Intro to Audiology (CSCD-UE 221)

Principles and techniques of pure tone and speech audiometer; interpretation of ideograms; consideration of etiologies and auditory characteristics of major types of hearing impairment.

Communicative Sciences & Disorders (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CSCD-UE 221-000 (7596)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by Castanza, Kristen

Playful Performance Props (COART-UT 505)

In this class, we’ll learn TouchDesigner, a powerful software hub for live audiovisual content, and control it with DIY props and digital interfaces that we’ll build to connect to our art directly from the stage. With a cutting-edge buffet of inputs and outputs at our disposal, what new, evolved, or remixed types of performance can we create? If you’re a musician, you’ll build and play instruments that didn’t exist before. If you’re a dancer, your movements will become the music and visuals, instead of the other way around. If you’re a filmmaker, you’ll shoot a real-life scene with a virtual camera or light a physical set with real-time VFX. If you’re a visual artist, you’ll warp color, distort images, and push pixels to the brink of destruction. If you’re all of the above, you’ll have fun in this class. To connect to TouchDesigner, we’ll build hardware props using Arduinos, tiny computers that we can hook up sensors, buttons, and LEDs to, and create unique thematic interfaces that augment our performances and interactive installations. Weekly assignments explore AI tools, electronic circuits, fabrication, camera input and livestreams, 3D models and procedural animation, and more. Midway through the semester we’ll begin performing live using our connected props for DJ/VJing and projection-mapped interactive spaces, with the class culminating in a final public performance bringing together the best of student work. No previous coding or performance experience necessary. There is a lab fee for the hardware we’ll use to build our devices.

Collaborative Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


COART-UT 505-000 (17885)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Luhrs, August

Future of Media and Technology (ITPG-GT 2297)

This course covers the next several years of evolution in technology, culture, and other trends. It uses scenario planning, a technique for considering complex interrelationships that can’t be predicted, distinguishing predetermined elements from critical uncertainties, and exploring the underlying patterns that influence events. Students will conduct original research on significant trends, use those trends to develop compelling, sophisticated, plausible stories about possible futures, and present the futures – and the strategies they suggest – to a public audience. The course will take place at a pivotal moment of historical uncertainty: recovering from a global pandemic, with AI and other digital technologies crossing a threshold, and dramatic political and economic tensions. All of these, and more, affect media development – and are deeply affected by them. The goal of the course is to enable you to make more robust decisions now in the face of uncertainty — applicable to planning for technological change, starting a business, plotting a career or making major life decisions. This class has developed a longstanding following at ITP because it helps us make sense of complex issues without oversimplifying them. In a climate of candid, respectful discussion and debate, the class explores theories about system dynamics, long-wave organizational and societal change, and economic and technological development.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2297-000 (15683)
09/03/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kleiner, Arthur · Powell, Juliette

Cultures & Contexts: Multicultural France (CORE-UA 9547)

With an important history of immigration, France has long been a site of cultural contact and exchange. This course considers the country’s multicultural make-up and the ideologies, institutions, conflicts, and paradoxes that shape how that diversity has taken form through time. Conflicts and controversies of the past 40 years, which include the rise of the extreme right, the problem of the disadvantaged suburbs, the question of Islamic headscarves, and more, have in particular pushed these questions to the front of the country’s domestic agenda. Looking historically and across several case studies, we ask as well as what the French example can add to our understanding of culture, diversity, and race. Conducted in English.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CORE-UA 9547-000 (2551)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Editing I (FMTV-UT 1016)

This is a hands-on course designed to introduce the student to narrative and documentary editing techniques, and to the role of the editor in shaping the final form of film and video productions. Good editing is crucial to the success of every film and video. This class is recommended to students pursuing directing or producing who want a better understanding of how the post-production workflow functions, as well as to any student, from sophomore to senior, who would like to gain a clearer understanding of the role of the editor as an artist, a technician and a collaborator. To achieve this, the class will delve into the methods, objectives, and technical aspects of post-production. It will thoroughly explore two major editing programs (Avid Media Composer and Adobe Premiere Pro) used in today’s professional post-production environment, and acquaint the student with every stage of the editing workflow from capture to final output. Students will learn to approach these and other non-linear programs as variations on common themes rather than as completely new and foreign tools. In addition, the class will present examples of edited sequences from both narrative and documentary films for discussion, and have invited guests who will share their experiences in bringing films to completion. There will also be a course pack of assigned readings. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19414)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lewis, Emir


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19415)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Frank


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19416)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lewis, Emir


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19417)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pollard, Jason


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19418)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Weinstein, Yonatan

Portrait of an Artist: Walter Murch (OART-UT 901)

This course examines the artistic career and creative work of Walter Murch, Oscar-winning film editor and sound designer, and the first and only artist to win Academy Awards for both film editing and sound mixing on a single film (The English Patient, 1997). The class will provide an unprecedented inside look into Mr. Murch’s processes of sound designing, editing, mixing, writing, and directing on such acclaimed and memorable films as THX 1138, American Graffiti, The Conversation, Apocalypse Now, The Godfather, Return to Oz, The English Patient, Touch of Evil, and Cold Mountain. Through interviews, articles, and materials from his private archives never before publicly available, students learn about the creative world of an artist who has brought the importance of sound and editing to a new level. In addition to his work in film and his inventions used in the filmmaking process, two additional areas of interest of Mr. Murch will be examined: translations of Curzio Malaparte’s writings and his passion for astronomy. Mr. Murch will participate on several occasions in the course as a guest lecturer by visiting the class and/or via video conferencing.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


OART-UT 901-000 (15488)09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Zivkovic, Brane

Topics in Conversational Chinese (EAST-UA 207)

This is a 2-credit repeatable course designed for students who have completed Intermediate Chinese II or equivalent, and wish to get additional opportunities to further expand their vocabulary and grammatical knowledge with a focus on strengthening their conversational skills and/or get more chance to practice speaking outside of their regular Advanced Chinese I/II classes. Students will perform in various conversational tasks, such as presenting, discussing, debating, etc. and improve the description and narration skills that the advanced level learners are expected to have. Students will engage in conversation in a clearly participatory manner in order to communicate information on autobiographical topics, as well as topics of community, national, or international interest.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


EAST-UA 207-000 (9264)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hou, Xiaohong


EAST-UA 207-000 (9265)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


EAST-UA 207-000 (24496)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hou, Xiaohong

Cultures & Contexts: Topics (CORE-UA 500)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CORE-UA 500-000 (10506)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Igsiz, Asli


CORE-UA 500-000 (10507)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10508)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10509)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10510)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10511)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Juette, Daniel


CORE-UA 500-000 (10512)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10513)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10514)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10515)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10516)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10517)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10518)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bottex-Ferragne, Ariane


CORE-UA 500-000 (10519)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10520)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10521)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10522)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10523)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stark, Soren


CORE-UA 500-000 (10524)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Jingyi


CORE-UA 500-000 (10525)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Jingyi


CORE-UA 500-000 (10526)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fiorio, Soraya


CORE-UA 500-000 (10527)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fiorio, Soraya


CORE-UA 500-000 (10528)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cordivari, Braden


CORE-UA 500-000 (10529)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cordivari, Braden


CORE-UA 500-000 (10530)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10531)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Designing For: (GAMES-GT 310)

“Designing for” classes focus on working with a real-world client or partner, preparing students for professional collaborations with institutions, publishers and media companies beyond the game industry who partner with game developers on playable experiences. Outside partners have included museums, non-profit organizations, non-digital publishers and digital media platforms. In each version of this class, students will interact directly with representatives from one outside partner and collaborate with other students on a single semester-long project tailored to the client’s goals, developing an initial idea from conceptualization through pitching and prototyping, based on criteria and feedback provided by the partner. Students will learn to follow a structured process for ideation, collaboration and prototyping, while taking care to understand the audience, content and goals of the partner organization’s industry and the context of play. The semester culminates in a final presentation of playable prototypes to the partner.

Game Design (Graduate)
2-4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


GAMES-GT 310-000 (25338)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by


GAMES-GT 310-000 (25353)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by Corbetta, Ramiro


GAMES-GT 310-000 (25349)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by Parker, Matthew

R&D Studio: Feature, Smart, and Super Phones (ITPG-GT 3009)

In this special format studio class, students will investigate techniques and frameworks to challenge the socioeconomics of planned obsolescence. We will research, design, and develop projects that rethink our strained relationship with smartphones and re-imagine the future of “old” devices. This is a production-heavy, four-credit course, where students will contribute to original research, and develop projects that combine HCI, design, and critical theory. Prerequisites include an open mind, the drive to make, and graduate-level Physical Computing.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3009-000 (14800)
01/23/2024 – 04/30/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Galvao Cesar de Oliveira, Pedro

Magazines, Art, and Public Culture (CEH-GA 3028)

This course examines magazines as collaborative sites for artists and writers internationally, leading the way to a global, networked cultural sphere. We will consider periodicals as both commercial and artist-driven enterprises and as material objects to be studied through the lens of the history of photography, journalism, and design.

Center for Experimental Humanities (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CEH-GA 3028-000 (10923)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cole, Lori

Inquiry Seminar (MCC-UE 1200)

MCC Research Inquiry Seminars, taken early in the major, expose students to the department’s culture of scholarly inquiry. Course topics reflect faculty research interests, offering students a chance to explore emerging issues in the field of media studies.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13990)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Benson, Rodney


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13991)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fleetwood, Nicole


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13992)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gitelman, Lisa


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13993)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hegde, Radha


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13994)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Robles, Erica


MCC-UE 1200-000 (5470)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ross, Andrew · Tawil-Souri, Helga


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13995)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13996)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Huda


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13997)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Senior Honors in Media Culture/Communication (MCC-UE 1210)

Seminar for students who have been approved by the department to pursue honors in the major. Extended primary research in Communication Studies, focusing on the development and sharing of individual research projects. Students will enroll concurrently in two points of independent study under the director of a faculty honors sponsor, as outlined in departmental guidelines.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1210-000 (13998)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schull, Natasha

TV Nation: Inside and Out of The Box (FMTV-UT 1086)

TV Nation: Inside and Out of the Box gives students the opportunity to experience, first hand, how the world of network television works from two points of view: business and creative. Students will gain an understanding of the business aspect through the vantage point of the network executives and programmers. They will also learn the creative process from development to pitching, from the vantage point of writers and producers in the industry. In TV Nation, students will role play the entire process as the key players who put together a season for broadcast and cable networks. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1086-000 (19478)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldman, Andrew

The Beat: (JOUR-UA 201)

This course is designed to hone the student journalist?s ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test their ideas with the strength of their reporting and research, and then present them in story form.

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2023)


JOUR-UA 201-000 (2398)05/22/2023 – 07/05/2023 Tue,Thu11:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Morning)at OnlineInstructed by Flaherty, Francis


JOUR-UA 201-000 (2491)06/06/2023 – 06/29/2023 Tue,Wed,Thu3:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Mihai, Adrian

Documenting the African City (ANTH-UA 9087)

This interdisciplinary course combines ethnographic readings, representations, and interpretations of city and urban cultures with a video production component in which students create short documentaries on the city of Accra. The interpretative classes will run concurrently with production management, sights and sound, and post-production workshops. The course will have three objectives: (1) teach students the documentary tradition from Flaherty to Rouch; (2) use critical Cinema theory to define a document with a camera; and (3) create a short documentary film.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ANTH-UA 9087-000 (2318)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Accra (Global)
Instructed by Suberu, Yahaya

Documenting The African City (SCA-UA 9124)

This interdisciplinary course combines ethnographic readings, representations, and interpretations of city and urban cultures with a video production component in which students create short documentaries on the city of Accra. The interpretative classes will run concurrently with production management, sights and sound, and post-production workshops. The course will have three objectives: (1) teach students the documentary tradition from Flaherty to Rouch; (2) use critical Cinema theory to define a document with a camera; and (3) create a short documentary film.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


SCA-UA 9124-000 (10094)
01/26/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Accra (Global)
Instructed by Suberu, Yahaya

Film Story Analysis: (DWPG-UT 1105)

This text analysis course is designed to provide a platform for an in-depth study of how the story of a film is presented, what choices are made by the author, how information is offered or withheld and what effect this has on the drama. This class will be an “anthology” of different works, each selected for a different aspect of storytelling, exploring how the stylistic choices, themes, and dramatic devices reveal themselves within the body of work. The course is designed to better help students organize their own narratives by analyzing the techniques employed by various screenwriters in constructing their screenplays. A selection of films will be screened and discussed in terms of continuity of theme; delineation of plot, development of structure, protagonist’s story purpose, dialogue as action and character. After each screening, the instructor will lead a group discussion and analysis of the film, focusing further on the techniques, conventions and devices employed by the screenwriter to both tell a good story and satisfy the demands of the audience.

Dramatic Writing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DWPG-UT 1105-000 (9511)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bogle, Donald

City Photography and Architecture: Discovering Urban Treasures (IPHTI-UT 1210)

City, territory and architecture have been, from the beginning of photography, privileged objects for its practice. Photography has become a tool to strengthen the understanding of architecture, to highlight aesthetic and design ideas and to critically interpret the space. This class focuses on architectural photography and the photography of urban space, both in relation to their historical roots and contemporary practice. Florence offers a perfect environment to develop one’s artistic talent while learning the art of photography and discovering the secrets of one of the most fascinating cities in the world. Assignments are designed to help explore options for technical control as well as visual experimentation and individual style. Keeping in mind the inseparability of photographic technique and expression, students are expected to articulate their particular choices in relation to the overall conceptual approach of the projects. Critiques of assignments are important to the progress of each individual in the class, to help verbalize visual concepts, and to learn to see actively. The final exam consists of the presentation of a portfolio of photographs and an artist’s statement. Students are expected to work on their projects to develop an aesthetic and coherent photographic language and a personal approach to the photographic medium in a different environment. An emphasis is also placed on refining craft in relation to ideas, and to research on an individual basis, since it is crucial in developing an artistic practice. The course includes lectures, shooting sessions and field trips, discussions and critiques of the photographs. Each student must have a camera with manually adjustable aperture and shutter speed.

Int`l Pgms, Photography (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IPHTI-UT 1210-000 (4947)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Capodacqua, Alessandra

Applied Audio for Video (MPATE-UE 1225)

A continuation of MPATE-UE 1010. This is an advanced & detailed study of the audio-visual production & post-production process including digital recording techniques, with special emphasis on synchronization & the interfacing of SMPTE time code. Sound design, advanced Foley topics, * creative workflow in audio post production will also be discussed.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MPATE-UE 1225-000 (12867)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shafter, Spencer

Sailors, Convicts, and Pilgrims: The Indian Ocean Since 1500 (IDSEM-UG 2067)

Can oceans be the subject of historical inquiry? Maritime spaces help in thinking beyond nations and national borders that dominate modern global histories, leading us into a world of connected pasts. This course investigates the Indian Ocean’s long expanse from the early modern to the modern period from 1500 to the early 20th century. What changed about movement and exchange across land and sea in the longer transition from empires to nation-states? In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, despite growing European presence in the Indian Ocean littoral, pre-existing networks between East Africa, the Persian Gulf, the Indian sub-continent, and Southeast Asia remained resilient. Yet, by the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, new shipping technologies, the monitoring of movement across borders, and the introduction of travel documents like the passport became crucial in the formation of nation-states that emerged from colonial empires. From sailors, moneylenders, and pilgrims to convicts and indentured laborers, cultures of mobility connected vast geographies, often defying the logic of nation-states and colonialism. In examining this history, we will cover themes ranging from encounters in port-cities, commodities, smuggling, piracy, and pilgrimage to documents of identity and travel. Readings may include: Broeze’s Brides of the Seas, Ewald’s Motley Crews: Indian and African Seafarers, Tagliacozzo’s Secret trades, porous borders, and Torpey’s The Invention of the Passport, and translations from Samarqandi’s Account of Calicut and Vijayanagar, Afonso De Albuquerque’s Letter from Aden, Linschoten’s Itinerario, Munshi Rahman Khan’s Autobiography of an Indian Indentured Laborer, and Nawab Sikandar Begam’s A Pilgrimage to Mecca.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IDSEM-UG 2067-000 (12492)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dayal, Subah

History of Editing (FMTV-UT 1003)

The theory and practice of editing, from Griffith to Kubrick. The emphasis will be on experiments in narrative clarity and dramatic emphasis in storytelling. For many, editing is the unique source of the art of filmmaking. This course addresses this point of view. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


FMTV-UT 1003-000 (6959)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rea, Peter

American Cinema: 1960 to Present (FMTV-UT 324)

Offered in the spring semester only. Course level: Intermediate. 4 points. No prerequisite. Over the last 50 years the American Cinema has produced a remarkably rich abundance of entertaining, exciting, and challenging films. This course is designed to provide a survey of the wealth of styles, forms, purposes, and approaches to filmmaking that developed and emerged in this era. While Hollywood has obviously served as the dominant mode of filmmaking in this country, a significant of other filmmaking practices have continued to operate and sometimes thrive outside of it. Beyond the attention paid to Hollywood narrative cinema as it has changed and evolved over this half-century, we will also consider documentaries, avant-garde and experimental works, independent narraive cinema, and “cult” films. Consequently, we will be screening a variety of films, including works by such notable American filmmakers as Steven Spielberg, Francis Ford Coppola, Quentin Tarantino, George Romero, John Singleton, and Michael Moore.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


FMTV-UT 324-000 (23683)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
6:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brasiskis, Lukas


FMTV-UT 324-000 (23684)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Banfi, Ryan


FMTV-UT 324-000 (23685)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Banfi, Ryan


FMTV-UT 324-000 (23686)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Banfi, Ryan

International Cinema: 1960 to Present (CINE-UT 56)

Cinema Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CINE-UT 56-000 (13919)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
6:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dominguez, Anthony


CINE-UT 56-000 (13920)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CINE-UT 56-000 (13921)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CINE-UT 56-000 (13922)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Manus et Machina (CADT-UH 1001)

This course explores how technology and machines have influenced human life across the ages. It further explores how technology has influenced the fields of arts and design and investigates this inspirational source for new technological developments. Lecture and discussion will be the breeding ground for concept development of new machines: Every student will realize a prototype of a machine executing a certain task. This hands-on project will be complemented by case studies, reading assignments, workshops, excursions, and one-on-one meetings with the professor. The course builds knowledge about futuristic developments and their use and influence from past to present, including questions concerning ethics and values. Students will leave the course with a completed project to be displayed in an exhibition and a personal philosophy of Arts, Design, and Technology.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CADT-UH 1001-000 (4555)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alawadi, Khulood


CADT-UH 1001-000 (4556)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alawadi, Khulood

France and Islam (FREN-UA 9806)

Islam is the second most important religion in France (after Roman Catholicism) and France has the highest Muslim population in Europe. Complex events from the mid-20th century forward have led to continuous heated debate and controversy about the place of Muslim citizens within the secular Republic. France’s interwoven history with Islam dates back, however, to the first Umayyad conquests of the Iberian peninsula in the 8th century and then to the period of the Crusades. Through the use of primary sources, literary and filmic texts, and critical readings (notably in history, sociology and cultural studies), this course traces the complexity and heterogeneity of French perceptions of Islam within a broad historical perspective beginning with these early encounters and continuing up to the present day.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FREN-UA 9806-000 (2624)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Human Genetics: Genes in Human Health & Disease (CCEX-SHU 136)

The goal of the first half of the course is to build a basic understanding of how information about traits is encoded in our genes, how this “blueprint” is interpreted by cellular machinery to build a complex human being, and how our heredity has resulted in our evolution. In the senond half of the course, we will continue the exploration of how environment, experience and random errors affect the process of building our traits, what happens when these processes fail, and the promise and possible peril of genetic technologies for human life. Fulfillment: CORE ED (with CCEX-SHU 137)

Exper Discovery in Nat World (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CCEX-SHU 136-000 (21479)
01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yu, Danyang


CCEX-SHU 136-000 (21480)
01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yu, Danyang

Designing for Well-Being (ITPG-GT 3000)

This course would focus on the questions of 1) what makes people healthy? and 2) how can we design tools and environments that support healthy lifestyles? Key topics to be covered include public health concepts like the multiple determinants of health and the social-ecological framework, plus a little evolutionary biology; the role of behavior in health, key tenets of behavioral economics and behavior change strategies; and systems thinking concepts from Donella Meadows and others. Students will come away with a much more sophisticated understanding of the complex system of factors and forces that affect people’s health; understanding of key systems concepts and some techniques for understanding systems; and experience designing for behavior at scale. A potential final project could be to reimagine/redesign a popular commercial service so that it would have a more health-producing impact — or, alternatively, to focus on designing changes to the ITP environment that would promote better health for students, faculty and staff. About Steve Downs: www.stevedowns.net

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3000-000 (14792)
01/23/2024 – 03/05/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Downs, Stephen

Introduction to Quantum Technologies (ITPG-GT 3003)

Quantum technologies are the next frontier of electronics and computing. Quantum Computers, Quantum Sensors, Quantum Materials are just beginning to emerge from laboratories and enter the realm of practical application. The course introduces the underlying principles of quantum physics, and reviews emerging capabilities of quantum computers and related technologies. Coursework will include programming quantum algorithms on a simulator, and running programs on actual cloud-based quantum computing hardware. The topics will be highly technical and will require the study of scientific principles and experimental apparatus. We will cover some basic mathematical operations in linear algebra, and we’ll be encountering some equations from physics and computer science.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3003-000 (14794)
01/23/2024 – 03/05/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Shakar, Gregory

Biophilic Experiences – activating our sensory relationship to nature (ITPG-GT 2361)

As the scale of human impact on global climate and ecosystems deepens, we see the need to alter our trajectory, to be more inclusive of other species in our imagining of the future. This class sets out to investigate the relationships we humans have with nature and non-human animals, to dive deep into the meaning and utility of being in relationship, and ultimately to translate these ideas into tangible, multimedia experiences that expose a larger audience to a multi-species worldview. This class sits at the intersection of art, science, and technology. It combines studio practice and research with example case studies and critical texts. Together, we will meet artists, designers and scientists who build multispecies futures through urban ecology, biology, and public art. This class is for students who are eager to develop XD (experience design) and storytelling skills. The course follows a research-driven process that results in a design proposal and proof-of-concept that can be pitched to a public arts org. Keywords: bioArt, interactive installations, experience design, research, eco-activism

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2361-000 (14783)
01/23/2024 – 03/05/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Ruckman, Leslie

Future Mapper (ITPG-GT 2362)

As you know, projection mapping and Light Art are becoming popular again because of large-scale pop-up installations worldwide: ARTECHOUSE, SuperReal, Meow Wolf, and TeamLab. Technology has advanced over the years, but how people enjoy light art have not changed so much. How do your ideas and artwork fit into these site-specific installations? This class is for anyone interested in creating a site-specific installation using mapping technologies to create new experiences for the public audience. This class guides students through conceptual and technical processes of project and artist development. It consists of three parts: Project & Artist Development, Projection Mapping, and LED Mapping. We will research and discuss the history of visual artwork, public engagement, and technical exercises using real international contests and festival sites. The student will learn the latest Projection and LED Mapping techniques using Madmapper. And we will also focus on advanced techniques like multi-projector projection, projector calculation, Interactive Mapping, and software & hardware to culminate in a final project. The class will also invite guest speakers to discuss the nuts and bolts of their art and business. About Chika Iijima: www.mappathon.com, www.imagima.com

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2362-000 (14784)
01/23/2024 – 04/30/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Iijima, Chika

Through the Lens: Modalities of AR (ITPG-GT 2368)

In this course, students will explore the fundamentals of augmented reality by dissecting the interaction between camera, computer, and user. Each week we will focus on a different AR modality: image, face, body, environment, and object, and consider their real-world applications. Through weekly explorations, we will examine the existing affordances of AR as well as their impact. This course will culminate in a final project, and our tool of choice will be Lens Studio. Course syllabus: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1wMWVnDdzgz2bbsCNp7jRAiCe1job4glq61o67sWAP00/edit?usp=sharing

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2368-000 (14785)
03/12/2024 – 04/30/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pruitt, Maya

Design with Climate Change (ARTS-UG 1636)

The course explores how design can respond to environmental problems and climate change. In analyzing past attempts, the course starts with decolonizing turn of the century admirations for primitivism and ends with the cyber punks planning new environments online. Following the work of architects, artists, urban planners, graphic designers and fashionista, the course will review histories of adaptation and ways to design with climate. The class will decolonize modernist design schemes, and focus on better ways to design with climate. We will also devote time to discuss topics such as building closed ecological systems, counterculture designs, cyber environments, sick building syndrome, biomimetics, eco-fashion, earth art, and other methods to design within the realm of nature. The overall objective is twofold; to survey the larger historical context of ecological design and define specific contributions to the climate change debate. Ultimately, the students will be asked to design, develop, and participate in an ecologically driven conceptual final design project of their choice.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ARTS-UG 1636-000 (12489)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Anker, Peder · Joachim, Mitchell

Advertising and Consumer Society (MCC-UE 9015)

This course will examine the emergence of advertising as a form of communication, its influence upon other forms of mediated communication and its impact upon culture and society.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9015-000 (2561)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Murad, Salim

Rethinking Public Relations (MCC-UE 1750)

Public relations means different things to different things to different people but it has one undeniable element: communication. This course is concerned with arranging, handling, and evaluating public relations programs. Students work with actual case histories and deal with contemporary topics such as the use of the computer in public relations.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1750-000 (14007)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Devitt, James


MCC-UE 1750-000 (14008)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gabrielski, Jo Temah

Computational Letterforms and Layout (ITPG-GT 2051)

Language is more than just words and meanings: it’s paper and ink, pixels and screens, fingertips on keyboards, voices speaking out loud. Language is, in a word, material. In this course, students will gain an understanding of how the material of language is represented digitally, and learn computational techniques for manipulating this material in order to create speculative technologies that challenge conventional reading and writing practices. Topics include asemic writing, concrete poetry, markup languages, keyboard layouts, interactive and generative typography, printing technologies and bots (alongside other forms of radical publishing). Students will complete a series of weekly readings and production-oriented assignments leading up to a final project. In addition to critique, sessions will feature lectures, class discussions and technical tutorials. Prerequisites: Introduction to Computational Media or equivalent programming experience.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ITPG-GT 2051-000 (22296)
01/24/2023 – 05/02/2023 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Parrish, Allison

Fundamentals of Machine Learning (CSCI-UA 9473)

Machine learning is an exciting and fast-moving field of computer science with many recent consumer applications (e.g., Microsoft Kinect, Google Translate, Iphone’s Siri, digital camera face detection, Netflix recommendations, Google news) and applications within the sciences and medicine (e.g., predicting protein-protein interactions, species modeling, detecting tumors, personalized medicine). This course introduces undergraduate computer science students to the field of machine learning. Students learn about the theoretical foundations of machine learning and how to apply machine learning to solve new problems. Assuming no prior knowledge in machine learning, the course focuses on two major paradigms in machine learning which are supervised and unsupervised learning. In supervised learning, we learn various methods for classification and regression. Dimensionality reduction and clustering are discussed in the case of unsupervised learning

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CSCI-UA 9473-000 (2626)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


CSCI-UA 9473-000 (2627)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Introduction to Engineering and Design (EG-UY 1004)

This course introduces selected aspects of the history, philosophy, methodology, tools, and contemporary topics in engineering. Also included are basic engineering experimentation, data analysis, and a team-design project. This course will provide an understanding of what professional engineers do. In this context, an emphasis will be placed on developing oral and written communication skills. EG1004 is a survey course that introduces students to NYU Tandon academic opportunities, professional and career development, and teamwork skills. Design and project management skills are developed throughout a semester-long design project. Disciplines within engineering will be introduced during lecture, and explored through practice in laboratory assignments.

General Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


EG-UY 1004-000 (12431)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12432)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12433)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12434)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12435)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12436)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12437)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12438)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12439)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12440)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12441)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12442)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12443)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12444)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12445)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12446)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12447)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12448)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12449)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12450)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12451)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12452)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12453)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12454)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rom, Cindy


EG-UY 1004-000 (12455)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12456)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12598)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12457)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12458)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12459)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12460)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12461)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12462)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12463)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12464)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12465)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Clenance, Pamela


EG-UY 1004-000 (12466)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12467)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12468)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter · Röhr, Jason


EG-UY 1004-000 (12469)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12470)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12471)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12472)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12473)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12474)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12475)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12476)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12477)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12478)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12479)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12480)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rom, Cindy


EG-UY 1004-000 (12481)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12482)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12483)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12484)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12485)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12486)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12487)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12488)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12489)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12490)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12491)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12492)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid

Data Structures (CSCI-SHU 210)

Data structures are fundamental programming constructs which organize information in computer memory to solve challenging real-world problems. Data structures such as stacks, queues, linked lists, and binary trees, therefore constitute building blocks that can be reused, extended, and combined in order to make powerful programs. This course teaches how to implement them in a high-level language, how to analyze their effect on algorithm efficiency, and how to modify them to write computer programs that solve complex problems in a most efficient way. Programming assignments. Prerequisite: ICS or A- in ICP. Equivalency: This course counts for CSCI-UA 102 Data Structures (NY). Fulfillment: CS Required, Data Science Required, CE Required.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20398)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Tue3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)at ShanghaiInstructed by Tam, Yik-Cheung


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20399)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Thu3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)at ShanghaiInstructed by Simikin, Sven


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20400)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Wed3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)at ShanghaiInstructed by Simikin, Sven


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20401)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Mon11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at ShanghaiInstructed by Tam, Yik-Cheung


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20402)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Wed11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at ShanghaiInstructed by Simikin, Sven


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20403)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Fri11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at ShanghaiInstructed by Simikin, Sven

Architectural Design and Drawing (ARTS-UG 1621)

This architecture workshop introduces the basic principles of design. It begins with an analysis of a house by an important architect that examines the design concept or parti of the building, historical and environmental issues, as well as function, circulation, spatial organization, site, zoning, light, proportions, structure, and materials. In developing this project, students are also introduced to a vocabulary of design terms and the process of creating an architectural concept. In the projects that follow, students create their own designs for various types of structures. The assignments might include a New York loft space, a house in the country, or a small public or commercial building. These exercises provide the experience of creating designs by applying the concepts learned in the analysis. The basic techniques of drafting, rendering, and using Sketchup or similar software are also discussed. Films, lectures and texts on architectural theory provide additional insight. Design experience is useful, but not required.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1621-000 (16717)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goodman, Donna

Statistics for Business and Economics (BUSF-SHU 101)

This course introduces students to the use of statistical methods. Topics include: descriptive statistics; introduction to probability; sampling; statistical inference concerning means, standard deviations, and proportions; correlation; analysis of variance; linear regression, including multiple regression analysis. Applications to empirical situations are an integral part of the course. Pre-requisites: None Fulfillment: This course satisfies the following: Major req: BUSF, BUSM, ECON, CS, DS Foundational course; Social Science: methods course; IMB Business elective.

Business and Finance (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


BUSF-SHU 101-000 (17187)
09/13/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Zheng, Dan


BUSF-SHU 101-000 (17188)
09/13/2022 – 12/16/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Zheng, Dan


BUSF-SHU 101-000 (17189)
09/13/2022 – 12/16/2022 Fri
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Zheng, Dan

TrendingMentalHealth (CAMS-UA 504)

Addresses current problems facing our society and threatening our mental health, such as the opioid epidemic, gun violence, video game addiction, legal use of marijuana, and prolonged separation of children from their parents. Students contrast what is scientifically understood with what is commonly believed and learn critical reading and thinking skills as they parse fact from fiction, reality from supposition. Given the topical nature of this course, themes may vary by semester and instructor expertise (including a focus on social and cultural issues, novel neuroscience, digital health technology, etc.).

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CAMS-UA 504-000 (9479)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Waugh, Whitney


CAMS-UA 504-000 (9700)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Castellanos, Francisco · Baroni, Argelinda


CAMS-UA 504-000 (19793)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gerson, Ruth · Marsh, Akeem · Chhabra, Divya

Advanced Circuits (ENGR-UH 2311)

This course builds on the foundations of the Circuits Fundamentals Course. The topics covered include sinusoidal steady-state response, complex voltage, current and the phasor concept; impedance, admittance; average, apparent and reactive power; polyphase circuits; node and mesh analysis for AC circuits; frequency response; parallel and series resonance; and, operational amplifier circuits.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ENGR-UH 2311-000 (4721)
01/22/2024 – 03/08/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rasras, Mahmoud


ENGR-UH 2311-000 (4722)
01/22/2024 – 03/08/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rasras, Mahmoud · Mulugeta, Tadesse


ENGR-UH 2311-000 (4723)
03/20/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ha, Sohmyung


ENGR-UH 2311-000 (4724)
03/20/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ha, Sohmyung · Mulugeta, Tadesse

The Garden of Forking Paths: Exploring the Interactive Story (ARTS-UG 1642)

In Jorge Luis Borges’s 1941 short story, The Garden of Forking Paths, a character named Ts’ Ui Pen seeks to build a labyrinth in which all men will lose their way. Borges reveals that labyrinth to be a sprawling book in which all moments in time are followed by every possible subsequent moment. Multiple futures and timelines exist as one in this garden of forking paths. Fast forward to today, where we find that Ts’ Ui Pen’s seemingly incomprehensible vision has come to fruition via video games and interactive fiction. Both often eschew linearity and instead offer users the opportunity to drive the story and shape their own narrative experience. In this course, we will first explore the trajectory of interactive fiction, from its early overtures in works by Borges and Italo Calvino, forward through Agusto Boal’s Forum Theatre, early computer text adventures, Choose Your Own Adventure books, non-linear film, and into the various digital interactive fictions of today, such as hypertext literature, adventure games, and visual novels. From there, students will embark on their own adventure through interactive creative writing. The journey will begin with students taking apart and diagraming existing interactive works, and using digital tools to craft and share their own short interactive scenes and dialogs. We will confront the challenges and limitations of writing interactive story and establish some key critical theories governing non-linearity. The course will culminate in students designing and writing a complete short work of interactive fiction in a medium of their choice.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ARTS-UG 1642-000 (12470)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bishop, Barton

Internet Design (FMTV-UT 1123)

This course focuses on the fundamentals of Web design and production. It will provide students with a basic understanding of HTML and CSS page construction, designing and optimizing graphics for the Web and the basic technical skills necessary for getting the student and his/her site online. This course teaches the students how to create a Website along with utilizing Social Media tools and channels as an effective part of a promotional strategy. YouTube, Vimeo, FaceBook, Twitter, KickStarter and Mobile all offer opportunities. In this age of multiple media sources competing for our attention it is important to maintain a consistent and integrated Communications and Brand Strategy across all media distribution channels. The class examines various creative and technical approaches to image manipulation, design, and montage as well as discussing the production techniques necessary to implement creative concepts. This course deals with many of the unique technical and creative challenges – graphic optimization, video compression, and file format conversion – for putting one’s reel, trailer or film online. The students are taught typographical design principles, including the aesthetics of text style and font faces. The class will explore the creative possibilities of designing layouts and integrating animation and video into their sites. Students are introduced to a variety of Internet, DHTML and multimedia tools and experiment with their creative applications. We focus on the Internet as a promotion and distribution medium for the independent artist and filmmaker. Branding, audience awareness and usability are also emphasized.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1123-000 (19497)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beaver, Howard

Advanced Topics in Music Technology: Multichannel Media Installation and Performance (MPATE-UE 1633)

Multichannel Media Installation & Performance is a course designed for composers & artists who want to work in a performance or installation context with immersive sound & image technology. The course focuses on software & hardware workflows for the creative applications of multi-channel sound & immersive video for the creation of fixed, generative, reactive, performance-based, & interactive systems that can be experienced in a gallery context or a live performance. Students will develop a semester-length project to use scale & immersion to creative effect. The course will feature regular creative critique as well as an overview of relevant interaction design strategies for creating interactive spaces using sensors & cameras.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MPATE-UE 1633-000 (12919)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ostrowski, Matthew

Fundamentals of Music Technology (MPATE-UE 1801)

A general introduction to the fundamental concepts of music technology, including: MIDI and sequencing, the basics of digital audio, sound recording, mixing and sound synthesis,. The course will also briefly overview advanced topics and applications in the field.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (12129)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Geluso, Paul


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (10670)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Las Heras, Diego


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (10673)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mueller, Charles


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (12130)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mann, Mason

Rcdg Tech for Non Majors (MPATE-UE 1022)

Introduction to the physical aspects of sound, psychoacoustics, basic electricity, principles and practice of magnetic recording and an overview of the recording studio, including an introduction to multi-track recording techniques. Students perform various duties just as they would in a professional recording session with live musicians in the recording studio. Open to students without previous experience in recording technology.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10658)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Filadelfo, Gary


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10660)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Griffin, J Chris


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10662)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Losada, Juan

Concert Recording (MPATE-UE 1011)

Introduction to the concepts of live concert recording. Microphone selection, characteristics & placement as well as acoustic problems encountered in concert halls will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to apply the lecture material by recording undergraduate rehearsals & recitals.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1011-000 (12977)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MPATE-UE 1011-000 (12978)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Design Your NYU Shanghai (IMBX-SHU 1)

Design Your NYU Shanghai is a first-year course to help you make the most out of your college experience. You’ll be introduced to design thinking as a creative approach to explore majors and interests, craft global opportunities, and engage in intercultural connections. This action-oriented course uses rapid prototyping and reflection activities to ignite personal growth as you navigate this transformative time of your life.

Interactive Media and Business (Undergraduate)
1 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


IMBX-SHU 1-000 (27175)
08/30/2021 – 12/10/2021 Tue
9:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Tsiang, Emily

Real Time Media: Concepts and Production (IMBX-SHU 9501)

This course explores the disruptions and creative possibilities that realtime emerging media provides through the lens of learning how to design, create, produce and perform in realtime. Students will be learning how to design and produce for realtime interactive audiences, understand the modern streaming media pipeline, the fundamentals of virtual production, digital content creation and the basics of game engines and other software – all in the service of delivering a more engaging and intimate connection between audience and performer. Students will design and perform 2 distinct realtime performances as well as work together with peers to conceptualize, design and produce a short realtime ‘pilot’ using the tools and techniques you’ve learned in the first two projects. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: Interactive Media Business Elective ; Interactive Media Arts Elective

Interactive Media and Business (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IMBX-SHU 9501-000 (24204)
01/25/2022 – 05/10/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by Kumar, Archana


IMBX-SHU 9501-000 (24205)
01/25/2022 – 05/10/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by Kumar, Archana

The Meme: Images and Words Make Ideas (ARTS-UG 1664)

This course explores image making, writing and their juxtaposition, as a method of thinking through and evoking ideas. At times, images lead, and text follows, providing descriptions of images, and at other times, text leads and images illustrate that text. In the realm of the contemporary American meme, just about every time images and words are present they have an effect upon each other in the mind of the viewer, which changes the meaning of both, producing something which is more than what is present in both image and text. That third and phantasmic image exists in the mind. The examples of Chinese Literati painting, and Surrealism will provide a historical point of departure, from which we to engage 21st century examples of image and word juxtapositions that create new ideas. This course will provide students with a general history of the relationship between the image and word, and a critical understanding of the composition and decomposition of image-word printed and digital matter. Along with skills in Lino-cut printmaking, Risograph printmaking, and publication design, students will also write poetry, short essays, and art criticism. Students will participate in the content production, design, and publishing of a book and magazine, zine and poster.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1664-000 (17074)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bryant, Ernest

Hardware Security (ENGR-UH 4320)

This course covers topics related to security and trustworthiness of electronic hardware. Lectures and in-class discussions on recent research papers cover the following topics: Trustworthiness of integrated circuits; counterfeit chips, hardware Trojans, reverse engineering and IP piracy. Design-for-Trust; hardware metering, logic encryption, split manufacturing, IC camouflaging. Encryption hardware; AES, DES, etc. Testability vs Security; misuse of test infrastructure to attack encryption hardware and countermeasures. Encrypted architectures; homomorphic encryption, privacy-preserving computation. Signal processing in the encrypted domain. Malware detection through hardware structures, side channel attacks, cyber-security for the smart grid. Lectures are complemented by hands-on lab exercises.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ENGR-UH 4320-000 (17229)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


ENGR-UH 4320-000 (17230)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Transportation and Traffic Engineering (ENGR-UH 3413)

The course introduces students to fundamental concepts that underlie highway design, traffic operations and control, and transportation systems. The course begins with vehicle performance and the role it has on road design. We later cover the fundamentals of traffic flow theory and operations. In combination with such fundamentals we also discuss the use and collection of traffic data, as well as more advanced concepts on traffic safety, public transportation, and traffic management and control. Moreover, we look at clear applications of the concepts covered in class with a real-world student led project.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3413-000 (3541)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Menendez, Monica


ENGR-UH 3413-000 (3542)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zekar, Aicha · Menendez, Monica

Engineering Statics (ENGR-UH 2011)

This course introduces students to the field of mechanics through study of rigid bodies in static equilibrium. Knowledge and understanding of static equilibrium is essential for future study of topics as diverse as dynamics, solid mechanics, structures, robotics, and fluid mechanics. The methods, techniques, theory, and application of equilibrium in the solution of engineering problems are presented for two-dimensional systems. Topics covered include collinear forces, coincident forces, general equilibrium, moments and torques, analysis of trusses, frames and machines, Coulomb friction, centroid, center of mass, and moments of inertia.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3556)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sousa, Rita Leal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3557)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sousa, Rita Leal · Mengiste, Eyob


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3792)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Celik, Kemal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (4361)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sousa, Rita Leal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3793)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ayed, Lana Odeh · Celik, Kemal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (4362)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mengiste, Eyob

Computer Programming for Engineers (ENGR-UH 1000)

The objective of the course is for students to acquire the fundamental knowledge of computer programming, develop transferable programming skills, and learn to solve engineering problems via programming. The course is primarily based on the C programming language and an introduction to another programming language such as MATLAB (to demonstrate transferring programming knowledge from one language to another). The course explores the application of engineering computation in various engineering domains including mechanical, civil, computer, and electrical engineering. The following topics are covered: introduction to computer systems, standard input/output, file input/output, decision structures, loop structures, functions, arrays, addressing, dynamically allocated memory, structures, introduction to object oriented programming, problem solving via programming algorithm design, and applications in another programming language such as MATLAB.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3554)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3555)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Jamil, Muhammad Hassan · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3567)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Negoiu, Elena · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3588)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Negoiu, Elena · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3991)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Jamil, Muhammad Hassan · Eid, Mohamad

Computer-Aided Design (ENGR-UH 3720)

This course provides an introduction to computer-aided design (CAD) using solid modeling. Students learn to create solid object models using extrusions, revolutions, and swept paths, and learn to modify parts using cutting, patterns, fillets, chamfers, and other techniques. Assemblies of multiple parts are used to demonstrate the need for geometric tolerances, and students spend a large portion of class in hands-on use of software tools. The labs emphasize experiential learning of CAD concepts and applications using software tools.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3720-000 (4030)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Montalvo Navarette, Jorge


ENGR-UH 3720-000 (4031)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Montalvo Navarette, Jorge

Probability and Statistics for Engineers (ENGR-UH 2010Q)

Introductory course in probability and statistics with an emphasis on how these topics are relevant in engineering disciplines. Topics in probability theory include sample spaces, and counting, random variables (discrete and continuous), probability distributions, cumulative density functions, rules and theorems of probability, expectation, and variance. Topics in statistics include sampling, central limit theorem, and linear regression. The course emphasizes correct application of probability and statistics and highlights the limitations of each method presented. NOTE: This course may be replaced with MATH-UH 1003Q or MATH-UH 2011Q

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2010Q-000 (3562)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain


ENGR-UH 2010Q-000 (4098)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Diabat, Ali


ENGR-UH 2010Q-000 (3628)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain · Ayed, Lana Odeh


ENGR-UH 2010Q-000 (4099)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ayed, Lana Odeh · Diabat, Ali

Numerical Methods (ENGR-UH 2017)

This course provides an introduction to the methods, techniques, theory, and application of numerical methods in the solution of engineering problems. Topics to be covered include the following: finding roots of equations, numerical differentiation and integration, time marching methods in solving ordinary differential equations, and optimization. MATLAB software is the primary computing environment.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2017-000 (3651)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Karathanasopoulos, Nikolaos


ENGR-UH 2017-000 (4055)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Karathanasopoulos, Nikolaos


ENGR-UH 2017-000 (3652)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Khalifa, Duoaa Magdi


ENGR-UH 2017-000 (4056)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Khalifa, Duoaa Magdi

Object-Oriented Programming (ENGR-UH 2510)

This intermediate-level programming course focuses on object oriented programming using C . Classes and objects including constructors, destructors, member functions and data members. Topics in this course include data representation, pointers, dynamic memory allocation and recursion, inheritance and templates, polymorphism, the process of compiling and linking using makefiles, memory management, exceptional control flow, introduction to performance evaluation, and optimization.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2510-000 (3818)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alhanai, Tuka


ENGR-UH 2510-000 (3819)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alhanai, Tuka

Digital Logic (ENGR-UH 2013)

This module provides a rigorous introduction to topics in digital logic design mostly focusing on combinational circuits but also touching upon basic concepts in sequential circuits. Introductory topics include: classification of digital systems, number systems and binary arithmetic, error detection and correction, and switching algebra. Combinational design analysis and synthesis topics include: logic function optimization, arithmetic units such as adders and subtractors, and control units such as decoders and multiplexers. A brief overview of sequential circuits by introducing basic memory elements such as flip-flops, and state diagrams concludes the module.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (3810)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (3811)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (3660)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (4060)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (3661)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (4061)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur

Autonomous and Social Robots (CADT-UH 1038)

How do we feel about robots? With technological developments in capability, performance, autonomy, ease of use, and cost-effectiveness, robots have arrived in everyday life. This course considers the history and ethics of human-robot interaction and explores unsolved hurdles we face as robots assume a ubiquitous presence in our lives. How are robots currently integrating into human-centered, civic industries such as education, heath, and smart cities? What roles might robots play in the future of these industries? What are the economic and labor implications associated with robotic integration? How will consumers respond to the increased use of robots in daily life? How have popular media representations over the last century influenced the way we experience these changes? Topics will also include the miniaturization of robots and their use in situations such as focused drug delivery within the human body, save-and-rescue missions, or military combat. Students will assemble and program several Lego Mindstorm robots capable of carrying prefabricated objects and will also assemble a small house.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CADT-UH 1038-000 (3704)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by García de Soto, Borja


CADT-UH 1038-000 (7562)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by García de Soto, Borja

Utilitas, Venustas, Firmitas (CADT-UH 1016)

Design seems to be omnipresent, but what is it? This course (whose title is Latin for usage, beauty, and stability) explores how design influences our life and investigates the fundamentals of “good design.” It takes a look at the status quo of the use of design in media, objects, and architecture, and observe its influence on art and technology from past to present. Design tools and processes will be highlighted. Based on the fusion of readings, study, discussion, and experiences, over the course of the semester students will develop an understanding of how mutually reinforcing and beneficiary a mix of Arts, Design, and Technology can be. Lecture and discussion will help develop the design of a bricolage: Every student will realize a product prototype to be displayed in an exhibition and a personal philosophy of about Arts, Design, and Technology.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


CADT-UH 1016-000 (17217)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alawadi, Khulood


CADT-UH 1016-000 (17243)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alawadi, Khulood

Introduction to Computer Programming (CSCI-SHU 11)

An introduction to the fundamentals of computer programming. Students design, write, and debug computer programs. No prior knowledge of programming is assumed. Students will learn programming using Python, a general purpose, cross-platform programming language with a clear, readable syntax. Most class periods will be part lecture, part lab as you explore ideas and put them into practice. This course is suitable for students not intending in majoring in computer science as well as for students intending to major in computer science but having no programming experience. Students with previous programming experience should instead take Introduction to Computer Science. Prerequisite: Either placed into Calculus or at least a C in Pre-Calculus Fulfillment: Core Curriculum Requirement Algorithmic Thinking; EE Required Major Courses. Note: Students who have taken ICS in NY, Abu Dhabi, and Shanghai cannot take ICP.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (17503)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (17504)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23632)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23633)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Liu, Yijian


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23634)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23767)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Liu, Yijian


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (26252)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
9:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Spathis, Promethee


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (26253)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
9:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Spathis, Promethee

Introduction to Computer and Data Science (CSCI-SHU 101)

This course has three goals. First, the mastering of a modern object-oriented programming language, enough to allow students to tackle real-world problems of important significance. Second, gaining an appreciation of computational thinking, a process that provides the foundations for solving real-world problems. Finally, providing an overview of the very diverse and exciting field of computer science – a field which, arguably more than any other, impacts how we work, live, and play today. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Programming or placement exam. Equivalency: This course counts for CSCI-UA 101. Fulfillment: Core Curriculum Requirement Algorithmic Thinking; Computer Science Major Required Courses; Computer Systems Engineering Major Required Courses; Data Science Major Foundational Courses; Electrical and Systems Engineering Major Required Major Courses.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CSCI-SHU 101-000 (17449)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Gu, Xianbin


CSCI-SHU 101-000 (17509)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yin, Wen


CSCI-SHU 101-000 (17572)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
8:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yin, Wen


CSCI-SHU 101-000 (17596)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Gu, Xianbin


CSCI-SHU 101-000 (17751)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yin, Wen

Network Everything (IM-UH 2112)

This course explores the possibilities and challenges of designing alternate physical network interfaces. Through weekly readings, class discussions, and a series of projects, students will create physical objects that talk to each other over distance. Various wireless communication mechanisms such as radio (Bluetooth, Zigbee, WiFi, and raw), infrared, and ultrasonic are used in the context of creating novel “smart” devices. Topics of discussion in this course include networking protocols and network topologies; network time versus physical time; mobile objects; and wireless networks. Opportunities to build collaborative and creative campus-wide networked projects and systems will also be explored.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


IM-UH 2112-000 (24975)
01/29/2019 – 05/16/2019 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


IM-UH 2112-000 (18392)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


IM-UH 2112-000 (24976)
01/29/2019 – 05/16/2019 Thu
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


IM-UH 2112-000 (18550)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Temporary Expert: Developing a Research-based Art Practice (IM-UH 1513)

What does it mean to become a “temporary expert?” How does one develop one’s own creative research-based practice? This course will address these questions by engaging with Abu Dhabi’s environmental and social dimensions as a subject for research, context and imaginative art and design opportunities. Students will adopt a wide variety of tools and strategies in order to lay the foundations for a research-based art practice that considers materials, media, context, and audience, as well as one’s personal strengths and desires. Over the course of the semester, students will develop art and design projects that interface with a multiplicity of other disciplines, and engage in idea exchange with experts in the field. Through hands-on practice, case studies, and readings on systems thinking, communication, and the idea of “the public,” we will explore method, documentation and presentation of research, as well as the merits of both success and failure.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


IM-UH 1513-000 (24971)
01/29/2019 – 05/16/2019 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


IM-UH 1513-000 (18534)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


IM-UH 1513-000 (24972)
01/29/2019 – 05/16/2019 Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


IM-UH 1513-000 (18535)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Advanced Lab: Open Project (INTM-SHU 301)

This course offers students the opportunity to develop a self-initiated project with close mentorship from a faculty member. Projects undertaken can span the areas of conceptual research, business development, creative practice, and media production. The course includes structured weekly workshop and critique times with peers and special guests. It is expected that students will be invested in the work of their peers by providing feedback and carefully consider the feedback they receive during critiques. In addition to weekly meeting times, students are expected to also participate in regular one-on-one meetings with faculty, peers, and guests. A formal project proposal, weekly assignments and documentation, a final project presentation, and participation in the IMA End of Semester show are all required. Although students are encouraged to continue work they may have initiated in a prior class, they may not combine or in any way double count work from this class in another class taken in the same semester. Group work is allowed assuming all group members are enrolled in this class. Students may take this course in either the first or second 7 weeks for 2 credits or repeated across 14 weeks for 4 credits. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Fulfilment: IMA/IMB elective; IMA advanced elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


INTM-SHU 301-000 (19667)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 301-000 (25298)
03/28/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Parren, Eric

Intro to Soviet Cinema (RUSSN-UA 850)

Iampolski. Offered every year. 4 points. An examination of the history of Russian cinema from its beginnings. The main focus is on landmarks of cinematic art and on the cultural specificity of Russian cinema. The survey also includes questions of cinema and politics (cinema as a propaganda tool), and cinema and the market. Artists discussed include Eisenstein, Vertov, Pudovkin, Kuleshov, Barnet, Shub, Kozintsev, Trauberg, and Tarkovsky. Topics include cinema and revolution, the cinema of the Russian avant-garde and constructivism, cinema and totalitarianism, and socialist realism in film.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


RUSSN-UA 850-000 (23815)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Iampolski, Mikhail

Advanced Psychological Statistics (PSYCH-UA 11)

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9029)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hilford, Andrew


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9030)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sun, Siqi


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9031)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sun, Siqi


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9134)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Judy


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9135)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Judy


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9363)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Qingqing


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9364)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Qingqing

Social Psychology (PSYCH-UA 32)

Gollwitzer, Trope, Uleman. Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduction to theories and research about the social behavior of individuals, such as perception of others and the self, attraction, affiliation, altruism and helping, aggression, moral thought and action, attitudes, influence, conformity, social exchange and bargaining, group decision making, leadership and power, and environmental psychology.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8510)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gollwitzer, Peter


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8511)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Adjei Boateng, Fiona


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8512)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwak, Jasmine


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8513)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tao, Bradley


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8514)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tao, Bradley


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8515)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwak, Jasmine


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8516)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liaquat, Usman


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (25991)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Adjei Boateng, Fiona


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (25995)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liaquat, Usman

Personality (PSYCH-UA 30)

AndersenAndersen. Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduction to research in personality, including such topics as the self-concept; unconscious processes; how we relate to others; and stress, anxiety, and depression.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9269)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Andersen, Susan


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9270)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ganapathy, Rheanna


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9271)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qin, Joyce


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9272)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qin, Joyce


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9273)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ganapathy, Rheanna

Cognition (PSYCH-UA 29)

McElree, Murphy, Rehder. Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduction to theories and research in some major areas of cognitive psychology, including human memory, attention, language production and comprehension, thinking, and reasoning.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8505)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ausch, Robert


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8506)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Muhareb, Samer


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8507)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Muhareb, Samer


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8508)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vaghani, Jhanvi Bharatbhai


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8509)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Muhareb, Samer


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (26096)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vaghani, Jhanvi Bharatbhai


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (26111)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vaghani, Jhanvi Bharatbhai

On Eating Others (PORT-UA 403)

The notion of cannibalism is a recurring concern in the history of ideas regarding the primitive, the animalistic, the monstrous, or any of the other classifications frequently invoked to mark others, regardless of their actual culinary preferences. Reflection upon cannibalism as an intellectual phenomenon suggests how people eating people, or at least the possibility of it, says a great deal about those that do not. In some regions of the Caribbean and Brazil, ideas regarding cannibalism have made an important turn, such that the cannibal has become a provocative affirmation of self. The aim of this course is to think about cannibalism, not, as it often is, as a theme for anthropologists and ethnographers, but rather as an intellectual problem that has enjoyed a very long life in the history of ideas about self. In this course, we shall revisit a selection of texts regarding cannibalism from Columbus’ diaries to the present, and including works by, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Oswald de Andrade, Nelson Pereira dos Santos, and Suely Rolnik, in the company of some key notions involving postcolonial theory. Readings will be made available in Portuguese, Spanish, and English, and course papers may be carried out in any of the three languages according to student interest and ability.

Portuguese (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PORT-UA 403-000 (22046)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Robbins, Dylon

Introduction to Research Methods for Politics (POL-UA 850)

New research is the most exciting and important aspect of political science: we are able to pose novel questions, construct fresh theories, and provide new evidence about the way the world works. But before we start doing research, we have to learn how it is done. With this in mind, this class will introduce students to quantitative techniques used for research in the study of politics. Part of this task is conceptual: helping students to think sensibly and systematically about research design. To this end, students will learn how data and theory fit together, and how to measure the quantities we care about. But part of the task is practical too: students will learn a `toolbox’ of methods–including statistical software–that enable them to execute their plans.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 850-000 (9156)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harvey, Anna


POL-UA 850-000 (9238)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by López Peceño, Alejandro


POL-UA 850-000 (9157)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by López Peceño, Alejandro


POL-UA 850-000 (9158)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pulejo, Massimo


POL-UA 850-000 (9159)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pulejo, Massimo


POL-UA 850-000 (9734)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Demin, Sasha


POL-UA 850-000 (25687)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Melnick, Justin

International Politics (POL-UA 700)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Analysis of state behavior and international political relations; how things happen in the international state system and why. Emphasizes the issue of war and how and in what circumstances states engage in violence. Topics include different historical and possible future systems of international relations, imperialism, the Cold War, game theory and deterrents, national interests, and world organization.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 700-000 (8260)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bueno De Mesquita, Bruce


POL-UA 700-000 (8261)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Becker, Michael


POL-UA 700-000 (8262)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Becker, Michael


POL-UA 700-000 (8263)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yildirim, Mikdat


POL-UA 700-000 (8264)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yildirim, Mikdat


POL-UA 700-000 (8265)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schwarz, Christopher


POL-UA 700-000 (8266)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schwarz, Christopher


POL-UA 700-000 (8267)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ge, Zoe


POL-UA 700-000 (9112)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ge, Zoe


POL-UA 700-000 (10194)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by MEDA, Francis William


POL-UA 700-000 (10195)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by MEDA, Francis William

Comparative Politics (POL-UA 500)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Major concepts, approaches, problems, and literature in the field of comparative politics. Methodology of comparative politics, the classical theories, and the more recent behavioral revolution. Reviews personality, social structure, socialization, political culture, and political parties. Major approaches such as group theory, structural-functionalism, systems analysis, and communications theory and evaluation of the relevance of political ideology; national character; elite and class analysis; and problems of conflict, violence, and internal war.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 500-000 (8257)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Slough, Tara


POL-UA 500-000 (8258)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Mark


POL-UA 500-000 (8259)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Mark


POL-UA 500-000 (10534)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Niu, He


POL-UA 500-000 (9210)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Niu, He


POL-UA 500-000 (9360)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by He, Ning


POL-UA 500-000 (9361)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by He, Ning


POL-UA 500-000 (25686)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cheng, Mengfan

Power & Politics in America (POL-UA 300)

A survey of national political institutions and behavior in the United States, which introduces students to a variety of analytical concepts and approaches useful for the study of domestic politics. Concepts typically covered include public goods and collective action; preference aggregation and the median voter theorem; delegation, representation, and accountability; agenda control; inter-branch bargaining; and the mechanisms of private influence on public policy.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 300-000 (8252)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dawes, Christopher Todd


POL-UA 300-000 (8253)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wirsching, Elisa


POL-UA 300-000 (8254)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, Lexi


POL-UA 300-000 (8255)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, Lexi


POL-UA 300-000 (8256)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wirsching, Elisa


POL-UA 300-000 (8796)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heo, Kun


POL-UA 300-000 (8797)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heo, Kun


POL-UA 300-000 (10192)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McGrath, David

Quantum Mechanics I (PHYS-UA 123)

Designed to deepen the insights into quantum mechanics introduced in PHYS-UA 103, 104 and to provide an introduction to the more formal mathematical structure of quantum mechanics. The Schr?dinger and Heisenberg description of quantal systems; perturbation theory; spin and statistics; coupling of angular momenta; scattering theory; and applications to atomic, molecular, nuclear, and elementary particle physics.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHYS-UA 123-000 (8210)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grier, David


PHYS-UA 123-000 (8211)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 123-000 (9336)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

General Physics II (PHYS-UA 12)

Continuation of PHYS-UA 11. Topics include electric charge, field, and potential; magnetic forces and fields; resistive, capacitive, and inductive circuits; electromagnetic induction; wave motion; electromagnetic waves; geometrical optics; interference, diffraction, and polarization of light; relativity; atomic and nuclear structure; elementary particle physics.

Physics (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10171)


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10172)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Somawanshi, Prajwal Prakshep


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10173)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (23490)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10175)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (23495)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10177)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10178)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10179)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10180)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10181)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10182)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10183)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Engstler, Justin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10184)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by La Madrid, Joan


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10185)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by La Madrid, Joan


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10186)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10187)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10188)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10642)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (25702)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Somawanshi, Prajwal Prakshep

Philosophy of Physics (PHIL-UA 94)

We will investigate different approaches to understanding space and time, and how the account of space-time structure has evolved in physics. One of the main objectives is to have a clear and accurate understanding of the Special Theory of Relativity, detailed enough to allow the student to solve some physics problems. This will require a bit of mathematics, but not more than algebra. We will discuss the General Theory of Relativity in a more qualitative way, including an account of the structure of black holes. Philosophy students do not need any further background in physics or mathematics, and physics students will not benefit from greater mathematical sophistication. We will also study the relevant history of physics and philosophy, particularly the debate between Newton and Leibniz about the nature of space and time. There will be two lectures each week and a recitation section.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


PHIL-UA 94-000 (19175)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Maudlin, Tim


PHIL-UA 94-000 (19176)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher


PHIL-UA 94-000 (19177)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher

Set Theory (PHIL-UA 73)

An introduction to the basic concepts and results of set theory.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


PHIL-UA 73-000 (19544)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fine, Kit


PHIL-UA 73-000 (19545)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher


PHIL-UA 73-000 (19546)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher

Cellular & Molecular Neurobiology (NEURL-UA 210)

Lecture and laboratory course that provides students with broad exposure to current questions and experimental approaches in cellular neuroscience. Lectures and laboratories are organized into three areas: cell structure aLecture and laboratory course that provides students with broad exposure to current questions and experimental approaches in cellular neuroscience. Lectures and laboratories are organized into three areas: cell structure and organization of the vertebrate central nervous system, mechanisms underlying neural signaling and plasticity, and control of cell form and its developmental determinants. Laboratory instruction in anatomical, physiological, and biochemical methods for investigating the biology of nerve cells.

Neural Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


NEURL-UA 210-000 (9291)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aoki, Chiye · Shapley, Robert


NEURL-UA 210-000 (9292)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NEURL-UA 210-000 (9293)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NEURL-UA 210-000 (9343)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NEURL-UA 210-000 (10246)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Politics of The Middle East (MEIS-UA 750)

Historical-political background of the Middle East and its contemporary social and political problems, including the impact of the West; religious and liberal reactions; conflict of nationalisms (Arab, Iranian, Turkish, and Zionist); and revolutionary socialism. Specific social, political, and economic problems?using a few selected countries for comparison and analysis?including the role of the military, the intelligentsia, the religious classes, the legitimization of power, urban-rural cleavages, bureaucracy, and political parties.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9142)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Keshavarzian, Arang


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9143)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bell, Robert


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9144)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by ODell, Kelley


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9145)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bell, Robert


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9146)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by ODell, Kelley

Mediterranean Worlds (MEIS-UA 660)

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 660-000 (21873)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Balbale, Abigail


MEIS-UA 660-000 (21874)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cuyler, Zack


MEIS-UA 660-000 (21875)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cuyler, Zack

South Asian Literature (MEIS-UA 717)

Addresses the rich literary product of modern and contemporary South Asia. Offers more advanced undergraduates a window on a rich and culturally varied area of the world, as well as an understanding of aspects of South Asian history and society as represented in translations of modern prose writing (short stories and novels) originally written in South Asian languages.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MEIS-UA 717-000 (9065)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ilieva, Gabriela Nik

Calculus I (MATH-UA 121)

Any one of the following: a score of 670 or higher on the mathematics portion of the SAT, a score of 650 or higher on the SAT Subject Test in Mathematics 1, a score of 650 or higher on the SAT Subject Test in Mathematics 2, an ACT mathematics score of 30 or higher, a score of 3 or higher on the AP Calculus AB exam, an AB subscore of 3 or higher on the AP Calculus BC exam, a score of 3 or higher on the AP Calculus BC exam, a grade of C or higher in Algebra and Calculus (MATH-UA 9), or a passing score on a departmental placement exam. Derivatives, antiderivatives, and integrals of functions of one variable. Applications include graphing, maximizing, and minimizing functions. Definite integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Areas and volumes.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 121-000 (10098)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kalaycioglu, Selin


MATH-UA 121-000 (10099)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saha, Shuvadeep


MATH-UA 121-000 (10100)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saha, Shuvadeep


MATH-UA 121-000 (20793)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patki, Sarvesh


MATH-UA 121-000 (20794)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patki, Sarvesh


MATH-UA 121-000 (10102)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Foster, Joseph


MATH-UA 121-000 (10103)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Agostino, Marina


MATH-UA 121-000 (10104)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Agostino, Marina


MATH-UA 121-000 (10105)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Salha, Fatima


MATH-UA 121-000 (10106)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Salha, Fatima


MATH-UA 121-000 (10107)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sia, Charmaine


MATH-UA 121-000 (10108)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vasantha, Rajashekar


MATH-UA 121-000 (10109)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Star, Zachary


MATH-UA 121-000 (10110)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vasantha, Rajashekar


MATH-UA 121-000 (10111)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Star, Zachary


MATH-UA 121-000 (10112)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Foster, Joseph


MATH-UA 121-000 (10113)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cortes, Julian


MATH-UA 121-000 (10114)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cortes, Julian


MATH-UA 121-000 (10115)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gangan, Pradyuman


MATH-UA 121-000 (10116)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gangan, Pradyuman

Neural Bases of Language (LING-UA 43)

A state-of-the-art survey of the cognitive neuroscience of language, a rapidly developing multidisciplinary field at the intersection of linguistics, psycholinguistics, and neuroscience. Covers all aspects of language processing in the healthy brain, from early sensory perception to sentence-level semantic interpretation, as well as a range of neurological and development language disorders.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


LING-UA 43-000 (10444)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pylkkanen, Liina


LING-UA 43-000 (10445)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Blanco-Elorrieta, Esti

Sex, Gender, & Language (LING-UA 21)

How linguistic practices reflect and shape our gender identity. Do women and men talk differently? Are these differences universal or variable across cultures? How does gendered language intersect with race and class-linked language? What impact does gendered language have on social power relationships?

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LING-UA 21-000 (8360)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shapp, Allison


LING-UA 21-000 (8361)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Akanegbu, Anuli

Phonological Analysis (LING-UA 12)

How languages organize sounds into highly constrained systems. Topics: What do the sound systems of all languages have in common? How can they differ from each other? What is the nature of phonological processes, and why do they occur?

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LING-UA 12-000 (8357)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stanton, Juliet


LING-UA 12-000 (8963)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mason, Alicia

Honors Senior Seminar (JOUR-UA 352)

The following semester, honors students are required to take a specially designed honors senior seminar, which culminates in each student?s writing a large (6,000-10,000 word/15-20 minutes for broadcast) feature, completing the capstone. The student has to defend his/her work orally before at least two members of the faculty and perhaps a member of the profession.

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


JOUR-UA 352-000 (9155)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Boynton, Robert


JOUR-UA 352-000 (9160)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Samuels, Jason

Modern Italy (ITAL-UA 9868)

This course introduces contemporary Italy in all its complexity and fascination. Reviewing politics, economics, society, and culture over the past two centuries, the course has a primary goal — to consider how developments since the 1800s have influenced the lives and formed the outlook of today’s Italians. In other words, we are engaged in the historical search for something quite elusive: Italian “identity”. Topics will include the unification of the country, national identity in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the First World War, and Italian fascism, World War Two and the resistance, the post-war Italian Republic, the economic “miracle”, the South, the Mafia, terrorism, popular culture, and the most recent political and social developments, including Italy and the European Union. Lectures combine with readings and films (taking advantage of Italy’s magnificent post-war cinema).

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITAL-UA 9868-000 (2402)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Lombardo, Davide

American Cinema: Origins to 1960 (CINE-UT 50)

This course offers a broad survey of American cinema from its beginnings (and even its pre-history) up to 1960. While the emphasis will be on the dominant, narrative fiction film, there will be attention to other modes of American cinema such as experimental film, animation, shorts, and non-fiction film. The course will look closely at films themselves — how do their styles and narrative structures change over time? — but also at contexts: how do films reflect their times? how does the film industry develop? what are the key institutions that had impact on American film over its history? We will also attend to the role of key figures in film’s history: from creative personnel (for example, the director or the screenwriter) to industrialists and administrators, to censors to critics and to audiences themselves. The goal will be to provide an overall understanding of one of the most consequential of modern popular art forms and of its particular contributions to the art and culture of our modernity.

Cinema Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CINE-UT 50-000 (13927)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
6:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Treihaft, Lauren


CINE-UT 50-000 (13928)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CINE-UT 50-000 (13929)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CINE-UT 50-000 (13930)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Environmental Social Movements (ENVST-UA 9481)

How do social movements form in response to environmental concerns? What makes them effective or ineffective? This course analyses the various social movements that organized in response to environmental concerns. Both historical and sociological dimensions of environmental movements are covered, with particular attention given to how issues of environmental protection and social justice intersect. At NYU Berlin, the course includes American (I), European, and in particular German (II), as well as global movements (III).

Environmental Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENVST-UA 9481-000 (2369)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by

Readings in Talmud (in Hebrew) (HBRJD-UA 784)

Studies a selected section of the Hebrew and Aramaic text of the Babylonian Talmud, utilizing both traditional and academic methods of study.‎ Emphasis is on mastering the themes and concepts while studying the text and its commentaries in depth.

Hebrew & Judaic Studies (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


HBRJD-UA 784-000 (7705)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schiffman, Lawrence

Are Friends Electric? Music, Science, & Futurism in the 21st Century (REMU-UT 1229)

Historically, the music business has generally relinquished the most significant inventions and innovations to third parties. And while many can recite the contemporary Pavlovian catch phrases of the moment, what about the next wave of science and thinking that will impact music? This class will seek to identify, understand and predict the latest advancements in science that will serve to influence and transform music consumption in the next 20 years.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


REMU-UT 1229-000 (13182)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kolosine, Errol

Social Media Strategy (MKTG-UB 9045)

This course will introduce students to social media marketing. Through case studies, interactive sessions, and class exercises, students will learn best practices and develop the skills to connect business objectives with social media strategy, platforms and tactics. We will study how to develop a strategy for a product or service in social media, how to execute that strategy and how to assess the results. Topics will include choosing appropriate platforms, creating effective and engaging social media content, content management, social listening and creating a social media plan. The course also has a practical component, for which students work in small groups and individually.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MKTG-UB 9045-000 (4955)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Grazzini, Laura

Entertainment & Media Industries (MKTG-UB 40)

This course provides students with a framework for understanding the economics and key strategic issues facing organizations in the entertainment industry. It establishes a basis for the formulation of marketing tactics and strategies for firms competing for consumers’ discretionary spending. Recent developments in major sectors of the entertainment industry are covered, including movies, television and cable, theatre, and sports. Issues that cut across all types of entertainment industries are examined, including licensing, promotion, and new technologies.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10507)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Tuschman, Robert


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10508)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)at Washington SquareInstructed by Krushel, Kenneth J


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10509)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Hardart, Paul


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10510)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Lieberman, Alvin


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10547)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Lieberman, Alvin


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10601)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Narayanan, Sunder


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10640)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Narayanan, Sunder


MKTG-UB 40-000 (22981)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)at Washington SquareInstructed by

Ethics & The Environment (ENVST-UA 400)

Environmental philosophy encompasses questions in metaphysics, the philosophy of science, and the history of philosophy, as well as in such normative areas as ethics, aesthetics, and political philosophy. Presents basic concepts in value theory and introduces some major controversies.

Environmental Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


ENVST-UA 400-000 (8289)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jamieson, Dale


ENVST-UA 400-000 (8290)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferguson, Kyle


ENVST-UA 400-000 (8291)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferguson, Kyle

Physical Chemistry Laboratory (CHEM-UA 661)

Introduction to the principles and practices of experimental methods widely used in analytical and research laboratories. Emphasizes understanding of background physicochemical theory as well as capabilities and limitations of methods and interpretations of data. Covers instrumental methods, such as UV/visible spectroscopy, FT-IR, NMR, and fluorescence, for the systematic characterization of compounds and the use of interfaced computers for data collection and spreadsheet analysis. Studies also include an introduction to computer modeling of molecular properties. Optional experiments include fluorescence studies of protein denaturation and laser studies of excited state kinetics.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 661-000 (7945)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sabo, Dubravko


CHEM-UA 661-000 (7946)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sabo, Dubravko


CHEM-UA 661-000 (7947)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hopkins, Terrence


CHEM-UA 661-000 (7948)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sabo, Dubravko


CHEM-UA 661-000 (8947)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Katz, Dana

Organic Chemistry II & Laboratory (CHEM-UA 226)

This course constitutes a continuation of the study of chemistry of organic compounds. The material is presented in the functional group framework, incorporating reaction mechanisms. Topics include structure and bonding of organic materials, nomenclature, conformational analysis, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, and reactions of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, amines, and carbonyl compounds. Multifunctional organic compounds are covered, including topics of relevance to biochemistry, such as carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, and nucleic acids. Laboratories provide training in the syntheses of organic precursors in high yields and high purity needed for multistep procedures. An extensive research project involving unknown compounds is conducted. The use of IR and NMR spectroscopy is explored.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7921)


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20984)


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20985)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wlodarczyk, Marek


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20986)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wlodarczyk, Marek


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20987)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwok, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20988)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwok, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20989)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tosovska, Petra


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20990)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tosovska, Petra


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20991)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tosovska, Petra


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20992)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tosovska, Petra


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20993)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwok, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20994)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwok, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20995)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7931)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tosovska, Petra


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7932)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wlodarczyk, Marek


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9570)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Angelo, Nicholas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9943)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Helm, Elena


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20998)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9571)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Burnham, Erica


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7933)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Navarro, Abel


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7934)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwok, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7935)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tosovska, Petra


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9572)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wlodarczyk, Marek


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7936)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ben-Zvi, Benjamin


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7937)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Angelo, Nicholas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7938)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwok, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9944)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7939)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Helm, Elena


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7940)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Paolillo, Joshua


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9573)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Navarro, Abel


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9574)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ben-Zvi, Benjamin


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20999)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kelly, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (21000)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mitchell, Joshua


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7941)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wlodarczyk, Marek


CHEM-UA 226-000 (8957)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kelly, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9575)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Seraydarian, Matthew


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9576)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zang, Shihao


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9577)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Whittaker, St. John


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9945)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Andia, Alexander


CHEM-UA 226-000 (25985)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Whittaker, St. John


CHEM-UA 226-000 (25990)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 226-000 (25994)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 226-000 (26004)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

General Chemistry II & Laboratory (CHEM-UA 126)

See General Chemistry I and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 125), above. Laboratories are a continuation of CHEM-UA 125, with emphasis on the analysis of quantitative data rather than its collection. Experiments are selected to provide illustration and reinforcement of the topics covered in the course, including solution chemistry, kinetics, equilibrium, buffers, solubility, and electrochemistry.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7866)


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7867)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gustafson, Afton


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7868)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gustafson, Afton


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7869)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shtukenberg, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7870)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9505)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tariq, Mehrin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9506)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7871)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7872)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shtukenberg, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9924)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reyes, Rhea-Donna


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7873)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7874)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7875)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gustafson, Afton


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7876)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7877)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7878)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7879)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9925)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7880)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mandziuk, Malgorzata


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7881)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Burt


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9926)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9927)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reyes, Rhea-Donna


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9928)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tariq, Mehrin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (20976)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (20977)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7882)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7883)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Geggier, Stephanie


CHEM-UA 126-000 (20978)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tariq, Mehrin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9930)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9931)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7884)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Singh, Vidya


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7885)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Chengtong


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7886)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ohayon, Yoel


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7887)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dar, Aisha


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7888)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Malwana, Lakshika


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7889)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cuen, Jackie


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7890)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sandler, Sterling


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7891)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Andia, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7892)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reyes, Rhea-Donna


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7893)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Garabaghli, Humay


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7894)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Shengguo


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9932)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shtukenberg, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7895)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Crispell, Gavin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (8935)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Chengtong


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7896)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Andia, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7897)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shtukenberg, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7898)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reyes, Rhea-Donna


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7899)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tariq, Mehrin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7900)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Geggier, Stephanie


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7901)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Shengguo


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9933)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mandziuk, Malgorzata


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9565)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sasazawa, Moeka


CHEM-UA 126-000 (8931)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kurikka Valappil Pallachalil, Muhammed Shafi


CHEM-UA 126-000 (8932)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Savino, Brian


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7902)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reyes, Rhea-Donna


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7903)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sheshova, Mia


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9569)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tariq, Mehrin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7904)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cuen, Jackie


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7905)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Andia, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7906)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tariq, Mehrin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9566)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bae, Jessica


CHEM-UA 126-000 (20979)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Soper, Nathan


CHEM-UA 126-000 (20980)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Japanese Animation & New Media (EAST-UA 708)

This course looks at the terms and conditions of Japanese animation (primarily, though not exclusively, anime) as, in many ways, a new and unique mode of expression. The course is framed in which anime might, or might not, shift earlier modes of expression (both literary and animated): the prevalence of mythology in animation and the tension between mythology and ideology; the importance of genre; and the impact of ?old? and ?new? media on narrative structure and reception. Implications of these conditions for thinking about ?Japanese? culture are also considered.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


EAST-UA 708-000 (19320)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Looser, Thomas

Sonic Utopia: Unconventional Applications for Sound (OART-UT 1096)

Sound is physical. It can move objects, vibrate surfaces, perceptually alter our emotions, and shape the way viewers engage with spaces. As artists, we are conditioned to aspire to situate our work within traditional settings. How can we reposition sound as a main element of a work within unconventional contexts? This course will use the question of a sonic utopia as a platform to create interdisciplinary projects that exist between installation, sculpture, video, performance, movement, and music. Students will learn sound theories through lectures and in-class workshops and are encouraged to incorporate their individual interests into each of the four main projects that aim to position sound as a primary element of a work in order to expand the possibilities of working with sound.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OART-UT 1096-000 (13635)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Intermediate Poetry Workshop (CRWRI-UA 817)

The intermediate workshops offer budding fiction writers and poets an opportunity to continue their pursuit of writing through workshops that focus on a specific genre. The workshops also integrate in-depth craft discussions and extensive outside reading to deepen students’ understanding of the genre and broaden their knowledge of the evolution of literary forms and techniques.

Creative Writing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8090)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rohrer, Matthew


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8091)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Popa, Maya


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8692)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fitterman, Robert


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8092)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gallagher, Jean


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8628)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nutter, Geoffrey


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (20174)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Eye, David

Behavioral & Integrative Neuroscience (BIOL-UA 202)

Lecture and laboratory course that focuses on how the brain uses both sensory and stored information to generate behavior. Lectures and laboratories cover four main areas: sensory process, learning and memory, motivational and attentional mechanisms, and the motor system. Laboratories employ a range of electrophysiological techniques, lesions and pharmacological manipulations, and various behavioral techniques to examine the integrative processes by which the brain governs behavior.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


BIOL-UA 202-000 (7896)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 202-000 (7897)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 202-000 (7898)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 202-000 (7899)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 202-000 (7900)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Environmental and Molecular Analysis of a Disease (BIOL-UA 500)

This is an upper-level undergraduate course that will teach students about the environmental determinants of disease vectors, and the molecular techniques used to measure prevalence of a pathogen in these vectors. Students will partake in a semester-long research project on Lyme disease, the most prevalent vector-borne disease in the United States. The aim of the project is to determine the prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease causative agent, in tick populations from selected New Jersey or New York forests. Students will collect ticks, bring them back to the lab and analyze them for the presence of the Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria. Then collected and analyzed data will be fed into epidemiological models to assess human risk of Lyme disease in the studied areas.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


BIOL-UA 500-000 (10112)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kirov, Nikolai · Killilea, Mary

Biostatistics and Human Genetics (BIOL-UA 45)

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


BIOL-UA 45-000 (9642)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gresham, David


BIOL-UA 45-000 (9752)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Avecilla, Grace


BIOL-UA 45-000 (9753)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Buzby, Cassandra


BIOL-UA 45-000 (24768)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Buzby, Cassandra


BIOL-UA 45-000 (24772)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Avecilla, Grace


BIOL-UA 45-000 (24773)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Avecilla, Grace

Life Drawing: The Figure (FMTV-UT 1112)

Reccomended for students studying both animation and live action. This course is designed to train animation students to think visually, and to strengthen their overall drafting and design skills. The focus of the course is drawing humans and animals from live subjects, thereby learning to translate the three-dimensional world into two-dimensional terms. Drafting skills are important to all animators, regardless of their chosen media or focus. In particular, strong drafting skills are essential for character animators. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1112-000 (19493)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Camhy, Sherry

Principles of Biology Laboratory (BIOL-UA 123)

Biology (Undergraduate)
1 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8768)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bijou, Christopher


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8776)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Bessie


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8777)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Murray, Sean


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8778)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Creighton, Kathryn


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8779)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mestvirishvili, Tamara


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8780)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bijou, Christopher


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8781)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Meng


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8782)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vikraman, Pooja


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8783)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Hailey


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8784)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lisi, Brianna


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8790)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Akum, Barbara Fei


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8785)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Meng


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8786)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tuncer, Alara


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8787)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tuncer, Alara


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8788)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lisi, Brianna


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8789)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mestvirishvili, Tamara


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8791)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vikraman, Pooja


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8792)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8793)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Hailey


BIOL-UA 123-000 (10308)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Bessie


BIOL-UA 123-000 (10309)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Murray, Sean


BIOL-UA 123-000 (25642)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Molecular and Cell Biology II (BIOL-UA 22)

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


BIOL-UA 22-000 (7840)


BIOL-UA 22-000 (10390)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mason, Guy


BIOL-UA 22-000 (10391)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mason, Guy


BIOL-UA 22-000 (7842)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chen, Yu-Chieh


BIOL-UA 22-000 (7843)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Garcia, Jeremy


BIOL-UA 22-000 (7844)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Elorza, Setiembre


BIOL-UA 22-000 (8746)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 22-000 (7841)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Osmundson, Joseph


BIOL-UA 22-000 (8987)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Elorza, Setiembre


BIOL-UA 22-000 (10568)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Podolska, Natalia


BIOL-UA 22-000 (20118)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Osmundson, Joseph


BIOL-UA 22-000 (25732)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chen, Yu-Chieh


BIOL-UA 22-000 (25734)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Podolska, Natalia

Principles of Biology II (BIOL-UA 12)

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7826)


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7827)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xu, Winnie


BIOL-UA 12-000 (10442)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7828)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gilligan, Conor


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7829)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7830)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7831)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7832)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nguyen, Emma


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7833)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7834)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krishnamurthi, Smrthi


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7835)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abulimiti, Akida


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7836)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krishnamurthi, Smrthi


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7837)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bamidele, Ifeoluwa


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7838)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mieles, Dave


BIOL-UA 12-000 (8681)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rangel Valenzuela, Jesus


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7839)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gilligan, Conor


BIOL-UA 12-000 (8800)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 12-000 (8801)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rangel Valenzuela, Jesus


BIOL-UA 12-000 (10305)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abulimiti, Akida


BIOL-UA 12-000 (10607)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mieles, Dave


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20130)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xu, Winnie


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20131)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gupta, Selena


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20113)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bamidele, Ifeoluwa


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20114)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gupta, Selena


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20115)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20116)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20117)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nguyen, Emma

Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory (BIOL-UA 223)

This laboratory course applies concepts learned in the Molecular and Cell Biology course (BIOL-UA 21) to a molecular biology research project. The research project will introduce students to standard genetic and biochemical techniques common in a molecular biology lab, such as DNA isolation, agarose-gel electrophoresis, and transformation. The project also will provide students with a hands-on understanding of how modern DNA-sequencing technology, along with bioinformatic tools, can be used to discover genetic differences and understand cellular function.

Biology (Undergraduate)
1 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


BIOL-UA 223-000 (9053)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Osmundson, Joseph


BIOL-UA 223-000 (9054)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tuncer, Alara


BIOL-UA 223-000 (9209)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carrozza, Michael


BIOL-UA 223-000 (9210)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carrozza, Michael


BIOL-UA 223-000 (25644)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Murray, Sean


BIOL-UA 223-000 (25645)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Knoll, Marissa


BIOL-UA 223-000 (26031)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leon, Victor


BIOL-UA 223-000 (26657)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carrozza, Michael

Microbiology and Microbial Genomics (BIOL-UA 44)

Intended for majors and minors in biology as a comprehensive description of microbes, the most abundant and diverse organisms on the planet. Organized into four modules: the microbial cell, microbial genomics, microbial development and adaptation, and microbial interactions with the host and the environment. Through lectures and critical analysis of primary literature, students are led to realize how the advent of genomics has revolutionized microbiology, a scientific discipline that is more than a century old.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


BIOL-UA 44-000 (7855)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Eichenberger, Patrick


BIOL-UA 44-000 (7856)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Akbary, Zarina


BIOL-UA 44-000 (7857)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Akbary, Zarina

Molecular and Cell Biology I (BIOL-UA 21)

In-depth study of cell biology, with an emphasis on the molecular aspects of cell function. Topics include protein structure and synthesis, gene expression and its regulation, cell replication, and specialized cell structure and function. The course provides an introduction to genomics and bioinformatics and examines developmental biology, evolution, and systems biology.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7841)


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7842)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7843)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7844)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7845)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferreira, Amanda


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7846)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 21-000 (8866)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferreira, Amanda


BIOL-UA 21-000 (8867)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mathis, Sallie


BIOL-UA 21-000 (8985)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Obaji, Daniel


BIOL-UA 21-000 (8986)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lou, Karen


BIOL-UA 21-000 (9398)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mathis, Sallie


BIOL-UA 21-000 (10649)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferreira, Amanda


BIOL-UA 21-000 (10723)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Obaji, Daniel


BIOL-UA 21-000 (21108)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 21-000 (21109)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aharonoff, Avrami


BIOL-UA 21-000 (21110)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 21-000 (21111)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aharonoff, Avrami


BIOL-UA 21-000 (21112)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mathis, Sallie

Principles of Biology I (BIOL-UA 11)

Introductory course mainly for science majors, designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental principles and processes of biological systems. Subjects include the basics of chemistry pertinent to biology, biochemistry and cell biology, genetics and molecular biology, anatomy and physiology, neurobiology, ecology, population genetics, and history and classification of life forms and evolution. Laboratory exercises illustrate the basics of experimental biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, and genetics, as well as the diversity of life forms and organ systems.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7819)


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7820)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Savin, Avital


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7821)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Hailey


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7822)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nguyen, Emma


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7823)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jallad, Raya


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7824)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jin, Dongmin


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7825)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lotka, Lauren


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7826)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jin, Dongmin


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7827)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gupta, Selena


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7828)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gupta, Selena


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7829)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jallad, Raya


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7831)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by De, Titir


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7832)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sookdeo, Akash


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7833)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Podolska, Natalia


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7834)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hart, Sydney


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7835)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nguyen, Emma


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7836)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lisi, Brianna


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7837)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nikulkova, Maria


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7838)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Podolska, Natalia


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7839)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by De, Titir


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7840)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hart, Sydney


BIOL-UA 11-000 (9211)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Hailey


BIOL-UA 11-000 (9212)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lisi, Brianna


BIOL-UA 11-000 (9213)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sookdeo, Akash


BIOL-UA 11-000 (21100)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nikulkova, Maria


BIOL-UA 11-000 (21101)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Elorza, Setiembre


BIOL-UA 11-000 (21103)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lotka, Lauren


BIOL-UA 11-000 (21105)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Savin, Avital


BIOL-UA 11-000 (21106)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Elorza, Setiembre


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7830)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 11-000 (21107)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vikraman, Pooja

Play & Creativity (CAMS-UA 149)

How do we conceptualize the elusive phenomenon of “play”? Is there a biological imperative to play? How does play influence child development and maintain psychological health as we mature? In this course we survey the historical, scientific, clinical, cultural, and artistic perspectives on the role of play through the life cycle. Is the play-element a catalyst for creativity and innovation? We explore various theories of creativity through the lens of neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and mysticism. We consider the use of improvisation and free play in life, art, clinical work, and scientific discovery. Topics include: exploration of play styles, observations of animal play, the role of play in child development and education, how play influences attachment and social bonding, the aesthetics and cultural value of play, the consequences of play deprivation, the art and science of creativity, and the relationship between creativity, mental illness, and genius.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CAMS-UA 149-000 (9680)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Castellanos, Francisco · Amanbekova, Dinara

Arts of Africa (ARTH-UA 560)

Formerly ARTH-UA 80. Identical to SCA-UA 787. Survey of art of West and Central Africa and the South Pacific. Although art from these areas is popularly thought of in terms of its impact on the West, the art is primarily studied in relation to its meaning and function in its own society, where art socializes and reinforces religious beliefs, reflects male and female roles, and validates leadership. Films and field trips to a museum and gallery supplement classroom lectures.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


ARTH-UA 560-000 (21852)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meier, Sandy Prita

Literature and the Environment (ANST-UA 475)

This class explores the role of literature in creating empathy – how can it help us imagine the lives of “others” & that of animals? By querying the politics of meat mainly through contemporary literature, we put three similar (yet often disconnected) disciplines in conversation with each other: food studies, environmental studies, and animal studies. Two key questions we will address are: 1. What relationship – if any – is there between what we eat and who we are? 2. How are the intimate spaces of both human and nonhuman bodies – and their cultivation – related to notions of ecological violence?

Animal Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ANST-UA 475-000 (21118)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Athanassakis, Yanoula

Immersive Design for Video Games (INTM-SHU 259)

The current design methods and technologies in the field of digital entertainment, from design concepts to design tools, are still based on 2D screens, but the product is often 3D. This contradiction results in the designers not being able to see the final consequences of their work directly. Can existing VR technologies solve this contradiction? Immersive design is a new design method for digital creativities beyond the screen. It usually takes VR, AR, or MR devices as design interfaces to craft 3D models, textures, game environments, and other gaming experiences. Not only game assets creation but also game design concepts can be changed with these new technical inputs. In this course, students will answer the following questions: ○ Is immersive design more intuitive? ○ Is immersive design more efficient? ○ Do immersive design techniques have lower learning costs? ○ What traditional design lessons and concepts can be applied in an immersive design environment? In view of these questions, students from different disciplines will give answers through discussions, projects, collaboration, documentation, and VR games. Prerequisite: Communications Lab. Fulfillment: IMA/IMB Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 259-000 (17316)
09/05/2022 – 10/28/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Zhang, Xingchen

Digital Arts and New Media (INTM-SHU 125)

This course investigates digital art and new media from creative, theoretical, and historical perspectives. We will examine the paradigm shift resulting from the rise of digital art and its expansion as well as explore current ideas, creative strategies, and issues surrounding digital media. The topics of study will include digital image, digital sound, net art, systems, robotics, telematics, data art, and virtual/augmented reality. The course provides students with the means to understand what digital media is, and establish their own vision of what it can become, from both a practical and a theoretical perspective. The course consists of lectures, field trips, and small studio-based practices. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: IMA/IMB Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 125-000 (17296)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Lee, Inmi

Advanced Lab: Web Page to Web Space (INTM-SHU 304)

Web Page to Web Space is a course that explores virtual interactive experience in the context of Virtual Embodiment, Virtual Space, Telepresence, and Metaverse. Students will investigate new possible ways of using the Web to create new immersive environments in a web platform, by utilizing algorithmic 3D animation and server-side programming. This is an advanced course with technically challenging concepts with three.js and node.js and suitable for students with prior knowledge in visual programming. Prerequisite: Nature of Code or Machine Learning for New Interfaces or Critical Data and Visualization or ABC Browser Circus or Kinetic Interfaces or Machine Learning for Artists and Designers or Expanded Web or Movement Practices and Computing. Fulfillment: IMA/IMB Elective, Advanced IMA Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 304-000 (17318)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Moon, Jung Hyun

Food Management Theory (NUTR-UE 91)

Organization and management of commercial and institutional food service facilities in hotels, restaurants, and educational and community program sites.

Nutrition & Dietetics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


NUTR-UE 91-000 (13048)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zagor, Stephen


NUTR-UE 91-000 (13196)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zagor, Stephen

Screening History: (MCC-UE 1140)

This course explores the ways in which popular Hollywood films construct the historical past, the ensuing battles among historians and the public over Hollywood’s version of American history, and the ways such films can be utilized as historical documents themselves. We will consider films as products of the culture industry; as visions of popularly understood history and national mythology; as evidence for how social conflicts have been depicted; and as evidence of how popular understanding and interpretations of the past have been revised from earlier eras to the present.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1140-000 (14041)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Miller, Mark


MCC-UE 1140-000 (14042)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Loven, Hillevi

The Poetics and Politics of Mourning (IDSEM-UG 1835)

If “the past is never dead,” as Faulkner wrote, how does it continue to live on? How do its ghosts continue to haunt the political present? Can these ghosts be exorcised or does one have to learn to live with them? These questions become especially urgent and consequential in the aftermath of war and catastrophe, as writers and artists confront the legacy of violence and try to memorialize annihilated bodies and spaces. The aesthetic modes they choose to address both the dead and the living and the ways in which they narrate the past have political consequences for the future. We will explore and try to answer these questions by reading a selection of texts (fiction, poetry, film, and visual art) as sites and acts of mourning. We will read and view works from and about Armenia, South Africa, Palestine, Iraq, Lebanon, and the US. Readings will include Benjamin, Boulus, Butler, Darwish, Derrida, Freud, Khoury, Morrison, and Youssef.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


IDSEM-UG 1835-000 (19459)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Antoon, Sinan

The Sublime (IDSEM-UG 1788)

The “sublime” evades simple definition. In everyday conversation, it is often synonymous with the wonderful or the excellent. But, in the arts, humanities and aesthetic theory, the “sublime” is a topic of deep and extensive writing and reflection amongst poets, artists, theorists, and philosophers. The sublime, in this context, goes back to classical times and forward to the present. Common examples of the sublime included natural or artistic representations mountains, avalanches, waterfalls, stormy seas, human ruins, or the infinite vault of the starry sky. This course examines theoretical and creative representations of the sublime in writers and artists from ancient to postmodern, including Aristotle, Longinus, Sappho, Kant, Schiller, Wordsworth, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Newman, Rosenblum, Du Bois, Lyotard, Battersby, Chopin, Freeman, Malick, Wagner, Viola, and von Trier.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


IDSEM-UG 1788-000 (22039)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lewis, Bradley

Environmental Racism and Environmental Injustice: Rights, Citizenship, and Activism (IDSEM-UG 2114)

How are environmental racism and environmental injustice related to belonging in—and exclusion from—local, national, and international communities? How do questions about citizenship, rights, and rightlessness relate to environmental racism and environmental injustice? This course addresses questions about how numerous forms of environmental racism and environmental injustice impact people’s access to their human rights—universally guaranteed in principle but so frequently inaccessible in reality. These questions have newfound urgency amid the COVID-19 pandemic, as marginalized communities already subjected to environmental repression have been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic. Drawing on works from the realms of political theory, international law, literature, activism, and others, we will address relationships between race, class, gender, and environmental injustice. We will discuss fence-line communities. There are powerful connections between so-called “local” environmental injustice and the climate crisis—how are these connections overlooked by international law? We will focus on how communities of color, Indigenous communities, and stateless people are affected by and resist pollution inequity and differential access to healthcare. Historical and contemporary cases include denial of water access (e.g. Flint and Detroit, Michigan; the Palestinian West Bank and Gaza; and Cape Town, South Africa); forced exposure to toxins in armed conflict zones (ranging from the WWII bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, to the Vietnam War, and the Iraq War); poisoning from industrial pollution (such as in Minamata, Japan in the 20th century); and international examples of lead poisoning. Scholars, novelists, poets, theorists, and practitioners whose work will be read and discussed may include: Robert D. Bullard, Rachel Carson, Steve Lerner, Harriet A. Washington, Walter Benjamin, Hannah Arendt, Seyla Benhabib, Benedict Anderson, Antony Anghie, Tōge Sankichi, Ghassan Kanafani, and Yoko Tawada.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IDSEM-UG 2114-000 (12502)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krakow, Carly

History of British Fashion (IDSEM-UG 9252)

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON. This course offers a survey of key aspects of British fashion from 1500 to the present day, including womenswear, menswear, accessories, and more. We will examine selected features of producing, consuming, and representing dress, relating important shifts in fashion to historical developments in areas such as trade, economics, politics, and visual culture. Students will study examples of historical clothing as well as depictions of it, and become familiar with a variety of methodological approaches to its study. The majority of classes will take place in Bedford Square, London, and be formed of illustrative lectures, class activities, discussion of set readings, and student presentations. Each lecture is described in the syllabus and includes discussion questions, required as well as recommended readings, and recommended films. Several classes will take place on location, at museums and archives, and will explore important collections of British dress and of British everyday life and fashionable consumption.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IDSEM-UG 9252-000 (2740)
09/02/2024 – 12/06/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Li, Leren

History of Italian Fashion (IDSEM-UG 9200)

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-FLORENCE. The aim of this course is to explore the history of Italian fashion with an interdisciplinary approach focused on social, cultural, economic and political aspects. By focusing on select topics of key interest students will acquire a basic knowledge of the history of Italian fashion from the Renaissance to the present, understand the complex and multivalent clothing codes that help to order social interaction and learn to decode it. These abilities will provide students with a useful basis for understanding the capital role of the fashion of the past both as the origin of a ‘language’ of clothes still in use and as a boundless source of inspiration for contemporary designers. Conducted in English.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IDSEM-UG 9200-000 (2458)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Lurati, Patricia


IDSEM-UG 9200-000 (19675)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Thu
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Lurati, Patricia

Keeping It Real: Realism in Writing and Acting on Stage (ARTS-UG 1007)

Since the terms Realism and Naturalism were first applied to plays like Hedda Gabler and Miss Julie, the attempt to create a semblance of everyday life on stage has defined and sometimes dominated Western drama, even by inspiring other styles and movements in reaction. This course will explore the forms and purposes – the how and the why – of these “realistic” approaches to theater, both from a literary and a performance perspective. With the 19th Century movement in visual arts (Courbet, Manet) and literature (Zola, Elliot) as background, and contemporary equivalents in other media (Lucien Freud, Nan Goldin) as context, we will ask what is particular about Realism as a way of seeing or defining the “real”? What perspectives and assumptions does it use to recreate the details of lived experience, and what does a theater audience experience? We will look at some classic 20th Century English-language theatrical examples, from O’Neill and Hansberry to Athol Fugard and August Wilson, alongside contemporary pieces that draw from them, by writers like Robert O’Hara, Lucy Kirkwood, Kenneth Lonergan and Amy Herzog. Acting and directing texts from Uta Hagen and Harold Clurman, as well as writing about associated acting styles (such as “The Method”), will guide our work. Through rehearsing scenes and critical analysis, students will interrogate the techniques and their assumptions, asking what they now might offer us, in a culture suffused in “reality TV” and “realistic” film. The class will then create their own scenes inspired by this tradition.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ARTS-UG 1007-000 (13540)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Morgan, Ian

Topics in Recorded Music: Indigenous Pop Around the World (REMU-UT 1175)

In 2021, New Zealand pop star / singer-songwriter Lorde released a five-song EP of tracks from her Solar Power album, rerecorded in the indigenous Māori language. Five years prior, pop stars like Pharrell Williams, Dave Matthews, Radiohead, and Sia raised their voices at Standing Rock, North Dakota in support of the protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline—one of many increasing threats to the sovereignty of Indigenous Nations. Their celebrity presence was key to attracting mainstream media coverage. However, those artists were largely following the lead of Native hip-hoppers like Supaman, Snotty Nose Rez Kids, and Prolific, who’d already been at Standing Rock since the start of the protests, rallying their own communities. This course will engage students around the growing globalization of Indigenous Peoples movements that intersects culture, politics, and economics. These days, Indigenous musicians like Aboriginal Australian rapper Baker Boy and Canadian First Nations vocalist Jeremy Dutcher are gaining in visibility, topping critics’ year-end Best-Of lists and taking home awards. This “Creative Natives” wave is being felt far outside of music, too: Tzotzil fashion designer Alberto López Gomez from Chiapas, Mexico was featured in New York Fashion Week; Māori filmmaker Taika Waititi won an Oscar for JoJo Rabbit; influential art critics heralded White Mountain Apache music performance artist and film scorer Laura Ortman at the 2020 Whitney Biennial, and Seminole/Muscogee Creek showrunner Sterling Harjo’s Reservation Dogs is the new hit on FX/Hulu. Over the course of seven weeks, students will engage with a wide range of international Indigenous performers and music(s) they may have never heard before—from Māori metal to Saami yoik-rap, Quechua huanyo-pop, Inuit throatsinging, Maasai hip-hop, Hawaiian reggae, Tokelauan dance-pop, and even Tuareg rock. Meanwhile, they will discover how Indigenous artists have not only achieved national, even international, acclaim in popular mainstream music genres, they are increasingly “indigenizing” them with languages, instruments, and vocal techniques from their own cultural traditions. We will also look at some Indigenous stars who broke barriers to achieve mainstream fame as singular personalities and cultural ambassadors: artists like Yma Sumac, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Israel Kamakawiwo’ole, and more. And also, we’ll survey the impact of Indigenous artists and music on the both the mainstream recording industry, as well as the growth of Indigenous-directed business entities doing things on their own terms. Through readings, lectures, and class discussions, students will be introduced to important scholarship on Indigenous identity, (de-)colonization, cultural appropriation, aesthetics, and so on. Any student interested in socio-cultural movements, roots music trends, arts-centered activism, and the ways in which music introduces audiences to the messages within each of these—especially regarding themes like climate justice, human rights, social inclusion, and sovereignty issues—will benefit from taking this class. Students can also expect to leave the course with a greater awareness of, and hopefully appreciation for, the growing global presence and popularity of Indigenous sounds, voices, and views.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


REMU-UT 1175-000 (14536)
01/23/2023 – 03/20/2023 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Veran, Cristina

Topics in Recorded Music: Gaming (REMU-UT 1155)

Fortnite’s concerts with Marshmello and Travis Scott. Open Pit’s DIY music festivals in Minecraft. League of Legends’ K-pop and hip-hop groups. Indie label Monstercat’s deals with Rocket League and Roblox. Sony Music’s gaming imprint Lost Rings. Grand Theft Auto’s 75 billion minutes of in-game music listening. “Fantasy record label” apps like FanLabel that allow fans to assemble their own “brackets” of artists that they think will do best on the charts. These are just a handful of examples of how music and games are increasingly overlapping as industries, experiences and cultures. There are strong mutual incentives at play: Game developers are blooming into full-fledged media brands and are looking to the music business for both financial and cultural capital, while music companies are looking to diversify their revenue, experiment with more interactive technologies and tap into the power of highly engaged communities online. In the process, this merging of entertainment worlds is also rewriting conventional wisdom of what it means to be an artist, a performer, gamer and especially a fan. This course will give students the critical frameworks and vocabulary to dissect how games are being incorporated into every corner of the music industry — from the moment music is created, to the strategies that inform how music is then disseminated, marketed, monetized and performed. We will draw from a combination of theoretical readings and real-world case studies to dissect video games that center music in their player experience on the one hand, and musical projects that draw direct inspiration from games in their approaches to design, marketing, business and fan engagement on the other hand. Because this field is relatively new, many of these case studies may emerge in real time as the course unfolds. This course will be reading-, writing- and play-intensive, with required and suggested games and soundtracks for students to play, watch or listen to every week. Throughout the course, students will have the opportunity to workshop their own creative, marketing and/or business strategies for hybrid music/game projects, walking away with a concrete plan of action for incorporating the fast-paced gaming industry into their own careers.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


REMU-UT 1155-000 (14332)
03/21/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Burke, Christopher

Creative Music Entrepreneurs in Historical Context (REMU-UT 1201)

This 14-week class introduces students to the history of innovative entrepreneurs and institutions in American recorded music. We recount the stories and make arguments about famous executives, managers, producers, performers, DJs, and journalists/publishers from the dawn of the music business until the present day. We study how and why the fields, fiefdoms, and empires built by these impressive and sometimes controversial icons have transformed the course of popular music. Along the way, students become well versed in the history of 20th and 21st century recorded music, and in various music genres and styles; and we place the art and business of creating and selling recorded music in historical, political, cultural and social context. Throughout, we look at approaches to crafting successful oral and written arguments about popular music with clear, compelling writing about sound.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


REMU-UT 1201-000 (17715)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnas, Daniel


REMU-UT 1201-000 (17716)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnas, Daniel

The Language of Film (FMTV-UT 4)

Language of Film is an introduction to the craft, history and theory of filmmaking and film-watching. The main challenge facing all filmmakers is to show the story: in other words, to visualize the drama. Over the past century, narrative, experimental and documentary filmmakers have developed a variety of creative strategies and techniques designed to give their audiences compelling, multi-sensorial experiences. The goal of this class is to explore how filmmakers in different historical and cultural settings have contributed to the evolution of film as a powerful, complex and captivating art form.. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


FMTV-UT 4-000 (14350)01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)at Washington SquareInstructed by Pollard, Sam


FMTV-UT 4-000 (14351)01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)at Washington SquareInstructed by Trope, Zipora


FMTV-UT 4-000 (14352)01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Rea, Peter


FMTV-UT 4-000 (14353)01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)at Washington SquareInstructed by Kenny, Glenn


FMTV-UT 4-000 (14354)01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Santha, Laszlo


FMTV-UT 4-000 (14355)01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)at Washington SquareInstructed by Cornell, Julian


FMTV-UT 4-000 (14704)01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)at Washington SquareInstructed by Kenny, Glenn

Statistics for The Behavioral Sciences (PSYCH-UA 10)

Bauer. Offered every semester. 4 points. Students gain familiarity with data description, variance and variability, significance tests, confidence bounds, and linear regression, among other topics. Students work on psychological data sets, learn approaches to statistical prediction, and learn to interpret results from randomized experiments.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8659)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bauer, Elizabeth


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8660)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zuo, Shimiao


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8661)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Wenze


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8662)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zuo, Shimiao


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8663)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Stan


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8664)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Stan


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8665)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bauer, Elizabeth


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8666)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Glinton, Kristen


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8667)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Glinton, Kristen


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8668)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Parihar, Sushmeena


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8669)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Parihar, Sushmeena


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8670)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Judy


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (26969)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Wenze


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (27040)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Judy

Intro to Foods and Food Science (NUTR-UE 85)

Introduction to the foods of various world regions and the techniques used to prepare them through hand-on food preparation, demonstrations, lectures and field trips.

Nutrition & Dietetics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


NUTR-UE 85-000 (10938)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mortillaro, Lourdes


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12408)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12409)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12410)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12411)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (11672)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12412)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12413)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12414)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Perception (PSYCH-UA 22)

Carrasco, Heeger, Landy, Pelli. Offered every semester. 4 points. How do we construct a conception of physical reality based on sensory experience? Survey of basic facts, theories, and methods of studying sensation and perception. The major emphasis is on vision and audition, although other modalities may be covered. Represen-tative topics include receptor function and physiology; color; motion; depth; psychophysics of detection, discrimination, and appearance; perceptual constancies; adaptation, pattern recognition, and the interaction of knowledge and perception.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 22-000 (8495)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Maloney, Laurence


PSYCH-UA 22-000 (8496)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Little, Pat


PSYCH-UA 22-000 (8497)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Little, Pat


PSYCH-UA 22-000 (8498)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Elizabeth


PSYCH-UA 22-000 (8499)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwak, Yuna


PSYCH-UA 22-000 (25982)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwak, Yuna


PSYCH-UA 22-000 (25984)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Elizabeth

Human Evolution (ANTH-UA 2)

Investigates the evolutionary origins of humans. The study of human evolution is a multidisciplinary endeavor involving a synthesis of concepts, techniques, and research findings from a variety of different scientific fields, including evolutionary biology, paleontology, primatology, comparative anatomy, genetics, molecular biology, geology, and archaeology. Explores the different contributions that scientists have made toward understanding human origins and provides a detailed survey of the evidence used to reconstruct the evolutionary history of our own species.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7767)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Higham, James


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7775)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gunson, Jessica


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7768)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gunson, Jessica


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7769)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Galway-Witham, Julia


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7770)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Galway-Witham, Julia


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7771)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Xue


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7772)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dudas, Madelynne


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7773)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dudas, Madelynne


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7774)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Xue


ANTH-UA 2-000 (26376)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Guerra, Jordan

Interaction as Art Medium (IMNY-UT 249)

While traditional forms of art such as painting and sculpture only expect intellectual communication with the spectator, interactive arts consider the audience as active participants and directly involve their physical bodies and actions. Interactive art invites its audience to have a conversation with the artwork or even be part of it. Well designed interactions add new meanings to the artwork and enhance effective and memorable communication with the viewer through their magical quality. Artists have achieved interactivity in their art through different strategies based on various technologies. For example, some projects have physical interfaces such as buttons and knobs, some projects react to the audience’s presence or specific body movements, and yet others require collaborations between the audience as part of the interaction process. Some artwork involves interactions that require a long period of time for the engagement. In many of these interactive art projects, interaction methods are deeply embedded into the soul and voice of the work itself. In this class, we will explore interaction as an artistic medium. We will be looking at interactive media art history through the lens of interaction and technology to explore their potential as art making tools. Every 1-2 weeks, you will be introduced to a new interaction strategy along with a group of artists and projects. You will learn about relevant technologies and skills for the interaction strategies and build your own project to be in conversation with the artists and projects. You will also explore and discuss the future of interactions and how interactive art can contribute to innovations in interactions, and vice versa. You will also learn about how to contextualize and articulate your project in an artistic way. The assignments include reading, short writing, hands-on labs, and production assignments. Technical topics covered in class include but are not limited to: physical computing, sensing, and interaction design.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IMNY-UT 249-000 (22306)
03/22/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Song, Yeseul

Pixel by Pixel (IMNY-UT 231)

This class focuses on the art of computer graphics and image processing. We explore the concepts of pixilation, image representation and granularity and the tension between reality and image. Students are introduced to the tools and techniques of creating dynamic and interactive computer images from scratch, manipulating and processing existing images and videos, compositing and transitioning multiple images, tracking and masking live video, compositing and manipulating live video as well as manipulating depth information from Kinect. The class uses Processing and the Java language and also introduces students to shaders and the glsl language.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IMNY-UT 231-000 (22308)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rozin, Daniel

Immersive Arts (INTM-SHU 257)

This course aims to provide students with the means to understand immersive media experiences, and conduct experiments from both a practical and a theoretical perspective. The course consists of lectures, research, discussion and studio-based practice. Students will learn to produce stereoscopic – 3D images and photogrammetric 3D models, utilize multi-channel video and sound systems, and be introduced to the Unity game engine and VR hardware. For the final project, students produce VR environments in experimental and meaningful ways. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: IMA/IMB elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 257-000 (17304)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Her, Yun

Digital Sculpture (INTM-SHU 228)

This course investigates and illuminates the concepts and the aesthetics of kinetic sculpture and installation art in various forms from creative and historical perspectives. Students will learn to regard sound and performance as part of a sculptural form and learn to work with space. Students will gain woodworking and digital fabrication skills to expand on their physical computing skills to create moving sculpture and installation. The course consists of lectures, readings, and hands-on studio work.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


INTM-SHU 228-000 (23472)
01/24/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Lee, Inmi

Open Project Salon (INTM-SHU 140T-B)

This course offers students the opportunity to develop a self-initiated project with close mentorship from a faculty member. Projects undertaken can span the areas of conceptual research, business development, creative practice, and media production. The course includes structured weekly workshop and critique times with peers and special guests. It is expected that students will embrace open-source and open-content ideals in their work, be invested in the work of their peers by providing feedback, and consider the feedback they receive during critique. In addition to weekly meeting times, students are expected to also participate in regular one-on-one meetings with faculty, peers, and guests. A formal project proposal, weekly assessments and documentation, a final project presentation, and participation in the IMA End of Semester show are all required. Although students are encouraged to continue work they may have initiated in a prior class, they may not combine or in any way double count work from this class in another class taken in the same semester. Group work is allowed assuming all group members are enrolled in this class. Students may take INTM-SHU 140T-A in the first 7 weeks for 2 credits or take this course in the second 7 week or take both of them across 14 weeks for 4 credits. It is open to anyone in any major assuming they have satisfied the prerequisites. Prerequisites: None Fulfillment: IMA /IMB elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


INTM-SHU 140T-B-000 (25772)
03/22/2021 – 05/14/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Cossovich, Rodolfo

Open Project Salon (INTM-SHU 140T-A)

This course offers students the opportunity to develop a self-initiated project with close mentorship from a faculty member. Projects undertaken can span the areas of conceptual research, business development, creative practice, and media production. The course includes structured weekly workshop and critique times with peers and special guests. It is expected that students will embrace open-source and open-content ideals in their work, be invested in the work of their peers by providing feedback, and consider the feedback they receive during critique. In addition to weekly meeting times, students are expected to also participate in regular one-on-one meetings with faculty, peers, and guests. A formal project proposal, weekly assessments and documentation, a final project presentation, and participation in the IMA End of Semester show are all required. Although students are encouraged to continue work they may have initiated in a prior class, they may not combine or in any way double count work from this class in another class taken in the same semester. Group work is allowed assuming all group members are enrolled in this class. Students may take this course in the first 7 weeks for 2 credits or take INTM-SHU 140T-B in the second 7 week or take both of them across 14 weeks for 4 credits. It is open to anyone in any major assuming they have satisfied the prerequisites. Prerequisites: None Fulfillment: IMA /IMB elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


INTM-SHU 140T-A-000 (20409)
01/25/2021 – 03/19/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Cossovich, Rodolfo

Introduction to Media Industries and Institutions (IMBX-SHU 106)

“This course is an introduction to the media industries, with a particular focus on the institutional forces (i.e., market structures, law and regulation, technological advancement, and audience dynamics) that shape the content and forms of emerging media. Through lectures and guest talks, this class will make sense of the key concepts, professional terms, and business logics embedded in the production and operation of the global media industries. Furthermore, we will take case studies approach to examining the economic and social influences of media companies in specific contexts, particularly China, U.S., and U.K. These knowledge, together with the analytical skills that the students will acquire through in-class discussions, will allow them to comprehend and cope with the interplay among technology, market forces, and regulators in a wide array of media companies, including television, film, news, music industries, and the tech sector.” Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: IMA elective; IMB Business Flexible core course.

Interactive Media and Business (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IMBX-SHU 106-000 (17839)
01/24/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Wang, Jing

Advertising for Social Good (MCC-UE 1042)

With the COVID-19 pandemic and the rise of social movements like Black Lives Matter and #metoo, the field of social good advertising has rapidly expanded as brands seek social relevance, governments and nonprofits look to inform, and activists try to persuade. In this course, students will learn to plan and execute powerful social advertising campaigns, while thinking critically about the blurred lines between advertising and information, and branding and politics, in what Sarah Banet-Weiser calls “Shopping for Change.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MCC-UE 1042-000 (24128)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Railla, Jean

Environmental Systems Science (ENVST-UA 100)

A comprehensive survey of critical issues in environmental systems science, focusing on: human population; the global chemical cycles; ecosystems and biodiversity; endangered species and wildlife; nature preserves; energy flows in nature; agriculture and the environment; energy systems from fossil fuels to renewable forms; Earth?s waters; Earth?s atmosphere; carbon dioxide and global warming; urban environments; wastes; and paths to a sustainable future.

Environmental Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ENVST-UA 100-000 (9509)


ENVST-UA 100-000 (8090)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ENVST-UA 100-000 (8091)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ENVST-UA 100-000 (8092)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ENVST-UA 100-000 (8093)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ENVST-UA 100-000 (8094)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ENVST-UA 100-000 (9284)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

INTRODUCTION TO HAPTICS AND TELEROBOTICS IN MEDICINE (ROB-UY 3404)

In this course, the theoretical bases and applications, of haptics technologies with a particular focus on medical applications (specifically surgical, and neurorehabilitative) are taught. Basic technological aspects, such as instrumentation, actuation, control and mechanisms, are introduced. Also, some theoretical aspects related to telerobotic systems are discussed. Students are expected to have basic knowledge of programming. As part of this course, students will participate in experimental and simulation labs to acquire hands-on expertise in haptics implementation and programming. | Prerequisite: CS-UY 1114 and MA-UY 2034 and PH-UY 1013 or equivalents (see Minor in Robotics)

Robotics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ROB-UY 3404-000 (15568)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Atashzar, Seyed Farokh


ROB-UY 3404-000 (15569)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Atashzar, Seyed Farokh


ROB-UY 3404-000 (15570)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Atashzar, Seyed Farokh


ROB-UY 3404-000 (15567)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Atashzar, Seyed Farokh

Cultures & Contexts: Korea (CORE-UA 543)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CORE-UA 543-000 (21305)


CORE-UA 543-000 (21306)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 543-000 (21307)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 543-000 (21308)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 543-000 (21309)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Urban Data Science (CUSP-GX 1003)

The course targets current and future urban practitioners looking to harness the power of data in urban practice and research. This course builds the practical skillset and tools necessary to address urban analytics problems with urban data. It starts with essential computational skills, statistical analysis, good practices for data curation and coding, and further introduces a machine learning paradigm and a variety of standard supervised and unsupervised learning tools used in urban data science, including regression analysis, clustering, and classification as well as time series analysis. After this class, you should be able to formulate a question relevant to Urban Data Science, locate and curate an appropriate data set, identify and apply analytic approaches to answer the question, obtain the answer and assess it with respect to its certainty level as well as the limitations of the approach and the data. The course will also contain project-oriented practice in urban data analytics, including relevant soft skills – verbal and written articulation of the problem statement, approach, achievements, limitations, and implications.

Ctr for Urban Sci and Progress (Graduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CUSP-GX 1003-000 (23062)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at ePoly
Instructed by Sobolevsky, Stanislav

Surround & Immersive Sound Recording: A Mixed Reality (REMU-UT 1013)

This class builds upon the techniques of the recording studio and the techniques of producing recorded music begun in Engineering the Record I, IIand Producing the Record Side A and B and will explore advanced techniques used in surround and immersive sound recording and mixing. Today, surround and immersive audio can be found in all areas of popular entertainment: music, film, television, streaming, games, etc. By using the multichannel studio facilities of the Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music, students will further learn to record and mix in surround and immersive audio formats. Assigned work will take place in Studio 1 and Studio 4.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


REMU-UT 1013-000 (22415)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Anderson, Jim

Introduction to Performance Studies (PERF-GT 1000)

Performance Studies (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


PERF-GT 1000-000 (6689)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PERF-GT 1000-000 (6690)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PERF-GT 1000-000 (6691)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PERF-GT 1000-000 (6692)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PERF-GT 1000-000 (22097)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Introduction to Game Engines (GAMES-UT 183)

Introduction to Game Engines is a course intended for students who already have an understanding of programming fundamentals that introduces concepts, problems, and methods of developing games and interactive media using popular game engines. Game engines are no longer just used for the development of games, they have increasing gained popularity as tools for developing animations, interactives, VR experience, and new media art. Throughout the semester, students will have weekly programming assignments, using a popular game engine. There will be a final game assignment, as well as weekly quizzes and a final exam. The course assumes prior programming knowledge, if students do not have the appropriate prerequisites a placement exam may be taken. There will be an emphasis on using code in a game engine environment as a means of creative expression.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


GAMES-UT 183-000 (15841)
10/27/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Multisensory Storytelling in Virtual Reality and Original Flavor Reality (ITPG-GT 2347)

In this course, we will explore how to create narratives that leverage our lesser used senses like touch, taste and smell as well as lesser-known ones like space, time, balance and scale. We will dig into the history of experiential storytelling, starting from immersive theater and Smell-O-vision to cutting-edge haptics and mind-bending illusions of proprioception. To help center this back in practical applications, we will also explore how this evolving art is commonly used in exhibition design, experiential marketing and brick and mortar retail. The class will be a healthy mixture of game theory as well as experienced based learning (meaning there will be a couple field trips and multisensory VR projects to explore). A basic knowledge of game engines is ideal but not mandatory because we will be using predesigned templates in Unreal engine to be experienced and manipulated in real-time through virtual reality hardware.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2347-000 (23981)
09/02/2021 – 10/26/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

A Radical Thing (ITPG-GT 2357)

This course will serve as an incubator to imagine a speculative product advertisement in the year 2030. In films like Blade Runner, or Her adverts fill the world and become an important aspect of exposition for the film. And in the real world, works such as Alisha Wormlsey, Alexandra Bell, and Hank Willis Thomas begin to re-imagine advertisements as an art practice in society today. Our work will begin to speculate on near-future objects in which topics such as communication, energy storage, transportation can begin to be re-imagined in the next industrial revolution. Using 3D tools, students will gain experience in speculative design thinking, industrial design modeling, product lighting, and custom post-production methods. The final project will be a product advert that will be designed to promote a speculative design entirely made from 100% Biodegradable plastics. The course will look at the ready-made objects all around us as a launching pad. We will be starting with modeling an object in detail. Using Moi 3D, Maya, Render Engine TBD, After Effects, and premiere over the course of the semester. I will go through some of the latest tools within the VFX industry and support this course with a series of artists who have re-imaged the role of cultural production. The final will be an advertisement poster and animation.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2357-000 (23990)
10/27/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Art Toy Design (ITPG-GT 2196)

Is it a plaything? Sculpture? Nostalgia? A Product? Art toys exist at the center of a unique Venn diagram. Each student in this class will develop an original limited edition art toy. We will cover toy fabrication, character design, material selection, packaging design, and art toy culture. The class will be fabrication heavy, there will be weekly assignments, and a final project.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2196-000 (22643)
09/02/2021 – 10/26/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Realtime (IMBX-SHU 9501)

This course explores the disruptions and creative possibilities that realtime emerging media provides through the lens of learning how to design, create, produce and perform in realtime. Students will be learning how to design and produce for realtime interactive audiences, understand the modern streaming media pipeline, the fundamentals of virtual production, digital content creation and the basics of game engines and other software – all in the service of delivering a more engaging and intimate connection between audience and performer. Students will design and perform 2 distinct realtime performances as well as work together with peers to conceptualize, design and produce a short realtime ‘pilot’ using the tools and techniques you’ve learned in the first two projects. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: Interactive Media Business Elective ; Interactive Media Arts Elective

Interactive Media and Business (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IMBX-SHU 9501-000 (24204)
01/25/2022 – 05/10/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by Prasanna Kumar, Archana


IMBX-SHU 9501-000 (24205)
01/25/2022 – 05/10/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by

Topics in Physical Computing and Experimental Interfaces (IMNY-UT 248)

Physical Computing is an approach to computer-human interaction design that starts by considering how humans express themselves physically and how computers can sense that expression. This course is designed to provide students with hands-on experience in researching, designing, and building physical interfaces for computers and other digital devices. Physical computing takes a hands-on approach. Students will learn to understand electronic sensors, connect them to computers, write programs, and build enclosures to hold sensors and controls. They will also learn to integrate all of these skills in the design of devices which respond to human physical expression.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2021)


IMNY-UT 248-000 (6304)
07/06/2021 – 08/15/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Song, Yeseul

Intro to Physical Comp (ITPG-GT 2301)

This course expands the students’ palette for physical interaction design with computational media. We look away from the limitations of the mouse, keyboard and monitor interface of today’s computers, and start instead with the expressive capabilities of the human body. We consider uses of the computer for more than just information retrieval and processing, and at locations other than the home or the office. The platform for the class is a microcontroller, a single-chip computer that can fit in your hand. The core technical concepts include digital, analog and serial input and output. Core interaction design concepts include user observation, affordances, and converting physical action into digital information. Students have weekly lab exercises to build skills with the microcontroller and related tools, and longer assignments in which they apply the principles from weekly labs in creative applications. Both individual work and group work is required.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2301-000 (15684)
09/03/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Galvao Cesar de Oliveira, Pedro


ITPG-GT 2301-000 (15742)
09/03/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Feddersen, Jeffery


ITPG-GT 2301-000 (15685)
09/03/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rozin, Daniel


ITPG-GT 2301-000 (15686)
09/03/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Igoe, Thomas


ITPG-GT 2301-000 (15687)
09/03/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Song, Yeseul


ITPG-GT 2301-000 (15688)
09/03/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rozin, Daniel


ITPG-GT 2301-000 (15689)
09/03/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rios, David

Digital Arts and New Media (INTM-SHU 125T)

This course investigates digital art and new media from creative, theoretical, and historical perspectives. We will examine the paradigm shift resulting from the rise of digital art and its expansion as well as explore current ideas, creative strategies, and issues surrounding digital media. The topics of study will include digital image, digital sound, net art, systems, robotics, telematics, data art, and virtual/augmented reality. The course aims to provide students with the means to understand what digital media is, and establish their own vision of what it can become, from both a practical and a theoretical perspective. The course will consist of lectures, field trips, and small studio-based practices. Prereq: None Fulfillment: IMA/IMB elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


INTM-SHU 125T-000 (20378)
01/25/2021 – 05/14/2021 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Lee, Inmi

Expressive Culture: La Belle Epoque (CORE-UA 9761)

La Belle Époque, that period in the life of France’s pre-World War I Third Republic (1871-1914) associated with extraordinary artistic achievement, saw Paris emerge as the undisputed Western capital of painting and sculpture; it also was the most important production site for new works of musical theatre and, arguably, literature. It was during these decades that Impressionism launched its assault on the academic establishment, only itself to be superseded by an ever-changing avant-garde associated first with the nabis, then with fauvism and cubism; that the operas of Bizet, Saint-Saëns, and Massenet and the plays of Sardou and Rostand filled the world’s theatres; and that the novels of Zola and stories of Maupassant were translated into dozens of languages. Finally, this was the society that gave birth to one of the greatest literary works of all time, Marcel Proust’s Remembrances of Things Past, the first volume of which appeared just as the First World War was about to bring the Belle Époque to a violent end. Sources include reproductions of paintings, recordings of chamber music, opera and mélodies, and several of the most significant novels of the period.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


CORE-UA 9761-000 (24742)
01/25/2021 – 05/14/2021 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Shanghai (Global)
Instructed by Hackney, Melanie


CORE-UA 9761-000 (24743)
01/25/2021 – 05/14/2021 Tue
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Shanghai (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9761-000 (24744)
01/25/2021 – 05/14/2021 Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Shanghai (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9761-000 (24745)
01/25/2021 – 05/14/2021 Tue
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Shanghai (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9761-000 (24746)
01/25/2021 – 05/14/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Shanghai (Global)
Instructed by

Expressive Culture: Tpcs (CORE-UA 9700)

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


CORE-UA 9700-000 (24747)
01/25/2021 – 05/14/2021 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Shanghai (Global)
Instructed by Banai, Noit


CORE-UA 9700-000 (24748)
01/25/2021 – 05/14/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Shanghai (Global)
Instructed by Banai, Noit


CORE-UA 9700-000 (24749)
01/25/2021 – 05/14/2021 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Shanghai (Global)
Instructed by Banai, Noit


CORE-UA 9700-000 (24750)
01/25/2021 – 05/14/2021 Tue
3:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Shanghai (Global)
Instructed by Banai, Noit


CORE-UA 9700-000 (24751)
01/25/2021 – 05/14/2021 Fri
3:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Shanghai (Global)
Instructed by Banai, Noit

Cultures & Contexts: Japan (CORE-UA 507)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 507-000 (19713)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shimabuku, Annmaria


CORE-UA 507-000 (19714)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 507-000 (19715)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 507-000 (19716)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 507-000 (19717)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 507-000 (19718)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 507-000 (19719)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Life Science: Human Origins (CORE-UA 305)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


CORE-UA 305-000 (8176)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Burrell, Andrew


CORE-UA 305-000 (8177)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Avilez, Monica


CORE-UA 305-000 (8178)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Avilez, Monica


CORE-UA 305-000 (8179)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Petersdorf, Megan


CORE-UA 305-000 (8180)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Petersdorf, Megan


CORE-UA 305-000 (8181)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Decasien, Alexandra


CORE-UA 305-000 (8182)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Fri
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Decasien, Alexandra

Digital Electronics Lab (MPATE-UE 1828)

Hands-on lab accompanying Digital Electronics. Lab sessions will contain hands-on experience with logic circuits & microcontrollers. The course culminates with a student developed final project.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
1 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1828-000 (12132)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven


MPATE-UE 1828-000 (10687)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven


MPATE-UE 1828-000 (12133)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven


MPATE-UE 1828-000 (10689)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kleback, Mark


MPATE-UE 1828-000 (12134)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Analog Electronics (MPATE-UE 1817)

An introduction to Analog Electronic theory including solid-state devices. Ohm’s Law & related measurement techniques will be explored. Students must enroll in a Lab section to apply hands-on experience in basic circuit design & measurement.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1817-000 (10679)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven

Digital Electronics (MPATE-UE 1818)

An introduction to Digital Electronics, including binary systems & logic. Students must enroll in a Lab section to apply hands-on experience in simple computer programming techniques, digital processing applied to music with specific relevance to computer music synthesis & MIDI.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1818-000 (10681)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven

Software Music Production (MPATE-UE 1070)

Analytical and theoretical concepts required grasping the aesthetic development of electronic and computer music compositions. The course emphasizes analysis and historical understanding of techniques of production and compositional ideas.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1070-000 (10667)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Losada, Juan

History of Computing: How the Computer Became Personal (MCC-UE 1171)

This course focuses on technological developments and cultural contexts relevant to understanding the development of digital computing technology. The course familiarizes students with the social forces and technocultural innovations that shaped the personal computing industry, and uses primary documents, academic history and critical theory to contextualize and problematize popular frameworks of technological progress and challenge narratives of computing’s inevitability.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MCC-UE 1171-000 (24908)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brain, Tega · Nooney, Laine

Applied Cryptography (CS-GY 6903)

This course examines Modern Cryptography from a both theoretical and applied perspective, with emphasis on “provable security” and “application case studies”. The course looks particularly at cryptographic primitives that are building blocks of various cryptographic applications. The course studies notions of security for a given cryptographic primitive, its various constructions and respective security analysis based on the security notion. The cryptographic primitives covered include pseudorandom functions, symmetric encryption (block ciphers), hash functions and random oracles, message authentication codes, asymmetric encryption, digital signatures and authenticated key exchange. The course covers how to build provably secure cryptographic protocols (e.g., secure message transmission, identification schemes, secure function evaluation, etc.), and various number-theoretic assumptions upon which cryptography is based. Also covered: implementation issues (e.g., key lengths, key management, standards, etc.) and, as application case studies, a number of real-life scenarios currently using solutions from modern cryptography. | Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6903-000 (15957)
at ePoly
Instructed by Chen, Zhixiong


CS-GY 6903-000 (15958)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Di Crescenzo, Giovanni


CS-GY 6903-000 (15959)
at ePoly
Instructed by Di Crescenzo, Giovanni

Big Ideas: Artificial Intelligence (CSCI-UA 74)

This course provides a high-level overview of the key ideas and technologies that lead to revolutionary changes in Artificial Intelligence and to the explosive growth in practical applications of AI. Taught by a team of NYU’s top experts in artificial intelligence lead by the Turing award winner Yann LeCun, the course will introduce students to a range of topics in fundamentals of AI and its key sub-areas including machine learning, natural language processing, computer vision as well as its applications in different domains.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


CSCI-UA 74-000 (22982)
03/21/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lecun, Yann · Zorin, Denis

Occupy Outer Space (OART-UT 19)

Technology is a weasel. Squeezing its way into art, culture and the everyday. It infiltrates our psyche, inspiring playful interactions, fantastical ideas, vengeance and drama. It brings us together while tearing us apart. In this project-based studio, we will focus on a collective approach to creating art, tools, performances, and experiences. Outer Space in the context of this course will be used as a metaphor for the future, the unknown, and the seemingly impossible. We will investigate disparate cultural moments and unravel narratives that are both historical and technological. Technology will serve as a structure with open-ended assignments in music, video, sculpture, electronics, kineticism, surveillance, interactive graphics, and performance. Combined collaborative exercises and individual projects will augment classroom discussions and inform the art that we make. A willingness to use your imagination and personal experience to derail preconceived notions of linear timelines will serve you well in this hands-on multidisciplinary course.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


OART-UT 19-000 (23627)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Benjamin, Ithai

Choreography (OART-GT 2805)

The purpose of this course is to enable the student to gain a heightened awareness, appreciation, and knowledge of dance through movement and performance. We focus on the foundations of dance such as control, aesthetics, alignment, development of strength and flexibility, dynamics, athleticism, musicality, use of space, development of learning strategies within a group context, and personal, artistic expression. The student’s mastery of their body, expression with their body and creativity through their body is the center of the work. Through individual and collective kinesthetic participation in unfamiliar patterns, related, but not limited to China, West Africa, United States, and Japan, the student is physically and conceptually challenged and informed. Using these learned dances as inspiration, students go on to re interpret, improvise and choreograph their own variations on dance forms in their class assignments. Dance experience is not necessary.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


OART-GT 2805-000 (7359)09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Hoffbauer, Patricia

Making Webisodes (OART-GT 2569)

Making Webisodes is an intensive production workshop in which students create unique and compelling content for the web. Students will explore the basics of online video production, working with – concept creation – writing – directing – acting – production design – camerawork – sound – editing – online distribution – social media – web monetization – and advertising. Web series are an exploding new art form. Embedded ads, 5 second hooks, instagram stories, tik-tok, and viral videos all present a variety of new media approaches within the entertainment industry, business, lifestyle, and politics. Webisodes are short visual presentations that either entertain us, directly sell us product, indirectly sell us product, share a powerful message, investigate social issues, expose problems, celebrate joy, engage our perspective, shock us, or challenge us. Students will work with Sony FS5 cameras, microphones, and LED lights and they will also be trained to use their own dslrs and cellphones, in order to practice creating a wide variety of webisodes. Workshop assignments employ practical exercises to help the students conceive and create their own unique webisode, which can be fiction or non-fiction, experimental or satire, personal or political. Combining the powerful tools of traditional filmmaking with innovative new digital media tools, this class guides students to create dynamic web based projects. As the students produce their digital media, they learn by doing and they gain practical knowledge of the art, craft, and commerce of webisodes.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


OART-GT 2569-000 (7249)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tunnicliffe, William

Intro to Digital Tools (OART-GT 2823)

This course will explore the basic tools of digital imaging. We will cover the three main Adobe products for creative imaging – Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. Through a series of short assignments we will look at various graphic design and layout ideas using Illustrator and InDesign and will touch on the wealth of image enhancement techniques afforded by Photoshop. The short assignments introduce the basics of design, typography and compositing images. Students have the opportunity to complete a small project of their own for the end of the term. Class time will be divided between lectures, critiques, and work in class sessions. This course is not intended to completely cover the software listed, but will give students a fundamental understanding of the possibilities of digital imaging. While the majority of the class focuses on print media (images, books and magazines), we discuss the growing importance of screen output. We do not have time to cover specific web or media projects, but will address transferable skills and understanding. We will incorporate some Adobe apps to augment the desktop applications. Additional reading materials will be distributed during the semester. Students should have access to the Adobe Creative Suite through the NYU license.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


OART-GT 2823-000 (7363)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fallon, Catherine


OART-GT 2823-000 (7364)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fallon, Catherine

Introduction to Virtual Production (SPEC-UT 102)

Introduction to Virtual Production is a class composed of lectures, discussions, screenings, exercises, group critiques and presentations. The course is designed to expose students to the fundamental principles of storytelling through Virtual Production including writing, directing, cinematography, performance, editing, art direction, and technical direction. The course will explore emerging techniques utilizing software and technology. How do you tell a story in this new form of collaboration? How can students apply what is learned to their own creative work? History and theory of Virtual Production will be studied and used to inspire personal and creative work in order to better understand how story through Virtual Production can successfully be expressed and most effectively reach its audience.

TSOA Special Programs (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


SPEC-UT 102-000 (24797)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bae, Sang-Jin

Great Works in Philosophy (PHIL-UA 2)

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHIL-UA 2-000 (10163)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chaplin, Rosalind


PHIL-UA 2-000 (10164)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pohl, Stephan


PHIL-UA 2-000 (10165)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pohl, Stephan

Virtual Production (ITPG-GT 2079)

The class will teach how to architect and lead a virtual production by creating a dialogue between the Producer, Director, and Cinematographer in filmmaking with the Technical Producer and Director in creative technology. The class will cover an overview of all of the technical skills required to produce a remote virtual production through the lens of a project manager making administrative and creative decisions. This class will culminate in a real-time 3D project exploring motion capture and virtual production that will adapt a pre-existing cinematic work with the class themes in mind.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


ITPG-GT 2079-000 (25395)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Online
Instructed by BRYANT, TODD

Hand Held: Creative Tools for Phones (ITPG-GT 2068)

“The smartphone is not only the primary site for digital communication and consumption, it also hosts emerging forms of media production. Let’s investigate the potential of the mobile touchscreen as a creative instrument! This is a project based course, and we will explore by creating and testing a series of functioning web-based toys – including drawing apps, character creators, and writing tools. You can expect to sharpen your skills in javascript and design. “

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2068-000 (14779)
01/23/2024 – 04/30/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Bittker, Max

The Body, Everywhere and Here (ITPG-GT 2070)

Today’s internet, made up of mostly text documents and two-dimensional images and videos, is the result of historical limitations in bandwidth, graphics processing and input devices. These limitations have made the internet a place where the mind goes, but the body cannot follow. Recent advances in motion capture devices, graphics processing, machine learning, bandwidth and browsers, however, are paving the way for the body to find its place online. This course will explore embodied interactions in the browser and across networks. Specifically, we’ll explore TensorFlow.js models like PoseNet and BodyPix, and Microsoft Kinect in p5.js and Three.js. Assignments will consider designing engaging embodied experiences for individual and social interactions online. Experience with Node, HTML and JavaScript is helpful but not required. ICM level programming experience is required. The course will have weekly assignments that explore embodied interaction online. Assignments will begin with exploring single points of interaction (i.e. one mouse or one joint), and progress to considering full bodies and multiple bodies in one browser. Students will have a 2-3-week final project with which they will delve more deeply into the subject matter in one piece of work. Students will have readings/watchings focused on embodied and networked user experience. Some influential works that will likely be assigned/discussed are Laurie Anderson’s “Habeas Corpus,” Todd Rose’s “The End of Average,” and Myron Krueger’s “Artificial Reality.” The course examples will be taught in Javascript using web technologies/frameworks. However, students are welcome to work in their preferred medium.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2070-000 (22670)
09/02/2021 – 10/26/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Desert of the Real: Deep Dive into Social VR (ITPG-GT 2461)

he virtual expansion of screens began during the 1960’s with the exploration of head-mounted displays. Since the 60’s, virtual reality has been explored in a multi-disciplinary context including philosophy, design, arts, behavioral therapy. Baudrillard, with his publication of Simulacra and Simulation (1981), declared that human experience is being replaced by a simulation of reality (HyperReality). His theories brought the dystopian narrative of the virtual to mainstream pop-culture, as seen in films such as The Lawnmower Man and The Matrix . Contrary to Baudrillard, Canadian VR Pioneer Char Davies brings a more positive perspective to Virtual Reality, “facilitating a temporary release from our haitial perceptions and culturally biased assumptions about being in the world, to enable us, however momentarily, to perceive ourselves and the world us freshly.” Throughout the class, the friction between Baudrillard and Davies will create the foundation of our exploration of Virtual Reality, where we will use room scale headsets and game engines to create meaningful “temporal experiences” exploring themes from behavioral sciences to narrative storytelling. We will be exploring ● existing VR projects, popular culture references and theory. ● concepts such as sense of embodiment (SoE), social VR design, and interactive storytelling techniques. ● methods for designing, modeling and rigging avatars for VR. ● live and pre-recorded animation. ● spatial audio techniques such as ambisonic sounds engines. ● packaging and distributing applications for social VR. This is a production class, along with a theoretical foundation, in which we will prototype projects with networking, inverse kinematics, raycasting and face tracking technologies to explore questions such as “how does the viewer become part of the experience?” and “how does the real space relate to the virtual worlds we design?” In the second half of the class, students will work in groups to build a final social VR project based on their exploration of the above framework.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 11 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


ITPG-GT 2461-000 (22642)
09/08/2020 – 11/24/2020 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Nassima, Igal

Project Development Studio (ITPG-GT 2564)

This is an environment for students to work on their existing project ideas that may fall outside the topic areas of existing classes. It is basically like an independent study with more structure and the opportunity for peer learning. This particular studio is appropriate for projects in the area of interactive art, programing, physical computing and digital fabrication. There are required weekly meetings to share project development and exchange critique. Students must devise and then complete their own weekly assignments updating the class wiki regularly. They also must present to the class every few weeks. When topics of general interest emerge, a member of the class or the instructor takes class time to cover them in depth. The rest of the meeting time is spent in breakout sessions with students working individually or in groups of students working on related projects.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2564-000 (15691)
09/03/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Galvao Cesar de Oliveira, Pedro

Developing Assistive Technology (ITPG-GT 2446)

Assistive or Adaptive Technology commonly refers to “products, devices or equipment, whether acquired commercially, modified or customized, that are used to maintain, increase or improve the functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities.” This multi-disciplinary course allows students from a variety of backgrounds to work together to develop assistive technology. Partnering with outside organizations students work in teams to identify a clinical need relevant to a certain clinical site or client population, and learn the process of developing an idea and following that through to the development of a prototype product. Teams are comprised of ITP students as well as graduate rehabilitation, physical and occupational therapy students. Prerequisites (for ITP students): H79.2233 Introduction to Computational Media and H79.2301 Introduction to Physical Computing. This course has a lab fee of $201.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2446-000 (12615)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Perr, Anita · Hurst, Amy

Cultures & Contexts: The Black Atlantic (CORE-UA 9534)

This course considers the Black Atlantic as a socio-cultural economic space from the first arrival of Africans in the ‘New World,’ beginning around in the 15th century, through the rise of slavery in the Americas. During this class we will trace the origins and importance of the concept of the Black Atlantic within broad political contexts, paying special attention to the changing social, cultural and economic relations that shaped community formation among people of African descent and laid the foundations for modern political and economic orders. Once we have established those foundations, we will think about the Black Atlantic as a critical site of cultural production. Using the frame of the Atlantic to ask questions about the relationship between culture and political economy. We will explore a range of genres–film, fiction, music, as well as formal scholarship–so as to explore questions of evidence in the context of the real and the imaginary. Topics to be covered include African enslavement and settlement in Africa and the Americas; the development of transatlantic racial capitalism; variations in politics and culture between empires in the Atlantic world; creolization, plantation slavery and slave society; the politics and culture of the enslaved; the Haitian Revolution; slave emancipation; and contemporary black Atlantic politics and racial capitalism.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CORE-UA 9534-000 (4806)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9534-000 (2315)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Accra (Global)
Instructed by Baku, Kofi


CORE-UA 9534-000 (2746)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9534-000 (2516)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9534-000 (2618)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Washington DC (Global)
Instructed by

Texts and Ideas: (CORE-UA 9400)

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CORE-UA 9400-000 (4853)
08/29/2024 – 12/04/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Buenos Aires (Global)
Instructed by Orellana, Patricio


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2609)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9400-000 (4939)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Giglioli, Matteo


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2508)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2510)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2512)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2520)
08/29/2024 – 12/04/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Soto, Teresa


CORE-UA 9400-000 (3460)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Thorne, Vanda


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2849)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by Hallsworth, Djuna

Expressive Culture: Tpcs (CORE-UA 700)

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


CORE-UA 700-000 (20063)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nagel, Alexander


CORE-UA 700-000 (20064)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rose, Shannah


CORE-UA 700-000 (20065)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rose, Shannah


CORE-UA 700-000 (20125)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Strauss, Scarlett


CORE-UA 700-000 (20126)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Strauss, Scarlett

Intro to Visual Communication (GAMES-UT 201)

This course allows students to harness the power of visual language in order to convey messages and meaning. The elements of visual foundation that will be covered include components (color, texture, image and typography), composition, and concept. Although the class takes place in the Game Design department, we will be less concerned with visuals as they are applied to games and instead will look at visual communication across a wide range of disciplines, from visual art to graphic design to web and interface design. Although non-digital mediums will be addressed, the understanding and use of industry-standard software is also a primary goal. The class is about the importance of visual design, how it shapes our culture. The students will learn about and discuss widely-practiced methods of visual communication, and then find their own voice through developing their own works, driven by a clearer understanding of their own tastes and interested fields.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


GAMES-UT 201-000 (14815)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


GAMES-UT 201-000 (14866)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Design Thinking (IMBX-SHU 211)

Design Thinking is a theoretical, methodological and practical framework that has the potential of bringing about socially responsible innovation. This course will introduce the core concepts and toolkits of design thinking as the foundation of innovative thinking and practices. It requires you to step out of your comfort zone and to examine and challenge your own assumptions. Critical thinking, teamwork, and empathy are the three pillars of this course. Prerequisite: None

Interactive Media and Business (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


IMBX-SHU 211-000 (18585)
08/31/2020 – 12/11/2020 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by

Digital Photography I for Non Majors (ART-UE 300)

A hands-on introduction to the technical & creative uses of digital photography. The class will explore the use of digital technologies to compose, shoot, scan, alter, & print images, as well as considering the ways in which photographic meaning has been changed by the use of the computer. Student provides their own camera & paper.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ART-UE 300-000 (12836)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carballar, Karla


ART-UE 300-000 (12038)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sunairi, Hiroshi


ART-UE 300-000 (12858)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Guo

Linear Algebra (MA-UY 3044)

Systems of linear equations, Gaussian elimination, matrices, determinants, Cramer’s rule. Vectors, vector spaces, basis and dimension, linear transformations. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and quadratic forms. Restricted to Tandon math and CS majors and students with a permission code from the math department. Fulfills linear algebra requirement for the BS Math and BS CS degrees. Note: Not open to students who have already taken MA-UY 1533, MA-UY 2034, MA-UY 3113 or MA-UY 3054. | Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MA-UY 1022 or MA-UY 1024 or MA-UY 1324 or MATH-UH 1012Q or MATH-UH 1013Q or MATH-SHU 121 or MATH-SHU 201

Mathematics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MA-UY 3044-000 (6775)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Raquepas, Renaud


MA-UY 3044-000 (6776)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 3044-000 (6777)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 3044-000 (6778)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 3044-000 (6779)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 3044-000 (6780)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by Sanfratello, Andrew


MA-UY 3044-000 (6781)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by


MA-UY 3044-000 (6782)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Online
Instructed by


MA-UY 3044-000 (6783)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 3044-000 (6784)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 3044-000 (6785)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Majmudar, Trushant


MA-UY 3044-000 (6786)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 3044-000 (6787)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 3044-000 (6788)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 3044-000 (6789)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 3044-000 (6790)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sanfratello, Andrew


MA-UY 3044-000 (6791)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 3044-000 (6792)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 3044-000 (6793)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 3044-000 (6794)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 3044-000 (18499)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Diaz-Alban, Jose


MA-UY 3044-000 (18500)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


MA-UY 3044-000 (6795)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pillaud-Vivien, Loucas


MA-UY 3044-000 (6796)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 3044-000 (6797)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 3044-000 (6798)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MA-UY 3044-000 (6799)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Fundamentals of Electronics I (ECE-UY 3114)

This course focuses on circuit models and amplifier frequency response, op-amps, difference amplifier, voltage-to-current converter, slew rate, full-power bandwidth, common-mode rejection, frequency response of closed-loop amplifier, gain-bandwidth product rule, diodes, limiters, clamps and semiconductor physics. Other topics include Bipolar Junction Transistors; small-signal models, cut-off, saturation and active regions; common emitter, common base and emitter-follower amplifier configurations; Field-Effect Transistors (MOSFET and JFET); biasing; small-signal models; common-source and common gate amplifiers; and integrated circuit MOS amplifiers. The alternate-week laboratory experiments on OP-AMP applications, BJT biasing, large signal operation and FET characteristics. The course studies design and analysis of operational amplifiers; small-signal bipolar junction transistor and field-effect transistor amplifiers; diode circuits; differential pair amplifiers and semiconductor device- physics fundamentals. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: EE-UY 2024 or EE-UY 2004 (C- or better) and PH-UY 2023 | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 214 and SCIEN-AD 110. | Prerequisites for Shanghai Students: EENG-SHU 251 (C- or better) and PHYS-SHU 93 or CCSC-SHU 51. ABET competencies a, b, c, e, k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 3114-000 (11561)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3114-000 (11562)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3114-000 (11563)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3114-000 (11564)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Electromagnetic Waves (ECE-UY 3604)

Electromagnetic wave propagation in free space and in dielectrics, starting from a consideration of distributed inductance and capacitance on transmission lines. Electromagnetic plane waves are obtained as a special case. Reflection and transmission at discontinuities are discussed for pulsed sources, while impedance transformation and matching are presented for harmonic time dependence. Snell’s law and the reflection and transmission coefficients at dielectric interfaces are derived for obliquely propagation plane waves. Guiding of waves by dielectrics and by metal waveguides is demonstrated. Alternate-week laboratory. Objectives: Establish foundations of electromagnetic wave theory applicable to antennas, transmissions lines and materials; increase appreciation for properties of materials through physical experiments. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: EE-UY 2024 or EE-UY 2004 (C- or better). | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 214. | Prerequisites for Shanghai Students: EENG-SHU 251 (C- or better). ABET competencies: a, b, c, e, k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 3604-000 (11593)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3604-000 (11594)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3604-000 (11595)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3604-000 (11596)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Das, Nirod

Applied Cryptography (CS-UY 4783)

This course examines Modern Cryptography from a both theoretical and applied perspective, with emphasis on “provable security” and “application case studies”. The course looks particularly at cryptographic primitives that are building blocks of various cryptographic applications. The course studies notions of security for a given cryptographic primitive, its various constructions and respective security analysis based on the security notion. The cryptographic primitives covered include pseudorandom functions, symmetric encryption (block ciphers), hash functions and random oracles, message authentication codes, asymmetric encryption, digital signatures and authenticated key exchange. The course covers how to build provably secure cryptographic protocols (e.g., secure message transmission, identification schemes, secure function evaluation, etc.), and various number-theoretic assumptions upon which cryptography is based. Also covered: implementation issues (e.g., key lengths, key management, standards, etc.) and, as application case studies, a number of real-life scenarios currently using solutions from modern cryptography. | Prerequisite: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and MA-UY 2314.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4783-000 (16117)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Di Crescenzo, Giovanni

COMPUTER SECURITY (CS-UY 3923)

This course covers cryptographic systems. Topics: Capability and access control mechanisms, authentication models, protection models. Database and operating system security issues, mobile code, security kernels. Malicious code, Trojan horses and computer viruses. Security policy formation and enforcement enforcement, legal aspects and ethical aspects. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 2214 | Prerequisite for CAS Students: CSCI-UA 201 | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UH 2010 or ENGR-AD 3511 | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CENG-SHU 202 | Co-requisite for ALL Students: CS-UY 3224

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 3923-000 (15976)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Cappos, Justin

Introduction to Databases (CS-UY 3083)

This course introduces database systems and their approach as a mechanism to model the real world. The course covers data models (relational, object-oriented), physical database design, query languages, query processing and optimization, as well as transaction management techniques. Implementation issues, object oriented and distributed databases also are introduced. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Students: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and MA-UY 2314 | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: (ENGR-UH 3510 or CS-UH 1050) (C- or better) and CS-UH 1002 | Prerequisites for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 210 (C- or better) and CSCI-SHU 2314

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 3083-000 (12274)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dey, Ratan


CS-UY 3083-000 (12275)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Arfaoui, Salim

Genetics (BMS-UY 3114)

The course covers the genetics of bacteria, viruses and high organisms. Emphasis is on both the genetic and biochemical analyses of gene replication, heredity, mutation, recombination and gene expression. Included are comparisons of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genetics and regulation. Laboratory techniques are used to study genetic phenomena in prokaryotes, eukaryotes and viruses. The course emphasizes modern approaches to genetic research. A lab fee is required. | Prerequisite: BMS-UY 1004. Co-requisite: CM-UY 2213 or CM-UY 2214.

Biomolecular Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


BMS-UY 3114-000 (20339)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


BMS-UY 3114-000 (20340)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


BMS-UY 3114-000 (20338)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Geographic Information Systems (URB-UY 2114)

Geographic Information Systems are computer systems for the storage, retrieval, analysis, and display of geographic data, that is data about features and phenomena on the surface of the earth. This course will introduce the students to GIS through hands-on computer exercises, as well as readings and lectures about cartography, tools, data, and the social impacts of GIS. GIS projects start with data and move through analysis to cartographic display. Pedagogically, we will be starting at the end moving backward to data and analysis. | Note: This course cannot be used to satisfy Humanities/Social Science requirements for majors outside of the TCS department. | Prerequisite: EXPOS-UA 1 or EXPOS-UA 4

Urban Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


URB-UY 2114-000 (21070)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mistry, Himanshu

General Chemistry for Engineers (CM-UY 1004)

This is a one-semester introductory course in general chemistry. It covers chemical equations, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, gases, atomic and molecular structure, periodic table, chemical bonding, states of matter, chemical equilibrium, organic, inorganic and polymeric materials and electrochemistry. | Corequisite: EX-UY 1

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


CM-UY 1004-000 (16847)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chigirinskaya, Lyubov


CM-UY 1004-000 (16848)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chigirinskaya, Lyubov


CM-UY 1004-000 (16849)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Roy, Debasish


CM-UY 1004-000 (16850)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Roy, Debasish


CM-UY 1004-000 (16851)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chigirinskaya, Lyubov


CM-UY 1004-000 (16852)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chigirinskaya, Lyubov


CM-UY 1004-000 (16968)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnick, Suzanne


CM-UY 1004-000 (16969)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnick, Suzanne


CM-UY 1004-000 (24919)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mishiyev, Robert


CM-UY 1004-000 (24918)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mishiyev, Robert


CM-UY 1004-000 (16853)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hagver, Rena


CM-UY 1004-000 (16854)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pollack, Myron


CM-UY 1004-000 (16855)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Thu
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pollack, Myron


CM-UY 1004-000 (16856)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chigirinskaya, Lyubov


CM-UY 1004-000 (16857)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chigirinskaya, Lyubov


CM-UY 1004-000 (20330)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnick, Suzanne


CM-UY 1004-000 (20331)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnick, Suzanne


CM-UY 1004-000 (17125)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnick, Suzanne


CM-UY 1004-000 (17124)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
6:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnick, Suzanne


CM-UY 1004-000 (16858)

General Chemistry II (CM-UY 1024)

This course covers states of matter, chemical thermodynamics and equilibria, kinetics, acid-base chemistry, electrochemistry, introduction to organic chemistry, natural and synthetic polymers. The course is required for students in the Biomolecular Science Program. | Prerequisite: CM-UY 1004 or CM-UY 1014. Corequisite: EX-UY 1.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


CM-UY 1024-000 (19120)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pollack, Myron


CM-UY 1024-000 (19121)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pollack, Myron


CM-UY 1024-000 (19122)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mishiyev, Robert


CM-UY 1024-000 (19123)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon
5:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mishiyev, Robert


CM-UY 1024-000 (19124)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Fri
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Roy, Debasish


CM-UY 1024-000 (19125)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Roy, Debasish


CM-UY 1024-000 (19126)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Fri
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Roy, Debasish


CM-UY 1024-000 (19127)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Roy, Debasish


CM-UY 1024-000 (19128)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sun, Donghong

Expanding Cinema New Media/The Movies & Bynd (FMTV-UT 1208)

Atari. Computer Generated Imagery. YouTube. What is new media and will it change the world? In this course we will explore diverse examples of ?old? and ?new? media including interactive web work, gaming, installations, and movies. We will use blogs, online forums, and YouTube to discuss new media?s roots in older popular media including film and literature. We will question how new media have impacted traditional narrative forms and the structure of the film industry, as well as the broader contexts of new media in a changing world culture. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES. Non-majors must process a “Permission Notice for Non-Majors” form to register for the course (subject to availability).

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


FMTV-UT 1208-000 (15796)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Intro to Visual Communication (OART-UT 1620)

Intro to Visual Communication builds a foundation for visual literacy and visual design thinking. The class focuses on the fundamentals of visual communication – line, color, composition, typography – as well as their application in a variety of contexts. You may or may not end up being a visual designer or artist, but all kinds of game design and development involves visual thinking. The philosophy of the class is learning by doing. Each week, in class and out of class, you will be creating visual projects on and off the computer. Sometimes you will be drawing in a sketchbook or making paper collages. Other times you will be using visual design software, such as Illustrator and Photoshop. The goal of the course is to connect the visual exercises to skills and issues related to directly to games. Sometimes we will be working on fundamental skills. Other times, we will be applying those skills to game-related problems.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 1620-000 (14479)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


OART-UT 1620-000 (14480)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Voshell, Burgess

Intro to Game Studies (GAMES-UT 110)

This class is an overview of the field of games that approaches them from several theoretical and critical perspectives. No special theoretical background or prior training is needed to take the course, but to have had a broad practical experience with and basic knowledge of games is a distinct advantage. Also, an interest in theoretical and analytical issues will help. You are expected to actively participate in the lectures, which are dialogic in form, with ample room for discussion. The course will prepare the student to: Understand and discuss games from a theoretical perspective, as well as the components of a game; Apply new theories and evaluate them critically; Assess and discuss game concepts and the use of games in various contexts; Analyze games, and understand and apply a range of analytical methods.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


GAMES-UT 110-000 (14536)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pratt, Charles


GAMES-UT 110-000 (14532)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pratt, Charles


GAMES-UT 110-000 (14533)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pratt, Charles

Intangible Interaction (ITPG-GT 2055)

Touchless devices and systems have become an essential part of our built environment—for example, automatic doors, automatic toilets, faucets, hand sanitizer dispensers, thermometers, and even paper towel dispensers have sensors that allow them to detect when they are needed. You might have experienced interactive artwork or exhibits that are activated responding to your presence and body movement—for example, interfaces where people can type with different body postures, musical instruments that you can play by waving your arms in the air, or mechanical systems that respond to your breath. Intangible interactions are those that we engage in without involving direct physical contact. Intangible interfaces don’t have a tangible form that explicitly instructs us how to interact with them, and these interactions utilize other forms of feedback than those we feel through touch. While technologies used for intangible interaction such as sensors and computer vision are now more available and accessible, philosophy and knowledge around the design and implementation of effective intangible interactions is a much less documented subject.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2055-000 (14768)
01/23/2024 – 04/30/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Song, Yeseul

Machine Learning for Physical Computing (ITPG-GT 2050)

With Machine Learning models are getting smaller, and microcontrollers are getting more computing power, Machine Learning is moving towards edge devices. This class explores the idea of how machine learning algorithms can be used on microcontrollers along with sensor data to build Physical Computing projects. In this class, we will learn about TensorFlow Lite, a library that allows you to run machine learning algorithms on microcontrollers. We will talk about common machine learning algorithms and techniques and apply them to build hands-on interactive projects that enrich our daily lives. Students will learn to use pre-trained models, and re-train the models with sensor data. We are going to talk about Image Classification, Transfer Learning, Gesture and Speech Detection. For each topic, we will first discuss its history, theory, datasets, and applications, and then build simple experiments based on the topic. Prospective students are expected to have taken Introduction to Physical Computing and Introduction to Computational Media course, or have equivalent programming experience with Arduino and JavaScript.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2050-000 (22889)
03/24/2020 – 05/05/2020 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Shi, Yining

Music Interaction Design (ITPG-GT 2475)

This class is a project development studio for interactive music projects —that is, pieces of music that are not linear, but rather offer multiple dimensions for listeners to explore (on their phones in a crowded subway, at an abandoned factory in Palermo, back on their couches after a long day, at a classical concert hall). Students will take a project from concept to execution over several iterations, applying Interaction Design principles and techniques. During the first half of the semester, they will gather aural and visual references, compose graphic notations, and create interactive studies to explore specific elements of their composition. This work will lead to the implementation of the midterm project: a functional, high-fidelity prototype. For their final projects, students will evaluate their midterm pieces from the perspectives of music, visual design and interaction design, and refine them to produce an expressive piece of interactive music. ICM or equivalent experience is required. Some experience in making or producing music will be useful, but is not required.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2475-000 (22929)
01/28/2020 – 05/05/2020 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pereira Hors, Luisa

Escape Room (ITPG-GT 2491)

Over 7 weeks students in this course will explore different game mechanics, puzzle mechanics, group dynamics, and narrative structures and work in groups to design and build a room sized escape game. We will explore how to design immersive and participatory experiences through play and problem solving. Students will construct weekly puzzles and narratives and in the final week build and operate an “escape room” experience. Prerequisites: Physical Computing and ICM. Comfort with fabrication strongly encouraged.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2491-000 (22864)
01/28/2020 – 03/10/2020 Tue
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rios, David


ITPG-GT 2491-000 (22865)
03/24/2020 – 05/05/2020 Tue
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rios, David

Big LEDs (ITPG-GT 2481)

Light Emitting Diodes or LEDs are used creatively all around us. They have the ability to emit light at different colors and intensities instantly and from very tiny points. How can we make creative visual works out of these amazing devices? What construction methods can we use to make those works reliable? Big LEDs will cover the process of designing large LED systems. We will cover LED array hardware and how to map pixels from computer generated media onto them. We will go through every major part of the hardware – different styles of LED arrays, drivers and gateways, cables, data protocols, and how to safely power all of them. We will learn to use the pixel mapping softwares Enttec ELM and Madmapper. We will also cover the paperwork needed to furnish a professional LED installation, including drafting riser diagrams, plan, section, and elevation views, creating a bill of materials, and writing instructions for users and installers. This year’s final project will be a site-specific LED sculpture installed in a public space at 375 Jay St. The installations will be able to display student chosen media that can be viewed for one minute. Students will work either in groups or alone and can choose from one of four installation options to present on: – A prepared square section of 2.0mm pitch LED video tiles (approx 256px x 256px, 2’-6” x 2’-6”) – A prepared low-resolution sculpture with diffused linear elements (approx 500px, 2’-6” x 5’-0” overall) – A student conceptualized LED video tile project – A student conceptualized low-resolution project Because of this year’s pandemic, unprecedented changes have come to the professional world of LED installations. As a result, we will be using remote tools such as networked-based cameras, remote desktop applications, and virtual private network connections to watch and operate the final projects. We will spend class time setting these tools up together. The two prepared options for the final project will be installed and maintained by the instructor.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2481-000 (14766)
03/12/2024 – 04/30/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Parsekian, Aaron

Intro to Wearables (ITPG-GT 2189)

With emerging research and development with soft circuit technologies and its integration into textile and clothing design, the garment as a reactive interface opens up new possibilities in engendering self-expressions, sensory experiences and more. This 14-week class is to introduce students to this realm by creating connections between hardware engineering and textile crafting. The class is for students with basic physical computing knowledge to explore the possibility of wearables, and arouse discussion about the potential in re-imagining our relationship with personal devices, textiles and garment design as an interactive media.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2189-000 (23074)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Zhu, Jingwen

BioDesigning the Future of Food (ITPG-GT 2131)

We’ve been tinkering with the living systems that generate our foodstuffs for millennia. But climate change is radically and rapidly shifting these food landscapes, and the impacts include the extinction of many of the foods we love: chocolate, wine, beer, coffee and more importantly starvation for those in the world who are already food insecure. In this class, we’ll explore biotechnologies and bioengineering along with microbes and mushrooms to design and create pathways for the restoration of some of the damage we’ve wrought on our food system. We’ll also use art and design and systems thinking to build speculative and actionable projects that will focus not just on the future of food but the future of our planet and all of its inhabitants. This class is part of the Biodesign Challenge.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2021)


ITPG-GT 2131-000 (6365)
05/24/2021 – 07/05/2021 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Online
Instructed by Bardin, Stefani R

Hacking the Browser (ITPG-GT 2811)

Web browsers were originally used only for displaying simple HTML pages, but over the years they have become supercharged all-powerful web execution machines. In this class we’ll explore experimental new features and HTML5 APIs that allow browsers to communicate with the OS and their environment. APIs that will be covered may include: Battery Status, Geolocation, notifications, accelerometer usage, video access, speech recognition, and text-to-speech. We’ll cover the mechanics of bookmarklets and Chrome extensions, with a sustained multi-week focus on building extensions and exploring Chrome’s extensions APIs. Class workshops will include projects such as building an ad blocker, programmatically replacing text and images on a website, and making sites that respond to external events. Students will give weekly in-class presentations on web capabilities, complete small weekly assignments, and present a final project. This class leans heavily on web technologies, and experience with HTML, CSS and modern JavaScript (ICM with p5.js or Commlab Web/Networked Media) is required.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 5 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2811-000 (22881)
01/28/2020 – 03/03/2020 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Forsyth, Cory