The Contemporary Literature Lab (ENGL-UA 9995)

This course bridges scholarly and professional training by providing students with an intensive introduction to the world of contemporary literature: its writers, its communities, and its organizations and institutions. Built around the English Department’s Contemporary Literature Series (CLS), which brings noted authors who are on course syllabi that semester to the NYU campus, the focus of the CLS Lab varies each semester depending on the featured authors. Some of the topics to be explored include: literary publishing, forums for literary discussion and criticism, literary organizations and institutions, and the possibilities and challenges of writing scholarly literary criticism about contemporary literature. By the end of the CLS Lab, students will have a firm grasp of the contemporary literary landscape and they will be better prepared to translate their interests and skills as English majors into the intellectual and professional contexts of the literary world.

English (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGL-UA 9995-000 (2758)
09/02/2024 – 12/06/2024 Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Robson, Catherine

Cities and Citizenship: Readings in Global Urbanism (IDSEM-UG 1880)

Cities have long been viewed as the crucible of citizenship. “But over the last few decades, the rapid urbanization of the global South has recalibrated Western derived models of cities and citizenship. “This course draws on interdisciplinary readings from urban studies, geography, anthropology, and history to grapple with this global “urban revolution.” Rejecting the language of crisis, chaos, and exception that is so often used to characterize cities in the global South, it will provide theoretically informed perspectives on social, cultural, and political life in rapidly urbanizing places throughout the postcolonial world. Attention will be paid to histories and legacies of colonialism alongside novel forms of governance and claims to the city. “Though focused primarily on cities in the global South, the class is intended to probe how these cities reconfigure conventional understandings of being a citizen in the city (anywhere), and will also examine the global South within the “North”. “Topics may include the rights to the city, infrastructure and planning, gentrification, political ecologies, technologies of rule, informality and slum upgrading, and urban social movements. “”Selected authors may include Ananya Roy, James Holston, Mamadou Diouf, Nikhil Anand, and AbdouMaliq Simone.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IDSEM-UG 1880-000 (12439)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fredericks, Rosalind

Intro to Urban Agriculture (FOOD-UE 1030)

This course provides a practical introduction to urban agriculture. Students will learn horticultural skills while performing tasks at the NYU Urban Farm Lab. They will also learn about the biological processes that these tasks manage & how they fit together in a system. Through visits to other sites around the city, students will be exposed to a wide variety of strategies for practicing horticulture in the urban environment.

Food Studies (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FOOD-UE 1030-000 (10584)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Metrick, Melissa


FOOD-UE 1030-000 (10585)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Metrick, Melissa

Digital Revolution: History of Media III (IDSEM-UG 1042)

We are in the midst of a revolution. Computers permeate nearly every aspect of our life, yet we understand relatively little about how they work, their historical development, and their impact on our thought and actions. As with previous technological and communications revolutions like the rise of print and the ascendency of the image, computing is transforming our economic and political landscape, bringing with it new possibilities as well as new problems. In this course, we explore this ever-changing and rapidly expanding terrain, paying special attention to how computers and the Internet are transforming how we experience and understand identity and community, control and liberation, simulation and authenticity, creation and collaboration, and the practice of politics. Authors whose works we read may include Donna Haraway, Jean Baudrillard, Jorge Luis Borges, Yochai Benkler, Nicholas Carr, the Critical Art Ensemble, Galileo, Lawrence Lessig, Sherry Turkle, Lewis Mumford, Plato, the RAND Corporation, and Ellen Ullman.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IDSEM-UG 1042-000 (17140)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Duncombe, Stephen

Experiments in Collective Joy (OART-UT 18)

How do ants or bees organize on a mass scale when their individual brains are incapable of understanding the bigger systems they’re creating together? How did a Twitch hive-mind of 1.2 million people beat Pokémon one collective move at a time? How do we make art that makes us and our audience feel more connected, more alive, more powerful? This hands-on project studio course is about making art where participants are the medium, and the masterpiece created exists inside and between them. Let’s explore community and its connection to transformational, radical joy — not complacent happiness, but a joy that is the feeling of power, agency, and capacity growing within us and within the people around us as we cooperate to overcome shared challenges. Which systems and forms of art, play, and expression foster that kind of joy? This course is heavy on imagination, vulnerability, reading, discussion, experimentation, playtesting, and interactive group activities. Each week explores the relationship of the individual to the group under various lenses and spheres of life (i.e. politics, religion, activism, evolutionary biology, sociology, pleasure, the universe, sports, games, childhood, etc.). Then together, we break down the relationships, dynamics, and effects those systems have, and create multi-media prototypes and performance experiments inspired by these themes and ideas. The early assignments are solo, and then almost all assignments are in groups. The core process of the class uses iterative game design as a structure for ideating, creating, playtesting, and refining, though students are welcome to work in any medium they choose, so long as the goal is to explore themes of collective joy.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


OART-UT 18-000 (7263)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Luhrs, August

Platform Cultures (MCC-UE 1039)

Platforms are instrumental in mediating a wide range of phenomena, including social interaction, economic transactions, resource access, information circulation, cultural experiences, and more. Their ubiquity in everyday life is documented in concepts of platformization and platform capitalism and an emerging discipline of platform studies. This course explores the metaphors, histories, logics, and materialities of platforms. Through lenses of media studies, political economy, and anthropology, students investigate the implications of platforms in contemporary life.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1039-000 (14064)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Future of Media and Technology (ITPG-GT 2297)

This course covers the next several years of evolution in technology, culture, and other trends. It uses scenario planning, a technique for considering complex interrelationships that can’t be predicted, distinguishing predetermined elements from critical uncertainties, and exploring the underlying patterns that influence events. Students will conduct original research on significant trends, use those trends to develop compelling, sophisticated, plausible stories about possible futures, and present the futures – and the strategies they suggest – to a public audience. The course will take place at a pivotal moment of historical uncertainty: recovering from a global pandemic, with AI and other digital technologies crossing a threshold, and dramatic political and economic tensions. All of these, and more, affect media development – and are deeply affected by them. The goal of the course is to enable you to make more robust decisions now in the face of uncertainty — applicable to planning for technological change, starting a business, plotting a career or making major life decisions. This class has developed a longstanding following at ITP because it helps us make sense of complex issues without oversimplifying them. In a climate of candid, respectful discussion and debate, the class explores theories about system dynamics, long-wave organizational and societal change, and economic and technological development.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2297-000 (15683)
09/03/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kleiner, Arthur · Powell, Juliette

Stats F/Bus Cntl Regress & Forecasting Models (STAT-UB 103)

This course examines modern statistical methods as a basis for decision making in the face of uncertainty. Topics include probability theory, discrete and continuous distributions, hypothesis testing, estimation, and statistical quality control. With the aid of computers, these statistical methods are used to analyze data. Also presented are an introduction to statistical models and their application to decision making. Topics include the simple linear regression model, inference in regression analysis, sensitivity analysis, and multiple regression analysis.

Statistics & Operations Research (Undergraduate)
6 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


STAT-UB 103-000 (2538)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Giloni, Avi.


STAT-UB 103-000 (2539)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Duan, Yaqi


STAT-UB 103-000 (2540)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chen, Elynn


STAT-UB 103-000 (2541)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kovtun, Vladimir


STAT-UB 103-000 (2542)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Turetsky, Jason


STAT-UB 103-000 (2995)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Turetsky, Jason

Climate Change and Environmental Justice (SCA-UA 632)

Readings from climatologists, economists, anthropologists, geographers, cultural analysts, and activists. Examines the natural and social impact of global warming in the context of the climate justice movement, which is modeled on American-derived principles of environmental justice in the 1990s and poses a legal and humanitarian challenge to those who place their faith in market-driven solutions. Examines how populations are unevenly affected by climate change, and how this imbalance is being addressed by advocates of decarbonization.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


SCA-UA 632-000 (10318)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ross, Andrew

Introduction to the Study of Literature (ENGL-UA 9101)

Gateway course to the major that introduces students to the demands and pleasures of university-level investigation of English literature. Develops the tools necessary for advanced criticism: close-reading skills, knowledge of generic conventions, mastery of critical terminology, and skill at a variety of modes of analysis, from the formal to the historical. Also emphasizes frequent writing.

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ENGL-UA 9101-000 (4062)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Hopf, Courtney

Writing London (SCA-UA 9886)

This course will study a variety of texts written at particular times in the history of London. The aims of the course are to encourage the student to think historically, in terms of the way London and representations of the city have changed and developed over time; and theoretically, in terms of the way the city is mediated through different forms and genres (e.g. poetry, novels, essays, film; satire, detective and crime fiction), and the interrelationship of literary and material spaces. We will also examine the significance of gender, the definition of the modern metropolis as a labyrinthine city of Babylon, the influence of metropolitan culture on Modernism and Modernity, assimilation versus multiculturalism, immigration, and the effects of new modern spaces on individuals.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


SCA-UA 9886-000 (4067)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Landau, Leya


SCA-UA 9886-000 (4068)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Landau, Leya

Media History of NY (MCC-UE 1151)

New York has played a crucial role in the history of media, and media have placed a crucial role in the history of New York. New York has been represented by media since Henry Hudson wrote his reports to the Dutch. Media institutions have contributed centrally to its economy and social fabric, while media geographies have shaped the experiences of city living. This course explores media representations, institutions, and geographies across time and is organized around the collaborative production of an online guidebook to the media history of New York.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1151-000 (20991)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ramirez, George

Food and Nutrition Global Society (FOOD-UE 1180)

This course unites the liberal arts experience with a specialization in food and nutrition. It contains three areas of focus: food and nutrition history; ethical issues in food and nutrition; and emerging technologies as they related to food and nutrition.

Food Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


FOOD-UE 1180-000 (18285)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Arab Theatre & Film: (MEIS-UA 747)

Examines recent trends in contemporary Arab theatre and film, contextualizing these within a broader history of Arab performance. Particular attention is given to how experimental practitioners have explored issues of human rights and the control of territories under the modern state. Strategies addressed include the conflation of the past and present as a means of exploring the persistence of the colonial power structure in the modern Arab world; the use of the parable to speak truth to power; the incorporation of the populist entertainment forms that directly engage the audience; and the use of familiar tales to explore new political realities.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MEIS-UA 747-000 (13271)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Atrach, Naila

The Future of the Music Streaming Economy (REMU-UT 1231)

Streaming Economy represents a great paradigm shift in the music industry and its monetization. In 2013, digital streaming of music replaced the CD as the main source of music sales and has provided economic hope to a – commercially speaking – weakening industry. However, with artists such as Thom Yorke, The Black Keys, David Byrne and many others speaking out against the royalty of streaming services like Spotify, streaming, in its current structure, as a permanent replacement for CD and digital download sales remains a controversial subject. Through this course the student will be guided through the history of streaming, the controversies surrounding its business model, and the technology that made it possible. Students will be introduced to the new storefront of online music and be shown how the digital marketplace is changing music marketing and artist development. Streaming offers exciting new opportunities along with serious and complex challenges. This course will examine the pros and cons of the current streaming status quo. The student will practice techniques of releasing music online through a hands-on workshop, which will lead them through the beginning steps of registering, and releasing their own project via Phonofile and WiMP on all major platforms and services.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 3 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


REMU-UT 1231-000 (3303)
07/03/2024 – 07/23/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Bjelland, Stein

The Gardens and Landscapes of Tuscany (ARTH-UA 9653)

To provide the student with an awareness and appreciation of gardens and landscapes of Tuscany from early Roman precedents to the 21st century. The design of the Italian landscape and garden is studied as a means of cultural communication–an expression of a society’s values, philosophy and understanding of the environment. Emphasis is placed on historic precedent, sustainable design techniques utilized in Italian gardens and classic Renaissance design concepts. The format includes lectures, class presentations and field trips.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


ARTH-UA 9653-000 (2596)
05/21/2024 – 07/01/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Bucellii, Claudia

Topics in East Asian Studies (EAST-UA 302)

This course is designed for students whose levels of Japanese are EAST-UA 248 and EAST-UA 249. The overall goal of this course is to help students build reading speed, reading fluency, and vocabularies and expressions through experiencing the pleasure of reading in Japanese. The focus of the class will be individual reading activity and consultations with the instructor.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


EAST-UA 302-000 (19326)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Catherine


EAST-UA 302-000 (19327)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Management and Organizations (MGMT-UB 1)

In this course you will attain an understanding of the key factors that contribute to organizational success and the role that managers play in helping their organizations become more successful. The better that you understand these issues, the more effective you will be in your future careers. More specifically, the course will explore how organizational leaders develop winning strategies, and then design their organization in a way that aligns structures, social relationships, tasks, human resource practices, and people to achieve those strategies. In exploring these issues, you will identify the challenges that organizational leaders and managers face as they try to make good decisions in the face of a constantly evolving industry environment, competing goals and agendas, and an increasingly diverse and global workforce.

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19615)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Hee


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19616)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Hee


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19617)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Steiner, Jeff


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19618)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Steiner, Jeff


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19620)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kern, Molly


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19624)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Howard, Elizabeth


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19627)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Howard, Elizabeth

Cultures & Contexts: Topics (CORE-UA 500)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CORE-UA 500-000 (10506)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Igsiz, Asli


CORE-UA 500-000 (10507)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10508)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10509)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10510)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10511)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Juette, Daniel


CORE-UA 500-000 (10512)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10513)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10514)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10515)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10516)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10517)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10518)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bottex-Ferragne, Ariane


CORE-UA 500-000 (10519)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10520)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10521)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10522)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10523)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stark, Soren


CORE-UA 500-000 (10524)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Jingyi


CORE-UA 500-000 (10525)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Jingyi


CORE-UA 500-000 (10526)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fiorio, Soraya


CORE-UA 500-000 (10527)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fiorio, Soraya


CORE-UA 500-000 (10528)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cordivari, Braden


CORE-UA 500-000 (10529)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cordivari, Braden


CORE-UA 500-000 (10530)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10531)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Expressive Culture: Topics (CORE-UA 700)

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CORE-UA 700-000 (10544)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ganti, Tejaswini


CORE-UA 700-000 (10545)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 700-000 (10546)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 700-000 (10547)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 700-000 (10548)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 700-000 (10549)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hay, Jonathan


CORE-UA 700-000 (10550)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xie, Vivi Fupeng


CORE-UA 700-000 (10551)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xie, Vivi Fupeng


CORE-UA 700-000 (10552)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Deng, Zhilong


CORE-UA 700-000 (10553)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Deng, Zhilong

Advanced Lab: Synthetic Media (INTM-SHU 306)

This advanced course investigates emerging trends in machine learning and artificial intelligence for generating media content – images, video, and sound. The course explores the idea of how artists, designers, and creators can use machine learning in their own research, production, and development processes. Students will learn and understand machine-learning techniques and use them to generate creative media content. We will cover a range of different platforms and models and also experiment with implementing the content with platforms for interaction design, such as Unity. Prerequisite: INTM-SHU 120 Communications Lab OR INTM-SHU 205 What’s New Media OR INTM-SHU 124 Emerging Technologies & Computational Arts

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


INTM-SHU 306-000 (6121)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Didakis, Stavros

Mod Chines Fiction (EAST-UA 732)

This course will survey literature produced at various points in the tumult of modern Chinese history, from the late Qing through to the present day. While the time period will be broad, we will hope to engage in close, critical readings of significant works of fiction from a selection major authors primarily from Mainland China. How do certain concerns of modernity arise in different texts, at different times, and for different writers? What different relationships do we see being shaped between literature, life, and politics, and how does fiction negotiate certain tensions and anxieties about modern and contemporary life? By exploring a variety of engaging novels and short stories, we will hope to gain a more nuanced understanding of modern China and the role that fiction has played as both an agent of modernity and a reflection of modern Chinese life.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


EAST-UA 732-000 (7696)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Foley, Todd

Designing Curiosity Portals (ITPG-GT 3008)

By exploring and dissecting the field of STEM education, we will research how STEM education currently exists with clear biases and gatekeeping. Through that we intend to create a framework to challenge the biases and design more inclusive and accessible pathways. As a class we will engage in discussions around spaces (community/public spaces and private spaces), STEM as an inclusive element, and definitions of accessibility. The hope is to yield an experience where students can observe, inspire (or get inspired) by mundane things around their day to day lives and connect them to STEM experiences that might seem rather oblivious. Students will create assignments in dialogue with “making with everyday objects”, STEM pedagogy practice, social/emotional learning in spaces, and human-centered design. Students will be exposed to STEM literacy pedagogy, will curate a pop-up space, practice comprehensive user-testing, and reconstruct the framework around accessible and universal design. Students will engage in critical thinking, critiques, visiting artist lectures, field trips and class discussions. About Sharon De La Cruz: https://www.sharonleedelacruz.com/about-me, https://khushbukshirsagar.weebly.com/about.html

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3008-000 (14799)
01/26/2024 – 05/03/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by De La Cruz, Sharon

Global Media Capstone (MCC-UE 1220)

Specifically for students in the Global Media Scholars program, this course is the required culminating experience taken in the senior year, alongside a travel component during the January term. Course topics reflect faculty research interests, offering students a chance to explore emerging issues in the field of media studies, and will be site-specific based on the country chosen for January travel.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1220-000 (14063)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mills, Mara

Visual Culture/Science and Technology (MCC-UE 1411)

This course examines the imagery of science and technology, the role of visuality in the construction of scientific knowledge, artistic renditions of science, and the emergence of visual technologies in modern society. It looks at how visuality has been key to the exercise of power through such practices as cataloguing and identification; the designation of abnormality, disease, and pathologies; medical diagnosis; scientific experimentation; and the marketing of science and medicine. We will examine the development of the visual technologies in the emerging scientific practices of psychiatry and criminology; explore the sciences of eugenics, genetics, pharmacology, brain and body scans, and digital medical images of many kinds; the marketing of pharmaceuticals, and the emerging politics of scientific activism.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1411-000 (14031)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Almenara, Maria Paz

Middle East Media (MCC-UE 1341)

This course examines contemporary media in (primarily Arab parts of) the Middle East and media about the Middle East, and Islam within the U.S. it analyzes the role played by these media in representing and reproducing the perceived rift between Islam and the West. Readings and media examples focus on the politics of culture, religion, modernity, and national identity as they shape and intersect with contemporary geopolitical events, cultural formations, and media globalization.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1341-000 (14028)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gurleyik, Ece

Senior Honors in Media Culture/Communication (MCC-UE 1210)

Seminar for students who have been approved by the department to pursue honors in the major. Extended primary research in Communication Studies, focusing on the development and sharing of individual research projects. Students will enroll concurrently in two points of independent study under the director of a faculty honors sponsor, as outlined in departmental guidelines.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1210-000 (13998)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schull, Natasha

Inquiry Seminar (MCC-UE 1200)

MCC Research Inquiry Seminars, taken early in the major, expose students to the department’s culture of scholarly inquiry. Course topics reflect faculty research interests, offering students a chance to explore emerging issues in the field of media studies.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13990)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Benson, Rodney


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13991)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fleetwood, Nicole


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13992)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gitelman, Lisa


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13993)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hegde, Radha


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13994)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Robles, Erica


MCC-UE 1200-000 (5470)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ross, Andrew · Tawil-Souri, Helga


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13995)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13996)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Huda


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13997)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Elementary Arabic 1 (ARABL-UH 1110)

This course is designed for learners with no prior knowledge of Arabic. Students who have studied Arabic before or who have prior knowledge of Arabic are required to take a placement test. This is a full semester (or equivalent session) course during which students first learn the Arabic alphabet, then move on to work on the sentence and paragraph levels. It is an interactive course designed to build the student’s abilities in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. At the end of the semester students should be able to carry on a short conversation; ask and answer questions; introduce themselves and others; provide simple biographical information; interact in simple daily life situations; ask for assistance; express likes and dislikes; read short texts; and gain a basic understanding of Arab culture. Types of tasks and assignments required for this course include daily homework assignments, periodic quizzes, brief presentations, short essay writing, and a final exam.

Arabic Language (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARABL-UH 1110-000 (3501)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Kittaneh, Khulood


ARABL-UH 1110-000 (3502)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by El Araby, Omima


ARABL-UH 1110-000 (3518)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by El Araby, Omima


ARABL-UH 1110-000 (3623)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Kittaneh, Khulood

Intro to Marketing (MKTG-UB 9001)

This course evaluates marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and a catalyst of business activity. It presents a comprehensive framework that includes a) researching and analyzing customers, company, competition, and the marketing environment, b) identifying and targeting attractive segments with strategic positioning, and c) making product, pricing, communication, and distribution decisions. Cases and examples are utilized to develop problem-solving abilities.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4953)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Thu
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Donvito, Raffaele


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4981)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (21443)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4834)
08/29/2024 – 12/04/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Magarino, Victor


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (3462)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Anton, Muriel


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (21026)
at NYU Tel Aviv (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (3380)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by West, Andrew

Entertainment Law (MULT-UB 48)

This two-credit course is about key legal aspects of the entertainment industry. Entertainment law is not a separate legal discipline. There is really no such thing as entertainment law. Instead, it lies at the intersection of several areas of law and applies those disciplines to the diverse entertainment industry of products and services. The course will involve a foundational coverage of the following areas: contract, advertising, protection of ideas by contract, copyright and trademark (including the concepts of parody and fair use), rights of publicity and privacy, defamation, and artist representation. This course should prepare you to analyze a wide variety of entertainment law issues at a general level. Entertainment law does not tend towards an orderly system because it lacks overriding organizational principles that would tie together its myriad facets. As such, this course will appear to lack a logical outline in its progression and instead, will examine this corner of law in separate pieces, which will cover doctrine, analytical problem-solving, practical skills related to law (e.g., analytical writing, reasoning skills, argument structure, etc.), and the particular contexts in which issues arise in the entertainment industry. Dealing with more narrow topics, such as constitutional concerns or union representation, or obtaining a much deeper knowledge of specific topics discussed in class, will require additional, specialized study. This class also helps students further develop their reasoning, communication, and listening skills.

Multidisciplinary (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MULT-UB 48-000 (10639)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MULT-UB 48-000 (10725)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Writing as Critical Inquiry (WRCI-UF 102)

The second in a two-course series, Writing as Critical Inquiry introduces students to advanced reading, writing, and critical thinking skills with an explicit emphasis on developing complex and nuanced skills of inquiry. The course also introduces more indepth research skills necessary for academic work and writing beyond academic contexts. After having learned in Writing as Exploration how to present and interpret or otherwise respond to different types of subject material—for example, personal experiences, written and visual texts, objects, public events and/or social phenomena—students in Writing as Critical Inquiry learn more complex methods for engaging these skills through individualized, research-based writing. Writing as Critical Inquiry courses are themed—most sections devote the semester to a specific realm of inquiry around an interdisciplinary topic. Each course engages global issues and perspectives through its theme and, by extension, its reading and writing assignments.

Writing as Critical Inquiry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12698)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moore, Carley


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12552)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, David


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12553)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hartman, Amie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12554)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dunks, Robert


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12555)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fortuna, Devereux


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12712)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tomlinson, Timothy


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12556)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williams, Deborah


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12557)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, David


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12558)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Langer, Irina


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12559)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tobin, Elayne


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12560)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tobin, Elayne


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12561)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Alessandro, Nina


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12818)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lin, Cammie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12562)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Policoff, Stephen


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12563)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hartman, Amie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (20633)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fortuna, Devereux


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12564)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williams, Deborah


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12565)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Corcoran, Jonathan


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12566)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hendrickson, Janet


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12567)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Manko, Vanessa


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12568)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Roma, Mary


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12569)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by del Rosso, Lisa


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12570)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kolisnyk, Mary Helen


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12571)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Langer, Irina


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12572)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Alessandro, Nina


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12573)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Alessandro, Nina


WRCI-UF 102-000 (20634)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cordon Hornillos, Sara


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12780)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Polchin, James


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12574)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Jason


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12575)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Buck, Marie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (20635)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cordon Hornillos, Sara


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12576)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heiser, Erin


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12725)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by del Rosso, Lisa


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12577)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heiser, Erin


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12578)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rzonca, Christopher


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12579)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lin, Cammie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12601)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Eve, Sean


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12820)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Datcher, Michael


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12729)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Datcher, Michael


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12841)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bishop, Jacqueline


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12730)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12580)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Banks, Danis


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12581)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ray, Montana


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12582)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Colonna, Joseph


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12583)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moore, Carley


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12584)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Jason


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12585)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ray, Montana


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12854)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williams, Deborah


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12596)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bishop, Jacqueline


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12586)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rzonca, Christopher


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12731)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Eve, Sean


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12587)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shivers, Kaia


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12732)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tomlinson, Timothy


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12588)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moore, Carley


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12589)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ray, Montana


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12590)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12591)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hendrickson, Janet


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12592)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hendrickson, Janet


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12602)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Datcher, Michael


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12593)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wilkinson, Amy


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12594)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tobin, Elayne


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12710)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Roma, Mary


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12595)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Buck, Marie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12597)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Colonna, Joseph


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12598)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12699)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Banks, Danis


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12599)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tomlinson, Timothy


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12600)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Jason


WRCI-UF 102-000 (20636)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Corcoran, Jonathan

Global Works and Society in a Changing World (GWC-UF 102)

The second semester of Social Foundations spans a thousand years, from the rise of Islam and the reunification of China under the Tang dynasty (in the 7th century C.E.) through the Scientific Revolution and the decline of the Mogul empire in India. This course invites students to consider great ideas that have often helped earlier peoples organize their lives–but which have also set them in conflict, sometimes with other communities, sometimes among themselves. Such ideas have sparked movements for ethical and social reform, for conquest, for the recovery of lost classics, and for religious renewal.

Global Works and Society in a Changing World (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


GWC-UF 102-000 (13378)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13379)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13380)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22751)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13608)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22752)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13382)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13477)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22753)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22754)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13384)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13385)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22755)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22756)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13387)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13388)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13478)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13389)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13390)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13391)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13392)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13393)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13394)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13395)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13396)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13503)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13397)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13398)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13399)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13400)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13401)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13504)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13403)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13407)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13404)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13406)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13405)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13582)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13381)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13383)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13386)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13402)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22757)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Global Works and Society: Antiquity (GWA-UF 101)

The first semester of Social Foundations introduces students to the ancient world and ends with the dissolution of the Western Roman Empire, of the Gupta Empire in India, and of the Han Dynasty in China. This course takes a global perspective and uses an interdisciplinary approach, and part of its aim is to explore enduring questions such as the relation between the individual and society, between justice and power, and between humanity and the divine.

Global Works and Society: Antiquity (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


GWA-UF 101-000 (12770)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Katz, Gal


GWA-UF 101-000 (12771)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Katz, Gal


GWA-UF 101-000 (12866)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Browning, Jacob


GWA-UF 101-000 (12772)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bonakdarian, Mansour


GWA-UF 101-000 (12786)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bonakdarian, Mansour


GWA-UF 101-000 (12787)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Karavitis, Gerasimos


GWA-UF 101-000 (12803)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Browning, Jacob


GWA-UF 101-000 (12867)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wagnon, Daniel


GWA-UF 101-000 (12868)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hewitt, Anne


GWA-UF 101-000 (12869)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Karavitis, Gerasimos


GWA-UF 101-000 (12870)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Altonji, Alexander


GWA-UF 101-000 (12871)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Prichea, Andreea


GWA-UF 101-000 (12872)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Prichea, Andreea

Principles of Macroeconomics (ECI-UF 101)

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental topics in macroeconomics, the analysis of the economy as a whole. After an overview of introductory economic concepts, such as comparative advantage, opportunity costs, and supply and demand, the course focuses on the determinants of aggregate income, employment, and prices. Other topics include the study of long-run economic growth, the business cycle, the financial system, as well as monetary and fiscal policy. *ECI-UF 101 and ECII-UF 102 may meet some of the equivalent course requirements for the College of Arts and Science. Students may take ECI-UF 101 and ECII-UF 102 in any order; neither course is a pre-requisite for the other.

Economics I (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECI-UF 101-000 (19798)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mejorado, Ascension


ECI-UF 101-000 (13426)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mejorado, Ascension


ECI-UF 101-000 (13352)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mejorado, Ascension


ECI-UF 101-000 (19799)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ECI-UF 101-000 (19800)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Quantified Self (CCOL-UH 1059Q)

Self-tracking. Biohacking. Personal informatics. Quantified self. The contemporary “quantified self” movement makes claims of “self-knowledge through numbers” and improving health and human welfare. There are clearly other elements to self-tracking culture that deserve critical investigation. What does the self become through the lens of data? What is the dark side of data that can be used against us, and without regard for social justice and equality? This multidisciplinary course takes both a theoretical and a practical look at the pressing issue of data aggregation about human beings. It looks to the past for historical forms of self-quantification and to the future of a rapidly expanding globalized landscape of app tracking and wearable technologies. With the question of human data in mind, the course examines the unsure futures of humanity in a variety of domains: medicine and aging, education, the arts, marketing, and the Internet of Things. Students will situate themselves critically within this increasingly dense data landscape by creating data about themselves that can be analyzed and interpreted using a variety of data visualization and storytelling frameworks.

Core: Colloquium (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


CCOL-UH 1059Q-000 (22917)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Wrisley, David

Cultural Appropriation (CCEA-UH 1069)

Virtually unknown outside of academic discourse until very recently, the term cultural appropriation has become a commonplace in social and popular media, as activists and public intellectuals have highlighted what they see as problematic uses (or abuses) of cultural symbols, artifacts, or expressive modes connected to marginalized groups. But what exactly is cultural appropriation, and under what circumstances can it be said to constitute a form of exploitation or violence? This course approaches these questions both philosophically and empirically, asking, on the one hand: What is culture, and how can it be “owned” or “stolen”? and on the other: How have practices of adopting or using culture been implicated in processes of social subjugation or marginalization? Course readings are drawn from a range of disciplines across the humanities and social sciences, including cultural anthropology, art theory, music studies, and philosophy. By engaging with a rich corpus of ideas through in-class discussions, oral presentations, and written reflections, students will develop critical perspectives on cultural appropriation as well as the broader concepts of culture, race, and ethnicity.

Core: Cultural Exploration & Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


CCEA-UH 1069-000 (16833)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Eisenberg, Andrew Jarad

Shared Minds (ITPG-GT 3033)

“What capabilities does computational media have for depicting and conveying the experience of our minds? In this course we will start out using 3D graphics to depict the conventional physical reality that appears before us. Then we will turn inward to reflect the multidimensional reality of our minds, using artificial neural networks. Finally we return to embodied interfaces connected with cloud networking and databases to share with other people. The class will operate at a conceptual level, inviting students’ empirical psychological and philosophical investigations of the nature of their experience and how to convey it with art and story. It will ask students to look critically at existing computational media’s tendencies to bore, divide or inflame its users. But this is also very much a coding class where students will prototype their own ideas for new media first with 3D graphics using the threejs library, and then with machine learning models like Stable Diffusion using Huggingface APIs or Colab notebooks and finally with networking and databases using Firebase or P5 Live Media. Students can substitute other coding tools but game engines will not work for this class. The coding is in javascript, with a possible touch of python, and is a natural sequel to Introduction to Computational Media.” Prerequisite: ICM / ICM: Media (ITPG-GT 2233 / ITPG-GT 2048)

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3033-000 (15739)
09/04/2024 – 12/04/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by O’Sullivan, Daniel

On Becoming: Finding Your Artist Voice (ITPG-GT 3023)

On Becoming is a two-part professional development course. Finding Your Artist Voice (part one) filters your fears and apprehensions so you can declare your creative process and practice courageously. The seven-week system will help you proclaim your artistic identity, theoretical underpinnings, and trajectory with clarity, precision, and commanding written language. Students will build personalized masterplans and workflows to facilitate measurable professional growth while learning to catalog and archive their work. Students will develop a working artist biography, artist statement, and fully documented work samples. For the final project, students will be supported in selecting and submitting a post-graduate fellowship, residency, grant, or open call!

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3023-000 (15732)
09/06/2024 – 10/18/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Williams, Tanika

Alter Egos: Assuming New Identities Through Costume and Performance (ITPG-GT 3024)

Throughout history, musicians have channeled their creativity into outrageous fashion statements and invented personas: think MF DOOM, Sun Ra, Ghostface Killah, Daft Punk, Leikeli47 and Rammellzee. By embracing their alter egos in extreme and outlandish ways, artists have found their authentic creative voices. This course will introduce participants to the art of masquerade using their resourcefulness to create costumes from found materials, and performance as an exploration in creative expression using new media and technology. Students will be introduced to ideas surrounding abstract storytelling, experimental audio video production, and A/V performance using a combination of technical and hands-on approaches. This course requires CL: Hypercinema or equivalent experience. Prerequisite: CL: Hypercinema (ITPG-GT 2004)

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3024-000 (15733)
09/09/2024 – 12/09/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Santana, Ali

Streaming Against the Current (ITPG-GT 3022)

Live streaming is so seamlessly embedded into our online experience. We lay in bed, on our phones watching hearts flicker across the screen as the person we’re watching greets all of the competing messages in the chat, asking for birthday shout outs and follow-backs. While the ability to live stream feels more accessible than ever, it feels very tied to corporate structures, branding and self promotion. How can we push the concept of a live stream in a new direction and rethink what a live stream can be?

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ITPG-GT 3022-000 (21881)
09/08/2023 – 10/20/2023 Fri
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Soto, Amalia

User Experience Design (ITPG-GT 3017)

“This 2-pt course aims to provide students with the critical thinking and practical skills for creating effective and compelling interfaces. We will dissect what a compelling user experience is, apply proven research techniques for approaching and defining UX problems and apply design frameworks including mapping and testing techniques. The class format will include lectures, discussion, in-class design exercises and a final project. Week 1: what is UX Week 2: inclusive research methods Week 3: frameworks for defining a problem Week 4: understanding behavior and motivation Week 5: mapping flow and visual strategies, final project intro Week 6: testing methods and future UX Week 7: final projects”

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3017-000 (15727)
10/25/2024 – 12/11/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Su, Peiqi

Digital Audio Workstations: Ableton Live (REMU-UT 1022)

We live in an age of digital production where so much of today’s music is produced with comparatively few tools, and at the heart of the modern production set up, whether in the bedroom of the studio, is software that uses MIDI. One of the most versatile of today’s platforms which can be used in production, live performance, and even as a visual tool is Ableton Live. Ableton is unique amongst the contemporary software programs making music in that it is the only one that was created by working musicians who were looking for a tool that allowed for both the seamless creation of ideas and could also serve as a performance instrument. In the past 15 years, Ableton has played an important role in creating countless tracks and records in numerous genres and the go-to software for live performance, whether for vocalists and bands or for massive spectacles like Cirque du Soleil. In this course, we will cover Ableton’s unique abilities to manipulate audio which make it the preferred platform for remixing and mash-ups. We will cover the fundamentals of the software, explore techniques to program beats, chordal and melodic ideas, as well as cover creative workflow – how to use Ableton to quickly generate ideas for producers and songwriters. Finally, we will discuss its use as a live performance tool for use with live instrumentalists and vocalists, as a DJ tool and even as a VJing tool. 

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


REMU-UT 1022-000 (13316)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Carrero, Joanne


REMU-UT 1022-000 (21555)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Carrero, Joanne


REMU-UT 1022-000 (21556)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Freeman, Dan


REMU-UT 1022-000 (21557)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Freeman, Dan


REMU-UT 1022-000 (21558)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Freeman, Dan


REMU-UT 1022-000 (21559)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Freeman, Dan

Future of Media (ITPG-GT 2297)

This course covers the next several years of evolution in technology, culture, and other trends. It uses scenario planning, a technique for considering complex interrelationships that can’t be predicted, distinguishing predetermined elements from critical uncertainties, and exploring the underlying patterns that influence events. Students will conduct original research on significant trends, use those trends to develop compelling, sophisticated, plausible stories about possible futures, and present the futures – and the strategies they suggest – to a public audience. The course will take place at a pivotal moment of historical uncertainty: recovering from a global pandemic, with AI and other digital technologies crossing a threshold, and dramatic political and economic tensions. All of these, and more, affect media development – and are deeply affected by them. The goal of the course is to enable you to make more robust decisions now in the face of uncertainty — applicable to planning for technological change, starting a business, plotting a career or making major life decisions. This class has developed a longstanding following at ITP because it helps us make sense of complex issues without oversimplifying them. In a climate of candid, respectful discussion and debate, the class explores theories about system dynamics, long-wave organizational and societal change, and economic and technological development.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ITPG-GT 2297-000 (21828)
09/11/2023 – 12/11/2023 Mon
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kleiner, Arthur · Powell, Juliette

Bio-sensors and Biochips (ENGR-UH 4142)

This course covers the principles, technologies, methods and applications of biosensors and bioinstrumentation beginning with an examination of the ethical, legal, cultural, religious, and social implications of nanotechnologies. The objective of this course is to link engineering principles to understanding of biosystems in sensors and bioelectronics. The course provides students with detail of methods and procedures used in the design, fabrication, and application of biosensors and bioelectronic devices. The fundamentals of measurement science are applied to optical, electrochemical, mass, and pressure signal transduction. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to be able to explain biosensing and transducing techniques; design and construct biosensors instrumentation.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ENGR-UH 4142-000 (19903)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Song, Yong-Ak (Rafael)


ENGR-UH 4142-000 (19904)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Song, Yong-Ak (Rafael)

Interdisciplinary Projects: Guided Practice (ART-UE 9921)

This course provides space and guidance for students to work on self-driven, individual and group projects in art and media. Course content consists of texts, site visits, presentations, workshops, and critiques built around each student’s individual practice. Faculty and guest critics will hold regular studio visits, to help guide students through their process. Students’ material and technical investigations and theoretical inquiries will be addressed in group workshops and demonstrations. This course will culminate in a public presentation of students’ work.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 9921-000 (2387)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by Komarov, Aleksander

In With The Old, Out With The New: Debates on “Tradition” in Western Music (IDSEM-UG 1823)

Contests between stalwart custodians of “tradition” and rebels searching for new, untested modes of expression pervade Western music history. This course surveys some of the most contentious debates on music’s past, present, and future waged between music theorists, critics, artists, and audiences, spanning the last five hundred years. Our focus is on the seemingly inevitable tension between what music is, what it should be, and what it can be. Starting with the Greek philosophers of antiquity, we explore debates on the music of Claudio Monteverdi, Ludwig van Beethoven, Richard Wagner, Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, Carmen Miranda, John Cage, Bob Dylan, and The Slits. We also examine the backlash against and subsequent defense of styles like jazz, rock and roll, punk rock, rap, and 2000s pop. Our goal is to better understand how culture is “made” precisely during these moments of charged debate, where a particular music’s perceived merits or transgressions serve as the pretext for larger often controversial ideological issues. Art in this sense–and music in particular–becomes a platform by which to observe how competing aesthetic value systems reveal deep social and cultural rifts. Each unit within this course has two parts. First, we scrutinize and discuss primary sources related to the debate: letters, scores, newspaper and magazine articles, journal entries, singles, albums, and films. Secondly, we read and discuss secondary sources by scholars, critics, and investigative journalists for context, using this new information as a way to think critically about the primary sources and our own aesthetic judgments. What we will see is that debating music in terms of what’s “good” and “bad,” classical and avant-garde, edifying and dangerous, traditional and innovative, is, in the Western world, a long-standing tradition in its own right.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IDSEM-UG 1823-000 (12292)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Coleman, Kwami

Sailors, Convicts, and Pilgrims: The Indian Ocean Since 1500 (IDSEM-UG 2067)

Can oceans be the subject of historical inquiry? Maritime spaces help in thinking beyond nations and national borders that dominate modern global histories, leading us into a world of connected pasts. This course investigates the Indian Ocean’s long expanse from the early modern to the modern period from 1500 to the early 20th century. What changed about movement and exchange across land and sea in the longer transition from empires to nation-states? In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, despite growing European presence in the Indian Ocean littoral, pre-existing networks between East Africa, the Persian Gulf, the Indian sub-continent, and Southeast Asia remained resilient. Yet, by the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, new shipping technologies, the monitoring of movement across borders, and the introduction of travel documents like the passport became crucial in the formation of nation-states that emerged from colonial empires. From sailors, moneylenders, and pilgrims to convicts and indentured laborers, cultures of mobility connected vast geographies, often defying the logic of nation-states and colonialism. In examining this history, we will cover themes ranging from encounters in port-cities, commodities, smuggling, piracy, and pilgrimage to documents of identity and travel. Readings may include: Broeze’s Brides of the Seas, Ewald’s Motley Crews: Indian and African Seafarers, Tagliacozzo’s Secret trades, porous borders, and Torpey’s The Invention of the Passport, and translations from Samarqandi’s Account of Calicut and Vijayanagar, Afonso De Albuquerque’s Letter from Aden, Linschoten’s Itinerario, Munshi Rahman Khan’s Autobiography of an Indian Indentured Laborer, and Nawab Sikandar Begam’s A Pilgrimage to Mecca.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IDSEM-UG 2067-000 (12492)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dayal, Subah

Storytelling: from Aristotle to Beyonce and Beyond (FMTV-UT 1203)

Aristotle to Beyoncé and Beyond introduces students to an eclectic group of storytellers and storytelling. Students study the mechanics of telling a story, gaining a deeper appreciation and understanding of how storytellers and storytelling impact the world.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


FMTV-UT 1203-000 (3347)
07/03/2024 – 08/15/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Riazi, Saba


FMTV-UT 1203-000 (3348)
07/03/2024 – 08/15/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Riazi, Saba

Hollywood Auteurs (FMTV-UT 1154)

This course will analyze the possibility of pursuing the ideals of an “author cinema” – a personal way of expressing ideas that can deal with Hollywood mainstream and also with the independents, but will never be considered an integral part of either one. The “author cinema” would be a cinema of personal expression that refuses the mainstream’s prison of “three acts, happy ending, stars, etc.”; and at the same time, refuses the trends and the limited scope of most of the independents: a cinema that shows not only how to make a film, but why. Films from all over the world will be analyzed, focusing in particular on the authors that are able to keep alive their personal vision while dealing with the studios (i.e. Stone, Lee, Scorsese, Kubrick), the ones that dared to fight Hollywood (i.e. Welles, Peckinpah, Cimino, von Stroheim) and the loose cannons independent at heart (Altman, P.T. Anderson, Coen brothers). A series of guests to the class will be comprised of critics, curators and cultural organizers, filmmakers and producers. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES. Non-majors must process a “Permission Notice for Non-Majors” form to register for the course (subject to availability).

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1154-000 (19539)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Monda, Antonio

Traditions in Narrative (FMTV-UT 1031)

This course surveys narrative forms and representative works from literature that employ them, contributing to a familiarity with the literary tradition inherited by film, television, and radio. It examines the various strategies of narrative structure and its principal components (e.g., plot, theme, character, imagery, symbolism, point of view) with an attempt to connect these with contemporary forms of media expression. The course includes extensive readings, which are examined in discussions, and selected from English, American, and world literature. This course may be allocated to either History & Criticism or Gen Ed Humanities for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


FMTV-UT 1031-000 (6982)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Monda, Antonio

Film Analysis (FMTV-UT 1204)

A rival reportedly asked Walt Disney why Disney’s films were so much better. Disney replied, “I analyze.” His rival said, “So do I.” Disney answered, “I analyze better.” Film Analysis is an advanced course in film criticism taught by practitioners. We build upon the analytical skills developed in Language of Film, Storytelling Strategies and the various production courses in order to strengthen the students’ ability to critically assess the weave of narrative content, mise-en-scene, cinematic technique and structures. Through this in-depth examination of a wide range of films, students deepen their understanding of how filmmakers over the years and in various cultures have created meaningful experiences for their audiences.This course counts as History & Criticism for Film Majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1204-000 (19541)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Santha, Laszlo

Research for Customer Insights (MKTG-UB 9)

This course provides students with both research and managerial perspectives in the development and application of marketing research tools and procedures. It describes the development of research designs from problem formulation to analysis and submission of the research report. It also covers the analysis of techniques in marketing research, such as focus groups, experimental design, surveys, sampling, statistical analysis, and reporting. Cases are utilized in the development of methods and in specific areas of application.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 9-000 (18453)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pluzinski, Carol

Arts & War Seminar: (ASPP-UT 1046)

Art and War: Battle Lines of the Graphic Novel This course explores storytelling about war through the use of the graphic novel. Students will be introduced to both recent and historically significant comics about war. Our goal is to gain a deeper understanding of the interplay between image and text in sequential art, and the ability to critically analyze graphic novels that deal with challenging subject matter. What are the methodological and ethical issues that arise when constructing sequential narratives of war? What are the varying strengths between war narratives that are autobiographical, documentary or fictional? Is there something unique about the format of graphic novels that enables artists to tell a different kind of war story than filmmakers, musicians or performers? How do comic books circulate culturally, and how might this expand or limit their ability to inform our understandings of war? We will explore these questions through close readings, robust discussions and careful written analysis of well-known works by Art Spiegelman, Marjane Satrapi and Joe Sacco, as well as graphic novels by Keiji Nakazawa, Jason Lutes, Gipi, Emmanuel Guibert and others.

Ctr for Art, Society & Pub Pol (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ASPP-UT 1046-000 (22204)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hebert, Patrick

Electronics (ENGR-UH 3611)

This course focuses on fundamentals of electronics theory and design. The topics covered include semiconductor physics, diodes, diode circuits such as limiters, clamps; bipolar junction transistors; small-signal models; cut-off, saturation, and active regions; common emitter, common base and emitter-follower amplifier configurations; field-effect transistors (MOSFET and JFET); biasing; small-signal models; common-source and common gate amplifiers; and integrated circuit MOS amplifiers. The laboratory experiments include the design, building and testing of diode circuits, including rectifiers, BJT biasing, large signal operation and FET characteristics, providing hands-on experience of design, theory and applications, with emphasis on small signal analysis and amplifier design. The course also covers the design and analysis of small-signal bipolar junction transistor and field-effect transistor amplifiers; and, diode circuits. The students are introduced to designing and analyzing circuits using the LTPSpice or Cadence simulation tool.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3611-000 (3595)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ha, Sohmyung


ENGR-UH 3611-000 (3596)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sheikh, Muhammad Faraz · Ha, Sohmyung

Introduction to Data Analysis for Engineers (ENGR-UH 2027)

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of data analysis. The course starts with tools used to summarize and visualize data. The focus then shifts to fitting and parameter estimation. The derivation of estimators of parameters using both maximum likelihood and least-squares techniques are covered. Analysis of the statistical properties of estimators is also covered. The course includes hands-on exercises using MATLAB.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ENGR-UH 2027-000 (17233)
10/26/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Jabari, Saif Eddin Ghazi


ENGR-UH 2027-000 (17234)
10/26/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Computational Approaches to Music and Audio I (MUSIC-UH 2419)

The Computational Approaches to Music and Audio I will introduce students to programming for the development of applications of generative music and audio, ranging from standalone musical compositions to fun and engaging musical games or intelligent musical instruments. These applications will be developed mostly in Max, a widely used and very popular graphical programming environment for electronic music and interactive media. By the end of this course students will have become familiar with current approaches to audio and music programming namely in the Max programming environment, plug-in creation for Ableton Live, as well as have acquired a strong foundation in the field that will prepare them for the second course in the sequence.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MUSIC-UH 2419-000 (4520)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Guedes, Carlos

Manus et Machina (CADT-UH 1001)

This course explores how technology and machines have influenced human life across the ages. It further explores how technology has influenced the fields of arts and design and investigates this inspirational source for new technological developments. Lecture and discussion will be the breeding ground for concept development of new machines: Every student will realize a prototype of a machine executing a certain task. This hands-on project will be complemented by case studies, reading assignments, workshops, excursions, and one-on-one meetings with the professor. The course builds knowledge about futuristic developments and their use and influence from past to present, including questions concerning ethics and values. Students will leave the course with a completed project to be displayed in an exhibition and a personal philosophy of Arts, Design, and Technology.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CADT-UH 1001-000 (4555)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alawadi, Khulood


CADT-UH 1001-000 (4556)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alawadi, Khulood

Reading in French Lit: The Modern Era (In French) (FREN-UA 9121)

In this course students read masterpieces of French literature from the French Revolution to the end of the twentieth century. Works are considered from various historical, aesthetic and theoretical perspectives. Texts include: Le Père Goriot (Balzac); Madame Bovary (Flaubert); Les Faux-Monnayeurs (Gide); La Nausée (Sartre); Le Ravissement de Lol V. Stein (Duras), and Du côté de chez Swan I (Proust), which will be the subject of a final essay. Conducted in French.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


FREN-UA 9121-000 (10584)
02/04/2019 – 05/16/2019 Tue,Thu
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

France and Islam (FREN-UA 9806)

Islam is the second most important religion in France (after Roman Catholicism) and France has the highest Muslim population in Europe. Complex events from the mid-20th century forward have led to continuous heated debate and controversy about the place of Muslim citizens within the secular Republic. France’s interwoven history with Islam dates back, however, to the first Umayyad conquests of the Iberian peninsula in the 8th century and then to the period of the Crusades. Through the use of primary sources, literary and filmic texts, and critical readings (notably in history, sociology and cultural studies), this course traces the complexity and heterogeneity of French perceptions of Islam within a broad historical perspective beginning with these early encounters and continuing up to the present day.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FREN-UA 9806-000 (2624)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Contemporary Art and Theory in North America and Europe (HUMN-SHU 231)

Contemporary art can seem perplexing, yet when viewed as a progression of ideas and aesthetic strategies that respond to societal shifts, a certain logic emerges. This course traces movements in North American and European art from 1945 to the present through a study of primary and secondary texts, artwork examples, and historic context. In lectures, discussion and activities, we will investigate how artists went beyond primarily object-based works to explore expanded notions of what art can be and the interaction between the artwork and the viewer. The ways institutional frameworks, media and technology, politics, and social relations, informed contemporary art practice will also be examined. At the end of this course, students should be able to identify contemporary art movements, key artists, and relevant artworks and create compelling arguments around these works. They will also be able to articulate the conceptual and visual strategies employed in these pieces, recognize connections and differences across movements and have a basic knowledge of the milieu in which they were produced. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: Humanities Introductory course (18-19: survey).

Humanities (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


HUMN-SHU 231-000 (20180)
01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Fri
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Kramer, Maya

Human Genetics: Genes in Human Health & Disease (CCEX-SHU 136)

The goal of the first half of the course is to build a basic understanding of how information about traits is encoded in our genes, how this “blueprint” is interpreted by cellular machinery to build a complex human being, and how our heredity has resulted in our evolution. In the senond half of the course, we will continue the exploration of how environment, experience and random errors affect the process of building our traits, what happens when these processes fail, and the promise and possible peril of genetic technologies for human life. Fulfillment: CORE ED (with CCEX-SHU 137)

Exper Discovery in Nat World (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CCEX-SHU 136-000 (21479)
01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yu, Danyang


CCEX-SHU 136-000 (21480)
01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yu, Danyang

Foundations of Art History (ARTH-UA 10)

Introduces students to the skills and concepts they will need in order to develop a meaningful engagement with the visual arts and art history as a global discipline. Rather than providing a chronological survey of great works, it covers examples and perspectives from a wide array of regions, periods, and societies. Topics include materials and techniques of production; formal analysis; subject matter and iconography; historical and cultural contexts; the social role and formation of artists; and the history of art history as a discipline. Pitched for students who have little or no background in the study of art and architecture, this course provides a rigorous introduction to the foundations of the discipline. It is required of all art history majors.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ARTH-UA 10-000 (9715)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flood, Finbarr


ARTH-UA 10-000 (9716)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ARTH-UA 10-000 (9717)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ARTH-UA 10-000 (9718)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ARTH-UA 10-000 (9719)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

STEM Accessibility (ITPG-GT 3008)

By exploring and dissecting the field of STEM education, we will research how STEM education currently exists with clear biases and gatekeeping. Through that we intend to create a framework to challenge the biases and design more inclusive and accessible pathways. As a class we will engage in discussions around spaces (community/public spaces and private spaces), STEM as an inclusive element, and definitions of accessibility. The hope is to yield an experience where students can observe, inspire (or get inspired) by mundane things around their day to day lives and connect them to STEM experiences that might seem rather oblivious. Students will create assignments in dialogue with “making with everyday objects”, STEM pedagogy practice, social/emotional learning in spaces, and human-centered design. Students will be exposed to STEM literacy pedagogy, will curate a pop-up space, practice comprehensive user-testing, and reconstruct the framework around accessible and universal design. Students will engage in critical thinking, critiques, visiting artist lectures, field trips and class discussions. About Sharon De La Cruz: https://www.sharonleedelacruz.com/about-me, https://khushbukshirsagar.weebly.com/about.html

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ITPG-GT 3008-000 (22334)
01/27/2023 – 05/05/2023 Fri
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by De La Cruz, Sharon

Designing for Well-Being (ITPG-GT 3000)

This course would focus on the questions of 1) what makes people healthy? and 2) how can we design tools and environments that support healthy lifestyles? Key topics to be covered include public health concepts like the multiple determinants of health and the social-ecological framework, plus a little evolutionary biology; the role of behavior in health, key tenets of behavioral economics and behavior change strategies; and systems thinking concepts from Donella Meadows and others. Students will come away with a much more sophisticated understanding of the complex system of factors and forces that affect people’s health; understanding of key systems concepts and some techniques for understanding systems; and experience designing for behavior at scale. A potential final project could be to reimagine/redesign a popular commercial service so that it would have a more health-producing impact — or, alternatively, to focus on designing changes to the ITP environment that would promote better health for students, faculty and staff. About Steve Downs: www.stevedowns.net

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3000-000 (14792)
01/23/2024 – 03/05/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Downs, Stephen

Biophilic Experiences – activating our sensory relationship to nature (ITPG-GT 2361)

As the scale of human impact on global climate and ecosystems deepens, we see the need to alter our trajectory, to be more inclusive of other species in our imagining of the future. This class sets out to investigate the relationships we humans have with nature and non-human animals, to dive deep into the meaning and utility of being in relationship, and ultimately to translate these ideas into tangible, multimedia experiences that expose a larger audience to a multi-species worldview. This class sits at the intersection of art, science, and technology. It combines studio practice and research with example case studies and critical texts. Together, we will meet artists, designers and scientists who build multispecies futures through urban ecology, biology, and public art. This class is for students who are eager to develop XD (experience design) and storytelling skills. The course follows a research-driven process that results in a design proposal and proof-of-concept that can be pitched to a public arts org. Keywords: bioArt, interactive installations, experience design, research, eco-activism

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2361-000 (14783)
01/23/2024 – 03/05/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Ruckman, Leslie

Web Art as Site (ITPG-GT 2094)

WEB ART AS SITE addresses the history and practice of art made for and inseparable from the web, while teaching basic coding for the web. We explore key examples of web art from the early days of the internet through today, asking questions about this idiosyncratic artistic medium like: How do different forms of interaction characterize the viewer and/or the artist? What happens to our reading practice when text is animated or animates? How is an internet-native work encountered, and how does the path we take to reach it affect our reading? Who is able to see a work of web art, and what does access/privilege look like in this landscape? How are differently-abled people considered in a web artwork? What feels difficult or aggressive in web art, and when is that useful? How do artists obscure or reveal the duration of a work, and how does that affect our reading? What are the many different forms of instruction or guidance online? As we ask these questions, we exploit the internet pedagogically, collaborating online, playing with anonymity, and breaking the internet spaces we know. Students learn web coding through specialized online tutorials; most of class time is reserved for discussion (of web art and supplementary readings) and critique. Throughout the semester, students will produce two major works of web art. Students need only a standard laptop, and will not be expected to purchase any software or text (cost of materials: $0).

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2094-000 (14781)
01/24/2024 – 05/01/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Ballew, Theo Ellin

Noodles Prototyping in Performance (ITPG-GT 2367)

Cooking programs with an image based language is a fundamental skill in the production and design of modern digital processes. Visual programming is not only an alternative way to code, but a solution to approach generative and interactive media. This class reviews the past, present and future of visual programming languages used to procedurally generate and manipulate media such as Max/MSP(Nato.0 55 3d), Isadora, Quartz composer, Touch designer, Houdini, cables.gl and Unreal Engine among others. The core of this course is the study of Unreal Engine’s Blueprint Visual Scripting system as a way to produce an interactive program in an executable form using only Visual Programing. We will study how to create actors, functions, interfaces and how they communicate with each other. We will also take a look into 2 other visual editors, The material/shader editor for the creation of HLSL like shaders and visuals and the new Metasound editor for the manipulation, generation and sequence of sound within the engine. A general understanding of Unreal Engine is a prerequisite for this class. Students will learn how to use blueprints to produce an interactive program that can be a video game, an installation or a Real Time digital Performance.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ITPG-GT 2367-000 (22316)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Morales, Victor

Global Media Seminar: Sydney, Australia (MCC-UE 9456)

In this seminar- based subject, students will discuss the latest global media developments in the context of key theoretical frameworks. Central topics include: the increasing disruption of established information flows; challenges facing the fourth estate and democracy itself; the role of soft power and popular culture; trust in journalism and traditional media; the rise of social platforms as near-sovereign technocracies; gender and diversity biases in media and emerging media tech; ethics and regulation; the proliferation of fake news and deep fakes; the potential erosion of privacy; the emergence of citizen journalism; the phenomenon of cancel culture; the influence of hacktivism and digital activism; inequality after #metoo and #blacklivesmatter; the emerging architectures of the metaverse and VR/AR; advancements in Web 3.0 and blockchain; as well as the suite of emerging implications resulting from generative AI, including the intensifying and sometimes intimate relationships between humans and machines. The focus will be international, with an emphasis on Australia. Ultimately, the course will examine the ways in which global communication is undergoing a ceaseless paradigm shift.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9456-000 (2843)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by Varga, David

Video Game Economies (MCC-UE 9008)

The course approaches video games through the lens of political economy. This means examining games foremost as commodities, transactional goods through which various modes of economic life occur. This course introduces students to the structure and economics of the game industry since its emergence in the 1970s, particularly across the United States, China, and Japan. Special attention is brought to the dramatic industry changes catalyzed by digital distribution, mobile gaming, live streaming, and other contemporary developments. Examines the emergence of video games as sites of contemporary cultural production & practice. Special attention is given to the symbolic & aesthetic dimensions of video games, including their various narratives forms and sub-genres, & concentrates on their interactive dimensions. The course provides insight into the emerging trends in the interface between humans & media technologies. The course also situates video games within the business practices of the entertainment industries.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9008-000 (2834)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Krobova, Tereza

Computational Letterforms and Layout (ITPG-GT 2051)

Language is more than just words and meanings: it’s paper and ink, pixels and screens, fingertips on keyboards, voices speaking out loud. Language is, in a word, material. In this course, students will gain an understanding of how the material of language is represented digitally, and learn computational techniques for manipulating this material in order to create speculative technologies that challenge conventional reading and writing practices. Topics include asemic writing, concrete poetry, markup languages, keyboard layouts, interactive and generative typography, printing technologies and bots (alongside other forms of radical publishing). Students will complete a series of weekly readings and production-oriented assignments leading up to a final project. In addition to critique, sessions will feature lectures, class discussions and technical tutorials. Prerequisites: Introduction to Computational Media or equivalent programming experience.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ITPG-GT 2051-000 (22296)
01/24/2023 – 05/02/2023 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Parrish, Allison

The Western History of Madness from the Bible to DSM-5 (IDSEM-UG 1961)

Viewed as a natural kind or socially constructed, “madness” was defined and treated, examined and controlled, diagnosed and cured according to the spirit of the time. This course follows the varied social imageries of “madness” throughout Western history, from the Hebrew Bible to the contemporary and controversial Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM), also known as “the bible of psychiatry”, in its most recent 5th edition. Students read primary and secondary texts by philosophers, physicians, theologians, jurists, tragedians, novelists, psychologists, social reformers, policy makers, journalists, historians and individuals who suffered madness, known as “experts by experience.” They also observe art and watch films that portray different aspects of madness. Reading includes: the Bible, Plato, Hippocrates, Ibn Sina, Maimonides, Margery Kempe, Erasmus, Robert Burton, Freud, George Canguilhem, Foucault, Ian Hacking, Elaine Showalter among others. The course explores the interaction between the social, cultural, scientific, political as well as economic factors that have shaped the views of “madness” and its treatment while paying ample attention to the history of ideas that informed and, often, framed them.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IDSEM-UG 1961-000 (17014)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ophir, Orna

Introduction to Engineering and Design (EG-UY 1004)

This course introduces selected aspects of the history, philosophy, methodology, tools, and contemporary topics in engineering. Also included are basic engineering experimentation, data analysis, and a team-design project. This course will provide an understanding of what professional engineers do. In this context, an emphasis will be placed on developing oral and written communication skills. EG1004 is a survey course that introduces students to NYU Tandon academic opportunities, professional and career development, and teamwork skills. Design and project management skills are developed throughout a semester-long design project. Disciplines within engineering will be introduced during lecture, and explored through practice in laboratory assignments.

General Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


EG-UY 1004-000 (12431)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12432)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12433)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12434)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12435)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12436)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12437)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12438)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12439)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12440)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12441)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12442)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12443)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12444)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12445)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12446)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12447)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12448)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12449)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12450)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12451)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12452)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12453)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12454)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rom, Cindy


EG-UY 1004-000 (12455)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12456)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12598)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12457)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12458)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12459)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12460)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12461)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12462)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12463)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12464)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12465)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Clenance, Pamela


EG-UY 1004-000 (12466)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12467)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12468)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter · Röhr, Jason


EG-UY 1004-000 (12469)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12470)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12471)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12472)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12473)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12474)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12475)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12476)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12477)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12478)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12479)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12480)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rom, Cindy


EG-UY 1004-000 (12481)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12482)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12483)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12484)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12485)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12486)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12487)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12488)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12489)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12490)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12491)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12492)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid

DIGITAL LOGIC AND STATE MACHINE DESIGN (ECE-UY 2204)

This course covers combinational and sequential digital circuits. Topics: Introduction to digital systems. Number systems and binary arithmetic. Switching algebra and logic design. Error detection and correction. Combinational integrated circuits, including adders. Timing hazards. Sequential circuits, flipflops, state diagrams and synchronous machine synthesis. Programmable Logic Devices, PLA, PAL and FPGA. Finite-state machine design. Memory elements. A grade of C or better is required of undergraduate computer-engineering majors. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 1114 (C- or better) or CS-UY 1133 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UH 1001 (C- or better) or ENGR-UH 1000 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 101 (C- or better)

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11545)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11546)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11547)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11548)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11549)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Reagen, Brandon

Beyond Picture Perfect: Personal Choice in a Digital World (ARTS-UG 1485)

This course covers the very basic techniques of photography and digital imaging. Beyond Picture Perfect explores the many choices available to today’s image makers. New technology combined with traditional photographic techniques will be addressed, enabling the students to realize their distinctive image-making vocabulary. Daily discussions include understanding hardware mechanics, choosing a personal color palette, and recognizing “your” unique composition key. We will debate the many analog and digital tools available to photographers vital to their artistic expression. These concepts will be supported by daily assignments and class critiques culminating in a final project portfolio. Students with interest in analog or digital formats will be encouraged to develop an understanding of their medium and form an original visual strategy. Readings may include selections from: Robert Adams, Why People Photograph; London and Upton, Photography.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 2 Weeks

Sections (January 2023)


ARTS-UG 1485-000 (1154)
01/03/2023 – 01/20/2023 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Day, Jeff

IRL/URL_Performing Hybrid Systems (COART-UT 212)

This course is a unique collaboration between the Collaborative Arts and IMA Tisch departments, and CultureHub at La Mama. During the pandemic many performing artists moved their work online, leading to an increasing acceptance of experimental practices that their predecessors developed in on-line work for the past 30 years. In Experiments in Hybrid (IRL/URL) Performance, students will have the opportunity to design, prototype, and present collaborative projects that build on this tradition, blending both physical and virtual elements. Over the course of the semester, students will have the opportunity to study at the CultureHub studio where they will be introduced to video, lighting, sound, and cueing systems. In addition, students will learn creative coding fundamentals allowing them to network multiple softwares and devices generating real-time feedback systems. The class will culminate with a final showing that will be presented online and broadcast from the CultureHub studio. 

Collaborative Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


COART-UT 212-000 (23156)01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Kananuruk, Tiriree

Hist of Nationalism in Cent & Eastern Europe (HIST-UA 9176)

The goal of this course is to introduce the students into nationalism studies and into a plethora of historical and present roots of national identities and manifestations of nationalism in Central and Eastern Europe. The course will examine how selected aspects of national histories have been used (and misused) in 19., 20. and 21. century to support/justify national political programs and leaders; specifically, how a romantic picture of national history influenced the development of national identity and what role its interpretation has had in political struggles and programs of Central and East European nations. The course focuses on forces that triggered many eruptions of ethnic hatred and atrocities in Central and Eastern Europe including Holocaust, post World War II expulsion of Germans, civil war in former Yugoslavia, and most recently the nationalist aspects of conflict between Ukraine and Russia. The course will focus on Ukraine and Russia, Poland, Hungary, former Czechoslovakia, present-day Czech Republic and Slovakia, on former Yugoslavia and on independent states on its territory, and it will motivate the students to formulate a positive and cooperative prospect for the region’s future.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


HIST-UA 9176-000 (2828)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Polisenska, Milada

Statistics for Business and Economics (BUSF-SHU 101)

This course introduces students to the use of statistical methods. Topics include: descriptive statistics; introduction to probability; sampling; statistical inference concerning means, standard deviations, and proportions; correlation; analysis of variance; linear regression, including multiple regression analysis. Applications to empirical situations are an integral part of the course. Pre-requisites: None Fulfillment: This course satisfies the following: Major req: BUSF, BUSM, ECON, CS, DS Foundational course; Social Science: methods course; IMB Business elective.

Business and Finance (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


BUSF-SHU 101-000 (17187)
09/13/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Zheng, Dan


BUSF-SHU 101-000 (17188)
09/13/2022 – 12/16/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Zheng, Dan


BUSF-SHU 101-000 (17189)
09/13/2022 – 12/16/2022 Fri
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Zheng, Dan

The Novel in Antiquity (CLASS-UA 203)

Survey of Greek and Roman narrative fiction in antiquity, its origins and development as a literary genre, and its influence on the tradition of the novel in Western literature. Readings include Chariton?s Chaereas and Callirrhoe, Longus?s Daphnis and Chloe, Heliodorus?s Ethiopian Tale, Lucian?s True History, Petronius?s Satyricon, and Apuleius?s Golden Ass. Concludes with the Gesta Romanorum and the influence of this tradition on later prose, such as Elizabethan prose romance.

Classics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CLASS-UA 203-000 (19322)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Barchiesi, Alessandro

Philosophical Approaches to Race and Racism (PHIL-UA 8)

This introductory-level course is needed to provide students with a firm understanding of distinctively philosophical approaches to issues concerning race and racism. This course has two themes. The first is an exploration of the concept of race. This is a question in social ontology, which is the philosophical study of the nature of social entities. The second is an examination of some of the normative and conceptual issues surrounding the most morally significant of the ways in which “race” has mattered for social life, namely as the concept that defines the object of the attitudes, practices, institutions and beliefs we call “racist.” We shall ask what racism is, what sorts of things can be racist, and what makes racism wrong.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHIL-UA 8-000 (10079)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Appiah, Kwame Anthony


PHIL-UA 8-000 (10080)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ulerie, Jodell


PHIL-UA 8-000 (10081)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ulerie, Jodell


PHIL-UA 8-000 (10082)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grabelsky, Dana


PHIL-UA 8-000 (10083)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grabelsky, Dana

Introduction to The New Testament (RELST-UA 302)

Introduces students to issues and themes in the history of the Jesus movement and early Christianity through a survey of the main texts of the canonical New Testament as well as other important early Christian documents. Students are given the opportunity to read most of the New Testament text in a lecture hall setting where the professor provides historical context and focus on significant issues, describes modern scholarly methodologies, and places the empirical material within the larger framework of ancient history and the theoretical study of religion.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


RELST-UA 302-000 (26095)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cady, Alyssa

Advanced Seminar in Personality Disorders (CAMS-UA 202)

Can we truly classify one’s personality, the very essence of an individual, as “disordered”? We explore the history, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of personality disorders. We begin with an overview of personality and theories of personality development and then complete an in-depth review of each disorder. We consider the genetic, neurobiological, and developmental research supporting and refuting these diagnoses. We review various classification systems, observe how the media often portrays personality disorders, and challenge the notion that undesirable personality traits are always maladaptive. Finally, we utilize both research and clinical material and aims at a nuanced understanding of these disorders and their sustained impact upon affected individuals.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CAMS-UA 202-000 (9695)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Ross · Davis, Jordan

TrendingMentalHealth (CAMS-UA 504)

Addresses current problems facing our society and threatening our mental health, such as the opioid epidemic, gun violence, video game addiction, legal use of marijuana, and prolonged separation of children from their parents. Students contrast what is scientifically understood with what is commonly believed and learn critical reading and thinking skills as they parse fact from fiction, reality from supposition. Given the topical nature of this course, themes may vary by semester and instructor expertise (including a focus on social and cultural issues, novel neuroscience, digital health technology, etc.).

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CAMS-UA 504-000 (9479)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Waugh, Whitney


CAMS-UA 504-000 (9700)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Castellanos, Francisco · Baroni, Argelinda


CAMS-UA 504-000 (19793)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gerson, Ruth · Marsh, Akeem · Chhabra, Divya

Queer Cultures and Democracy (SPAN-UA 9481)

In the last decade, many Latin American nations have witnessed decisive progress in the legal recognition of non-normative sexualities and gender identities. The conventional map of “advanced democracies” crafting models of democratization to be exported to “less developed” nations seems definitely challenged: a new understanding of the multiple temporalities of queer cultures in North and South America is even more necessary than ever. In order to explore this multi-layered landscape, this course is aimed at reconstructing the historical detours of queer cultures in Buenos Aires and New York, considered enclaves of queer cultures in Argentina and the US respectively. The course revisits the last three decades in order to question the dominant and frequently reductive narratives of lineal progress. Taught simultaneously in Buenos Aires and New York, the class includes critical readings of queer cultural production as well as work on local archives and interviews with activists and GLTTBI organizations.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


SPAN-UA 9481-000 (8803)
01/25/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Buenos Aires (Global)
Instructed by Lopez Seoane, Mariano

Spanish for Beginners- Level I (SPAN-UA 1)

Open to students with no previous training in Spanish and to others on assignment by placement test. 4 points. Beginning course designed to teach the elements of Spanish grammar and language structure through a primarily oral approach. Emphasis is on building vocabulary and language patterns to encourage spontaneous language use in and out of the classroom.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


SPAN-UA 1-000 (9237)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10108)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10109)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10110)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (9252)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10111)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10112)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10113)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10114)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Munoz, Sophy


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10115)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (9268)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Munoz, Sophy


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10116)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Burgos Trujillo, Felix


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10117)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Munoz, Sophy


SPAN-UA 1-000 (9277)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Burgos Trujillo, Felix


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10118)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Del Risco, Eida

Politics, Power, and Society (SOC-UA 471)

The nature and dimensions of power in society. Theoretical and empirical material dealing with national power structures of the contemporary United States and with power in local communities. Topics: the iron law of oligarchy, theoretical and empirical considerations of democracy, totalitarianism, mass society theories, voting and political participation, the political and social dynamics of advanced and developing societies, and the political role of intellectuals. Considers selected models for political analysis.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2021)


SOC-UA 471-000 (2730)
07/06/2021 – 08/15/2021 Mon,Wed,Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meyer, Neal


SOC-UA 471-000 (2742)
07/06/2021 – 08/15/2021 Mon,Wed,Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meyer, Neal

Sex and Gender (SOC-UA 21)

What forms does gender inequality take, and how can it best be explained? How and why are the relations between women and men changing? What are the most important social, political, and economic consequences of this ?gender revolution?? The course provides answers to these questions by examining a range of theories about gender in light of empirical findings about women?s and men?s behavior.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2022)


SOC-UA 21-000 (2406)
05/23/2022 – 07/06/2022 Mon,Tue,Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leigh, Jenny


SOC-UA 21-000 (4294)
07/07/2022 – 08/17/2022 Mon,Tue,Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kaplan, Golda


SOC-UA 21-000 (4373)
07/07/2022 – 08/17/2022 Mon,Tue,Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kaplan, Golda

Immigration (SOC-UA 9452)

To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


SOC-UA 9452-000 (4016)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Busch, Nicky


SOC-UA 9452-000 (4017)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Busch, Nicky

Psychology of Human-Machine Communication and Relationships (PSYC-SHU 344)

From the perspective of psychological science, developments in machine-learning and AI raise many interesting questions. AI technologies are already proving useful in their ability to monitor and assess human behaviors, emotions, and decision patterns. This is becoming possible through the sheer volume of information available online in connection with individuals, groups, and through the sophistication of predictive algorithms that can see patterns that the human mind cannot. As AI systems, machines, and robots are increasingly built to mimic human beings, will we begin to communicate with, react to, or feel the same towards them as we do to other human beings? If an AI system can assist in an online purchase or a psychological intervention (e.g., a chatbot), can they also become our friends? Could we fall in love with an artificial agent or a robot? In this course, we use the lens of psychological science to investigate these and other aspects of human-machine communication and their effects on human-human relationships. Prerequisite: Introduction to psychology (PSYC-SHU 101) OR Introduction to Neural Science (NEUR-SHU 201) OR Introduction to Computer Science (CSCI-SHU 101) Fulfillment: Core STS; IMA/IMB elective; Neural Science elective; Social Science Focus Psychology 300 level.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2022)


PSYC-SHU 344-000 (4390)
07/04/2022 – 08/12/2022 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Nyman, Thomas

Future of Medicine (CCOL-UH 1010)

One of the biggest challenges in medicine is to prevent disease and ensure personalized treatment. This is now becoming possible thanks to high-resolution DNA sequencing technology that can decipher our individual information. These developments are already impacting global health, but they raise global challenges such as equality. How will these new technologies blend into healthcare systems? What regulations are needed to ensure that personalized medicine reaches all layers of society? How do we prevent discrimination based on our genes? Through an inquiry-based approach we will examine the science, economics, and politics behind medicine and evaluate the ethical issues that arise in this fast-developing field.

Core: Colloquium (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CCOL-UH 1010-000 (3677)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Percipalle, Piergiorgio

The Politics of New Media: How the Internet Works and For Whom (PRACT-UG 1460)

This course will examine the communication of ideas online, and how that communication is shaped by commerce and surveillance. We will begin by considering the role of the public sphere in a democratic society, and then turn to the early anonymous days of the internet, the rise of social media platforms, and finally the Snowden revelations, debates over digital free speech, and new technologies like TikTok and virtual reality. We will experiment with simple counter-surveillance techniques like encrypted texts that are increasingly fundamental to the sensible practice of modern journalism and media work. The course will feature occasional guests. Students will finish the course with an understanding of the relationship between modern media forms and the expression of ideas in the public sphere.

Practicum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


PRACT-UG 1460-000 (12539)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leonard, Sarah

What is Science and Technology Studies (HUMN-SHU 110)

This course is an introduction to Science and Technology Studies (STS), an interdisciplinary field treating science and technology as socially embedded enterprises. We will examine how social, political, cultural, and material conditions shape scientific and technological activity and how science and technology, in turn, shape society. You will become familiar with the basic concepts and methods developed by STS scholars in history, sociology, and anthropology and explore how the scope of the field has expanded to include a variety of empirical case studies, theoretical arguments, and scholarly debates. The kinds of questions we will explore include: What counts as scientific knowledge? How is it produced? How do scientists establish credibility? Can there be a scientific study of scientific inquiry? To what extent are science and technology shaped by historical context? Prerequisite: None.

Humanities (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


HUMN-SHU 110-000 (23807)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by

Technophilia and Its Discontents (CCEA-UH 1043)

Why must Luke Skywalker turn off his in computer at the climactic moment of George Lucas’s iconic film Star Wars (1977)? The film started a revolution in cinematic special-effects, but underlying its narrative logic is a deeply rooted anxiety about the right uses of technology. If man, as Hannah Arendt famously put it, is homo faber, the “creator,” the tool-making animal, then from at least Plato to the present, human beings have told stories about how dangerous tools can be. This course investigates philosophical writing, novels, plays, and films from a variety of world cultures to explore the vexed relationship between humans and the technologies they create. Why are human beings, perhaps more than ever at the start of the 21st century, so enamored with technological progress? Why is technophilia, the love of technology, so often accompanied by its opposite, technophobia, the fear of technology? What do the attitudes represented in the texts and films we examine tell us about human agency and about the relationship between science and religion?

Core: Cultural Exploration & Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 3 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2022)


CCEA-UH 1043-000 (6042)
06/13/2022 – 07/07/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Patell, Cyrus

Information Technology in Business & Society (BUSF-SHU 142)

In Information Technology in Business and Society, students learn the fundamental concepts underlying current and future developments in computer-based information technology – including hardware, software, network and database-related technologies. They will also acquire proficiency in the essential tools used by today’s knowledge workers and learn how these can be used to help solve problems of economic, social or personal nature. Throughout the course, they will be exposed to a range of more advanced topics which may include big data, information privacy, information security, digital piracy and digital music. Pre-requisites: not open to freshman. Fulfillment: This course satisfies BUSF/ BUSM Business Elective, Business Analytics Track; IMB Business Flexible Core.

Business and Finance (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


BUSF-SHU 142-000 (17570)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Junque De Fortuny, Enric

Asian Art and Architecture (ART-SHU 180)

This course surveys Asian art and architecture from the earliest civilizations to the present day through several themes. It focuses more on the arts and monuments from China, Japan, and India but also introduces those from Korea and Southeast Asia. We will study how artistic traditions transmit and develop in distinctive yet interconnected societies in Asia, as well as how those traditions interact with specific political, religious, social, and cultural contexts in which they grow. Issues investigated include (but are not limited to): the spread and metamorphosis of Buddhist art, the artistic exchanges between the “East” and the “West” (and the formations of the ideas of the “East” and the “West”), the production and consumption of art as related to various forms of power such as political authority, social hierarchy, and gender, and the “Asian-ness” in the contemporary world. Prerequisite: None.

Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


ART-SHU 180-000 (23806)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Kong, Hyoungee

Electronics for Scientists I (PHYS-UA 110)

Introduction to basic analog and digital electronics used in physics experiments. Concepts and devices presented in lecture are studied in the laboratory. Topics include DC and AC circuits, filters, power supplies, transistors, operational amplifiers, analog to digital converters, and digital logic.

Physics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


PHYS-UA 110-000 (10434)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon
12:00 AM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gershow, Marc

Advanced Circuits (ENGR-UH 2311)

This course builds on the foundations of the Circuits Fundamentals Course. The topics covered include sinusoidal steady-state response, complex voltage, current and the phasor concept; impedance, admittance; average, apparent and reactive power; polyphase circuits; node and mesh analysis for AC circuits; frequency response; parallel and series resonance; and, operational amplifier circuits.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ENGR-UH 2311-000 (4721)
01/22/2024 – 03/08/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rasras, Mahmoud


ENGR-UH 2311-000 (4722)
01/22/2024 – 03/08/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rasras, Mahmoud · Mulugeta, Tadesse


ENGR-UH 2311-000 (4723)
03/20/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ha, Sohmyung


ENGR-UH 2311-000 (4724)
03/20/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ha, Sohmyung · Mulugeta, Tadesse

Introduction to Very Large Scale Integrated Circuits (ECE-UY 3193)

The course offers an overview of integrated circuit-design process: planning, design, fabrication and testing; device physics: PN junction, MOSFET and Spice models; inverter static and dynamic behavior and power dissipation; interconnects: cross talk, variation and transistor sizing; logic gates and combinational logic networks; sequential machines and sequential system design; subsystem design: adders, multipliers, static memory (SRAM), dynamic memory (DRAM). Topics include floor planning, clock distribution, power distribution and signal integrity; Input/Output buffers, packaging and testing; IC design methodology and CAD tools; implementations: full custom, application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), field programmable gate arrays (FPGA). The course provides foundations of VLSI design and custom VLSI design methodology and state-of-the-art CAD tools. | Prerequisites: CS-UY 2204 (C- or better) and EE-UY 3114. ABET competencies: a,c,e,k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ECE-UY 3193-000 (17965)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Selesnick, Ivan


ECE-UY 3193-000 (17966)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Bhavnagarwala, Azeez

Deal Making in the Entertainment Industry (MKTG-UB 43)

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the deal-making and business affairs process in the entertainment space, using film and television content as the primary example for what goes into cutting a deal. The course will explore the deal process from the perspective of the different players in entertainment and media, focusing on how each player looks to maximize value. Students will learn the process of striking a deal, from its inception, to the term sheet phase, to the negotiation process and contractual agreements, through to deal implementation. The process will be evaluated in the context of the factors that play into reaching an agreement, such as exclusivity, windowing, multi-platform rights and timing. Students will learn about negotiations strategies for maximizing value in content deals, identifying common issues in the deal process and effective paths to reaching resolution and striking a deal. The course is designed to help students: –Understand the basics of the process for making a deal in the entertainment industry –Appreciate the factors that play into maximizing value through the deal process, including understanding the relative position of the players in the entertainment industry –Learn and understand negotiating strategies and how to navigate the business affairs and deal-making process

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 43-000 (18481)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Globalization of The Entertainment Industry (MKTG-UB 46)

Provides a framework for understanding the global expansion of media and entertainment companies. Examines the impact that the significant export growth of American leisure products and services has on the U.S economy. Analyzes the strategies of several leading entertainment and media multinational companies and the development of their entertainment businesses within the major world economic zones. International speakers, cases and readings are used in this course.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


MKTG-UB 46-000 (22222)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Brown, Colin


MKTG-UB 46-000 (22228)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)at Washington SquareInstructed by Brown, Colin


MKTG-UB 46-000 (23357)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Maheswaran, Durairaj

Sports Economics (ECON-UB 211)

This course applies microeconomic theory and econometric analysis to sports and explores some public policy issues that have arisen in the design of sports competitions. The course is divided into four main parts: the structure of sports leagues, labor market issues, college sports, and the market for sports betting.

Economics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ECON-UB 211-000 (22435)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bowmaker, Simon

Future Reality: Trends and Impact of New Media (ARTS-UG 1643)

Augmented reality (AR), Virtual Reality (VR), AI (Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning) art, projection mapped art, NFT art, as well as other types of digital artworks, have come to be an integral part of new media culture. The genesis of and their relevance to new media are cultural imperatives to study and analyze — from a creative, historical, psychological, philosophical, marketing, and technological perspective. Many artists (painters, photographers, sculptors, filmmakers, animators, and writers), scientists, and technologists at NYU, as well as nearby VR World, Artechouse, and Hall Des Lumières , and other NYC organizations are central to producing realistic and immersive three-dimensional environments – AR, VR and projection mapped (360 digital imagery) worlds. Through lectures, group discussions, GoogleDoc reports, field trips to museums and new media organizations, and workshops specific to new media innovations and applications, students will gain a framework to understand the importance of these evolving technologies and their impact on the arts, ecology (sustainability initiatives), social justice, and behavioral science. Students from varying creative and technical backgrounds will participate in the development of new media art projects, intended to be showcased at the Gallatin Arts Festival. They will be introduced to and encouraged to take advantage of NYU’s LaGuardia Studio, LaGuardia Co-op, and LinkedIn Learning instructional tutorials, as well as using their own resources to aid in developing their new media projects.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ARTS-UG 1643-000 (12456)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Allen, Cynthia

Advanced Topics in Music Technology: Multichannel Media Installation and Performance (MPATE-UE 1633)

Multichannel Media Installation & Performance is a course designed for composers & artists who want to work in a performance or installation context with immersive sound & image technology. The course focuses on software & hardware workflows for the creative applications of multi-channel sound & immersive video for the creation of fixed, generative, reactive, performance-based, & interactive systems that can be experienced in a gallery context or a live performance. Students will develop a semester-length project to use scale & immersion to creative effect. The course will feature regular creative critique as well as an overview of relevant interaction design strategies for creating interactive spaces using sensors & cameras.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MPATE-UE 1633-000 (12919)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ostrowski, Matthew

Mixing in the Digital Audio Workstation (MPATE-UE 1135)

This course explores the art and craft of mixing records, with special attention to “mixing in the box” (via a digital audio workstation). Focus on methodology and technique, with particular emphasis on establishing balances, using such tools as compression and automation to enhance dynamics and develop unique coloration. Examines intersection of technology, budgets, and the marketplace. Students execute their own mixes, with guidance and critique from the instructor. Basic level of DAW proficiency required.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1135-000 (13050)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Killen, Kevin


MPATE-UE 1135-000 (13051)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Killen, Kevin

Electronic Product Design for Music and Audio (MPATE-UE 1017)

This is a multidisciplinary course in which students with previous experience with analog and digital electronics create a novel hardware–based electronic musical instrument, controller, effects unit, or other device related to their interests in music and audio. Student projects may be analog, digital, or a hybrid, and should be unique in some way from devices currently in the commercial marketplace. Students present their designs and functioning physical prototypes with the class as they evolve throughout the semester for feedback.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1017-000 (13044)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven


MPATE-UE 1017-000 (13045)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven

Fundamentals of Music Technology (MPATE-UE 1801)

A general introduction to the fundamental concepts of music technology, including: MIDI and sequencing, the basics of digital audio, sound recording, mixing and sound synthesis,. The course will also briefly overview advanced topics and applications in the field.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (12129)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Geluso, Paul


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (10670)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Las Heras, Diego


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (10673)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mueller, Charles


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (12130)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mann, Mason

Rcdg Tech for Non Majors (MPATE-UE 1022)

Introduction to the physical aspects of sound, psychoacoustics, basic electricity, principles and practice of magnetic recording and an overview of the recording studio, including an introduction to multi-track recording techniques. Students perform various duties just as they would in a professional recording session with live musicians in the recording studio. Open to students without previous experience in recording technology.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10658)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Filadelfo, Gary


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10660)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Griffin, J Chris


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10662)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Losada, Juan

Analog Recording Technology (MPATE-UE 1001)

The physical aspects of sound, analog recording technology & studio production techniques are explained & demonstrated. Lecture topics include microphones, stereo recording, analog consoles, multi-track tape recording, equalization, compression, reverberation & mixing. Studio lab assignments are performed outside of class reinforcing weekly lecture topics

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1001-000 (10647)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Filadelfo, Gary


MPATE-UE 1001-000 (10650)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Filadelfo, Gary

Communicating For Influence (IMBX-SHU 104)

Communication sits at the core of all human interactions and is highly valued in workplaces. Beyond the minimal goal of articulating and presenting one’s ideas effectively, communication also involves building empathy, cultivating an eye for detail, developing awareness of goals and contexts, and integrating critical and reflective thinking. How can we communicate our own projects to different audiences? Why should other people care? What types of media can we use and how do we know they are effective? How can collaborative and participatory elements help to improve engagement levels? This course aims to guide students to review and create their own learning profiles as they learn to engage a diverse range of targeted audience. Prerequisite: Not open to freshman. Fulfillment: IMA Major Electives; IMB Major Interactive Media Elective.

Interactive Media and Business (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


IMBX-SHU 104-000 (22138)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Thu
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Wang, Nicole

Digital Art and New Media (ARTS-UG 1635)

This workshop seeks to bring students from varying backgrounds together to engage in evaluating and sharing digital new media for the Internet and other new media art mediums. Each student brings to the class a set of experiences and skills, such as research, writing, design, film, music, photography, computer gaming, performance, animation, computer literacy, software knowledge, virtual reality, augmented reality, mixed reality, A.I. (Artificial Intelligence) Generative Art experiences, among others. The class will discuss new media concepts, content strategies, and frameworks that bridge theory and practice. Through lectures (including a survey of digital new media innovations), group discussions, virtual or other lectures and/or workshops, students will develop individual projects, based on their new media skills. The class intends to be a part of the development of the Virtual Reality (VR) Museum (“Virtual Museum XR”), or other Gallatin arts initiatives, such as Rabbit Hole. Digital new media projects may include digital photography, animated films, podcasts, sound art installations, TikTok, music videos, VR, AR, A.I. Generative Art, to name a few. Class projects, readings, and week-to-week journal-keeping reports are essential components of this workshop. They will reside in a designated Google Docs site, specific for this class. Students are encouraged to supply their own media and take advantage of NYU’s LinkedIn Learning new media tutorials and access NYU’s LaGuardia Studio and LaGuardia Co-op hardware and software opportunities.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1635-000 (16719)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Allen, Cynthia

Hardware Security (ENGR-UH 4320)

This course covers topics related to security and trustworthiness of electronic hardware. Lectures and in-class discussions on recent research papers cover the following topics: Trustworthiness of integrated circuits; counterfeit chips, hardware Trojans, reverse engineering and IP piracy. Design-for-Trust; hardware metering, logic encryption, split manufacturing, IC camouflaging. Encryption hardware; AES, DES, etc. Testability vs Security; misuse of test infrastructure to attack encryption hardware and countermeasures. Encrypted architectures; homomorphic encryption, privacy-preserving computation. Signal processing in the encrypted domain. Malware detection through hardware structures, side channel attacks, cyber-security for the smart grid. Lectures are complemented by hands-on lab exercises.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ENGR-UH 4320-000 (17229)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


ENGR-UH 4320-000 (17230)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Computer Vision (ENGR-UH 3331)

An important goal of artificial intelligence (AI) is to equip computers with the capability of interpreting visual inputs. Computer vision is an area in AI that deals with the construction of explicit, meaningful descriptions of physical objects from images. It includes the techniques for image processing, pattern recognition, geometric modeling, and cognitive processing. This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and techniques used in computer vision, which includes image representation, image pre-processing, edge detection, image segmentation, object recognition and detection, and neural networks and deep learning. In addition to learning about the most effective machine learning techniques, students will gain the practical implementation of applying these techniques to real engineering problems.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ENGR-UH 3331-000 (22825)
01/24/2023 – 03/10/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi


ENGR-UH 3331-000 (22826)
01/24/2023 – 03/10/2023 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi

Transportation and Traffic Engineering (ENGR-UH 3413)

The course introduces students to fundamental concepts that underlie highway design, traffic operations and control, and transportation systems. The course begins with vehicle performance and the role it has on road design. We later cover the fundamentals of traffic flow theory and operations. In combination with such fundamentals we also discuss the use and collection of traffic data, as well as more advanced concepts on traffic safety, public transportation, and traffic management and control. Moreover, we look at clear applications of the concepts covered in class with a real-world student led project.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3413-000 (3541)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Menendez, Monica


ENGR-UH 3413-000 (3542)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zekar, Aicha · Menendez, Monica

Thermodynamics (ENGR-UH 3710)

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of thermodynamics and their applications to engineering problems. The following topics are covered in this course: properties of pure substances; concepts of work and heat; closed and open systems; the fundamental laws of thermodynamics; Carnot and Clausius statements of the 2nd law; entropy and entropy production; heat engines, refrigerators, heat pumps; efficiencies, coefficients of performance.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3710-000 (3597)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ryu, Je Ir


ENGR-UH 3710-000 (3598)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Al-Chalabi, Mohammed · Ryu, Je Ir

Computer Organization and Architecture (ENGR-UH 3511)

The course introduces the principles of computer organization and basic architecture concepts. It discusses the basic structure of a digital computer and study in details formal descriptions, machine instruction sets design, formats and data representation, addressing structures, mechanization of procedure calls, memory management, arithmetic and logical unit, virtual and cache memory organization, I/O processing and interrupts, fundamental of reliability aspects. The course also covers performance and distributed system models. The labs emphasize experiential learning of computer organization and architecture concepts, and require students to use learned knowledge to create and build prototypes and evaluate their performance.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3511-000 (3593)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Maniatakos, Michail


ENGR-UH 3511-000 (3594)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Maniatakos, Michail · Annor, Prince

Bio-sensors and Bio-chips (ENGR-UH 4142)

This course covers the principles, technologies, methods and applications of biosensors and bioinstrumentation beginning with an examination of the ethical, legal, cultural, religious, and social implications of nanotechnologies. The objective of this course is to link engineering principles to understanding of biosystems in sensors and bioelectronics. The course provides students with detail of methods and procedures used in the design, fabrication, and application of biosensors and bioelectronic devices. The fundamentals of measurement science are applied to optical, electrochemical, mass, and pressure signal transduction. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to be able to explain biosensing and transducing techniques; design and construct biosensors instrumentation.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


ENGR-UH 4142-000 (23421)
08/29/2022 – 12/13/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Song, Yong-Ak


ENGR-UH 4142-000 (23422)
08/29/2022 – 12/13/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Song, Yong-Ak

Engineering Statics (ENGR-UH 2011)

This course introduces students to the field of mechanics through study of rigid bodies in static equilibrium. Knowledge and understanding of static equilibrium is essential for future study of topics as diverse as dynamics, solid mechanics, structures, robotics, and fluid mechanics. The methods, techniques, theory, and application of equilibrium in the solution of engineering problems are presented for two-dimensional systems. Topics covered include collinear forces, coincident forces, general equilibrium, moments and torques, analysis of trusses, frames and machines, Coulomb friction, centroid, center of mass, and moments of inertia.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3556)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sousa, Rita Leal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3557)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sousa, Rita Leal · Mengiste, Eyob


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3792)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Celik, Kemal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (4361)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sousa, Rita Leal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3793)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ayed, Lana Odeh · Celik, Kemal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (4362)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mengiste, Eyob

Computer Programming for Engineers (ENGR-UH 1000)

The objective of the course is for students to acquire the fundamental knowledge of computer programming, develop transferable programming skills, and learn to solve engineering problems via programming. The course is primarily based on the C programming language and an introduction to another programming language such as MATLAB (to demonstrate transferring programming knowledge from one language to another). The course explores the application of engineering computation in various engineering domains including mechanical, civil, computer, and electrical engineering. The following topics are covered: introduction to computer systems, standard input/output, file input/output, decision structures, loop structures, functions, arrays, addressing, dynamically allocated memory, structures, introduction to object oriented programming, problem solving via programming algorithm design, and applications in another programming language such as MATLAB.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3554)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3555)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Jamil, Muhammad Hassan · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3567)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Negoiu, Elena · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3588)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Negoiu, Elena · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3991)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Jamil, Muhammad Hassan · Eid, Mohamad

Applied Machine Learning (ENGR-UH 3332)

Machine Learning is the basis for the most exciting careers in data analysis today. This course introduces students to the concepts of machine learning and deep learning. This course covers a broad introduction to machine learning techniques, which include both supervised learning and unsupervised learning techniques such as classification, support vector machines, decision trees, ensemble learning and random forests, dimensionality reduction, and neural networks and deep learning. In addition to learning about the most effective machine learning techniques, you will gain the practical implementation of applying these techniques to real engineering problems.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3332-000 (4110)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi · Annor, Prince


ENGR-UH 3332-000 (20903)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi · Fang, Yi

Circuits Fundamentals (ENGR-UH 2019)

This module provides an introduction to electrical circuits. The topics covered include DC circuits, passive DC circuit elements, Kirchoff’s laws, electric power calculations, analysis of DC circuits, nodal and loop analysis techniques, voltage and current division, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems, and source free and forced responses of RL, RC and RLC circuits.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (3560)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Gyorgy, Andras


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (3561)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mulugeta, Tadesse · Gyorgy, Andras


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (3812)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rasras, Mahmoud


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (4062)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (3813)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mulugeta, Tadesse


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (4063)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Avdeev, Alexander

Computer-Aided Design (ENGR-UH 3720)

This course provides an introduction to computer-aided design (CAD) using solid modeling. Students learn to create solid object models using extrusions, revolutions, and swept paths, and learn to modify parts using cutting, patterns, fillets, chamfers, and other techniques. Assemblies of multiple parts are used to demonstrate the need for geometric tolerances, and students spend a large portion of class in hands-on use of software tools. The labs emphasize experiential learning of CAD concepts and applications using software tools.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3720-000 (4030)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Montalvo Navarette, Jorge


ENGR-UH 3720-000 (4031)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Montalvo Navarette, Jorge

Control Systems Engineering (ENGR-UH 4610)

The course introduces the principles of dynamic system modeling, analysis, and feedback control design with extensive, hands-on computer simulation. Modeling and analysis of dynamic systems. Description of interconnected systems via transfer functions and block/signal-flow diagrams. System response characterization as transient and steady-state responses and error considerations. Stability of dynamical systems: Routh-Hurwitz criterion. Controller design using root-locus and Bode-diagrams (frequency domain). Introduction to modern state-space controller designs. Computer-aided feedback control design for mechanical, aerospace, robotic, thermo-fluid, and other electrical systems.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 4610-000 (4379)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Tzes, Anthony


ENGR-UH 4610-000 (4380)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Avdeev, Alexander

Probability and Statistics for Engineers (ENGR-UH 2010Q)

Introductory course in probability and statistics with an emphasis on how these topics are relevant in engineering disciplines. Topics in probability theory include sample spaces, and counting, random variables (discrete and continuous), probability distributions, cumulative density functions, rules and theorems of probability, expectation, and variance. Topics in statistics include sampling, central limit theorem, and linear regression. The course emphasizes correct application of probability and statistics and highlights the limitations of each method presented. NOTE: This course may be replaced with MATH-UH 1003Q or MATH-UH 2011Q

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2010Q-000 (3562)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain


ENGR-UH 2010Q-000 (4098)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Diabat, Ali


ENGR-UH 2010Q-000 (3628)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain · Ayed, Lana Odeh


ENGR-UH 2010Q-000 (4099)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ayed, Lana Odeh · Diabat, Ali

Numerical Methods (ENGR-UH 2017)

This course provides an introduction to the methods, techniques, theory, and application of numerical methods in the solution of engineering problems. Topics to be covered include the following: finding roots of equations, numerical differentiation and integration, time marching methods in solving ordinary differential equations, and optimization. MATLAB software is the primary computing environment.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2017-000 (3651)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Karathanasopoulos, Nikolaos


ENGR-UH 2017-000 (4055)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Karathanasopoulos, Nikolaos


ENGR-UH 2017-000 (3652)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Khalifa, Duoaa Magdi


ENGR-UH 2017-000 (4056)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Khalifa, Duoaa Magdi

Object-Oriented Programming (ENGR-UH 2510)

This intermediate-level programming course focuses on object oriented programming using C . Classes and objects including constructors, destructors, member functions and data members. Topics in this course include data representation, pointers, dynamic memory allocation and recursion, inheritance and templates, polymorphism, the process of compiling and linking using makefiles, memory management, exceptional control flow, introduction to performance evaluation, and optimization.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2510-000 (3818)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alhanai, Tuka


ENGR-UH 2510-000 (3819)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alhanai, Tuka

Conservation Laws in Engineering (ENGR-UH 2012)

Conservation laws play a fundamental role in the analysis of engineering problems by providing a framework to derive the relationships between various physical properties of isolated systems. This course aims to introduce the students to these laws, namely, the conservation of mass, conservation of linear momentum, conservation of angular momentum, conservation of energy, and conservation of charge. These laws of conservation will be derived in integral forms and applied to selected case studies involving electrical, chemical, thermal, and fluid mechanical systems. In addition to the development of a unified framework for analysis of engineering problems, this course will also help the students develop a deeper understanding of the concepts of control volume and mass, work and heat, fluid pressure and hydrostatics, properties of pure substances, and the fundamental laws of thermodynamics.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (3794)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Hashaikeh, Raed


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (20078)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Julias, Margaret


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (3795)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Hashaikeh, Raed · Salim, Wahib


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (4364)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Julias, Margaret


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (3558)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Hashaikeh, Raed


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (3559)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Al-Chalabi, Mohammed

Digital Logic (ENGR-UH 2013)

This module provides a rigorous introduction to topics in digital logic design mostly focusing on combinational circuits but also touching upon basic concepts in sequential circuits. Introductory topics include: classification of digital systems, number systems and binary arithmetic, error detection and correction, and switching algebra. Combinational design analysis and synthesis topics include: logic function optimization, arithmetic units such as adders and subtractors, and control units such as decoders and multiplexers. A brief overview of sequential circuits by introducing basic memory elements such as flip-flops, and state diagrams concludes the module.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (3810)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (3811)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (3660)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (4060)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (3661)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (4061)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur

Instrumentation, Sensors, Actuators (ENGR-UH 3110)

The course focuses on theory of measurement systems, selected electrical circuits and components for measurement, including passive and active filtering for signal conditioning, dynamic measurement system response characteristics, analog signal processing, analog to digital conversion, data acquisition, sensors, actuators and actuator characteristics. The laboratory involves topics related to the design of measurement systems pertaining to all disciplines of engineering such as data acquisition, operational amplifiers, sensors for the measurement of force, vibration, temperature etc. In addition, actuators will also be introduced, including electric motors and pneumatics. Design of virtual instrumentation systems using LabVIEW is also included.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ENGR-UH 3110-000 (17388)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Tzes, Anthony


ENGR-UH 3110-000 (17389)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Silence (CADT-UH 1052)

How does “silence” help to define our sense of being and existence? Across different cultures, various philosophies of art, science, and society have viewed and thought about silence differently. This course invites students to think about and experience silence by asking three fundamental questions: 1) What does it mean to be silent? (Literally and metaphorically); 2) Does silence shape our lives? And if so, how? 3) Can we have an active relationship and recognition with silence just as we do with sound or action? Drawing on multi-disciplinary sources from around the world to explore the philosophical frameworks and thought systems that have engaged in the study and observation of silence, the syllabus will include works of art, literature, theater, films, architecture, and music, which students will engage via a mix of seminar, lecture, and studio methods of teaching, to enable the creations of their own artistic responses to their experience of silence and the material presented in class.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CADT-UH 1052-000 (19965)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Özhabeş, Özlem

Utilitas, Venustas, Firmitas (CADT-UH 1016)

Design seems to be omnipresent, but what is it? This course (whose title is Latin for usage, beauty, and stability) explores how design influences our life and investigates the fundamentals of “good design.” It takes a look at the status quo of the use of design in media, objects, and architecture, and observe its influence on art and technology from past to present. Design tools and processes will be highlighted. Based on the fusion of readings, study, discussion, and experiences, over the course of the semester students will develop an understanding of how mutually reinforcing and beneficiary a mix of Arts, Design, and Technology can be. Lecture and discussion will help develop the design of a bricolage: Every student will realize a product prototype to be displayed in an exhibition and a personal philosophy of about Arts, Design, and Technology.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


CADT-UH 1016-000 (17217)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alawadi, Khulood


CADT-UH 1016-000 (17243)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alawadi, Khulood

Creativity and Innovation (CADT-UH 1005)

Is creativity a gift or a skill? Can creativity be learned? Because creativity is deeply personal, this course will address these questions through individual and collective experiences. The heart of this course is the Personal Creativity Project – an opportunity for students to practice creativity by designing and executing a project of their choice. The project may be on any topic, from art and music to computer programs and business model development. The project will be complemented by reading assignments (completed prior to class), class discussions, and one-on-one meetings with the instructor. Students will leave the course with a completed project and a personal philosophy of creativity, based on the fusion of readings, study, discussion, and experience. The course provides a great deal of freedom for learning and does not provide step-by-step instructions. As a result, the successful completion of this course will require a significant amount of self-motivation.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CADT-UH 1005-000 (3626)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Julias, Margaret

Natural Language Processing (CS-UH 2216)

The field of natural language processing (NLP), also known as computational linguistics, is interested in the modeling and processing of human (i.e., natural) languages. This course covers foundational NLP concepts and ideas, such as finite state methods, n-gram modeling, hidden Markov models, part-of-speech tagging, context free grammars, syntactic parsing and semantic representations. The course surveys a range of NLP applications such as information retrieval, summarization and machine translation. Concepts taught in class are reinforced in practice by hands-on assignments.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 2216-000 (9051)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Habash, Nizar

Computer Systems Organization (CS-UH 2010)

The course focuses on understanding lower-level issues in computer design and programming. The course starts with the C programming language, moves down to assembly and machine-level code, and concludes with basic operating systems and architectural concepts. Students learn to read assembly code and reverse-engineer programs in binary. Topics in this course include the C programming language, data representation, machine-level code, memory organization and management, performance evaluation and optimization, and concurrency.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CS-UH 2010-000 (3374)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ali, Karim · Mengal, Khalid

Discrete Mathematics (CS-UH 1002)

Discrete mathematics concerns the study of mathematical structures that are discrete rather than continuous, and provides a powerful language for investigating many areas of computer science. Discrete structures are characterized by distinct elements, which are often represented by integers. Continuous mathematics on the other hand deals with real numbers. Topics in this course include: sets, counting techniques, logic, proof techniques, solving recurrence relations, number theory, probability, statistics, graph theory, and discrete geometry. These mathematical tools are illustrated with applications in computer science.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 1002-000 (3526)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fernandes, Joao Paulo · Ahmad, Liza


CS-UH 1002-000 (3624)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Mumtaz, Sara


CS-UH 1002-000 (3917)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Ahmed, Dena


CS-UH 1002-000 (19983)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 1002-000 (19984)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 1002-000 (19985)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Introduction to Computer Science (CS-UH 1001)

Computer Science is an innovative and exciting field that focuses on producing efficient solutions for solving problems in any field. This course introduces students to the foundations of computer science. Students learn how to design algorithms to solve problems and how to translate these algorithms into working computer programs using a high-level programming language. The course covers core programming concepts including basic computation, data structures, decision structures, iterative structures, file input/output, and recursion. Students also learn the elements of Object Oriented Programming (OOP), such as objects, classes, inheritance, abstraction, and polymorphism. A final project allows students to combine these concepts to produce a large program of their design.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 1001-000 (3489)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Pötsch, Thomas · Zeeshan, Faisal


CS-UH 1001-000 (3512)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Pötsch, Thomas · Mumtaz, Sara


CS-UH 1001-000 (3587)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Mumtaz, Sara

Temporary Expert: Developing a Research-based Art Practice (IM-UH 1513)

What does it mean to become a “temporary expert?” How does one develop one’s own creative research-based practice? This course will address these questions by engaging with Abu Dhabi’s environmental and social dimensions as a subject for research, context and imaginative art and design opportunities. Students will adopt a wide variety of tools and strategies in order to lay the foundations for a research-based art practice that considers materials, media, context, and audience, as well as one’s personal strengths and desires. Over the course of the semester, students will develop art and design projects that interface with a multiplicity of other disciplines, and engage in idea exchange with experts in the field. Through hands-on practice, case studies, and readings on systems thinking, communication, and the idea of “the public,” we will explore method, documentation and presentation of research, as well as the merits of both success and failure.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


IM-UH 1513-000 (24971)
01/29/2019 – 05/16/2019 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


IM-UH 1513-000 (18534)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


IM-UH 1513-000 (24972)
01/29/2019 – 05/16/2019 Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


IM-UH 1513-000 (18535)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

PROBLEM SOLVING AND PROGRAMMING I (CS-UY 1113)

This course introduces problem solving and computer programming and is for undergraduate engineering students who do not have prior experience in programming in any language. The course covers fundamentals of computer programming and its underlying principles using the Python programming language. Concepts and methods introduced in the course are illustrated by examples from engineering and other disciplines. | Co-requisite: EX-UY 1; Anti-requisite: CS-UY 1114

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 1113-000 (12329)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Romero Cruz, Sebastian


CS-UY 1113-000 (12330)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Romero Cruz, Sebastian


CS-UY 1113-000 (12331)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12332)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12333)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12334)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12335)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12336)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12337)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter

Design Projects (PHTI-UT 1020)

Prerequisite: Photography & Imaging: Multimedia or permission by the department. This is an intense design class for the crossover creature who yearns to design their own exhibit, create a street poster, develop an ad campaign, design titles for a film, invent a visual identity for a musical score, etc. This will be a hands-on process-driven class that will push you to imagine, create, and produce. Students must know InDesign.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


PHTI-UT 1020-000 (13240)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cuomo, Yolanda

Elementary Filipino I (SCA-UA 321)

An introduction to Filipino with an emphasis on mastering basic grammar skills and working vocabulary. Lessons incorporate discussions on history, current events, literature, pop culture, and native values. Open to beginning language students, and lessons are modified according to the needs of individual students. Because language is key to connecting with community concerns, the course includes field trips to Filipino neighborhoods in Queens and Jersey City.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


SCA-UA 321-000 (7439)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Magtoto, Agnes

Intermediate Filipino I (SCA-UA 323)

At this level, when the basic skills and working vocabulary have been mastered, emphasis can be placed on the linguistic rules to enable the student to communicate with more competence. There is also a focus on translation. Lessons use a holistic approach and incorporate discussions on history, current events, literature, pop culture, and native values. To observe and experience the language at work, the course includes field trips to Filipino centers in the New York/ New Jersey area, as well as invited guests who converse with students in Filipino about their life and work.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


SCA-UA 323-000 (8905)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Francia, Luis

Approaches to Gender & Sexuality Studies (SCA-UA 401)

Designed to interest and challenge both the student new to the study of gender and sexuality and the student who has taken departmental courses focusing on women, gender, and/or sexuality. Through a focus on particular issues and topics, explores the construction of sex, gender, and sexuality; gender asymmetry in society; sexual normativity and violations of norms; and the interactions of sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and nation. This interdisciplinary course engages materials and methodologies from a range of media and disciplines, such as literature, the visual arts, history, sociology, psychology, and anthropology. Examines both feminist and nonfeminist arguments from a variety of critical perspectives.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2022)


SCA-UA 401-000 (2751)
05/23/2022 – 07/06/2022 Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Cindy


SCA-UA 401-000 (2783)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Social and Cultural Analysis 101 (SCA-UA 101)

Introduces theories, methods, and political trajectories central to the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis (SCA). SCA 101 addresses how individuals and populations structure their worlds and navigate the resulting social, cultural, and political terrain. It privileges scholarly work with an intersectional approach, drawing on theoretical insights from such fields as social geography, feminism and queer studies, ethnic studies, urban and metropolitan studies, critical race theory, labor studies, and cultural studies.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


SCA-UA 101-000 (9221)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patros, Tyson


SCA-UA 101-000 (9222)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grimaldi, Nicole


SCA-UA 101-000 (9223)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grimaldi, Nicole


SCA-UA 101-000 (9224)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ghabin, Tamar


SCA-UA 101-000 (9225)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ghabin, Tamar

Theories of Symbolic Exchange (RUSSN-UA 860)

Marcel Mauss developed a concept of an alternative, non-market type of economy, based on a nonmonetary exchange of such symbolic values as social recognition, sovereignty, and political participation. Today, this concept has acquired a new relevance in relation to the economy of the Internet. Examines various theories of the symbolic that expand the original Maussian model and encompass multiple aspects of culture.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


RUSSN-UA 860-000 (21730)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Groys, Boris

Lab in Human Cognition (PSYCH-UA 46)

Students experience current thinking in hypothesis formulation, experimental design, data analysis and research communication. Experiments are performed in the fields of Cognition and Perception and can include visual processing, auditory processing, learning, memory, and decision making. Students complete research projects and gain experience in writing research reports that conform to APA guidelines.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


PSYCH-UA 46-000 (9749)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Advanced Psychological Statistics (PSYCH-UA 11)

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9029)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hilford, Andrew


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9030)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sun, Siqi


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9031)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sun, Siqi


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9134)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Judy


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9135)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Judy


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9363)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Qingqing


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9364)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Qingqing

Social Psychology (PSYCH-UA 32)

Gollwitzer, Trope, Uleman. Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduction to theories and research about the social behavior of individuals, such as perception of others and the self, attraction, affiliation, altruism and helping, aggression, moral thought and action, attitudes, influence, conformity, social exchange and bargaining, group decision making, leadership and power, and environmental psychology.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8510)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gollwitzer, Peter


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8511)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Adjei Boateng, Fiona


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8512)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwak, Jasmine


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8513)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tao, Bradley


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8514)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tao, Bradley


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8515)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwak, Jasmine


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8516)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liaquat, Usman


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (25991)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Adjei Boateng, Fiona


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (25995)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liaquat, Usman

Personality (PSYCH-UA 30)

AndersenAndersen. Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduction to research in personality, including such topics as the self-concept; unconscious processes; how we relate to others; and stress, anxiety, and depression.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9269)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Andersen, Susan


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9270)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ganapathy, Rheanna


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9271)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qin, Joyce


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9272)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qin, Joyce


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9273)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ganapathy, Rheanna

Cognition (PSYCH-UA 29)

McElree, Murphy, Rehder. Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduction to theories and research in some major areas of cognitive psychology, including human memory, attention, language production and comprehension, thinking, and reasoning.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8505)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ausch, Robert


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8506)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Muhareb, Samer


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8507)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Muhareb, Samer


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8508)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vaghani, Jhanvi Bharatbhai


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8509)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Muhareb, Samer


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (26096)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vaghani, Jhanvi Bharatbhai


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (26111)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vaghani, Jhanvi Bharatbhai

On Eating Others (PORT-UA 403)

The notion of cannibalism is a recurring concern in the history of ideas regarding the primitive, the animalistic, the monstrous, or any of the other classifications frequently invoked to mark others, regardless of their actual culinary preferences. Reflection upon cannibalism as an intellectual phenomenon suggests how people eating people, or at least the possibility of it, says a great deal about those that do not. In some regions of the Caribbean and Brazil, ideas regarding cannibalism have made an important turn, such that the cannibal has become a provocative affirmation of self. The aim of this course is to think about cannibalism, not, as it often is, as a theme for anthropologists and ethnographers, but rather as an intellectual problem that has enjoyed a very long life in the history of ideas about self. In this course, we shall revisit a selection of texts regarding cannibalism from Columbus’ diaries to the present, and including works by, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Oswald de Andrade, Nelson Pereira dos Santos, and Suely Rolnik, in the company of some key notions involving postcolonial theory. Readings will be made available in Portuguese, Spanish, and English, and course papers may be carried out in any of the three languages according to student interest and ability.

Portuguese (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PORT-UA 403-000 (22046)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Robbins, Dylon

Intermed Portuguese II (PORT-UA 4)

Portuguese language courses PORT-UA 10, PORT-UA 3, and PORT-UA 4 are oriented toward achieving oral proficiency and are taught in the native language. The elementary-level course stresses the structures and patterns that permit meaningful communication and encourages spontaneous and practical proficiency outside the classroom. The intermediate-level courses aim to promote fluency in speaking, as well as proficiency in reading and writing. They include readings and discussions on contemporary Portuguese and Brazilian texts.

Portuguese (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PORT-UA 4-000 (9058)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kettner, Michele

Games, Strategy, and Politics (POL-UA 844)

Offered every year. 4 points. Theories of political strategy with emphasis on the theory of games. Uses of strategy in defense and deterrence policies of nations, guerrilla warfare of revolutionaries and terrorists, bargaining and negotiation processes, coalitions and the enforcement of collective action, and voting in committees and elections. Secrecy and deception as political strategies and uses of power, with some applications outside political science.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


POL-UA 844-000 (9366)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brams, Steven


POL-UA 844-000 (9369)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


POL-UA 844-000 (9370)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Politics of Poverty & Welfare (POL-UA 382)

Prerequisite: V53.0300. Offered in the spring. 4 points. Poverty and welfare problems in the United States and the controversies aroused by them. Concentrates on the causes of poverty and dependency among the controversial working-age poor, the history of programs and policies meant to help them, and the enormous impact these issues have had on national politics.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


POL-UA 382-000 (9662)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williams III, Napoleon

National Security (POL-UA 712)

Prerequisite: V53.0700. Offered every year. 4 points. Starting with the traditional arena of national security and U.S. military policy, students analyze how national security decisions are made in this country, as well as the past and current military strategies used to carry out those decisions. From there, students examine the particular national security concerns and policies of Russia, China, Germany, and Japan. This course also looks at new thinking on national security, asking to what extent international trade and competition, immigration, illegal drugs, and the environment should be considered national security issues.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2022)


POL-UA 712-000 (4407)
07/07/2022 – 08/17/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lutmar, Carmela


POL-UA 712-000 (5147)
07/07/2022 – 08/17/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lutmar, Carmela

Introduction to Research Methods for Politics (POL-UA 850)

New research is the most exciting and important aspect of political science: we are able to pose novel questions, construct fresh theories, and provide new evidence about the way the world works. But before we start doing research, we have to learn how it is done. With this in mind, this class will introduce students to quantitative techniques used for research in the study of politics. Part of this task is conceptual: helping students to think sensibly and systematically about research design. To this end, students will learn how data and theory fit together, and how to measure the quantities we care about. But part of the task is practical too: students will learn a `toolbox’ of methods–including statistical software–that enable them to execute their plans.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 850-000 (9156)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harvey, Anna


POL-UA 850-000 (9238)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by López Peceño, Alejandro


POL-UA 850-000 (9157)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by López Peceño, Alejandro


POL-UA 850-000 (9158)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pulejo, Massimo


POL-UA 850-000 (9159)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pulejo, Massimo


POL-UA 850-000 (9734)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Demin, Sasha


POL-UA 850-000 (25687)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Melnick, Justin

Politics of Near & Middle East (POL-UA 9540)

The course description for this Topics in Politics course varies depending on the topic taught. Please view the course descriptions in the course notes section below.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


POL-UA 9540-000 (3992)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Tue,Thu
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Segal, Hagai


POL-UA 9540-000 (20920)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Segal, Hagai

International Relations of Asia (POL-UA 770)

Identical to V33.0770. Prerequisite: V53.0700. Offered every other year. 4 points. The relations of and between the principal Asian national actors (e.g., China, Japan, India) and the relationship of the Asian “subsystem” to the international system. Covers the traditional Asian concepts of transnational order, the impact of external interventions, the modern ideological conflict and technological revolution, the emergent multilateral balance beyond Vietnam, the changing patterns of relations in the Asian subsystem traced to the international evolution from bipolarity to multicentrism, and the U.S. role in Asia.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 770-000 (10196)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hsiung, James

International Politics (POL-UA 700)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Analysis of state behavior and international political relations; how things happen in the international state system and why. Emphasizes the issue of war and how and in what circumstances states engage in violence. Topics include different historical and possible future systems of international relations, imperialism, the Cold War, game theory and deterrents, national interests, and world organization.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 700-000 (8260)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bueno De Mesquita, Bruce


POL-UA 700-000 (8261)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Becker, Michael


POL-UA 700-000 (8262)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Becker, Michael


POL-UA 700-000 (8263)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yildirim, Mikdat


POL-UA 700-000 (8264)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yildirim, Mikdat


POL-UA 700-000 (8265)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schwarz, Christopher


POL-UA 700-000 (8266)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schwarz, Christopher


POL-UA 700-000 (8267)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ge, Zoe


POL-UA 700-000 (9112)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ge, Zoe


POL-UA 700-000 (10194)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by MEDA, Francis William


POL-UA 700-000 (10195)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by MEDA, Francis William

Comparative Politics (POL-UA 500)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Major concepts, approaches, problems, and literature in the field of comparative politics. Methodology of comparative politics, the classical theories, and the more recent behavioral revolution. Reviews personality, social structure, socialization, political culture, and political parties. Major approaches such as group theory, structural-functionalism, systems analysis, and communications theory and evaluation of the relevance of political ideology; national character; elite and class analysis; and problems of conflict, violence, and internal war.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 500-000 (8257)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Slough, Tara


POL-UA 500-000 (8258)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Mark


POL-UA 500-000 (8259)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Mark


POL-UA 500-000 (10534)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Niu, He


POL-UA 500-000 (9210)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Niu, He


POL-UA 500-000 (9360)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by He, Ning


POL-UA 500-000 (9361)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by He, Ning


POL-UA 500-000 (25686)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cheng, Mengfan

Power & Politics in America (POL-UA 300)

A survey of national political institutions and behavior in the United States, which introduces students to a variety of analytical concepts and approaches useful for the study of domestic politics. Concepts typically covered include public goods and collective action; preference aggregation and the median voter theorem; delegation, representation, and accountability; agenda control; inter-branch bargaining; and the mechanisms of private influence on public policy.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 300-000 (8252)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dawes, Christopher Todd


POL-UA 300-000 (8253)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wirsching, Elisa


POL-UA 300-000 (8254)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, Lexi


POL-UA 300-000 (8255)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, Lexi


POL-UA 300-000 (8256)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wirsching, Elisa


POL-UA 300-000 (8796)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heo, Kun


POL-UA 300-000 (8797)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heo, Kun


POL-UA 300-000 (10192)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McGrath, David

Political Theory (POL-UA 100)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduces students to some outstanding theories of politics. The theories treated offer alternative conceptions of political life, and they are examined from both theoretical and historical perspectives. Among the theorists included are Plato, Aristotle, Locke, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Rousseau, Mill, and Marx.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 100-000 (9202)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pevnick, Ryan


POL-UA 100-000 (9203)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bose, Amartya


POL-UA 100-000 (9204)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bose, Amartya


POL-UA 100-000 (9205)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yi, Sophie


POL-UA 100-000 (9206)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yi, Sophie

Computational Physics (PHYS-UA 210)

Introduction to computational physics, with an emphasis on fields of current research interest where numerical techniques provide unique physical insight. Topics are chosen from various branches of physics, including numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations, eigenvalue problems, Monte Carlo methods in statistical mechanics, field theory, dynamical systems, and chaos.

Physics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHYS-UA 210-000 (8214)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sels, Dries


PHYS-UA 210-000 (8871)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Physics II (PHYS-UA 93)

Continuation of PHYS-UA 91. Topics include electrostatics; dielectrics; currents and circuits; the magnetic field and magnetic materials; induction; AC circuits; Maxwell’s equations.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8451)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hogg, David


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8452)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lant, Caspar


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8453)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lant, Caspar


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8454)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Dynamics (PHYS-UA 120)

Topics include conservation laws, central force motion, Lagrange’s and Hamilton’s equations, non-inertial frames, inertia tensor, rigid body dynamics, coupled oscillators and particles, eigenvalues, eigenvectors and normal modes.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHYS-UA 120-000 (9318)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moscatelli, Frank


PHYS-UA 120-000 (9319)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Loizeau, Nicolas


PHYS-UA 120-000 (9503)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Loizeau, Nicolas

General Physics II (PHYS-UA 12)

Continuation of PHYS-UA 11. Topics include electric charge, field, and potential; magnetic forces and fields; resistive, capacitive, and inductive circuits; electromagnetic induction; wave motion; electromagnetic waves; geometrical optics; interference, diffraction, and polarization of light; relativity; atomic and nuclear structure; elementary particle physics.

Physics (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10171)


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10172)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Somawanshi, Prajwal Prakshep


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10173)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (23490)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10175)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (23495)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10177)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10178)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10179)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10180)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10181)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10182)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10183)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Engstler, Justin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10184)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by La Madrid, Joan


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10185)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by La Madrid, Joan


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10186)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10187)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10188)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10642)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (25702)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Somawanshi, Prajwal Prakshep

Existentialism and Phenomenology (PHIL-UA 36)

Examines the characteristic method, positions, and themes of the existentialist and phenomenological movements and traces their development through study of such thinkers as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Sartre.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


PHIL-UA 36-000 (19900)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jauernig, Anja


PHIL-UA 36-000 (19901)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Barat, Alan


PHIL-UA 36-000 (19902)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Barat, Alan

History of Ancient Philosophy (PHIL-UA 20)

Examines some of the most important philosophical ideas and developments in Ancient Greece and Rome. Covers major writings by Plato and Aristotle, and a selection of writings by such thinkers as the Presocratics, Stoics, Epicureans, and Skeptics.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8864)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moss, Jessica


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8865)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lingle, Clara


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8866)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lingle, Clara


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8867)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beizaei, Banafsheh


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8868)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beizaei, Banafsheh

History of Modern Philosophy (PHIL-UA 21)

Examines some of the most important philosophical ideas and developments in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe. Covers some of the major writings of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, and Hume, and concludes with a brief examination of some aspects of Kant’s philosophy. (Kant is examined in more detail in PHIL-UA 30.) May also include writings of Hobbes, Malebranche, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Conway, Berkeley, and Shepherd, among others.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


PHIL-UA 21-000 (8744)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 21-000 (8745)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 21-000 (8746)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 21-000 (8747)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 21-000 (8748)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Consciousness (PHIL-UA 7)

Examines conceptual and empirical issues about consciousness. Issues covered may include the explanatory gap, the hard and harder problems of consciousness, concepts of consciousness, phenomenal concepts, the mind-body problem and neural correlates of consciousness, higher-order thought theories of consciousness, the inverted spectrum, views of phenomenality as representation, and arguments for dualism.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


PHIL-UA 7-000 (19756)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 7-000 (19771)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 7-000 (19772)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 7-000 (19773)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 7-000 (19774)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Advanced Logic (PHIL-UA 72)

An introduction to the basic concepts, methods, and results of metalogic, i.e., the formal study of systems of reasoning.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHIL-UA 72-000 (20815)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dorr, Cian


PHIL-UA 72-000 (20816)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Roth, Richard


PHIL-UA 72-000 (20817)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Roth, Richard

Global Ethics (PHIL-UA 6)

This course aims to accomplish two things. The first is to introduce three broad traditions of normative thinking about social issues from around the globe: a Confucian tradition, one based in Islamic legal traditions, and one derived from European liberalism. The second is to address three current areas of normative debate: about global economic inequality, about gender justice and human rights. We shall explore these first-order questions against the background of the three broad traditions. Our aim will be to understand some of differences of approach that shape the global conversation about these issues that concern people around the world.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20339)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Appiah, Kwame Anthony


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20340)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wu, Patrick


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20341)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wu, Patrick


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20342)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zacek, Justin


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20343)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zacek, Justin

Epistemology (PHIL-UA 76)

Considers questions such as the following: Can I have knowledge of anything outside my own mind?for example, physical objects or other minds? Or is the skeptic’s attack on my commonplace claims to know unanswerable? What is knowledge, and how does it differ from belief?

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHIL-UA 76-000 (20336)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Xueyin


PHIL-UA 76-000 (20337)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ballarini, Cristina


PHIL-UA 76-000 (20338)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ballarini, Cristina

Cellular & Molecular Neurobiology (NEURL-UA 210)

Lecture and laboratory course that provides students with broad exposure to current questions and experimental approaches in cellular neuroscience. Lectures and laboratories are organized into three areas: cell structure aLecture and laboratory course that provides students with broad exposure to current questions and experimental approaches in cellular neuroscience. Lectures and laboratories are organized into three areas: cell structure and organization of the vertebrate central nervous system, mechanisms underlying neural signaling and plasticity, and control of cell form and its developmental determinants. Laboratory instruction in anatomical, physiological, and biochemical methods for investigating the biology of nerve cells.

Neural Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


NEURL-UA 210-000 (9291)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aoki, Chiye · Shapley, Robert


NEURL-UA 210-000 (9292)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NEURL-UA 210-000 (9293)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NEURL-UA 210-000 (9343)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NEURL-UA 210-000 (10246)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cellular & Molecular Neurobiology Lab (NEURL-UA 211)

Lecture and laboratory course that provides students with broad exposure to current questions and experimental approaches in cellular neuroscience. Lectures and laboratories are organized into three areas: cell structure and organization of the vertebrate central nervous system, mechanisms underlying neural signaling and plasticity, and control of cell form and its developmental determinants. Laboratory instruction in anatomical, physiological, and biochemical methods for investigating the biology of nerve cells.

Neural Science (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


NEURL-UA 211-000 (8176)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aoki, Chiye · Shapley, Robert

Elements of Music (MUSIC-UA 20)

Explores the underlying principles and inner workings of the tonal system, a system that has guided all of Western music from the years 1600 to 1900. It includes a discussion of historical background and evolution. Focuses on concepts and notation of key, scale, tonality, and rhythm. Related skills in sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard harmony are stressed in the recitation sections.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MUSIC-UA 20-000 (8415)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ha, Moon Young


MUSIC-UA 20-000 (8416)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rose, Michael


MUSIC-UA 20-000 (8417)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rose, Michael

Music Theory I (MUSIC-UA 201)

Students study principles of tonal music composition including 18th and 19th century harmonic, formal, and contrapuntal practices. Exercises in four-part voice-leading and species counterpoint are supplemented by analyses of music from around the world and from a variety of genres, including concert and popular music. Weekly lab sections are devoted to skills in musicianship and are required throughout the sequence.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MUSIC-UA 201-000 (9130)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hoffman, Elizabeth


MUSIC-UA 201-000 (9132)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vlasis, Konstantine


MUSIC-UA 201-000 (9133)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vlasis, Konstantine

Politics of The Middle East (MEIS-UA 750)

Historical-political background of the Middle East and its contemporary social and political problems, including the impact of the West; religious and liberal reactions; conflict of nationalisms (Arab, Iranian, Turkish, and Zionist); and revolutionary socialism. Specific social, political, and economic problems?using a few selected countries for comparison and analysis?including the role of the military, the intelligentsia, the religious classes, the legitimization of power, urban-rural cleavages, bureaucracy, and political parties.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9142)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Keshavarzian, Arang


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9143)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bell, Robert


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9144)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by ODell, Kelley


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9145)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bell, Robert


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9146)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by ODell, Kelley

Intermediate Hindi I (MEIS-UA 407)

Designed to further develop fluency in oral and written communication. In addition to the class, small-group activities, and language and computer lab sessions, students are given an individual assignment to work with native speakers from the community and report on their findings. The reading assignments are designed to broaden understanding of content used for oral presentations.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 407-000 (8168)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhargava, Rajni


MEIS-UA 407-000 (10148)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ilieva, Gabriela Nik

Intermediate Urdu I (MEIS-UA 303)

Continues where Elementary Urdu leaves off. The students are introduced to literary texts. Along with specific language tasks, criticism and analysis now form part of the curriculum. Dictation, memorizing poetry, comprehension, and engaging in longer sessions of conversation form an important part of this course. By the end of this course, students should have achieved some fluency in reading literary texts, writing short essays, and carrying on a conversation.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 303-000 (8165)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Naqvi, Tahira

Intermediate Arabic I (MEIS-UA 103)

Builds on the skills acquired in Elementary Arabic I and II, with increased emphasis on writing and reading from modern sources, in addition to aural/oral proficiency.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 103-000 (8161)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Alnaemi, Ali


MEIS-UA 103-000 (8162)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Alnaemi, Ali


MEIS-UA 103-000 (8163)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Amani

Elementary Arabic I (MEIS-UA 101)

Builds basic skills in modern standard Arabic, the language read and understood by educated Arabs from Baghdad to Casablanca. Five hours per week of instruction and drills, stressing the proficiency approach, plus work in the language laboratory.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 101-000 (8158)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badawi, Ghada


MEIS-UA 101-000 (8159)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badawi, Ghada


MEIS-UA 101-000 (8160)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Amani


MEIS-UA 101-000 (25871)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Suliman, Anas

Vector Analysis (MATH-UA 224)

Brief review of multivariate calculus: partial derivatives, chain rule, Riemann integral, change of variables, line integrals. Lagrange multipliers. Inverse and implicit function theorems and their applications. Introduction to calculus on manifolds: definition and examples of manifolds, tangent vectors and vector fields, differential forms, exterior derivative, line integrals and integration of forms. Gauss’ and Stokes’ theorems on manifolds.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


MATH-UA 224-000 (8661)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 224-000 (8662)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Honors Calculus III (MATH-UA 129)

The scope of this honors class will include the usual MATH-UA 123 syllabus; however this class will move faster, covering additional topics and going deeper. Functions of several variables. Vectors in the plane and space. Partial derivatives with applications, especially Lagrange multipliers. Double and triple integrals. Spherical and cylindrical coordinates. Surface and line integrals. Divergence, gradient, and curl. Theorem of Gauss and Stokes.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 129-000 (9309)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Serfaty, Sylvia

Honors Analysis II (MATH-UA 329)

Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in Honors Analysis I (MATH-UA 328), or a grade of A in Analysis (MATH-UA 325) and permission of instructor. Continuation of Honors Analysis I (MATH-UA 328). Topics include: metric spaces, differentiation of functions of several real variables, the implicit and inverse function theorems, Riemann integral on R^n, Lebesgue measure on R^n, the Lebesgue integral.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 329-000 (8889)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gunturk, C Sinan


MATH-UA 329-000 (8890)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mui, Stephanie

Honors Algebra II (MATH-UA 349)

Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in Honors Algebra I (MATH-UA 348), or a grade of A in Algebra (MATH-UA 343) and permission of instructor. Principal ideal domains, polynomial rings in several variables, unique factorization domains. Fields, finite extensions, constructions with ruler and compass, Galois theory, solvability by radicals.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 349-000 (8887)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goodman, Jonathan


MATH-UA 349-000 (8888)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Charyyev, Jumageldi

Introduction to Fluid Dynamics (MATH-UA 230)

Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in Calculus III (MATH-UA 123) or Math for Economics III (MATH-UA 213) (for economics majors). Recommended: Mathematical Physics (PHYS-UA 106). Fluid dynamics is the branch of physics that can describe the flow of blood in the human body, the flight of an insect, or the motions of weather systems. Key concepts include: the formalism of continuum mechanics; the conservation of mass, energy, and momentum in a fluid; the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations; and viscosity and vorticity. These concepts are applied to such classic problems in fluid dynamics as potential flow around a cylinder, the propagation of sound and gravity waves, and the onset of instability in shear flow.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 230-000 (8755)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sreenivasan, Katepalli Raju


MATH-UA 230-000 (8802)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 230-000 (25084)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dsa, Remston

Mathematics for Economics III (MATH-UA 213)

Further topics in vector calculus. Vector spaces, matrix analysis. Linear and nonlinear programming with applications to game theory. This course will provide economics students who have taken MATH-UA 211 Mathematics for Economics I and MATH-UA 212 Mathematics for Economics II with the tools to take higher-level mathematics courses.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 213-000 (8764)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Majmudar, Trushant S.


MATH-UA 213-000 (8765)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kreiner, Aaron


MATH-UA 213-000 (8766)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kreiner, Aaron


MATH-UA 213-000 (10146)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 213-000 (25303)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Normand, Raoul


MATH-UA 213-000 (25304)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chen, Zhe


MATH-UA 213-000 (25305)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chen, Zhe

Algebra (MATH-UA 343)

Introduction to abstract algebraic structures, including groups, rings, and fields. Sets and relations. Congruences and unique factorization of integers. Groups, permutation groups, homomorphisms and quotient groups. Rings and quotient rings, Euclidean rings, polynomial rings. Fields, finite extensions.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 343-000 (8402)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pigati, Alessandro


MATH-UA 343-000 (8403)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cortes, Julian


MATH-UA 343-000 (8756)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chiarelli, John


MATH-UA 343-000 (8757)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cortes, Julian

Analysis (MATH-UA 325)

This course is an introduction to rigorous analysis on the real line. Topics include: the real number system, sequences and series of numbers, functions of a real variable (continuity and differentiability), the Riemann integral, basic topological notions in a metric space, sequences and series of functions including Taylor and Fourier series.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 325-000 (8400)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by De Philippis, Guido


MATH-UA 325-000 (8401)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Peilen, Luke


MATH-UA 325-000 (10138)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Peilen, Luke


MATH-UA 325-000 (10139)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Weilin


MATH-UA 325-000 (10140)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beekie, Raj


MATH-UA 325-000 (10141)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beekie, Raj


MATH-UA 325-000 (10135)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cao, Yu


MATH-UA 325-000 (10136)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hess-Childs, Elias


MATH-UA 325-000 (10137)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hess-Childs, Elias


MATH-UA 325-000 (10627)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Weilin


MATH-UA 325-000 (10628)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Semenov, Vadim


MATH-UA 325-000 (10629)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Semenov, Vadim

Computers in Medicine & Biology (MATH-UA 256)

Introduces the student of biology or mathematics to the use of computers as tools for modeling physiological phenomena. The student constructs two computer models selected from the following list: circulation, gas exchange in the lung, control of cell volume, and the renal countercurrent mechanism. The student then uses the model to conduct simulated physiological experiments.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 256-000 (20798)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Peskin, Charles


MATH-UA 256-000 (20799)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Maxian, Ondrej

Chaos & Dynamical Systems (MATH-UA 264)

Topics include fixed points of one-dimensional maps; linear operators and linear approximations; stability and bifurcation; logistic maps. Cantor set, fractal sets, symbolic dynamics, conjugacy of maps. Dynamics in two dimensions. Introduction for students with little preparation to the recent discovery that, in certain regimes, fully deterministic mechanics can produce chaotic behavior.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 264-000 (8396)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ampatzoglou, Ioakeim


MATH-UA 264-000 (8397)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Guanchun

Numerical Analysis (MATH-UA 252)

In numerical analysis one explores how mathematical problems can be analyzed and solved with a computer. As such, numerical analysis has very broad applications in mathematics, physics, engineering, finance, and the life sciences. This course introduces the subject for mathematics majors. Theory and practical examples using Matlab are combined in the studying of topics ranging from simple root-finding procedures to differential equations and the finite element method.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 252-000 (8390)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 252-000 (8391)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 252-000 (9168)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stadler, Georg


MATH-UA 252-000 (9169)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Toler, Evan


MATH-UA 252-000 (9405)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Potter, Samuel


MATH-UA 252-000 (9406)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Martinez Aguilar, Mariana

Theory of Numbers (MATH-UA 248)

Divisibility and prime numbers. Linear and quadratic congruences. The classical number-theoretic functions. Continued fractions. Diophantine equations.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 248-000 (10470)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Staccone, Matteo


MATH-UA 248-000 (10471)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Feuer, Benjamin

Probability & Statistics (MATH-UA 235)

Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in Calculus II (MATH-UA 122) or Math for Economics II (MATH-UA 212) (for economics majors) or equivalent. Not open to students who have taken Theory of Probability (MATH-UA 233) or Mathematical Statistics (MATH-UA 234). Combination of MATH-UA 233 and 234 at a more elementary level to acquaint students with both probability and statistics in a single term. In probability: mathematical treatment of chance; combinatorics; binomial, Poisson, and Gaussian distributions; law of large numbers and the normal distribution; application to coin-tossing; radioactive decay. In statistics: sampling; normal and other useful distributions; testing of hypotheses; confidence intervals; correlation and regression; applications to scientific, industrial, and financial data.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 235-000 (8384)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cerfon, Antoine


MATH-UA 235-000 (8385)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vasantha, Rajashekar


MATH-UA 235-000 (10585)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vasantha, Rajashekar


MATH-UA 235-000 (20795)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Falconet, Hugo


MATH-UA 235-000 (20796)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Sixian


MATH-UA 235-000 (20797)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Sixian


MATH-UA 235-000 (26181)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Doshi, Jash Tejaskumar

Theory of Probability (MATH-UA 233)

Introduction to the mathematical techniques of random phenomena occurring in the natural, physical, and social sciences. Axioms of mathematical probability, combinatorial analysis, binomial distribution, Poisson and normal approximation, random variables and probability distributions, generating functions, Markov chains, applications.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 233-000 (8695)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tanzi, Matteo


MATH-UA 233-000 (8696)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Linfeng


MATH-UA 233-000 (8885)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leibovich, Matan


MATH-UA 233-000 (9078)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Liudeng


MATH-UA 233-000 (10636)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dunlap, Alexander


MATH-UA 233-000 (10638)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Liudeng


MATH-UA 233-000 (19808)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Stepp, Elizabeth


MATH-UA 233-000 (19809)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Zhang, Linfeng


MATH-UA 233-000 (26180)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Doshi, Jash Tejaskumar

Mathematical Statistics (MATH-UA 234)

Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in Theory of Probability (MATH-UA 233) or equivalent. Not open to students who have taken Probability and Statistics (MATH-UA 235). Introduction to the mathematical foundations and techniques of modern statistical analysis used in the interpretation of data in quantitative sciences. Mathematical theory of sampling; normal populations and distributions; chi-square, t, and F distributions; hypothesis testing; estimation; confidence intervals; sequential analysis; correlation, regression, and analysis of variance. Applications to the sciences.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 234-000 (8382)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nitzschner, Maximilian


MATH-UA 234-000 (8383)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Plotkin, Ted


MATH-UA 234-000 (9440)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dies, Erik


MATH-UA 234-000 (9441)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Plotkin, Ted

Calculus III (MATH-UA 123)

Prerequisite: MATH-UA.0122 with a grade of C or better, departmental placement exam, or permission of the department. Functions of several variables. Vectors in the plane and space. Partial derivatives with applications. Double and triple integrals. Spherical and cylindrical coordinates. Surface and line integrals. Divergence, gradient, and curl. Theorem of Gauss and Stokes.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 123-000 (8378)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Normand, Raoul


MATH-UA 123-000 (9179)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ristroph, Leif


MATH-UA 123-000 (9180)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Shizhu


MATH-UA 123-000 (8379)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Shizhu


MATH-UA 123-000 (8380)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leingang, Matthew


MATH-UA 123-000 (24839)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Linear Algebra (MATH-UA 140)

Systems of linear equations. Gaussian elimination, matrices, determinants, and Cramer?s rule. Vectors, vector spaces, basis and dimension, linear transformations. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, quadratic forms.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 140-000 (8381)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hammoud, Naima


MATH-UA 140-000 (10125)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qi, Sihan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10126)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qi, Sihan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10127)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Jiarui


MATH-UA 140-000 (10128)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Jiarui


MATH-UA 140-000 (8986)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sia, Charmaine


MATH-UA 140-000 (10129)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Xuenan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10130)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Xuenan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10131)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kotwal, Adit


MATH-UA 140-000 (10132)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kotwal, Adit


MATH-UA 140-000 (10120)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Shizhu


MATH-UA 140-000 (10121)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yap, Ted


MATH-UA 140-000 (10122)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yap, Ted


MATH-UA 140-000 (10123)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stempel, Jordan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10124)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Frank, Natalie


MATH-UA 140-000 (9777)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hammoud, Naima


MATH-UA 140-000 (10469)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Denis, Evan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10468)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harrington, Jeremiah

Calculus II (MATH-UA 122)

Techniques of integration. Further applications. Plane analytic geometry. Polar coordinates and parametric equations. Infinite series, including power series.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 122-000 (8373)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sondjaja, Mutiara


MATH-UA 122-000 (8374)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 122-000 (8375)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shum, Fanny


MATH-UA 122-000 (8376)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sondjaja, Mutiara


MATH-UA 122-000 (8377)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Feklistova, Mariya


MATH-UA 122-000 (8677)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Feklistova, Mariya


MATH-UA 122-000 (10117)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flek, Ruslan


MATH-UA 122-000 (10118)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shum, Fanny


MATH-UA 122-000 (24841)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kalaycioglu, Selin

Discrete Mathematics (MATH-UA 120)

A first course in discrete mathematics. Sets, algorithms, and induction. Combinatorics. Graphs and trees. Combinatorial circuits. Logic and Boolean algebra.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 120-000 (8370)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sia, Charmaine


MATH-UA 120-000 (8371)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flek, Ruslan


MATH-UA 120-000 (8372)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flek, Ruslan


MATH-UA 120-000 (8694)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chikhany, Ralph


MATH-UA 120-000 (8807)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 120-000 (8985)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leingang, Matthew


MATH-UA 120-000 (9437)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sanfratello, Andrew


MATH-UA 120-000 (9476)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sanfratello, Andrew


MATH-UA 120-000 (10639)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chikhany, Ralph


MATH-UA 120-000 (24840)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Oveys, Hesam


MATH-UA 120-000 (24904)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Oveys, Hesam


MATH-UA 120-000 (26350)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Clarkson, Corrin


MATH-UA 120-000 (26380)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Clarkson, Corrin

Calculus I (MATH-UA 121)

Any one of the following: a score of 670 or higher on the mathematics portion of the SAT, a score of 650 or higher on the SAT Subject Test in Mathematics 1, a score of 650 or higher on the SAT Subject Test in Mathematics 2, an ACT mathematics score of 30 or higher, a score of 3 or higher on the AP Calculus AB exam, an AB subscore of 3 or higher on the AP Calculus BC exam, a score of 3 or higher on the AP Calculus BC exam, a grade of C or higher in Algebra and Calculus (MATH-UA 9), or a passing score on a departmental placement exam. Derivatives, antiderivatives, and integrals of functions of one variable. Applications include graphing, maximizing, and minimizing functions. Definite integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Areas and volumes.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 121-000 (10098)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kalaycioglu, Selin


MATH-UA 121-000 (10099)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saha, Shuvadeep


MATH-UA 121-000 (10100)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saha, Shuvadeep


MATH-UA 121-000 (20793)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patki, Sarvesh


MATH-UA 121-000 (20794)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patki, Sarvesh


MATH-UA 121-000 (10102)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Foster, Joseph


MATH-UA 121-000 (10103)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Agostino, Marina


MATH-UA 121-000 (10104)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Agostino, Marina


MATH-UA 121-000 (10105)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Salha, Fatima


MATH-UA 121-000 (10106)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Salha, Fatima


MATH-UA 121-000 (10107)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sia, Charmaine


MATH-UA 121-000 (10108)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vasantha, Rajashekar


MATH-UA 121-000 (10109)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Star, Zachary


MATH-UA 121-000 (10110)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vasantha, Rajashekar


MATH-UA 121-000 (10111)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Star, Zachary


MATH-UA 121-000 (10112)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Foster, Joseph


MATH-UA 121-000 (10113)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cortes, Julian


MATH-UA 121-000 (10114)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cortes, Julian


MATH-UA 121-000 (10115)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gangan, Pradyuman


MATH-UA 121-000 (10116)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gangan, Pradyuman

Algebra and Calculus (MATH-UA 9)

Prerequisite: Three years of high school math or permission of the department. An intensive course in intermediate algebra and trigonometry. Topics include algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their graphs.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 9-000 (8365)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Foster, Joseph


MATH-UA 9-000 (8366)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Haosheng


MATH-UA 9-000 (8367)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Haosheng


MATH-UA 9-000 (8368)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sivakumar, Pranav Kamesh


MATH-UA 9-000 (8369)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sivakumar, Pranav Kamesh

Romance Syntax (LING-UA 42)

Introduces the syntax of Romance languages, primarily French, Italian, and Spanish, but also various Romance dialects. Considers what they have in common with each other (and with English) and how best to characterize the ways in which they differ from each other (and from English).

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


LING-UA 42-000 (18682)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kayne, Richard

Grammatical Diversity (LING-UA 27)

Introduces the syntax of languages quite different from English, from various parts of the world. Considers what they may have in common with English and with each other and how to characterize the ways in which they differ from English and from each other.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


LING-UA 27-000 (19064)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Thoms, Gary · Kayne, Richard

Language Change (LING-UA 14)

The methods of genealogical classification and subgrouping of languages. Examines patterns of replacement in phonology, morphology, and syntax. Focuses on internal and comparative phonological, morphological, and syntactic reconstruction. Considers phonological developments such as Grimm’s, Grassmann’s, and Verner’s Laws.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


LING-UA 14-000 (10088)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Grammatical Analysis II (LING-UA 16)

Introduces primary literature in syntactic theory and leads to an independent research project. Topics vary: binding theory, control, case theory, constraints on movement, antisymmetry, argument structure and applicatives, ellipsis, derivation by phase, etc.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


LING-UA 16-000 (19354)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harves, Stephanie · Kayne, Richard

Language and Mind (LING-UA 3)

Introduces the field of cognitive science through an examination of language behavior. Begins with interactive discussions of how best to characterize and study the mind. These principles are then illustrated through an examination of research and theories related to language representation and use. Draws from research in both formal linguistics and psycholinguistics.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


LING-UA 3-000 (8921)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cournane, Ailis · McElree, Brian


LING-UA 3-000 (8922)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grosu, Ioana


LING-UA 3-000 (8923)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flower, Nigel

Sound and Language (LING-UA 11)

Phonetic and phonological theory at an elementary level. Topics include the description and analysis of speech sounds, the anatomy and physiology of speech, speech acoustics, and phonological processes. Students develop skills to distinguish and produce sounds used in the languages of the world and to transcribe them using the International Phonetic Alphabet.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


LING-UA 11-000 (8045)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Davidson, Lisa


LING-UA 11-000 (8046)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


LING-UA 11-000 (8047)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Repetti-Ludlow, Chiara

Language in Latin America (LING-UA 30)

How and why American varieties of Spanish and Portuguese differ from European varieties, as well as the distribution and nature of dialect differences throughout the Americas. Examines sociolinguistic issues: class and ethnic differences in language, the origin and development of standard and nonstandard varieties, and the effects of contact with Amerindian and African languages. Considers Spanish- and Portuguese-based creoles and the question of prior creolization.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LING-UA 30-000 (10062)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Guy, Gregory


LING-UA 30-000 (10063)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stuck, Matthew

Advanced Semantics (LING-UA 19)

Builds a solid command of predicate logic and elements of the lambda calculus. Introduces the principles of compositional model theoretic semantics. Analyzes constituent order and a set of specific phenomena, possibly varying from year to year.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LING-UA 19-000 (20307)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Szabolcsi, Anna

Language (LING-UA 1)

Language is a social phenomenon, but languages share elaborate and specific structural properties. Speech communities exist, exhibit variation, and change within the strict confines of universal grammar, part of our biological endowment. Universal grammar is discovered through the careful study of the structures of individual languages, by cross-linguistic investigations, and the investigation of the brain. Introduces fundamental properties of the sound system and of the structure and interpretation of words and sentences against this larger context.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LING-UA 1-000 (8354)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Champollion, Lucas


LING-UA 1-000 (8355)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grosu, Ioana


LING-UA 1-000 (8356)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Okon, Thaddeus


LING-UA 1-000 (9146)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Thoms, Gary


LING-UA 1-000 (9147)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Blix, Hagen


LING-UA 1-000 (9148)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhao, Zhuoye

Elementary Haitian Kreyòl II (LATC-UA 122)

A continuation of Elementary Haitian Kreyòl I, this course develops student’s speaking, reading, and writing skills in Haitian Kreyòl, also called Creole. Haitian Kreyòl is spoken by Haiti’s population of nine million and by about one million Haitians in the U.S. including over 190,000 in the New York City area. In fact, New York City has the second largest population of Kreyòl speakers after Port-au-Prince, Haiti’s capital. We use a communicative approach, balanced with grammatical and phonetic techniques. Classroom and textbook materials are complemented by work with film, radio, and music, as well as with visits to city museums and institutions related to Haiti. At the end of the course, students will be better able to conduct a conversation in Haitian Kreyòl and have a better command of Haitian vocabulary and grammar within a relevant cultural context.

Latin Amer-Caribbean Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LATC-UA 122-000 (9077)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lamour, Wynnie


LATC-UA 122-000 (10249)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lamour, Wynnie

Journalistic Inquiry (JOUR-UA 101)

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


JOUR-UA 101-000 (8499)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


JOUR-UA 101-000 (8500)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


JOUR-UA 101-000 (8501)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


JOUR-UA 101-000 (9497)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


JOUR-UA 101-000 (24012)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


JOUR-UA 101-000 (25389)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


JOUR-UA 101-000 (25832)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Adv Reporting: (JOUR-UA 301)

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


JOUR-UA 301-000 (9062)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Newkirk, Pamela


JOUR-UA 301-000 (10023)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Swarns, Rachel


JOUR-UA 301-000 (8962)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Maloney, Jason

Production & Publication (JOUR-UA 9302)

The course focuses on combining the creative techniques of fiction with the rigor of journalistic travel writing to produce stories about Prague (not only) that move beyond the constraints of the news and feature story: stories that engage, resonate with readers, provide insight – stories which “produce the emotion”. The course proceeds by the reading and analysis of important contemporary journalism and classic travel pieces: examination of the narrative; fictional and literary devices used in travel writing; examination of and practice with various information gathering strategies; humor; point of view; unique voice. Distinguished Czech travel writers/journalists/photographers will be invited as guest lecturers.

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


JOUR-UA 9302-000 (4159)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Bednarova, Veronika

Conversations in Italian (ITAL-UA 9101)

Students entering the course should have mastered the fundamental structure of Italian. The course is designed to help students gain confidence and increase their effectiveness in speaking present-day Italian. Through discussions, oral reports, and readings, students develop vocabulary in a variety of topics, improve pronunciation, and learn an extensive range of idiomatic expressions. Conducted in Italian.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


ITAL-UA 9101-000 (2594)
05/21/2024 – 07/01/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by

Advanced Review of Modern Italian (ITAL-UA 30)

This course is a prerequisite for other advanced courses in language, literature, and culture and society. Systematizes and reinforces the language skills presented in earlier-level courses through an intensive review of grammar and composition, lexical enrichment, improvement of speaking ability, and selected readings from contemporary Italian literature.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ITAL-UA 30-000 (9092)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Perna, Joseph


ITAL-UA 30-000 (20635)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Marchelli, Chiara

Intermediate Italian II (ITAL-UA 12)

Continuation of ITAL-UA 11. To fulfill MAP requirements and continue on to the postintermediate level, a student must complete both ITAL-UA 11 and ITAL-UA 12. This sequence is equivalent to ITAL-UA 20.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ITAL-UA 12-000 (8347)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sebastiani, Concetta


ITAL-UA 12-000 (9320)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Curtoni, Chiara


ITAL-UA 12-000 (8348)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Perna, Joseph

Elementary Italian II (ITAL-UA 2)

Continuation of ITAL-UA 1. To continue on to the intermediate level, a student must complete both ITAL-UA 1 and ITAL-UA 2. This sequence is equivalent to ITAL-UA 10.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ITAL-UA 2-000 (8948)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Graves, Karen


ITAL-UA 2-000 (9199)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ducci, Elena


ITAL-UA 2-000 (8949)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Graves, Karen


ITAL-UA 2-000 (8623)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rinaldi, Tiziana


ITAL-UA 2-000 (8624)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scarcella Perino, Roberto


ITAL-UA 2-000 (20633)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bresciani, Laura


ITAL-UA 2-000 (9537)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sebastiani, Concetta

Elementary Italian I (ITAL-UA 1)

Open to students with no previous training in Italian and to others on assignment by placement test.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ITAL-UA 1-000 (8344)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gold, Eva


ITAL-UA 1-000 (9090)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Battaglia, Marco


ITAL-UA 1-000 (8345)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stemwedel, Nina Fiona


ITAL-UA 1-000 (8346)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scarcella Perino, Roberto


ITAL-UA 1-000 (25928)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Curtoni, Chiara


ITAL-UA 1-000 (9536)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sebastiani, Concetta

Financial Accounting (MG-UY 2204)

This course provides a solid foundation in constructing and interpreting financial statements. Topics include: accounting terminology, financial-statement preparation and analysis, liquidity and credit-risk ratios, depreciation calculations, revenue recognition, accrued liabilities and asset valuation. Also covered are the effects of equity transactions, cash flows and various accounting methods on financial statements.

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 2204-000 (14066)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by TALISSE, EDWARD


MG-UY 2204-000 (14067)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kohli, Ashish

East Asian Cultures (EAGC-UF 101)

This course introduces East Asian cultures, focusing to a greater or lesser extent on China, Japan, and Korea. Aspects of East Asia?s traditional and modern culture are presented by study of some of the area?s Great Books, as well as other literary, political, philosophical, religious and/or artistic works from the traditional, modern, or contemporary periods. Issues raised may include national or cultural This course introduces East Asian cultures, focusing to a greater or lesser extent on China, Japan, and Korea. Aspects of East Asia?s traditional and modern culture are presented by study of some of the area?s Great Books, as well as other literary, political, philosophical, religious and/or artistic works from the traditional, modern, or contemporary periods. Issues raised may include national or cultural identity in relation to colonialism/imperialism, East-West tensions, modernism?s clash with tradition, the persistence of tradition with the modern, the East Asian Diaspora, and the question of East Asian modernities.

East Asian Cultures- Global Cultures (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAGC-UF 101-000 (19791)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chandler, Jeannine


EAGC-UF 101-000 (13268)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chandler, Jeannine


EAGC-UF 101-000 (13269)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chandler, Jeannine

Perception and the Brain (CCEX-SHU 122)

“How do humans and other animals obtain knowledge about the world? It is easy to take perception for granted, but complex processes (only partly understood) underlie our ability to understand the world by seeing, hearing, feeling, tasting, and smelling it. This is not because the scientific study of perception is new. In fact, perception has fascinated philosophers, physicists, and physiologists for centuries. Currently, perception is a central topic in psychology, cognitive science, computer science, and neuroscience. How do scientists approach perception? We seek to discover lawful relations between perceptual experiences and the physical world and to develop models of the processes and mechanisms in the brain that produce these connections. In this course, in the lectures, we will discuss fundamental problems in perception (primarily vision), and in the lab sessions, you will learn about standard experimental methods and their use in the study of perceptual processes and to give you first-hand experience in conducting original research. As part of these activities you will learn to write experimental reports and to think critically about the relation between theory and experiment. You will also be exposed to the use of computers in perception research. Indeed, there will be considerable use of computers in the course, with part of the goal being to provide you with basic computer skills.” Prereq: None Fulfillment: CORE ED

Exper Discovery in Nat World (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CCEX-SHU 122-000 (23960)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Li, Li


CCEX-SHU 122-000 (23961)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Li, Li

Intro to Sociology (SOC-UA 1)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Survey of the field of sociology: its basic concepts, theories, and research orientation. Threshold course that provides the student with insights into the social factors in human life. Topics include social interaction, socialization, culture, social structure, stratification, political power, deviance, social institutions, and social change.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


SOC-UA 1-000 (20398)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Morning, Ann


SOC-UA 1-000 (20399)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martin-Caughey, Ananda


SOC-UA 1-000 (20400)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Um, Sejin


SOC-UA 1-000 (20401)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nelson, Christina


SOC-UA 1-000 (20420)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sieffert, Claire


SOC-UA 1-000 (20403)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martin-Caughey, Ananda


SOC-UA 1-000 (20404)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sieffert, Claire


SOC-UA 1-000 (20405)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cera, Michelle


SOC-UA 1-000 (20406)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Um, Sejin


SOC-UA 1-000 (20407)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nelson, Christina


SOC-UA 1-000 (20408)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cera, Michelle

Logic (PHIL-UA 70)

An introduction to the basic techniques of sentential and predicate logic. Students learn how to put arguments from ordinary language into symbols, how to construct derivations within a formal system, and how to ascertain validity using truth tables or models.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHIL-UA 70-000 (8448)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Peluce, Vincent


PHIL-UA 70-000 (8449)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Peluce, Vincent


PHIL-UA 70-000 (9185)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gomez, Veronica