden their knowledge of the evolution of literary forms and techniques.

Creative Writing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8090)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rohrer, Matthew


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8091)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Popa, Maya


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8692)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fitterman, Robert


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8092)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gallagher, Jean


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8628)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nutter, Geoffrey


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (20174)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Eye, David