The Making of Economic Policy in the White House (ECON-UB 217)

This course shows students how economic policy gets made, and should get made, at the highest levels of federal government. It draws upon almost fifty years of economic policy-making, and the challenges that have confronted the men and women who have sat in positions of power in the Treasury, the Office of Management and Budget, the Council of Economic Advisers, and the National Economic Council. These challenges include the breakdown of the Bretton Woods system and the transition to a predominantly floating exchange rate world, the era of rampant inflation, the collapse of the Soviet Union and the transition to market economies, the shock of 9/11, the financial crisis of 2008, and the Great Recession that followed. Lectures and discussions will lead to in-class exercises, in which students will role- play as advisers to US presidents from Richard Nixon to Donald Trump. What is it like to sit in the Oval Office and discuss policy with the president? To know that your input into his decisions will impact millions of people? To know that the wrong advice could be calamitous? Students will learn how to analyze policy problems and design solutions, taking into account the multi-dimensional aspects of making federal policy and the many constraints upon those decisions, including of course the influence of Congress. As part of the learning process, students will also have the opportunity to hear from guest speakers who have worked at the very top of economic policy-making in the executive branch of government, and played a role in the policy-making process through their work in the media.

Economics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Editing I (FMTV-UT 1016)

This is a hands-on course designed to introduce the student to narrative and documentary editing techniques, and to the role of the editor in shaping the final form of film and video productions. Good editing is crucial to the success of every film and video. This class is recommended to students pursuing directing or producing who want a better understanding of how the post-production workflow functions, as well as to any student, from sophomore to senior, who would like to gain a clearer understanding of the role of the editor as an artist, a technician and a collaborator. To achieve this, the class will delve into the methods, objectives, and technical aspects of post-production. It will thoroughly explore two major editing programs (Avid Media Composer and Adobe Premiere Pro) used in today’s professional post-production environment, and acquaint the student with every stage of the editing workflow from capture to final output. Students will learn to approach these and other non-linear programs as variations on common themes rather than as completely new and foreign tools. In addition, the class will present examples of edited sequences from both narrative and documentary films for discussion, and have invited guests who will share their experiences in bringing films to completion. There will also be a course pack of assigned readings. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19414)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lewis, Emir


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19415)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Frank


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19416)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lewis, Emir


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19417)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pollard, Jason


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19418)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Weinstein, Yonatan

Experiential Learning Seminar: Fashion Industry: Creativity & Business (MULT-UB 104)

Fashion companies, as business entities, have always been faced with balancing technological and operational necessities with creative and imaginative artistry. Today, this challenge is even more difficult to manage, as the industry’s traditional modes of operation (e.g. a multitude of physical retail locations, seasonally driven creation & distribution of products, near total dependency on foreign production, and the producer’s sense of fashion trend entitlement) has given way to omnichannel retailing, merchandise “drops” and smaller collections, reimagining production systems (aka “Supply Chains”)and the ascendency of the consumer as the controlling factor in confirming fashion trends and determining market outcomes, to name just a few of the disruptive changes. This has been underscored by the industry struggling to contain its role as a major source of global pollution, and global warming. The ESG/CSR Sustainability challenge has intensified Fashion’s need to manage these disruptive changes and incorporate new operational modes while, in the same space and time, embracing the new digital ways of thinking about business and fashion, including the impact of the Metaverse, NFT’s, Blockchain and virtual try-on processes and platforms. This course and this class is charged with finding new, untried but business-driven, solutions to these challenges placed within the Sustainability context.

Multidisciplinary (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


MULT-UB 104-000 (10943)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carr, Jeffrey

Entrepreneurship in Sustainable Protein (BSPA-UB 50)

Today, the food industry is the biggest emitter of greenhouse gases, accounting for up to 30% of emissions. A poor diet is now the leading cause of mortality in the U.S. As part of these huge global problems, animal production is arguably the biggest culprit. In recognition of this, consumers are dramatically altering diet patterns, and food entrepreneurs are rushing to solve the problem with desirable solutions. Vegetarianism and veganism are exploding and new alternative meat and dairy offerings are being launched at a frenetic pace. This undergraduate course—the first of its kind—is designed to put the idea of teaching entrepreneurship to its ultimate test—with the objective of incubating a series of ventures through the course of the semester that have the potential to be viable businesses and reverse negative externalities that arise from animal production. The course will start by exploring the chemistry of protein, the nutritional role of protein, the history of animal production and its environmental consequences. It will then take students through a series of frameworks to identify and implement solutions using entrepreneurship as the vehicle. These frameworks will include: (1) design thinking to identify opportunities, (2) sector / industry analysis models to identify need-gaps and validate the opportunity, (3) design thinking to prototype solutions and (4) business modeling in order to commercialize solutions. At the beginning of the semester, “start-up” teams of five to six students each will be formed and tasked with building a “blue-print” for a startup in the sustainable protein sector.

Business and Society (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


BSPA-UB 50-000 (19353)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Taparia, Hans

Introduction to Editing (FMTV-UT 1016)

This is a hands-on course designed to introduce the student to narrative and documentary editing techniques, and to the role of the editor in shaping the final form of film and video productions. Good editing is crucial to the success of every film and video. This class is recommended to students pursuing directing or producing who want a better understanding of how the post-production workflow functions, as well as to any student, from sophomore to senior, who would like to gain a clearer understanding of the role of the editor as an artist, a technician and a collaborator. To achieve this, the class will delve into the methods, objectives, and technical aspects of post-production. It will thoroughly explore two major editing programs (Avid Media Composer and Adobe Premiere Pro) used in today’s professional post-production environment, and acquaint the student with every stage of the editing workflow from capture to final output. Students will learn to approach these and other non-linear programs as variations on common themes rather than as completely new and foreign tools. In addition, the class will present examples of edited sequences from both narrative and documentary films for discussion, and have invited guests who will share their experiences in bringing films to completion. There will also be a course pack of assigned readings. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Storyboarding (FMTV-UT 1033)

Students will create a storyboard from an assigned literary property (i.e., fairy tales, folk tales, famous short stories, etc.) and research the chosen material visually in picture libraries, print and photo archives, museum/gallery libraries and online. From this basic research, the student will create and develop all the visual elements that lead to a final production storyboard; these elements include character model drawings; styling sketches for costumes and sets; experimental “inspirational” sketches exploring mood, color, and character relationships and experiments in animation and color test footage. Each week, students will “pitch,” (i.e. present material) as it is being developed. Through weekly critiques from the instructor and students, elements and shape of the production storyboard is refined to its final form. The approved storyboard at the end of the semester should be ready to go into production, and must reflect character ,attitude, design, entertainment, mood, expressions, feeling and type of action. It must use dialogue, music/sound effects, and tell the story in the best possible way. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19436)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moore, William


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19437)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baker, Zoya


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19438)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baker, Zoya


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19439)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Intro Theory of Probability (STAT-UB 14)

Covers the basic concepts of probability. Topics include the axiomatic definition of probability; combinatorial theorems; conditional probability and independent events; random variables and probability distributions; expectation of functions of random variables; special discrete and continuous distributions, including the chi-square, t, F, and bivariate normal distributions; law of large numbers; central limit theorem; and moment generating functions. The theory of statistical estimation is introduced with a discussion on maximum likelihood estimation.

Statistics & Operations Research (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


STAT-UB 14-000 (20243)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tenenbein, Aaron

History of Cinematography (FMTV-UT 1206)

This course deals with the history of the art and science of cinematography. A working Director of Photography will relate a perspective that is unique and factual to a theoretical discussion, which is traditionally academic. Cinematography has a strong tradition of adapting its tools to enhance the storytelling experience. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES. “Non-majors must process a “Permission Notice for Non-Majors” form” to register for the course (subject to availability).

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1206-000 (19531)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carmine, Michael

Economics of Media and Entertainment (ECON-UB 120)

The media and entertainment industries (including professional sports) share a series of peculiar features: essentially, they (a) produce an intangible output (e.g., a music recording), which can be distributed in a variety of forms and (b) do so based on an input which is extremely idiosyncratic: the creative output of a person or group of persons (e.g., a singer or a band). Finally, (c) recent technological innovation has changed the balance of power between the various players and led various industry segments to re-invent their business model. This course provides an introduction to the businesses of media and entertainment: value chain, key players, significant trends, etc. It takes a distinctive economics perspective to understanding how the forces of supply and demand have changed the business model of various industry segments.

Economics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

TV Nation: Inside and Out of The Box (FMTV-UT 1086)

TV Nation: Inside and Out of the Box gives students the opportunity to experience, first hand, how the world of network television works from two points of view: business and creative. Students will gain an understanding of the business aspect through the vantage point of the network executives and programmers. They will also learn the creative process from development to pitching, from the vantage point of writers and producers in the industry. In TV Nation, students will role play the entire process as the key players who put together a season for broadcast and cable networks. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1086-000 (19478)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldman, Andrew

ELECTRICITY AND LIGHT (PH-UY 1223)

Second of two introductory courses in general physics for non science or engineering majors. (Not an acceptable substitute for PH-UY 2023 or PH-UY 2033) Electric forces and fields. Electric potential and capacitance. Electric current. Magnetic forces and fields. Faradays law and inductance. Maxwell’s Theory of Electromagnetism. Electromagnetic waves. Light and Color. Geometrical optics. Image Formation. Interference and diffraction. | Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 1213 or PH-UY 1013; Co-requisite: EX-UY 1.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PH-UY 1223-000 (17458)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Di Bartolo, John


PH-UY 1223-000 (17459)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


PH-UY 1223-000 (17460)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Di Bartolo, John


PH-UY 1223-000 (17461)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Di Bartolo, John

Fund of Audio Tech II: Stu Maint (MPATE-UE 1009)

Advanced work in studio repair and maintenance focusing on digital equipment. Students will develop practical skills tracing schematics, using test equipment, and replacing components as required daily in the studio environment.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MPATE-UE 1009-000 (18223)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Glanz, Jake

Applied Audio for Video (MPATE-UE 1225)

A continuation of MPATE-UE 1010. This is an advanced & detailed study of the audio-visual production & post-production process including digital recording techniques, with special emphasis on synchronization & the interfacing of SMPTE time code. Sound design, advanced Foley topics, * creative workflow in audio post production will also be discussed.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MPATE-UE 1225-000 (12867)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shafter, Spencer

Interdisciplinary Projects: Guided Practice (ART-UE 9921)

This course provides space and guidance for students to work on self-driven, individual and group projects in art and media. Course content consists of texts, site visits, presentations, workshops, and critiques built around each student’s individual practice. Faculty and guest critics will hold regular studio visits, to help guide students through their process. Students’ material and technical investigations and theoretical inquiries will be addressed in group workshops and demonstrations. This course will culminate in a public presentation of students’ work.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 9921-000 (2387)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by Komarov, Aleksander

History of Editing (FMTV-UT 1003)

The theory and practice of editing, from Griffith to Kubrick. The emphasis will be on experiments in narrative clarity and dramatic emphasis in storytelling. For many, editing is the unique source of the art of filmmaking. This course addresses this point of view. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


FMTV-UT 1003-000 (6959)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rea, Peter

The Art of Sound (FMTV-UT 1007)

This is a critical studies course exploring the aesthetics and psycho-acoustics of sound: how sound works in art and life; how it affects emotions and stimulates the imagination; and how it is used in film, radio, television and other creative or artistic contexts, particularly its application as a key element in storytelling. This course examines the meaning and character of the soundscape (the acoustic environment) and the ways it has technically and aesthetically evolved throughout film history from the Kinetophone to the iPhone. The course includes reading in the theory of sound, and listening to examples of sound work by composers and sound designers. In previous semesters we have looked at the soundtrack in such films as: Playtime; Apocalypse Now, The Conversation, Aliens, The Evil Dead II, Saving Private Ryan, and Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Class meetings will be devoted to: 1) lecture and discussion based on assigned readings and listening and viewing assignments; and 2) screening of selected audio and video works. Students are graded on class participation, journals, a paper, and exams. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1007-000 (19411)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McKeever, Marsha

The Black Image in Cinema (FMTV-UT 1216)

This is a critical analysis of the Black image in cinema through film screenings, discussions, and selected readings. Film is an art form whose influence dictates how we see others and ourselves. It shapes our worldview and, yet, it is one of the youngest and most misunderstood art forms. On the surface, film viewing might seem like a passive form of learning, but effective films engage us on emotional, intellectual, spiritual, cultural, and political levels. Film is one of the most powerful mediums ever invented and since it’s invention, the Black image and experience has been distorted, demonized, romanticized, erased, appropriated as well as exalted and reified. So, it is our duty and responsibility to know its history, understand its present effects, so we can dictate its future and participate in how the Black image evolves and is treated over time. This course will survey and critically explore an historical range of the Black image on screen and Black films in relation to inspiration, narrative, a scene, set, and site of production. Screening will include a sampling of important Black independently made, and/or Black cast and narrative feature films. We will discuss and analyze specific technical elements (direction, editing, framing and composition, mise-en-scene, music, etc.) that reinforce and demonstrate these larger themes. Accordingly, our discussions and readings will cover the full range of current issues and debates in Black cinema studies, from independence vs. mainstream filmmaking; gender and sexuality; class and color caste; the ghettoization and upwardly mobile integration of urban zones; cooptation and the rise of the bourgeois story as genre, and so on.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1216-000 (19573)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pollard, Jason

Feminist Filmmakers (FMTV-UT 1156)

Feminist Filmmakers examines gender constructs in narrative film and episodic work. We will explore how gender constructs in film and television influence societal views of gender roles, as well as contextualize gender in the era and cultures specific films were made. The vehicle through which this course will examine gender will be the history and work of female directors around the world. Screenings, critical reading in film and gender studies, articles and interviews on current debates regarding gender and diversity inclusion in the film industry, make this class valuable for everyone.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1156-000 (20466)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zentelis, Enid

Storytelling: from Aristotle to Beyonce and Beyond (FMTV-UT 1203)

Aristotle to Beyoncé and Beyond introduces students to an eclectic group of storytellers and storytelling. Students study the mechanics of telling a story, gaining a deeper appreciation and understanding of how storytellers and storytelling impact the world.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


FMTV-UT 1203-000 (3347)
07/03/2024 – 08/15/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Riazi, Saba


FMTV-UT 1203-000 (3348)
07/03/2024 – 08/15/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Riazi, Saba

Music for Film and TV (FMTV-UT 1008)

This course examines the artistic, aesthetic, and technical aspects in composing and creating music for film and television. It provides an inside look into the relationship between composer, director, and music editor, exploring music as a creative tool. Through lectures, analysis, demonstrations, and presentations by guest speakers, students learn and deal with the specifics of the film composer’s job, duties, and responsibilities, including the basics of film scoring. As a result, students develop the listening and production skills necessary for creative use of music in films, television, and media. In addition to creative and technical considerations, the business and personal relationship between composer and director/producer will be discussed. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1008-000 (19412)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Hollywood Auteurs (FMTV-UT 1154)

This course will analyze the possibility of pursuing the ideals of an “author cinema” – a personal way of expressing ideas that can deal with Hollywood mainstream and also with the independents, but will never be considered an integral part of either one. The “author cinema” would be a cinema of personal expression that refuses the mainstream’s prison of “three acts, happy ending, stars, etc.”; and at the same time, refuses the trends and the limited scope of most of the independents: a cinema that shows not only how to make a film, but why. Films from all over the world will be analyzed, focusing in particular on the authors that are able to keep alive their personal vision while dealing with the studios (i.e. Stone, Lee, Scorsese, Kubrick), the ones that dared to fight Hollywood (i.e. Welles, Peckinpah, Cimino, von Stroheim) and the loose cannons independent at heart (Altman, P.T. Anderson, Coen brothers). A series of guests to the class will be comprised of critics, curators and cultural organizers, filmmakers and producers. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES. Non-majors must process a “Permission Notice for Non-Majors” form to register for the course (subject to availability).

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1154-000 (19539)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Monda, Antonio

Film Analysis (FMTV-UT 1204)

A rival reportedly asked Walt Disney why Disney’s films were so much better. Disney replied, “I analyze.” His rival said, “So do I.” Disney answered, “I analyze better.” Film Analysis is an advanced course in film criticism taught by practitioners. We build upon the analytical skills developed in Language of Film, Storytelling Strategies and the various production courses in order to strengthen the students’ ability to critically assess the weave of narrative content, mise-en-scene, cinematic technique and structures. Through this in-depth examination of a wide range of films, students deepen their understanding of how filmmakers over the years and in various cultures have created meaningful experiences for their audiences.This course counts as History & Criticism for Film Majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1204-000 (19541)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Santha, Laszlo

Research for Customer Insights (MKTG-UB 9)

This course provides students with both research and managerial perspectives in the development and application of marketing research tools and procedures. It describes the development of research designs from problem formulation to analysis and submission of the research report. It also covers the analysis of techniques in marketing research, such as focus groups, experimental design, surveys, sampling, statistical analysis, and reporting. Cases are utilized in the development of methods and in specific areas of application.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 9-000 (18453)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pluzinski, Carol

Consumer Behavior (MKTG-UB 2)

This course presents a comprehensive, systematic, and practical conceptual framework for understanding people as consumers—the basic subject matter of all marketing. It draws on the social sciences to evaluate the influence of both individual and ecological factors on market actions. Students discuss relevant psychological and sociological theories and study how they can be used to predict consumers’ reactions to strategic marketing decisions. Basic methodologies for research in consumer behavior are developed and applied. Course emphasis is on developing applications of behavioral concepts and methods for marketing actions.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 2-000 (18452)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Watson, Jared


MKTG-UB 2-000 (18466)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Watson, Jared


MKTG-UB 2-000 (18486)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pham, Ngoc

Intro to 3D Character Design using Zbrush (FMTV-UT 1071)

This course explores the Art of Character Creation using the powerful digital sculpting program ZBRUSH. Students will learn the ins and outs of the program to create their own 3d characters from scratch. Sculpting, detailing, Polypainting, rendering and compositing in Photoshop will all be covered. The class will encourage learning while doing as I find it’s the best way to learn a new art. Zbrush is a unique program that allows users to manipulate 3D shapes in a quick fashion without having to model polygons like other 3D programs such as Maya. In effect you are using “digital clay” in Zbrush to push and pull primitive forms into fantastic creatures and characters. Zbrush is the perfect tool for traditional artists to transition to artmaking in the digital realm. Zbrush is an extremely feature-rich piece of software, with a unique interface unlike any other computer graphics program. While the interface may seem quite intimidating at first, rest assured we will explore the interface together and learn all the most important tools to get started and having fun with organic character creation! Some benefits of using Zbrush for Character and Creature Design over other computer design software: -The ability to quickly create concepts as if you were manipulating real clay -Great for rough character concepts or more finished painted renders -Transition is much smoother from practical to digital art using Zbrush because it feels like you are using an artistic tool rather than a technical tool – Zbrush offers such a deep diverse toolset, you can create stylized cartoon-like characters, realistic animals and humans! The possibilities are endless. You can use it for everything from organic characters to hard surface robots and props! -Once you learn the interface and tools, you can simply sculpt without worrying as much about technical aspects like polygons, faces, points and edges like other traditional polygon modelling programs

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1071-000 (20242)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Benevides, Rob

Introduction to 3D (FMTV-UT 1110)

This is an introductory course to the fundamentals of 3D computer animation. Through in-depth discussions and hands-on assignments, students will gain a thorough beginner’s understanding of the 3D production process. Using industry-leading Autodesk Maya running on high-end Mac Pro workstations, students will learn the basics of modeling and proceed through UV layout, texturing, rigging, animation, lighting and final render. At the end of the class students will have completed a series of exercises that will culminate in a final scene that showcases all they learned.This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1110-000 (19491)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McNagny, Phil


FMTV-UT 1110-000 (19492)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Guevara, Cesar

Legal Aspects of The Entertainment Industry (FMTV-UT 1195)

A course that tracks the filmmaking process from its inception, at the idea phase and follows the creative process through development, pre-production, principal photography and post-production. The class will focus on the business and legal issues that arise during every phase of filmmaking. Key topics covered will include: copyright law; option agreements for underlying rights such as books, plays, magazine and newspaper articles; sources of financing; distribution agreements; licensing of music; agreements for actors, directors, producers and writers. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. Students must have Junior or Senior standing. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1195-000 (19505)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lichter, Rosalind

Nanoelectronic devices and circuits (ECE-UY 4513)

Concepts of nanoelectronic materials, devices, and circuits. Fundamental and practical limits on the performance and energy dissipation of nanoelectronic devices. Physical, electrical and optical properties of semiconductor materials and how they are used in circuits. Relation of the properties of semiconductors to the fundamental limits at various levels of design hierarchy. Connections between the physical design and circuit-level performance of nanoelectronic circuits. | Prerequisites: MA-UY 2114 and PH-UY 2023 and EE-UY 3114

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


ECE-UY 4513-000 (21245)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Introduction to Very Large Scale Integrated Circuits (ECE-UY 3193)

The course offers an overview of integrated circuit-design process: planning, design, fabrication and testing; device physics: PN junction, MOSFET and Spice models; inverter static and dynamic behavior and power dissipation; interconnects: cross talk, variation and transistor sizing; logic gates and combinational logic networks; sequential machines and sequential system design; subsystem design: adders, multipliers, static memory (SRAM), dynamic memory (DRAM). Topics include floor planning, clock distribution, power distribution and signal integrity; Input/Output buffers, packaging and testing; IC design methodology and CAD tools; implementations: full custom, application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), field programmable gate arrays (FPGA). The course provides foundations of VLSI design and custom VLSI design methodology and state-of-the-art CAD tools. | Prerequisites: CS-UY 2204 (C- or better) and EE-UY 3114. ABET competencies: a,c,e,k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ECE-UY 3193-000 (17965)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Selesnick, Ivan


ECE-UY 3193-000 (17966)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Bhavnagarwala, Azeez

Machine Design (ME-UY 3233)

This course introduces students to fundamentals of machine elements, enabling them to employ this knowledge to design machines for various practical applications. The course begins with a brief review of stress, deformation and failure, followed by friction and wear. Subsequently, loaded columns, pressurized cylinders and shafts are presented. Bearings, gears, screws, springs, brakes, clutches and belts are discussed. The course ends with an introduction to MEMS, Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: ME-UY 3213 | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-UH 3210

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 3233-000 (12694)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Park, Kee

Real Estate Data Science, Artificial Intelligence, and Machine Learning (FINC-UB 36)

Exponential growth in the availability of high quality real estate and real estate-related data is fueling a major shift in development, investment, and lending decision-making processes. In this highly applied course, students will be introduced to major data analysis and machine learning platforms; a wide range of public and private real estate and urban data sources; approaches to exploratory data analysis, real estate data visualization, and communication of findings; applied statistical modeling, including forecast modeling; and, emerging and prospective real estate applications for artificial intelligence and machine learning. Assessment will include case work focusing on real-world real estate decisions and coding assignments. While the data and applications for this course are principally in the real estate sector, the applied skills learned may be of interest for students across a wide range of industries.

Finance (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 12 Weeks

Applications in Entrepreneurial Finance: Fintech (FINC-UB 62)

This course examines the lifecycle of high-growth new ventures (i.e. startups), with a focus on how they are funded. We will follow a successful startup’s path from founding through the stages of new venture finance. These include developing a business plan and its financials, the core skills of valuation, the venture capital industry, and how entrepreneurs and investors realize returns. Through examples of specific companies and technologies, we will also learn about the emerging landscape of financial technology (fintech) startups. We will consider the following subsectors, where startups are either seeking to displace incumbents or sell them their services: personal finance, blockchain, equity crowdfunding, lending (peer-to-peer and AI-augmented), payments, insurance, institutional investment, and money transfer.

Finance (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


FINC-UB 62-000 (19097)
02/06/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


FINC-UB 62-000 (19364)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Financial Information Systems (TECH-UB 50)

The financial services industry is being transformed by regulation, competition, consolidation, technology and globalization. These forces will be explored, focusing on how technology is both a driver of change as well as the vehicle for their implementation. The course focuses on payment products and financial markets, their key systems, how they evolved and where might they be going, algorithmic trading, market structure dark, liquidity and electronic markets. Straight through processing, risk management and industry consolidation and convergence will be viewed in light of current events. The course objective is to bring both the business practitioner and technologist closer together. Topics will be covered through a combination of lectures, readings, news, case studies and projects.

Computing and Data Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 12 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


TECH-UB 50-000 (21263)
09/23/2020 – 12/16/2020 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Donefer, Bernard

Networks, Crowds and Markets (TECH-UB 60)

This is a course on how the social, technological, and natural worlds are connected, and how the study of networks sheds light on these connections. Topics include: social network structure and its effects on business and culture; crowdsourcing; games on graphs; the propagation through networks of information, fads and disease; small worlds, network effects, and “rich-get-richer” phenomena; the power of networks for prediction; the power of the network for web search; networks and social revolutions, and the melding of economics, machine learning, and technology into new markets, such as “prediction markets” or markets for on-line advertisements.The class will be a combination of lectures based on the textbook and guest lectures from well-known experts on these topics, primarily Stern faculty (a well-known center of excellence for research on networks, crowds, and markets).One main goal of this class is to work our way through most of the new, acclaimed textbook: Networks, Crowds, and Markets: Reasoning About a Highly Connected World, by David Easley and Jon Kleinberg. http://www.cs.cornell.edu/home/kleinber/networks-book/networks-book.pdf The textbook readings will be complemented with classic and recent research papers.

Computing and Data Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


TECH-UB 60-000 (19341)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Sports Economics (ECON-UB 211)

This course applies microeconomic theory and econometric analysis to sports and explores some public policy issues that have arisen in the design of sports competitions. The course is divided into four main parts: the structure of sports leagues, labor market issues, college sports, and the market for sports betting.

Economics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ECON-UB 211-000 (22435)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bowmaker, Simon

COMPUTING IN CIVIL ENGINEERING (CE-UY 3013)

This course aims to introduce the modern computing methods, tools, and best practices for students in civil and urban engineering. The course uses Python as the programming language for solving a series of fundamental computational problems in civil and urban engineering, such as solving linear equations, data interpolation, curve fitting, root finding, numerical differentiation and integration, probability and statistics, linear programming and optimization. The course also introduces a series of generic computation tools and best practices for the students’ future study and research in computing applications in civil and urban engineering, including how to debug a program, visualize data, manage source codes, collaborative programming project management, etc. It aims at laying a solid foundation for civil and urban engineering students to better understand the modern programming workflow and utilize the computing tools. Students are first introduced with the fundamental concepts through the lecture, and then guided step-by-step via the in-class lab session in each weak. There will be multiple homework assignments and in-class quizzes for the evaluating the students’ performances. | Prerequisite: (CS-UY 1113 or CS-UY 1114 or CS-UY 1133) and MA-UY 2034 and MA-UY 2224 or Adviser’s approval.

Civil & Urban Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CE-UY 3013-000 (11388)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Ozturk, Baturalp

History of Animation (FMTV-UT 1144)

Offered in the fall semester only. A chronological survey of the art and commerce of the animated film internationally over the last 100 years. Designed to expand students’ awareness of the origins of a significant 20th-century art form and to acquaint them with a wide variety of practical techniques and styles, from pre-film influences to computer-generated images; from “Golden Age” studio cartoon factories to today’s independent avant-garde animator-filmmakers. Designed to expand student aesthetic sensibilities and sharpen critical perceptions about this unique genre. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES. Non-majors must process a “Permission Notice for Non-Majors” form to register for the course (subject to availability).

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1144-000 (19501)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kosarin, Ray

Internet Design (FMTV-UT 1123)

This course focuses on the fundamentals of Web design and production. It will provide students with a basic understanding of HTML and CSS page construction, designing and optimizing graphics for the Web and the basic technical skills necessary for getting the student and his/her site online. This course teaches the students how to create a Website along with utilizing Social Media tools and channels as an effective part of a promotional strategy. YouTube, Vimeo, FaceBook, Twitter, KickStarter and Mobile all offer opportunities. In this age of multiple media sources competing for our attention it is important to maintain a consistent and integrated Communications and Brand Strategy across all media distribution channels. The class examines various creative and technical approaches to image manipulation, design, and montage as well as discussing the production techniques necessary to implement creative concepts. This course deals with many of the unique technical and creative challenges – graphic optimization, video compression, and file format conversion – for putting one’s reel, trailer or film online. The students are taught typographical design principles, including the aesthetics of text style and font faces. The class will explore the creative possibilities of designing layouts and integrating animation and video into their sites. Students are introduced to a variety of Internet, DHTML and multimedia tools and experiment with their creative applications. We focus on the Internet as a promotion and distribution medium for the independent artist and filmmaker. Branding, audience awareness and usability are also emphasized.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1123-000 (19497)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beaver, Howard

Projects in Photography (ART-UE 1380)

Students work directly with internationally recognized figures in photography. Topics for workshops range from the techniques of established photographers to discussions of issues in photographic theory, history, & criticism.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 1380-000 (9681)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harouni, Shadi

Visual Arts Praxis (ART-UE 900)

A studio course that combines theory & artistic practice to examine the development of the arts from a critical perspective. The course will address a range of models from structuralism & semiotics to modern & postmodern paradigms. The class is designed for practicing artists, allowing students to gain the skills & confidence to express their artistic objectives in critical writing, art making, & verbal analysis. Each student is responsible for oral presentations, works of art generated through research, & written statements about their artistic objectives.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Advanced Topics in Music Technology: Multichannel Media Installation and Performance (MPATE-UE 1633)

Multichannel Media Installation & Performance is a course designed for composers & artists who want to work in a performance or installation context with immersive sound & image technology. The course focuses on software & hardware workflows for the creative applications of multi-channel sound & immersive video for the creation of fixed, generative, reactive, performance-based, & interactive systems that can be experienced in a gallery context or a live performance. Students will develop a semester-length project to use scale & immersion to creative effect. The course will feature regular creative critique as well as an overview of relevant interaction design strategies for creating interactive spaces using sensors & cameras.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MPATE-UE 1633-000 (12919)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ostrowski, Matthew

Mixing in the Digital Audio Workstation (MPATE-UE 1135)

This course explores the art and craft of mixing records, with special attention to “mixing in the box” (via a digital audio workstation). Focus on methodology and technique, with particular emphasis on establishing balances, using such tools as compression and automation to enhance dynamics and develop unique coloration. Examines intersection of technology, budgets, and the marketplace. Students execute their own mixes, with guidance and critique from the instructor. Basic level of DAW proficiency required.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1135-000 (13050)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Killen, Kevin


MPATE-UE 1135-000 (13051)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Killen, Kevin

Midi for Non-Majors (MPATE-UE 1810)

An introduction to MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) with an emphasis on sequencing, production and arranging techniques. Open to students without previous experience in music technology.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1810-000 (10676)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Phillips, Andrew

Electronic Product Design for Music and Audio (MPATE-UE 1017)

This is a multidisciplinary course in which students with previous experience with analog and digital electronics create a novel hardware–based electronic musical instrument, controller, effects unit, or other device related to their interests in music and audio. Student projects may be analog, digital, or a hybrid, and should be unique in some way from devices currently in the commercial marketplace. Students present their designs and functioning physical prototypes with the class as they evolve throughout the semester for feedback.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1017-000 (13044)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven


MPATE-UE 1017-000 (13045)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven

Midi Technology II (MPATE-UE 1014)

Programming for MIDI, C, and other appropriate techniques. Design and implementation of software sequencers, interface drivers, and hardware applications will be the focus.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1014-000 (12979)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krauss, Briggan

Rcdg Tech for Non Majors (MPATE-UE 1022)

Introduction to the physical aspects of sound, psychoacoustics, basic electricity, principles and practice of magnetic recording and an overview of the recording studio, including an introduction to multi-track recording techniques. Students perform various duties just as they would in a professional recording session with live musicians in the recording studio. Open to students without previous experience in recording technology.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10658)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Filadelfo, Gary


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10660)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Griffin, J Chris


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10662)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Losada, Juan

Analog Recording Technology (MPATE-UE 1001)

The physical aspects of sound, analog recording technology & studio production techniques are explained & demonstrated. Lecture topics include microphones, stereo recording, analog consoles, multi-track tape recording, equalization, compression, reverberation & mixing. Studio lab assignments are performed outside of class reinforcing weekly lecture topics

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1001-000 (10647)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Filadelfo, Gary


MPATE-UE 1001-000 (10650)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Filadelfo, Gary

Projects in Programming and Data Sciences (TECH-UB 24)

This course is the follow-on course to Introduction to Programming and Data Science, which is offered in the Fall. It is recommended for undergraduate students who 1) are interested in jobs in the rapidly growing fields of data science and data analytics or 2) who are interested in acquiring the technical and data analysis skills that are becoming increasingly relevant in all disciplines. Intro to Programming and Data Science forms the basis for this course, but it is not a pre-requisite. Students with basic knowledge of programming in Python and SQL are welcome to join. This course covers select topics that build on the prior course work and is largely project based. Much of the course will be project-based work, with students working on projects that utilize the skills used in this and the prior Programming and Data Science course.

Computing and Data Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


TECH-UB 24-000 (19343)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


TECH-UB 24-000 (19344)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Social Media & Digital Marketing (TECH-UB 38)

This course examines the major trends in digital marketing using tools from business analytics and data science. While there will be sufficient attention given to top level strategy used by companies adopting digital marketing, the focus of the course is also on business analytics: how to make firms more intelligent in how they conduct business in the digital age. Measurement plays a big role in this space. The course is complemented by cutting-edge projects and various business consulting assignments that the Professor has been involved in with various companies over the last few years. Prof Ghose has consulted in various capacities for Apple, AMD, Berkeley Corporation, Bank of Khartoum, CBS, Dataxu, Facebook, Intel, NBC Universal, Samsung, Showtime, 3TI China, and collaborated with Alibaba, China Mobile, Google, IBM, Indiegogo, Microsoft, Recobell, Travelocity and many other leading Fortune 500 firms on realizing business value from IT investments, internet marketing, business analytics, mobile marketing, digital analytics and other topics.We will learn about statistical issues in data analyses such as selection problem, omitted variables problem, endogeneity, and simultaneity problems, autocorrelation, multi-collinearity, assessing the predictive power of a regression and interpreting various numbers from the output of a statistical package, various econometrics-based tools such as simple and multivariate regressions, linear and non-linear probability models (Logit and Probit), estimating discrete and continuous dependent variables, count data models (Poisson and Negative Binomial), cross-sectional models vs. panel data models (Fixed Effects and Random Effects), and various experimental techniques that help can tease out correlation from causality such as randomized field experiments.

Computing and Data Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


TECH-UB 38-000 (19338)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Introduction to Programming and Data Science (TECH-UB 23)

This course is recommended for undergraduate students without programming experience who are interested in building capabilities in the rapidly growing fields of data science and data analytics. This hands-on coding course does not have any prerequisites and is meant to help students acquire programming and data analysis skills that are becoming increasingly relevant for entrepreneurial, corporate, and research jobs. The course offers an introduction to programming (using Python) and databases (using SQL). We will cover topics related to collection, storage, organization, management, and analysis of data. There is a strong focus on live coding in the classroom, with discussion of examples.

Computing and Data Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


TECH-UB 23-000 (19340)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


TECH-UB 23-000 (19342)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


TECH-UB 23-000 (19345)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Design Project (CS-UY 4523)

Students or several students work with a faculty member and/or graduate students on a current topic in computer science. Each term, a project course with a particular theme is offered by the Department of Computer and Information Science. A faculty member assigns individual or group projects. The project course is highly structured and supervised closely by faculty. Students are expected to use the design and project-management skills they learned in CS-UY 4513 Software Engineering. Alternatively, students may work with a faculty member on an individual project of mutual interest. A written report and oral presentation are required. | Prerequisite: CS-UY 4513 or CS-UY 3513.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4523-000 (12266)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred


CS-UY 4523-000 (12267)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred

PROBLEM SOLVING AND PROGRAMMING I (CS-UY 1113)

This course introduces problem solving and computer programming and is for undergraduate engineering students who do not have prior experience in programming in any language. The course covers fundamentals of computer programming and its underlying principles using the Python programming language. Concepts and methods introduced in the course are illustrated by examples from engineering and other disciplines. | Co-requisite: EX-UY 1; Anti-requisite: CS-UY 1114

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 1113-000 (12329)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Romero Cruz, Sebastian


CS-UY 1113-000 (12330)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Romero Cruz, Sebastian


CS-UY 1113-000 (12331)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12332)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12333)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12334)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12335)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12336)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12337)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter

Penetration Testing and Vulnerability Analysis (CS-UY 4773)

The course will start off with an in-depth review of the exploitation mitigations introduced in modern operating systems. The instructors will demonstrate their limitations through simple examples and gradually develop the basic exploitation techniques into more complicated methods applicable to real-world exploitation. Unlike most other exploitation courses, we will focus on approaching exploitation as a creative problem-solving process rather than an exercise of applying cookbook techniques to common types of vulnerabilities. Most of the course will focus on the hands-on application of the material through exercises and leading the students through the development of reliable exploits for recently patched vulnerabilities in widely used software. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: CS-UY 3933 and (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better). | Prerequisites for CAS Students: CS-UY 3933 and CSCI-UA 201. | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UY 3933 and CS-AD 103

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4773-000 (16116)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at ePoly
Instructed by Rajpal, Mantej

Electricity & Magnet I (PHYS-UA 131)

Introduction to Maxwell’s equations with applications to physical problems. Topics include electrostatics, magnetostatics, the solution of the Laplace and Poisson equations, dielectrics and magnetic materials, electromagnetic waves and radiation, Fresnel equations, transmission lines, wave guides, and special relativity.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHYS-UA 131-000 (8212)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gruzinov, Andrei


PHYS-UA 131-000 (8213)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 131-000 (9331)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Quantum Mechanics I (PHYS-UA 123)

Designed to deepen the insights into quantum mechanics introduced in PHYS-UA 103, 104 and to provide an introduction to the more formal mathematical structure of quantum mechanics. The Schr?dinger and Heisenberg description of quantal systems; perturbation theory; spin and statistics; coupling of angular momenta; scattering theory; and applications to atomic, molecular, nuclear, and elementary particle physics.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHYS-UA 123-000 (8210)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grier, David


PHYS-UA 123-000 (8211)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 123-000 (9336)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Physics II (PHYS-UA 93)

Continuation of PHYS-UA 91. Topics include electrostatics; dielectrics; currents and circuits; the magnetic field and magnetic materials; induction; AC circuits; Maxwell’s equations.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8451)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hogg, David


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8452)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lant, Caspar


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8453)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lant, Caspar


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8454)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Dynamics (PHYS-UA 120)

Topics include conservation laws, central force motion, Lagrange’s and Hamilton’s equations, non-inertial frames, inertia tensor, rigid body dynamics, coupled oscillators and particles, eigenvalues, eigenvectors and normal modes.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHYS-UA 120-000 (9318)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moscatelli, Frank


PHYS-UA 120-000 (9319)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Loizeau, Nicolas


PHYS-UA 120-000 (9503)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Loizeau, Nicolas

Strategies for Independent Producing (FMTV-UT 1092)

Today’s content creators must be entrepreneurs, navigating dynamically changing industry. How does emerging talent gain traction in a ’tsunami wave’ of independent films, episodics, webisodes and podcasts? This class explores development, funding, and legal strategies to make, market and distribute DIY low and ultra-low budget projects. Ones you can make now. Students will develop core competencies, culminating in a pitch deck for a viable indie feature film.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1092-000 (19479)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pichirallo, Joe

Dynamics (ME-UY 3223)

The course explores three-dimensional treatment of the kinematics of particles and rigid bodies using various coordinate systems, Newton’s laws, work, energy, impulse, momentum, conservative force fields, impact and rotation and plane motion of rigid bodies. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: ME-UY 2213 | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-UH 2011

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ME-UY 3223-000 (14918)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ME-UY 3223-000 (15064)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

THERMODYNAMICS (ME-UY 3333)

The course centers on properties of pure substances; concepts of work and heat; closed and open systems. Topics: Fundamental laws of thermodynamics. Carnot and Clasius statements of the 2nd law; entropy and entropy production; heat engines, refrigerators, heat pumps; efficiencies, coefficients of performance.| Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: MA-UY 1124 | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: MATH-UH 1020

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 3333-000 (12720)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Haverkamp, Sven


ME-UY 3333-000 (12721)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at ePoly
Instructed by Thorsen, Richard

Statics (ME-UY 2213)

The course covers three-dimensional vector treatment of the static equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies. Topics: Equivalent force and couple systems. Distributed force systems. Static analysis of trusses, frames and machines. Friction, impending motion. Methods of virtual work. | Prerequisite: PH-UY 1013 and MA-UY 1024

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 2213-000 (12689)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Benbelkacem, Ghania


ME-UY 2213-000 (12690)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hajesfandiari, Arezoo

Introduction to Materials Science (ME-UY 2813)

Students in this course become familiar with atomic structure and bonding, atomic arrangement in crystals, crystal imperfections, mechanical behavior and failure of materials and binary phase diagrams. | Brooklyn Students: Co-requisite PH-UY 1013 | Abu Dhabi Students: Prerequisite ENGR-UH 2012

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 2813-000 (12715)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Behera, Rakesh

Advertising (MKTG-UB 3)

This course provides students with a comprehensive framework and tools to understand the advertising process and to appreciate managerial and theoretical perspectives in advertising. It tackles the stages in developing an advertising plan- from analyzing the situation and defining clear advertising objectives to execution. Students learn tools related to various skill areas in advertising, including account planning, media planning and buying, and copywriting/art direction, while developing a broader appreciation of how each skill area fits into the overall structure of the advertising process. Coursework involves a comprehensive group project that utilizes learning in all functional areas of advertising, while simulating the development of an advertising campaign.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MKTG-UB 3-000 (10504)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cohen, Daniel

The Directors Process (FMTV-UT 125)

This class is an introduction to the craft of directing. We will take a step-by-step look at the director’s process and responsibilities in this most collaborative of arts. Our focus will include script, character and scene analysis; performance, casting and rehearsal; design and visual style; assembling the final form. We’ll talk about what an actor wants from a director, how to talk to the cinematographer and production/costume designers and why we look at editing as the final rewrite. Through lectures, screenings, assignments and discussions with working professionals, the class will offer a comprehensive foundation for the director on which to build a rich creative experience at Tisch and a long and satisfying professional career thereafter.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


FMTV-UT 125-000 (14309)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zentelis, Enid


FMTV-UT 125-000 (14375)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brown, Alrick

Life Drawing: The Figure (FMTV-UT 1112)

Reccomended for students studying both animation and live action. This course is designed to train animation students to think visually, and to strengthen their overall drafting and design skills. The focus of the course is drawing humans and animals from live subjects, thereby learning to translate the three-dimensional world into two-dimensional terms. Drafting skills are important to all animators, regardless of their chosen media or focus. In particular, strong drafting skills are essential for character animators. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1112-000 (19493)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Camhy, Sherry

Food Management Theory (NUTR-UE 91)

Organization and management of commercial and institutional food service facilities in hotels, restaurants, and educational and community program sites.

Nutrition & Dietetics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


NUTR-UE 91-000 (13048)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zagor, Stephen


NUTR-UE 91-000 (13196)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zagor, Stephen

Human Computer Interaction (CS-UY 4543)

Designing a successful interactive experience or software system takes more than technical savvy and vision–it also requires a deep understanding of how to serve people’s needs and desires through the experience of the system, and knowledge about how to weave this understanding into the development process. This course introduces key topics and methods for creating and evaluating human-computer interfaces/digital user experiences. Students apply these practices to a system of their choosing (I encourage application to prototype systems that students are currently working on in other contexts, at any stage of development). The course builds toward a final write-up and presentation in which students detail how they tackled HCI/user experience design and evaluation of their system, and results from their investigations. Some experience creating/participating in the production of interactive experiences/software is recommended.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4543-000 (16119)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Goyal, Nitesh


CS-UY 4543-000 (16120)
at ePoly
Instructed by Lutzky, Raymond

History of Children’s Television (FMTV-UT 1022)

Through lectures, discussion, program viewing, projects, guests, and our own lives, this course explores the state of children’s media for pre-schoolers to adolescents. The goal is to understand how we all have been affected by the media and how we can determine change for the next generation. We will consider the role television, videos, and the internet play in regard to family and peer relationships, education and social issues. We will also examine the broadcasting and cable industry as well as the success and failure of the government and such media groups as ACT (Action for Children’s Television) in regulating content of children?s programs. Assignments will include interviews of pre-schoolers and adolescents, website presentations, critique of children’s programs, and a proposal for children’s media. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1022-000 (20414)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McVeigh, Evelyn

Intro to Foods and Food Science (NUTR-UE 85)

Introduction to the foods of various world regions and the techniques used to prepare them through hand-on food preparation, demonstrations, lectures and field trips.

Nutrition & Dietetics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


NUTR-UE 85-000 (10938)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mortillaro, Lourdes


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12408)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12409)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12410)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12411)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (11672)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12412)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12413)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12414)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Stop Motion Animation (FMTV-UT 214)

Includes all techniques in which the animator works directly in front of the camera. Examples include: Claymation, puppet animation, paint under the camera, in-camera special effects, and pixillation. Demonstrations on character building, set construction, and design, armatures, and lighting for miniature. Several short assignments are required to introduce students to intricacies of stop-motion animation and relationship to 3-D computer animation. Each student will produce a short film with sound. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES. THIS COURSE HAS PREREQUISITES. Non-majors must process a “Permission Notice for Non-Majors” form to register for the course (subject to availability).

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


FMTV-UT 214-000 (14466)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Visual Effects and Compositing (FMTV-UT 1143)

Visual Effects and Compositing is a lecture and workshop course that covers the application and practical creation of 2D (greenscreen, color correction, morphing etc.)and integration of existing 3D (CGI, animation, virtual sets etc.) visual effects. The assignments will require students to explore how to create, manipulate and combine 2D and 3D images seamlessly.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


FMTV-UT 1143-000 (7092)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rathsmann, Birgit

Introduction to Visual Effects for Animated and Live Action Films (FMTV-UT 1153)

Introduction to Visual Effects for Animated and Live Action Films provides an in-depth overview of VFX production from the director-producer perspective. This course will offer a basic understanding of how VFX are utilized and will prepare students for the visual effects industry, and its constantly evolving digital and in-camera solutions. It will also provide an historical overview of the evolution of VFX. Students will also learn how powerful visual effects have been, and will continue to be, in helping to tell stories, especially projects with limited budgets. They will gain a detailed understanding of the type of camera coverage necessary on-set to facilitate the VFX process and what communications, with their primary crew, are necessary during early stages of preproduction to optimize footage for VFX. Areas of study include rig removal, green/blue screen compositing, motion capture, shooting backdrops, matte paintings, background plates, miniatures – models – forced perspectives, match lighting, sky replacement, crowd replication, integration of 2D and 3D CGI elements, motion control and practical effects shot in-camera.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


FMTV-UT 1153-000 (7111)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Weinstein, Jonathan

Podcasting Workshop (FMTV-UT 1006)

The narrative non-fiction podcast is one of the most popular and creative formats in the audio space, due to the critical success of shows like Serial, 99% Invisible, Ear Hustle, and many more. Although they are challenging to produce, these shows bring a unique blend of intimacy and urgency to the media landscape. This workshop is for those who want to learn the basics of long-form, narrative audio storytelling. Students will go through the editorial steps of pitching, recording, writing and producing a completed episode in a documentary-style format. We’ll work on interview and writing techniques, developing your voice and creative ways of editing sound. Students will also create a podcast pitch deck to support their episode and explore ways to market, distribute, and monetize a narrative podcast.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1006-000 (19410)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gonzales, Jocelyn

Nutrition and Health (NUTR-UE 119)

Introduction to nutrition science and its role in health and society: nutrient characteristics, requirements, and food sources, energy balance, weight control, dietary guides and food planning, and social and economic factors that affect food production and consumption. Liberal Arts CORE equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Natural Sciences for non-majors on an individual department basis-students should confirm with their Academic Advisor

Nutrition & Dietetics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


NUTR-UE 119-000 (11669)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Young, Lisa


NUTR-UE 119-000 (11670)


NUTR-UE 119-000 (11671)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zandes, Mitchell

Contemporary Techniques in Sound Art (DM-UY 3113)

This course explores sound as an art form and technical practice in its own right. Topics include contemporary techniques in composition, sound art, and interactive installation. Students will produce sound with narrative elements that evoke social, cultural & critical-thinking. Their final projects can be experimental podcasts, music (performance and/or recordings), multi-channel audio installations, or multimedia projects. | Prerequisite: DM-UY 1113 or MPATE-UE 1001

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 3113-000 (12650)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by O’Keefe, Timothy

ROBOT MOTION AND PLANNING (ROB-UY 3303)

This course covers the concepts, techniques, algorithms, and state-of-the-art approaches for robot localization, mapping, and planning. The course starts from basic concepts in 2D kinematics and probability and then introduces probabilistic approaches for data fusion. Then, the course introduces the trajectory planning problem in the time domain and free space. The motion planning problem is defined in a canonical version of the problem and the concept of configuration space is introduced. A selection of representative planning techniques is covered from probabilistic to heuristic techniques. Finally, some mapping representations and algorithms are presented. | Prerequisite: CS-UY 1114 and MA-UY 2034 and PH-UY 1013 or equivalents (see Minor in Robotics)

Robotics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ROB-UY 3303-000 (19176)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Loianno, Giuseppe

Applied Data Science (CUSP-GX 6001)

This course equips students with the skills and tools necessary to address applied data science problems with a specific emphasis on urban data. Building on top of the Principles of Urban Informatics (prerequisite for the class) it further introduces a wide variety of more advanced analytic techniques used in urban data science, including advanced regression analysis, time-series analysis, Bayesian inference, foundations of deep learning and network science. The course will also contain a team data analytics project practice. After this class the students should be able to formulate a question relevant to urban data science, find and curate an appropriate data set, identify and apply analytic approaches to answer the question, obtain the answer and interpret it with respect to its certainty level as well as the limitations of the approach and the data.

Ctr for Urban Sci and Progress (Graduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CUSP-GX 6001-000 (7539)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sobolevsky, Stanislav


CUSP-GX 6001-000 (7540)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sobolevsky, Stanislav

Data Visualization (CUSP-GX 6006)

Visualization and visual analytics systems help people explore and explain data by allowing the creation of both static and interactive visual representations. A basic premise of visualization is that visual information can be processed at a much higher rate than raw numbers and text. Well-designed visualizations substitute perception for cognition, freeing up limited cognitive/memory resources for higher-level problems. This course aims to provide a broad understanding of the principals and designs behind data visualization. General topics include state-of-the-art techniques in both information visualization and scientific visualization, and the design of interactive/web-based visualization systems. Hands on experience will be provided through popular frameworks such as matplotlib, VTK and D3.js.

Ctr for Urban Sci and Progress (Graduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CUSP-GX 6006-000 (7543)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sun, Qi

Urban Data Science (CUSP-GX 1003)

The course targets current and future urban practitioners looking to harness the power of data in urban practice and research. This course builds the practical skillset and tools necessary to address urban analytics problems with urban data. It starts with essential computational skills, statistical analysis, good practices for data curation and coding, and further introduces a machine learning paradigm and a variety of standard supervised and unsupervised learning tools used in urban data science, including regression analysis, clustering, and classification as well as time series analysis. After this class, you should be able to formulate a question relevant to Urban Data Science, locate and curate an appropriate data set, identify and apply analytic approaches to answer the question, obtain the answer and assess it with respect to its certainty level as well as the limitations of the approach and the data. The course will also contain project-oriented practice in urban data analytics, including relevant soft skills – verbal and written articulation of the problem statement, approach, achievements, limitations, and implications.

Ctr for Urban Sci and Progress (Graduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CUSP-GX 1003-000 (23062)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at ePoly
Instructed by Sobolevsky, Stanislav

Urban Computing Skills Lab: Introduction to Programming for Solving City Challenges (CUSP-GX 1001)

The UCSL at CUSP is a series of online sessions designed to build a common skillset and familiarity with techniques, concepts, and models for urban informatics computing. The online sessions focus on data explorations, programming skills and statistical methods needed for scientific computing in the field of Urban Informatics.

Ctr for Urban Sci and Progress (Graduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CUSP-GX 1001-000 (7738)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Balestra, Martina

Analog Electronics (MPATE-UE 1817)

An introduction to Analog Electronic theory including solid-state devices. Ohm’s Law & related measurement techniques will be explored. Students must enroll in a Lab section to apply hands-on experience in basic circuit design & measurement.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1817-000 (10679)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven

Digital Electronics (MPATE-UE 1818)

An introduction to Digital Electronics, including binary systems & logic. Students must enroll in a Lab section to apply hands-on experience in simple computer programming techniques, digital processing applied to music with specific relevance to computer music synthesis & MIDI.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1818-000 (10681)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven

Elect Music Synthesis: Fundamental Techn (MPATE-UE 1037)

This course focuses on electronic music synthesizer techniques. Concepts in the synthesis of music, including generation of sound, voltage control, and treatment of sound and tape techniques. Included is a short synopsis of the history and literature of analog electronic music. Students complete laboratory tasks and compositions on vintage synthesizer modules and create one or more final projects that demonstrate(s) the application of these concepts.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1037-000 (12985)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martin, Donald


MPATE-UE 1037-000 (12986)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martin, Donald

Comp Music Synthesis: Fundamental Techniques (MPATE-UE 1047)

Introduction for teachers, composers, and performers to explore potentials of computer music synthesis. Basic concepts of music synthesis presented through the use of a microcomputer, keyboard, and appropriate software. System may be used as a real-time performance instrument or as a studio composition instrument. Educators may explore potentials for classroom application.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1047-000 (10664)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by O’Keefe, Timothy


MPATE-UE 1047-000 (12128)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
8:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by O’Keefe, Timothy

Software Music Production (MPATE-UE 1070)

Analytical and theoretical concepts required grasping the aesthetic development of electronic and computer music compositions. The course emphasizes analysis and historical understanding of techniques of production and compositional ideas.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1070-000 (10667)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Losada, Juan

Digital Recording Technology (MPATE-UE 1003)

Digital recording technology & production techniques are explained & demonstrated. Lecture topics engage analog to digital conversion, digital to analog conversion, digital signal theory & filter design, digital audio effects & mixing. Studio lab assignments are performed outside of class reinforcing weekly lecture topics.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1003-000 (10652)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Valenzuela, Ernesto


MPATE-UE 1003-000 (12126)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Valenzuela, Ernesto

Applied Cryptography (CS-GY 6903)

This course examines Modern Cryptography from a both theoretical and applied perspective, with emphasis on “provable security” and “application case studies”. The course looks particularly at cryptographic primitives that are building blocks of various cryptographic applications. The course studies notions of security for a given cryptographic primitive, its various constructions and respective security analysis based on the security notion. The cryptographic primitives covered include pseudorandom functions, symmetric encryption (block ciphers), hash functions and random oracles, message authentication codes, asymmetric encryption, digital signatures and authenticated key exchange. The course covers how to build provably secure cryptographic protocols (e.g., secure message transmission, identification schemes, secure function evaluation, etc.), and various number-theoretic assumptions upon which cryptography is based. Also covered: implementation issues (e.g., key lengths, key management, standards, etc.) and, as application case studies, a number of real-life scenarios currently using solutions from modern cryptography. | Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6903-000 (15957)
at ePoly
Instructed by Chen, Zhixiong


CS-GY 6903-000 (15958)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Di Crescenzo, Giovanni


CS-GY 6903-000 (15959)
at ePoly
Instructed by Di Crescenzo, Giovanni

Application Security (CS-GY 9163)

This course addresses the design and implementation of secure applications. Concentration is on writing software programs that make it difficult for intruders to exploit security holes. The course emphasizes writing secure distributed programs in Java. The security ramifications of class, field and method visibility are emphasized. | Knowledge of Information, Security and Privacy equivalent to CS-GY 6813. Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 9163-000 (15952)
at ePoly
Instructed by


CS-GY 9163-000 (15953)
at ePoly
Instructed by


CS-GY 9163-000 (15954)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Satt, Mo

Machine Learning (CS-GY 6923)

This course is an introduction to the field of machine learning, covering fundamental techniques for classification, regression, dimensionality reduction, clustering, and model selection. A broad range of algorithms will be covered, such as linear and logistic regression, neural networks, deep learning, support vector machines, tree-based methods, expectation maximization, and principal components analysis. The course will include hands-on exercises with real data from different application areas (e.g. text, audio, images). Students will learn to train and validate machine learning models and analyze their performance. | Knowledge of undergraduate level probability and statistics, linear algebra, and multi-variable calculus. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6923-000 (16014)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


CS-GY 6923-000 (16015)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Musco, Christopher


CS-GY 6923-000 (16016)
at ePoly
Instructed by Radhakrishnan, Regunathan


CS-GY 6923-000 (16017)
at ePoly
Instructed by

Game Design (CS-GY 6553)

This course is about experimental game design. Design in this context pertains to every aspect of the game, and these can be broadly characterized as the game system, control, visuals, audio, and resulting theme. We will explore these aspects through the creation of a few very focused game prototypes using a variety of contemporary game engines and frameworks, high-level programming languages, and physical materials. This will allow us to obtain a better understanding of what makes games appealing, and how game mechanics, systems, and a variety of player experiences can be designed and iteratively improved by means of rapid prototyping and play-testing. The course combines the technology, design, and philosophy in support of game creation, as well as the real-world implementation and design challenges faced by practicing game designers. Students will learn design guidelines and principles by which games can be conceived, prototyped, and fully developed within a one-semester course, and will create a game from start to finish. The course is a lot of (team)work, but it’s also a lot of fun. Programming skills are helpful, but not a hard requirement. Artistic skills, or a willingness to learn them are a plus. | Prerequisite: (Graduate Standing AND CS-GY 6533) for SoE students OR (OART-UT 1600 and OART-UT 1605) for Game Center MFA students OR instructor permission.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6553-000 (16114)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Togelius, Julian

Big Data (CS-GY 6513)

Big Data requires the storage, organization, and processing of data at a scale and efficiency that go well beyond the capabilities of conventional information technologies. In this course, we will study the state of art in big data management: we will learn about algorithms, techniques and tools needed to support big data processing. In addition, we will examine real applications that require massive data analysis and how they can be implemented on Big Data platforms. The course will consist of lectures based both on textbook material and scientific papers. It will include programming assignments that will provide students with hands-on experience on building data-intensive applications using existing Big Data platforms, including Amazon AWS. Besides lectures given by the instructor, we will also have guest lectures by experts in some of the topics we will cover. Students should have experience in programming: Java, C, C , Python, or similar languages, equivalent to two introductory courses in programming, such as “Introduction to Programming” and “Data Structures and Algorithms. | Knowledge of Python. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6513-000 (16126)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rodriguez, Juan


CS-GY 6513-000 (16128)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rodriguez, Juan


CS-GY 6513-000 (16127)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Sat
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Patel, Amit


CS-GY 6513-000 (16129)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

COMPUTER VISION (CS-GY 6643)

An important goal of artificial intelligence (AI) is to equip computers with the capability of interpreting visual inputs. Computer vision is an area in AI that deals with the construction of explicit, meaningful descriptions of physical objects from images. It includes as parts many techniques from image processing, pattern recognition, geometric modeling, and cognitive processing. This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and techniques in computer vision. | Knowledge of Data Structures and Algorithms, proficiency in programming, and familiarity with matrix arithmetic. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6643-000 (15999)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Computer Networking (CS-GY 6843)

This course takes a top-down approach to computer networking. After an overview of computer networks and the Internet, the course covers the application layer, transport layer, network layer and link layers. Topics at the application layer include client-server architectures, P2P architectures, DNS and HTTP and Web applications. Topics at the transport layer include multiplexing, connectionless transport and UDP, principles or reliable data transfer, connection-oriented transport and TCP and TCP congestion control. Topics at the network layer include forwarding, router architecture, the IP protocol and routing protocols including OSPF and BGP. Topics at the link layer include multiple-access protocols, ALOHA, CSMA/CD, Ethernet, CSMA/CA, wireless 802.11 networks and linklayer switches. The course includes simple quantitative delay and throughput modeling, socket programming and network application development and Ethereal labs. | Knowledge of Python and/or C. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6843-000 (16008)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Reddington, Thomas


CS-GY 6843-000 (16009)
at ePoly
Instructed by Portnoy, Rafail


CS-GY 6843-000 (16010)
at ePoly
Instructed by Portnoy, Rafail


CS-GY 6843-000 (16011)
at ePoly
Instructed by Zhao, John

Artificial Intelligence I (CS-GY 6613)

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is an important topic in computer science and offers many diversified applications. It addresses one of the ultimate puzzles humans are trying to solve: How is it possible for a slow, tiny brain, whether biological or electronic, to perceive, understand, predict and manipulate a world far larger and more complicated than itself? And how do people create a machine (or computer) with those properties? To that end, AI researchers try to understand how seeing, learning, remembering and reasoning can, or should, be done. This course introduces students to the many AI concepts and techniques. | Knowledge of Data Structures and Algorithms. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6613-000 (15997)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Monogioudis, Pantelis


CS-GY 6613-000 (15998)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Wong, Edward

Culinary Physics (ITPG-GT 2569)

This studio and seminar course explores the basic principles of food biochemistry, enzymology and food processing and how they relate to memory, the senses and the processing of information. Students will also learn basic principles of molecular gastronomy and modernist cuisine as framing devices for understanding how food also functions in the context of bodily health, environmental health as well as cultural and political narratives. Our food system consists of more than food production and consumption and this class will address how science and food science plays a more integral role in this system and how this knowledge can be mined for work that creatively and functionally contributes to this emerging field. Assignments for the class will be based on the incorporation of food science into design and technology projects that uses food as a substrate to explore and illuminate information within the food system. Workshops involve using liquid nitrogen hydrocolloids as well as creating performative food objects and a Futurist meal.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


ITPG-GT 2569-000 (8007)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Thu
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bardin, Stefani R · Martino, Kelli

Developing Assistive Technology (ITPG-GT 2446)

Assistive or Adaptive Technology commonly refers to “products, devices or equipment, whether acquired commercially, modified or customized, that are used to maintain, increase or improve the functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities.” This multi-disciplinary course allows students from a variety of backgrounds to work together to develop assistive technology. Partnering with outside organizations students work in teams to identify a clinical need relevant to a certain clinical site or client population, and learn the process of developing an idea and following that through to the development of a prototype product. Teams are comprised of ITP students as well as graduate rehabilitation, physical and occupational therapy students. Prerequisites (for ITP students): H79.2233 Introduction to Computational Media and H79.2301 Introduction to Physical Computing. This course has a lab fee of $201.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2446-000 (12615)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Perr, Anita · Hurst, Amy

Contemporary Art (ARTCR-UE 52)

New art and new definitions of art and artist are discussed. Major attention is paid to the New York scene with guest lectures by artists and visits to galleries, museums, and other major sites in the current art system.

Art Theory & Critical Studies (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ARTCR-UE 52-000 (12940)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Graves, Anthony

Advanced Linear Algebra and Complex Variables (MA-UY 3113)

This course provides a deeper understanding of topics introduced in MA-UY 2012 and MA-UY 2034 and continues the development of those topics, while also covering functions of a Complex Variable. Topics covered include: The Gram-Schmidt process, inner product spaces and applications, singular value decomposition, LU decomposition. Derivatives and Cauchy-Riemann equations, integrals and Cauchy integral theorem. Power and Laurent Series, residue theory. | Prerequisites: (MA-UY 2122 or MA-UY 2114 or MA-UY 2514) AND (MA-UY 2012 or MA-UY 2034). Note: Not open to students who have taken MA-UY 1533, MA-UY 3112 or MA-UY 4433.

Mathematics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MA-UY 3113-000 (18494)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Introduction to Probability (MA-UY 2233)

Standard first course in probability, recommended for those planning further work in probability or statistics. Probability of events, random variables and expectations, discrete and continuous distributions, joint and conditional distributions, moment generating functions, the central limit theorem. | Prerequisites: MA-UY 109, MA-UY 2112, OR MA-UY 2114. Note: Not open to students who have taken MA-UY 2224 or MA-UY 3012 or MA-UY 3022.

Mathematics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


MA-UY 2233-000 (17510)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


MA-UY 2233-000 (17987)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS (ECE-UY 4183)

The required design project consists of two three-credit courses. The first course, EE DP1, is one of a number of specialty lab/project courses offered by the department in various subdisciplines such as electronics, machinery, robotics, imaging, communications, etc. (EE-UY 4113-4183, below). DP1 provides significant background laboratory experience in the student’s area of concentration. Students begin independent projects by finding an adviser and initiating the project work, and exercising oral presentation and written communication skills. | Prerequisite: ECE-UY 3054 and Senior Level

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 4183-000 (11572)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Knox, Michael


ECE-UY 4183-000 (11573)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Knox, Michael


ECE-UY 4183-000 (11574)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Knox, Michael

DP I – CONTROLS AND ROBOTICS (ECE-UY 4113)

The required design project consists of two three-credit courses. The first course, EE DP1, is one of a number of specialty lab/project courses offered by the department in various subdisciplines such as electronics, machinery, robotics, imaging, communications, etc. (EE-UY 4113-4183, below). DP1 provides significant background laboratory experience in the student’s area of concentration. Students begin independent projects by finding an adviser and initiating the project work, and exercising oral presentation and written communication skills. | Prerequisite: completion of all junior-level technical courses. ABET competencies: a, b, c, e, f, g, k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


ECE-UY 4113-000 (17960)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

REAL-TIME DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING (DP1) (ECE-UY 4163)

The required design project consists of two three-credit courses. The first course, EE DP1, is one of a number of specialty lab/project courses offered by the department in various subdisciplines such as electronics, machinery, robotics, imaging, communications, etc. (EE-UY 4113-4183, below). DP1 provides significant background laboratory experience in the student’s area of concentration. Students begin independent projects by finding an adviser and initiating the project work, and exercising oral presentation and written communication skills. | Prerequisite: completion of all junior-level technical courses. ABET competencies: a, b, c, e, f, g, k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


ECE-UY 4163-000 (17595)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Thu
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

POWER ELECTRONICS FOR THE INTERNET OF THINGS (ECE-UY 4863)

The course covers all aspects of supplying electric power to the Internet of Things devices and systems. Energy harvesting, conversion, and storage are discussed. Rectifiers, inverters, and dc-dc converters are analyzed and designed. Examples of wired and wireless power transfer systems for battery charging are provided. CAD software for power electronics is introduced. Just-in-time coverage of electric circuit concepts makes the course accessible to any student with an engineering math and physics background. | Prerequisite: MA-UY 2034 and PH-UY 2023; or instructor’s permission.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ECE-UY 4863-000 (17749)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Czarkowski, Dariusz

Communication Networks (ECE-UY 3613)

This course develops basic techniques used in communication networks. After protocol layering is introduced, algorithms and protocols are discussed for use in each of the five layers: physical, data link, network, transport and application. Specific protocols such as TCP/IP, ATM, SS7 are included. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Engineering Students: Junior status in electrical engineering, computer engineering, or computer science. Co-requisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: ECE-UY 2233 (EE majors) or MA-UY 2224 (CompE/CS majors) | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 194 (or co-req of MA-UY 3113) and ENGR-AD 195 (or co-req of ECE-UY 2233) . ABET competencies: a, c, e.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ECE-UY 3613-000 (17937)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Liu, Yong

FUND OF ELEC PWR ENG FOR NON EE STUDENTS (ECE-UY 2613)

Introduction to electricity: current, voltage and electrical power. Ohm’s Law. Kirchhoff’s Laws. Electrical materials. Electrical energy generation process. Principles of AC. Bulk electrical power generation: hydroelectricity and thermoelectricity. Alternative generation sources. Synchronous Generators. Induction Motors. Transmission and distribution systems. Substations and transformers. Low-voltage networks. Industrial, commercial and residential networks and loads. Short-circuit and protection equipment. Relays and circuit breakers. Power quality. Reliability and blackouts. Physiological effects of electric currents in the human body. Exposure to low-frequency magnetic fields. National Electric Code (NEC). ANSI-IEEE Standards. IEC standards. Certification of electrical products compliance. | Prerequisite(s): MA-UY 1024/1054/1324, and MA-UY 1124/1154/1424; and PH-UY 1004 or PH-UY 1013; and PH-UY 2004 or PH-UY 2023.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


ECE-UY 2613-000 (17003)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Bochynski, Zdzislaw

Wireless Information Systems Laboratory II (ECE-UY 4283)

This course includes hands-on experience with a combination of laboratory experiments, lectures and projects relating to basic and advanced topics in wireless communications. Specific topics include mixers, IQ modulation, phase locked loops, receiver design, PN code acquisition, smart antennas and RFID. | Prerequisite: EE-UY 4183

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ECE-UY 4283-000 (18002)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 4283-000 (18003)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 4283-000 (18004)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Knox, Michael

Introduction to Machine Learning (ECE-UY 4563)

This course provides a hands on approach to machine learning and statistical pattern recognition. The course describes fundamental algorithms for linear regression, classification, model selection, support vector machines, neural networks, dimensionality reduction and clustering. The course includes computer exercises on real and synthetic data using current software tools. A number of applications are demonstrated on audio and image processing, text classification, and more. Students should have competency in computer programming. | Prerequisites: ECE-UY 2233, MA-UY 2233, MA-UY 3012, MA-UY 2224 or MA-UY 2222, MA-UY 3514

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 4563-000 (11607)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Software Engineering (CS-UY 4513)

Focusing on software engineering, the course introduces techniques to specify, design, test and document medium and large software systems. Design techniques include information engineering, object orientation and complexity measures. Also covered are testing methods, such as path testing, exhaustive test models and construction of test data. An introduction to software tools and project management techniques is presented. Student projects involve team software development and tracking. | Prerequisites: Juniors or higher majoring in Computer Science, Computer Engineering or Electrical and Computer Engineering. Co-requisite: CS-UY 3224

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4513-000 (12271)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred


CS-UY 4513-000 (12272)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred


CS-UY 4513-000 (12273)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at ePoly
Instructed by Callahan, Eugene

DESIGN & ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS (CS-UY 2413)

This course covers fundamental principles of the design and analysis of algorithms. Topics include asymptotic notation, recurrences, randomized algorithms, sorting and selection, balanced binary search trees, augmented data structures, advanced data structures, algorithms on strings, graph algorithms, geometric algorithms, greedy algorithms, dynamic programming and NP completeness. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and MA-UY 2314; Corequisite: EX-UY 1 | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: (ENGR-UH 3510 or CS-UH 1050) (C- or better) and CS-UH 1002 | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 210 (C- or better) and CSCI-SHU 2314

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 2413-000 (12269)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hellerstein, Lisa


CS-UY 2413-000 (12270)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hellerstein, Lisa

INTRO TO GAME PROGRAMMING (CS-UY 3113)

A programming intensive introduction to the creation of computer games. Using mostly two-dimensional sprite-based programming, we examine and experiment with animation, physics, artificial intelligence and audio. In addition, the course explores the mathematics of transformations (both 2D and 3D) and the ways they may be represented. | Prerequisite: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better).

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 3113-000 (12268)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Romero Cruz, Sebastian

Game Development Studio I (CS-UY 3233)

This class introduces the principles of 2D and 3D computer game design. Students learn about the range of game types and understand their conceptual building blocks. Students complete a structured sequence of assignments towards the design for a new game.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 3233-000 (12661)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Garcia, Diego

Engineering Problem Solving and Programming (CS-UY 1133)

This introductory course in engineering problem solving and computer programming is for all undergraduate engineering students without prior programming experience in any language. The course covers the fundamentals of computer programming and its underlying principles using the MATLAB programming language. Concepts and methods are illustrated by examples from various engineering disciplines. Useful numerical techniques and their applications to real-world problems in science and engineering are also discussed. ABET competencies: a, e, k. | Corequisite: EX-UY 1.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


CS-UY 1133-000 (17100)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


CS-UY 1133-000 (17101)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


CS-UY 1133-000 (17102)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


CS-UY 1133-000 (17103)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


CS-UY 1133-000 (16932)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Introduction to Machine Learning (CS-UY 4563)

This course provides a hands on approach to machine learning and statistical pattern recognition. The course describes fundamental algorithms for linear regression, classification, model selection, support vector machines, neural networks, dimensionality reduction and clustering. The course includes computer exercises on real and synthetic data using current software tools. A number of applications are demonstrated on audio and image processing, text classification, and more. Students should have competency in computer programming. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 1134 AND (MA-UY 2034, MA-UY 2034G, MA-UY 3044 or MA-UY 3054) AND (MA-UY 2224, MA-UY 2222, MA-UY 2233, ECE-UY 2233, MA-UY 3012, MA-UY 3014, or MA-UY 3514) | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: (ENGR-UH 3510 or CS-UH 1050) (C- or better) AND (MATH-UH 1022 or MATH-UH 1023) AND (MATH-UH 2011Q or ENGR-UH 2010Q) | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 210 (C- or better) AND (MATH-SHU 140 or MATH-SHU 141) AND MATH-SHU 235

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4563-000 (12303)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sellie, Linda

Artificial Intelligence (CS-UY 4613)

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is an important topic in computer science that has many diversified applications. It addresses one of the ultimate puzzles human are trying to solve – How is it possible for a slow, tiny brain, whether biological or electronic, to perceive, understand, predict, and manipulate a world far larger and more complicated than itself? And, how do we go about creating a machine (or computer) with those properties? To this end, researchers in the AI field have been trying to understand how seeing, learning, remembering, and reasoning could, or should be done. This course introduces students to the many concepts and techniques in artificial intelligence. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-UH 3510 or CS-UH 1050 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 210 (C- or better)

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4613-000 (12277)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Wong, Edward

Application Security (CS-UY 4753)

This course addresses the design and implementation of secure applications. Concentration is on writing software programs that make it difficult for intruders to exploit security holes. The course emphasizes writing secure distributed programs in Java. The security ramifications of class, field and method visibility are emphasized. | Prerequisite: CS-UY 3923

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4753-000 (16115)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Satt, Mo

Applied Cryptography (CS-UY 4783)

This course examines Modern Cryptography from a both theoretical and applied perspective, with emphasis on “provable security” and “application case studies”. The course looks particularly at cryptographic primitives that are building blocks of various cryptographic applications. The course studies notions of security for a given cryptographic primitive, its various constructions and respective security analysis based on the security notion. The cryptographic primitives covered include pseudorandom functions, symmetric encryption (block ciphers), hash functions and random oracles, message authentication codes, asymmetric encryption, digital signatures and authenticated key exchange. The course covers how to build provably secure cryptographic protocols (e.g., secure message transmission, identification schemes, secure function evaluation, etc.), and various number-theoretic assumptions upon which cryptography is based. Also covered: implementation issues (e.g., key lengths, key management, standards, etc.) and, as application case studies, a number of real-life scenarios currently using solutions from modern cryptography. | Prerequisite: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and MA-UY 2314.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4783-000 (16117)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Di Crescenzo, Giovanni

Computer Networking (CS-UY 4793)

This course takes a top-down approach to computer networking. After an overview of computer networks and the Internet, the course covers the application layer, transport layer, network layer and link layers. Topics at the application layer include client-server architectures, P2P architectures, DNS and HTTP and Web applications. Topics at the transport layer include multiplexing, connectionless transport and UDP, principles or reliable data transfer, connection-oriented transport and TCP and TCP congestion control. Topics at the network layer include forwarding, router architecture, the IP protocol and routing protocols including OSPF and BGP. Topics at the link layer include multiple-access protocols, ALOHA, CSMA/CD, Ethernet, CSMA/CA, wireless 802.11 networks and link-layer switches. The course includes simple quantitative delay and throughput modeling, socket programming and network application development and Ethereal labs. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-UH 3510 or CS-UH 1050 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 210 (C- or better)

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4793-000 (12278)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by O’Rourke, Lucas


CS-UY 4793G-000 (2816)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


CS-UY 4793G-000 (2588)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

COMPUTER SECURITY (CS-UY 3923)

This course covers cryptographic systems. Topics: Capability and access control mechanisms, authentication models, protection models. Database and operating system security issues, mobile code, security kernels. Malicious code, Trojan horses and computer viruses. Security policy formation and enforcement enforcement, legal aspects and ethical aspects. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 2214 | Prerequisite for CAS Students: CSCI-UA 201 | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UH 2010 or ENGR-AD 3511 | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CENG-SHU 202 | Co-requisite for ALL Students: CS-UY 3224

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 3923-000 (15976)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Cappos, Justin

NETWORK SECURITY (CS-UY 3933)

This course covers reviews networking. Topics: Basic notations of confidentiality, integrity, availability; cryptographic systems, coding and decoding messages. Cryptographic protocols for privacy, integrity, key exchange and access control. TCP/IP security; Firewalls, IPSec; secure ecommerce. Intrusion detection, prevention, response. Advanced topics are included. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 4793 or ECE-UY 3613 or ECE-GY 5373 |Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UH 3012 or ENGR-UH 3512 | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 308

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 3933-000 (15977)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Satt, Mo

Interactive Computer Graphics (CS-UY 4533)

An introduction to the field of computer graphics: displays, image formation, visual perception, images, transformations (viewing and projection), programmable pipelines (vertex and fragment programs), modeling (primitives, polygon meshes, smooth curves and surfaces), animation (keyframing, procedural), rendering and realism (visibility, lighting, shading, shadows, texturing, ray tracing). | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and (MA-UY 2034 or MA-UY 3044 or MA-UY 3054) | Prerequisites for CAS Students: CSCI-UA 201 (C- or better) and (MATH-UA 140 or MATH-UA 148) | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: (ENGR-UH 3510 or CS-UH 1050) (C- or better) and (MATH-UH 1022 or MATH-UH 1023) | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 210 (C- or better) AND (MATH-SHU 140 or MATH-SHU 141)

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CS-UY 4533-000 (9966)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chiang, Yi-Jen

Introduction to Databases (CS-UY 3083)

This course introduces database systems and their approach as a mechanism to model the real world. The course covers data models (relational, object-oriented), physical database design, query languages, query processing and optimization, as well as transaction management techniques. Implementation issues, object oriented and distributed databases also are introduced. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Students: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and MA-UY 2314 | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: (ENGR-UH 3510 or CS-UH 1050) (C- or better) and CS-UH 1002 | Prerequisites for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 210 (C- or better) and CSCI-SHU 2314

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 3083-000 (12274)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dey, Ratan


CS-UY 3083-000 (12275)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Arfaoui, Salim

Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology (BMS-UY 1003)

The course covers the fundamentals of biology with emphasis on cell and molecular biology. The course material includes introduction to biomolecules and bioenergetics, basic organization and functioning of living cells and general principles of genetics and reproduction.

Biomolecular Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


BMS-UY 1003-000 (11404)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Stein, Richard


BMS-UY 1003-000 (11405)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Delker, Rebecca

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (CM-UY 2223)

This course continues CM-UY 2213 and emphasizes finding the principles of organic chemistry in industrial practice and biochemical mechanisms. It introduces instrumental methods of analysis and identification. | Prerequisite: CM-UY 2213. Co-requisite EX-UY 1

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CM-UY 2223-000 (8994)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Robinson-Surry, Julia

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (CM-UY 2213)

This course covers chemistry of organic molecules: structure, nomenclature, properties and reactions of carbon compounds with emphasis on aliphatic compounds. It also introduces reaction mechanisms and stereochemistry. | Prerequisite: CM-UY 1004 or CM-UY 1024

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CM-UY 2213-000 (11439)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Robinson-Surry, Julia


CM-UY 2213-000 (11440)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Robinson-Surry, Julia

Dynamic Web Applications (DM-UY 3193)

In this course, students focus on client and server side programming, as well as the web design and development process. Students are also introduced to databases for the web. Examples of dynamic web applications include content management systems, registration systems, and social media solutions. | Pre-requisite: DM-UY.2193

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 3193-000 (12665)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Ayres, James

Contemporary Techniques in Digital Photography and Imaging (DM-UY 2183)

This course will cover basic camera use as well as the more sophisticated skills of image editing. Developing sensitivity to the aesthetics of image making through the use of the camera’s technical controls and composition are the central goals of the class. The course will provide a background in the history, theory, and contemporary issues of photography through lectures and visits to museums and galleries. By the end of the semester students will have the know-how to make images that convey their aesthetic and conceptual ideas effectively.

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 2183-000 (12648)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Toolin, Jack Craig

Expanding Cinema New Media/The Movies & Bynd (FMTV-UT 1208)

Atari. Computer Generated Imagery. YouTube. What is new media and will it change the world? In this course we will explore diverse examples of ?old? and ?new? media including interactive web work, gaming, installations, and movies. We will use blogs, online forums, and YouTube to discuss new media?s roots in older popular media including film and literature. We will question how new media have impacted traditional narrative forms and the structure of the film industry, as well as the broader contexts of new media in a changing world culture. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES. Non-majors must process a “Permission Notice for Non-Majors” form to register for the course (subject to availability).

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


FMTV-UT 1208-000 (15796)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Drawing & Design for Animation (FMTV-UT 1313)

This course offers students an opportunity to increase their technical proficiency and, more importantly, develop stylistic and creative channels for dealing with common drawing problems. In animation, drawing is not simply seeing. It is thinking and, when successful, doing so on a deep level. The class includes one, two and three point perspective, figure drawing, character rotations, drawing exercises related to fine artists (Picasso, Matisse, Giacometti, etc.), use of tones, continuity sketches, layouts, animatics.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1313-000 (19514)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lennert, Dean

Rhino and 3D Modeling (ART-UE 1896)

3D Modeling with Rhino is an introduction to 3D modeling using the Rhino computer program for Mac OS X. Students gain the technical knowledge needed to push rigorous exploration of 3D modeling, both in the physical and digital realm. The course covers basic model manipulation and rendering operations. The course also reviews the history of 3D printing and an examination of how modeling for 2D differs from modeling for physical output. By course end, students will have the opportunity to output their work via CNC milling, 3D printing, or 2D rendered visualization.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


ART-UE 1896-000 (19660)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Torimitsu, Momoyo

Technology, Media and Democracy: Addressing the Threats to an Informed Electorate (ITPG-GT 2184)

Across the City’s universities, the Technology, Media and Democracy program will bring together journalism, design, and technical disciplines to understand the various threats to journalism and media, and attempt to address these challenges using technical and computational methods and techniques. The free press, journalism and the media are some of the most critical elements of our democracy, but have been increasingly under attack by political and market forces. These challenges include: dwindling resources and support for deep investigative journalism; smear, law and technical and even physical assaults of media organizations and journalists; challenges to credibility and reliability including fake news and discrediting campaigns; and shifting business models and income sources that threaten both local and national news organizations and coverage. This course will include various elements that will help frame the problem and build/prototype solutions.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2184-000 (14759)

Interdisciplinary Proj: Photo/Video, Performance/Installation (ART-UE 1995)

Course ​will provide a forum in which to explore & engage the relationship between photography, performance & contemporary art. Through class assignments & readings in contemporary theory we will develop a critical vocabulary for an understanding of the relationship between photography & performance & a forum in which to challenge & push our individual art practice to the next level.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 1995-000 (11650)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harris, Lyle

Digital Fabrication: Exploring the Fab Lab (ART-UE 1346)

This course will introduce student to digital fabrication techniques within the context of contemporary art. Students will complete a series of projects exploring fabrication technologies such as 3D printing, 3D Scanning, CNC milling and Laser cutting. In addition, student will question the machines’ raw output by fusing these processes with traditional sculptures techniques. Student will produce a series of works following project prompts. Although the course will process-heavy, student will maintain a rigorous conceptual grounding in their completed works.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 1346-000 (9720)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Torimitsu, Momoyo

Video (ART-UE 1318)

Assignments, critiques, & demonstrations expand skills & knowledge in the use of the video camera as an art medium. This class stresses technical & conceptual skills & the exploration of the experimental possibilities of the medium.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 1318-000 (9679)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nguyen, Alison

Design (ART-UE 1420)

Builds on a basic understanding of graphic design to help students refine their skills & develop more personally expressive ways to solving problems through visual communication. Assignments, readings, & research projects will allow students to consider the complex nature of graphic design. Both traditional & digital approaches to typography & layout will be incorporated with a wide range of assignment. A priority is placed on the use of concepts to dictate design techniques & on the pursuit of a genuinely creative vision

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 1420-000 (9685)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
5:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brandenburg, Claudia

Art & Ideas: Art World Today – Berlin & Beyond (ARTCR-UE 9153)

The contemporary art world is a convoluted interplay of aesthetics & economics; ego & idealism. How can an emerging artist navigate its layers & idiosyncrasies? Through readings of theory & criticism, lectures, discussions, site visits, guest speakers, & student responses in the form of multimedia projects and art writing, this course explores contemporary art’s mechanisms & current discourse, always keeping Berlin’s local context in mind.

Art Theory & Critical Studies (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTCR-UE 9153-000 (2377)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by Segebre Salazar, Jose B.

Visual Language and Storytelling: Visual Storytelling Through the Ages (OART-UT 290)

An overview of the development of visual storytelling throughout history. From the first creation of early hand drawn cave paintings to modern film production, all the essential elements of visual representation, visual imagery, visual grammar, and visual storytelling are explored. Lectures introduce and explain a variety of methods used to capture a visual image and how visual imagery, both with and without words, is used to convey meaning. Assignments are given for students to create their own visual imagery using these several different artistic formats. In class discussions then analyze the audience reception of the student’s work. The essential nature of visual storytelling is examined by analyzing how images collide to create new meaning, how a multiplicity of visual images are organized into a grammatical system, and how this system is managed in order to tell a visual story. The course examines how the basic tools of traditional narrative storytelling are also used in purely visual storytelling – to create a secondary world and to maintain a suspension of disbelief in order to inform, entertain, and affect the audience.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


OART-UT 290-000 (21135)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


OART-UT 290-000 (21136)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Experimental Cinema (DM-UY 4123)

This course provides an overview of experimental film and video history and theory, centered on hands-on production. The course will include readings, workshops, screenings, discussions, assignments, critiques, and technical instruction around cinema as a radical practice, and the ways in which computing techniques can be leveraged for new forms of expression in the moving image. Students will study and experiment with cutting-edge techniques in cinematic production such as motion capture, 3D (stereo, depth) filmmaking, and interactive / performative cinema. | Prerequisite: DM-UY 2263

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


DM-UY 4123-000 (9247)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Panzarino, Monica

Media in Game Design and Development (DM-UY 3153)

This class continues from DM-UY 2153, moving into advanced technological implementations of 2D games. Taking designs from DM-UY 2153 and working in teams, students create a complete game. Students, based on abilities and individual goals, are assigned individually to work in production areas ranging from sprite creation, mapping and level design to engine coding and interaction scripting. Students are responsible for completing their assignments as if they were members of a professional game-development team. | Prerequisite: DM-UY 2153

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


DM-UY 3153-000 (16555)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Clark, Lawra

Professional Practices for Creatives (DM-UY 4173)

This course introduces students to the fundamental skills and professional practices vital to pursuing a career within a range of creative fields and industries. Students will explore strategies for effective documentation and presentation of their creative work, the art of self-promotion and exhibiting work publicly in various forms and environments, as well as networking and career preparation. | Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 4173-000 (12679)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mirza, Touseef


DM-UY 4173-000 (12680)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Henriques, Piper


DM-UY 4173-000 (12681)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at ePoly
Instructed by Eng, Angelina

Sound Design for Media (DM-UY 2113)

This course explores sound design, primarily within visual contexts. The course will focus on the use of sound within visual and interactive media, including film, video production, interactive user experience, web design, and gaming. Students will create weekly studio assignments in all of these areas, with an emphasis on developing a strong competence in integrating digital audio techniques into other media. Final projects could include novel sound design developed for film, video, web, applications, or games. | Prerequisite(s): DM-UY 1113 or MPATE-UE 1001

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


DM-UY 2113-000 (9213)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kato, Hideki

3D Animation (DM-UY 3133)

Students will learn advanced techniques of 3D computer animation, along with the theories and principles of motion including motion capture. Students will become comfortable utilizing cameras, lights, dynamics, motion, and effects in an industry-standard software. Comprehensive critiques will be conducted regularly to encourage good design for time-based animation. | Prerequisites: DM-UY 2133

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 3133-000 (12637)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Skwarek, Mark

Intro to 3D Computer Animation (FMTV-UT 1110)

This is an introductory course to the fundamentals of 3D computer animation. Through in-depth discussions and hands-on assignments, students will gain a thorough beginner’s understanding of the 3D production process. Using industry-leading Autodesk Maya running on high-end Mac Pro workstations, students will learn the basics of modeling and proceed through UV layout, texturing, rigging, animation, lighting and final render. At the end of the class students will have completed a series of exercises that will culminate in a final scene that showcases all they learned.This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


FMTV-UT 1110-000 (14326)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McNagny, Phil


FMTV-UT 1110-000 (14165)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Introduction to the Galleries and Museums of New York (ART-UE 1002)

Survey a broad spectrum of visual art resources through guided lecture-tour visits to current exhibitions at leading museums, galleries and alternative art spaces located throughout New York City. Onsite meetings with art administrators affiliated with various organizations shed light on a wide range of career and management issues pertaining to the field and add to an understanding of the development and continued growth of New York’s exciting art world.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 1002-000 (9533)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schreibman, Vida


ART-UE 1002-000 (11619)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Barton, Nancy


ART-UE 1002-000 (11620)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Darts, David


ART-UE 1002-000 (9540)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Intro to Web Development (DM-UY 2193)

In this course, students focus on client-side programming. Assignments are arranged in sequence to enable the production of a website of professional quality in design and production. This studio stresses interactivity, usability, and the quality and appropriateness of look and feel.

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 2193-000 (12662)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rieper, Effie


DM-UY 2193-000 (12663)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Adee, Katie


DM-UY 2193-000 (12664)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rieper, Effie

Visual Foundation Studio (DM-UY 1123)

This course allows students to harness the power of visual language in order to convey messages and meaning. The elements of visual foundation that will be covered include components (color, texture, image and typography), composition, and concept. Although non-digital mediums will be addressed, the understanding and use of industry-standard software is also a primary goal.

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 1123-000 (12640)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Thurer, Sally


DM-UY 1123-000 (12641)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Stark, Jeff


DM-UY 1123-000 (12642)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Thurer, Sally


DM-UY 1123-000 (12643)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at ePoly
Instructed by Seegers, Jesse

3D Modeling (DM-UY 2133)

In this studio, students will learn to produce and render high-quality 3D models. Upon completion of this course, students will have a solid understanding of the fundamentals of modeling, texturing, animation and lighting using industry standard software. Students may create content for video games, web, film, or other interfaces.

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 2133-000 (12635)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Guevara, Cesar


DM-UY 2133-000 (12636)

Audio Foundation Studio (DM-UY 1113)

This course is an orientation to the essential concepts and practices of digital audio. It is a creative and theoretical foundation studio that combines an orientation to sound and listening with fundamental techniques of digital audio production: recording, editing, and mixing. The course covers topic areas such as microphone and field recording techniques, recording studio best practices, audio editing, DAW (digital multi-track) production, and mixing.

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 1113-000 (12638)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Schumacher, Michael


DM-UY 1113-000 (12639)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kato, Hideki

User Experience Design (UX) (DM-UY 2213)

From interacting with the latest device to cogently communicating complex data, user experience design (UX) is a discipline given increased prominence by the inescapable human relationship with technology. We will cover the UX design process as it relates to interactive interfaces found in websites, mobile apps, hardware, and events.

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


DM-UY 2213-000 (17644)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Van-Every, Karen

Motion Graphics Studio (DM-UY 2173)

Motion graphics can be found in a wide range of media: broadcast, web, animation, and film to name a few. This course will allow students to explore the elements of time and space to convey messages and meaning through type, image, and sound for the screen. Individual creativity will be stressed as well as the understanding and use of industry-standard software for developing motion graphics. | Prerequisite: DM-UY 1123

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 2173-000 (12678)

Still and Moving Images (DM-UY 2263)

This course provides an overview of image making and presentation techniques, from still to moving. Students will also be introduced to experimental image making. This course will cover introductory still and video camera use, as well as how to begin integrating image within media. Students will gain practical and analytical skills through workshops, assignments, critiques, technical instruction, readings, screenings, and discussions.

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 2263-000 (12675)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Panzarino, Monica


DM-UY 2263-000 (12676)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Leopold, Rebecca


DM-UY 2263-000 (12677)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Leopold, Rebecca

Ideation & Prototyping (DM-UY 1143)

In this class, the creative process will be investigated in order to generate ideas for art, design, technology, and business endeavors. The course will show how ideation, design research & thinking, and prototyping can inspire, inform, and bring depth to what one ultimately creates. Students will expand their arsenal of design research skills, learn how to think critically about their audience, content, form, and processes, as well as, understand the importance of utilizing more than one research and design strategy.

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 1143-000 (12671)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by McDermott, Kathleen


DM-UY 1143-000 (12672)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Petty, Lauren


DM-UY 1143-000 (12673)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Bennett, Katherine


DM-UY 1143-000 (12674)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Petty, Lauren

Documentary Cinema (DM-UY 3123)

This course provides an overview of documentary film and video history and theory, centered on hands-on production. The course will include readings, workshops, screenings, discussions, assignments, critiques, and technical instruction around documentary and pseudodocumentary forms. | Prerequisite: DM-UY 2263

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 3123-000 (12649)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Nagaraj, Vandana

Narrative Cinema (DM-UY 2123)

In this course, students complete a coordinated sequence of short projects that add up to a finished, live-motion video project. The course strongly emphasizes the relevance of particular tools and techniques to the specific project Concepts are introduced through the screening of historical examples, from 1895 to the present. The course format is modeled on professional standards and workflow for preproduction, production and postproduction. | Prerequisites: DM-UY 2263

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


DM-UY 2123-000 (15422)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

3D for Interactive Applications (DM-UY 4133)

In this course students will build form the skills they learned in 3D Modeling and 3D Animation to produce 3D for Interactive Applications. Projects may be geared to scientific, engineering or entertainment applications according to individual skills and professional aspirations. | Prerequisites: DM-UY 2133

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


DM-UY 4133-000 (16649)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by McDevitt, Bernard

Experimental Game Narratives (DM-UY 4153)

How do games tell stories? How can we move beyond the traditional narrative in games? Is there a more holistic approach that embeds the story deeply into the interaction? In this class, students will begin to answer these questions by analyzing games and developing their own experimental narrative games. | Prerequisite: DM-UY 2153

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


DM-UY 4153-000 (10430)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pizza, Toni

Mobile Application Development (DM-UY 4193)

Today’s applications are increasingly mobile. This course teaches students how to build mobile apps for Android or iOS devices, as well as how to deploy them in app stores. The history of mobile computing is also explored. | Prerequisite: DM-UY 2193

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 4193-000 (12666)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Adee, Katie

Photography and Words (DM-UY 3183)

This course explores various image editing techniques and outputs, utilizing various styles of text, including fiction and non-fiction. The assignments foreground how text influences viewers’ perception of images, and how images can enrich a body of writing. Students will use a range of production skills to create work — using After Effects for animation, HTML/CSS for website creation, book and print design, and archival printing methods. All projects are accompanied by readings that provide historical and theoretical grounding to support the concepts explored through practice. An emphasis on refining technical and aesthetic photography skills are central throughout the semester. Prerequisites: DM-UY 2183 or DM-UY 2263

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


DM-UY 3183-000 (9246)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Toolin, Jack Craig

Intro to Game Development (DM-UY 2153)

This class introduces the principles of 2D and 3D computer-game design. Students learn the range of game types and understand their conceptual building blocks. Students complete a structured sequence of assignments toward the completion of a new-game design. Students prepare, through a staged sequence of assignments, a fully worked-out design for an original game. Criteria include storyline quality, graphics quality and appropriateness of design to the game concept originality. For games with an educational or instructional purpose, clarity and effectiveness for the target audience is considered. | Prerequisite: DM-UY 1133

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 2153-000 (12644)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Garcia, Diego


DM-UY 2153-000 (12645)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by