Category Archives: Summer 2019

Computer Systems Organization (CS-UH 2010)

The course focuses on understanding lower-level issues in computer design and programming. The course starts with the C programming language, moves down to assembly and machine-level code, and concludes with basic operating systems and architectural concepts. Students learn to read assembly code and reverse-engineer programs in binary. Topics in this course include the C programming language, data representation, machine-level code, memory organization and management, performance evaluation and optimization, and concurrency.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 2010-000 (3495)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ali, Karim · Mengal, Khalid


CS-UH 2010-000 (3933)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mengal, Khalid

From Hegel to Nietzsche (PHIL-UA 32)

Examines some of the most important philosophical ideas and developments in Europe in the nineteenth century, preceded by a brief examination of some aspects of Kant’s philosophy. (Kant is examined in more detail in PHIL-UA 30.) Covers major writings by Hegel, and a selection of writings, determined by the special focus of the particular version of the course, from such thinkers as Fichte, Schelling, Feuerbach, Schopenhauer, Mill, Comte, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Adv Business Chinese I (EAST-UA 603)

This is a post-advanced level language course for students looking to pursue a career in the field of business or economics related to China. It is designed for students: (a) to develop conceptual framework to understand China’s economic reform, its integration into the global economy, and the subsequent challenges and opportunities for its economy, companies and society at large; (b) to learn the specialized vocabulary, phrases and syntax used for oral and written communication in authentic business settings. Course materials will include journal articles on various aspects of China’s economic developments, its evolving macro and micro economic policy, as well as genuine business case studies of both domestic and foreign companies operating in China. In addition to Advanced level proficiency in Chinese (completion of EAST-UA 206 or equivalent), this course also requires basic background in business and/or economics.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2019)


EAST-UA 603-000 (2427)
07/08/2019 – 08/18/2019 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


EAST-UA 603-000 (4807)
07/08/2019 – 08/18/2019 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Creative Learning Design (IMBX-SHU 241)

This practical, hands-on course will explore questions such as: How can we design engaging, creative learning experiences that are relevant to the cultural goals and needs of today’s youth in China, while laying the foundation for creative learning for the workforce of tomorrow? What are engaging, effective creative learning resources, and how are they best implemented in Chinese learning settings? How can we take advantage of young people’s near ubiquitous love of the arts to facilitate creative learning?’ In this course, students will work in teams to design digital learning resources and experience designs at the intersection of music, coding, arts, and technology. The course will begin with an introduction to emerging trends in learner engagement and design-based research, especially related to web- and mobile-based musical experiences and principles of making music with new media. Innovations in and applications of musical interaction, interactive technologies, user-centered design & engagement, scaffolded learning, creative learning, pedagogies of play and making, and educational entrepreneurship will also be explored. Students will work together in teams and paired with a partner audience of learners and teachers in Shanghai drawn from local and regional international schools, ed-tech startups, and cultural partners. Together they will assess the needs and opportunities of partner students and teachers, and engage in a two-stage iterative, reflective co-design process prototyping custom learning resources and experience designs with their partner end users. At the end of the course, students will present and demo their learning resources as part of a public showcase to an external audience of partners, educators, technologists, musicians, entrepreneurs, and experience designers in Shanghai. Prerequisites: None. Fulfillment: IMA Major Electives; IMB Major Business Elective/Interactive Media Elective; Business and Finance Major Non-Finance Electives; Business and Marketing Major Non-Marketing Electives.

Interactive Media and Business (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IMBX-SHU 241-000 (17770)
01/24/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Ruthmann, Alex

Making Webisodes (OART-GT 2569)

Making Webisodes is an intensive production workshop in which students create unique and compelling content for the web. Students will explore the basics of online video production, working with – concept creation – writing – directing – acting – production design – camerawork – sound – editing – online distribution – social media – web monetization – and advertising. Web series are an exploding new art form. Embedded ads, 5 second hooks, instagram stories, tik-tok, and viral videos all present a variety of new media approaches within the entertainment industry, business, lifestyle, and politics. Webisodes are short visual presentations that either entertain us, directly sell us product, indirectly sell us product, share a powerful message, investigate social issues, expose problems, celebrate joy, engage our perspective, shock us, or challenge us. Students will work with Sony FS5 cameras, microphones, and LED lights and they will also be trained to use their own dslrs and cellphones, in order to practice creating a wide variety of webisodes. Workshop assignments employ practical exercises to help the students conceive and create their own unique webisode, which can be fiction or non-fiction, experimental or satire, personal or political. Combining the powerful tools of traditional filmmaking with innovative new digital media tools, this class guides students to create dynamic web based projects. As the students produce their digital media, they learn by doing and they gain practical knowledge of the art, craft, and commerce of webisodes.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


OART-GT 2569-000 (7249)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tunnicliffe, William

Intro to Digital Tools (OART-GT 2823)

This course will explore the basic tools of digital imaging. We will cover the three main Adobe products for creative imaging – Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. Through a series of short assignments we will look at various graphic design and layout ideas using Illustrator and InDesign and will touch on the wealth of image enhancement techniques afforded by Photoshop. The short assignments introduce the basics of design, typography and compositing images. Students have the opportunity to complete a small project of their own for the end of the term. Class time will be divided between lectures, critiques, and work in class sessions. This course is not intended to completely cover the software listed, but will give students a fundamental understanding of the possibilities of digital imaging. While the majority of the class focuses on print media (images, books and magazines), we discuss the growing importance of screen output. We do not have time to cover specific web or media projects, but will address transferable skills and understanding. We will incorporate some Adobe apps to augment the desktop applications. Additional reading materials will be distributed during the semester. Students should have access to the Adobe Creative Suite through the NYU license.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


OART-GT 2823-000 (7363)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fallon, Catherine


OART-GT 2823-000 (7364)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fallon, Catherine

Creative Learning Design (INTM-SHU 241)

In this course, students will work in teams to design digital learning resources and experience designs at the intersection of music, coding, arts, and technology. The course will begin with an introduction to emerging trends in learner engagement and design-based research, especially related to web- and mobile-based musical experiences and principles of making music with new media. Innovations in and applications of musical creativity, interactive technologies, user-centered design & engagement, scaffolded learning, creative learning, pedagogies of play and making, and educational entrepreneurship in Chinese contexts will also be explored. The market for creative educational experiences in afterschool settings for youth in China is exploding. For-profit educational service companies are competing and searching for differentiated, learning experiences in music, coding, and creative project based learning that will attract high-paying parents looking for the best supplemental education for their children. This practical, hands-on course will explore questions such as: How can we design engaging, creative learning experiences that are relevant to the cultural goals and needs of today’s youth in China, while laying the foundation for creative learning for the workforce of tomorrow? What are engaging, effective creative learning resources, and how are they best implemented in Chinese learning settings? How can we take advantage of young people’s near ubiquitous love of music and technology to facilitate creative learning? Students will work together in teams and paired with a partner audience of learners and teachers in Shanghai drawn from local and regional international schools (e.g. Alibaba’s Cloud Valley), local afterschool programs (e.g., Music Lab), and cultural partners (e.g., Shanghai Symphony). Together they will assess the needs and opportunities of partner students and teachers, and engage in a two-stage iterative and reflective co-design process prototyping custom learning resources and experience designs with their partner end users. At the end of the course, students will present and demo their learning resources as part of a public showcase to an external audience of partners, educators, technologists, musicians, entrepreneurs, and experience designers in Shanghai. Prerequisites: None.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Law and Society (SOC-UA 413)

Sociological perspectives on law and legal institutions: the meaning and complexity of legal issues; the relation between law and social change; the effects of law; uses of law to overcome social disadvantage. Topics: ?limits of law,? legal disputes and the courts, regulation, comparative legal systems, legal education, organization of legal work, and lawyers? careers.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


SOC-UA 413-000 (9101)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SOC-UA 413-000 (9102)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SOC-UA 413-000 (9103)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Creative Learning Design (INTM-SHU 236A)

In this course, students will work in teams to design digital learning resources and experience designs at the intersection of music, coding, arts, and technology. The course will begin with an introduction to emerging trends in learner engagement and design-based research, especially related to web- and mobile-based musical experiences and principles of making music with new media. Innovations in and applications of musical creativity, interactive technologies, user-centered design & engagement, scaffolded learning, creative learning, pedagogies of play and making, and educational entrepreneurship in Chinese contexts will also be explored. The market for creative educational experiences in afterschool settings for youth in China is exploding. For-profit educational service companies are competing and searching for differentiated, learning experiences in music, coding, and creative project based learning that will attract high-paying parents looking for the best supplemental education for their children. This practical, hands-on course will explore questions such as: How can we design engaging, creative learning experiences that are relevant to the cultural goals and needs of today’s youth in China, while laying the foundation for creative learning for the workforce of tomorrow? What are engaging, effective creative learning resources, and how are they best implemented in Chinese learning settings? How can we take advantage of young people’s near ubiquitous love of music and technology to facilitate creative learning? Students will work together in teams and paired with a partner audience of learners and teachers in Shanghai drawn from local and regional international schools (e.g. Alibaba’s Cloud Valley), local afterschool programs (e.g., Music Lab), and cultural partners (e.g., Shanghai Symphony). Together they will assess the needs and opportunities of partner students and teachers, and engage in a two-stage iterative and reflective co-design process prototyping custom learning resources and experience designs with their partner end users. At the end of the course, students will present and demo their learning resources as part of a public showcase to an external audience of partners, educators, technologists, musicians, entrepreneurs, and experience designers in Shanghai. Prerequisites: None.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2019)


INTM-SHU 236A-000 (4149)07/08/2019 – 08/16/2019 Mon,Wed1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)at ShanghaiInstructed by Ruthmann, Alex

Making Data Tangible (ITPG-GT 2028)

Data is ubiquitous. Yet, it’s often invisible. In this course, we will explore ways to create physical data visualizations using contemporary design and digital fabrication tools. Students will learn how to collect data, find interesting patterns, design creative digital models and build tangible pieces using laser cutters, 3D printers and woodworking tools. We will visualize everything from street performers in Washington Square to Instagram influencer trends. Topics related to creative coding, Arduino, artificial intelligence, projection mapping and traditional art-making techniques will also be discussed.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 5 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2020)


ITPG-GT 2028-000 (4268)
05/27/2020 – 07/01/2020 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kuiphoff, John

Understanding Story (OART-UT 568)

Understanding Story is a class composed of lectures, discussions, screenings, readings, critical and creative writing, group critiques and presentations. The course is designed to expose the student to the fundamental principles of storytelling across a spectrum of mediums, including the written story, playwriting, film, poetry, dance, games, photography, fine art and music. How do all these different art forms tell stories? How can the student apply what is learned to their own creative work? History and theory of story will be studied and used to inspire personal and creative work in order to better understand how story can most successfully be expressed in different mediums and reach its audience.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 568-000 (14319)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Limoncelli, Rosanne

Intro to Digital Tools (OART-UT 823)

This course will explore the basic tools of digital imaging. We will cover the three main Adobe products for creative imaging – Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. Through a series of short assignments we will look at various graphic design and layout ideas using Illustrator and InDesign and will touch on the wealth of image enhancement techniques afforded by Photoshop. The short assignments introduce the basics of design, typography and compositing images. Students have the opportunity to complete a small project of their own for the end of the term. Class time will be divided between lectures, critiques, and work in class sessions. This course is not intended to completely cover the software listed, but will give students a fundamental understanding of the possibilities of digital imaging. While the majority of the class focuses on print media (images, books and magazines), we discuss the growing importance of screen output. We do not have time to cover specific web or media projects, but will address transferable skills and understanding. We will incorporate some Adobe apps to augment the desktop applications. Additional reading materials will be distributed during the semester. Students should have access to the Adobe Creative Suite through the NYU license.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 823-000 (14195)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fallon, Catherine


OART-UT 823-000 (14320)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fallon, Catherine

Making Webisodes (OART-UT 569)

Making Webisodes is an intensive 14 week course which combines lectures and workshops in which students create unique and compelling content for the web and then learn how to post that content on the web. Students will explore the basics of film production and online webisode distribution, working with – concept creation – writing – directing – acting – production design – camerawork – sound – editing – online tracking tools and social media – web monetization and advertising. The webisode is an exploding new art form. Web series, embedded ads, 5 second hooks, snapchats, vines and viral videos all present a variety of new media approaches within the entertainment industry, business, lifestyle, and politics. Webisodes are short visual presentations that either entertain us, directly sell us product, indirectly sell us product, or shock and engage our perspective, as in political propaganda videos. Lectures provide students with an overview of the emerging web series industry, concentrating on how the webisode is used to hook the audience, generate hits, and drive customers to websites and/or online advertising. Workshops then employ practical exercises to help the students conceive and create their own unique webisode, which can be narrative or non-narrative, fiction or non-fiction, experimental or satire, personal or political. The goal is to use the resources at hand and create instant media – webisodes. As the students produce their webisodes, they will learn by doing and they will be provided with practical knowledge of the art, craft, and commerce of webisodes.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


OART-UT 569-000 (23613)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tunnicliffe, William