Playful Performance Props (COART-UT 505)

In this class, we’ll learn TouchDesigner, a powerful software hub for live audiovisual content, and control it with DIY props and digital interfaces that we’ll build to connect to our art directly from the stage. With a cutting-edge buffet of inputs and outputs at our disposal, what new, evolved, or remixed types of performance can we create? If you’re a musician, you’ll build and play instruments that didn’t exist before. If you’re a dancer, your movements will become the music and visuals, instead of the other way around. If you’re a filmmaker, you’ll shoot a real-life scene with a virtual camera or light a physical set with real-time VFX. If you’re a visual artist, you’ll warp color, distort images, and push pixels to the brink of destruction. If you’re all of the above, you’ll have fun in this class. To connect to TouchDesigner, we’ll build hardware props using Arduinos, tiny computers that we can hook up sensors, buttons, and LEDs to, and create unique thematic interfaces that augment our performances and interactive installations. Weekly assignments explore AI tools, electronic circuits, fabrication, camera input and livestreams, 3D models and procedural animation, and more. Midway through the semester we’ll begin performing live using our connected props for DJ/VJing and projection-mapped interactive spaces, with the class culminating in a final public performance bringing together the best of student work. No previous coding or performance experience necessary. There is a lab fee for the hardware we’ll use to build our devices.

Collaborative Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


COART-UT 505-000 (17885)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Luhrs, August

The Business of Nonprofit Management (UPADM-GP 242)

This course is a general introduction to nonprofit management, with heavy emphasis on practical application. How do not-for-profit organizations actually function? How do they attract “customers?” How do these companies grow when there are no owners with financial incentives to grow the business? What are the core elements of a “good” not-for-profit company? What are the metrics for determining the health of a company without profit? And, what, exactly does not-for-profit even mean?

UG Public and Nonprofit Management and Policy (Graduate)
4 credits – 5 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


UPADM-GP 242-000 (3459)
07/08/2024 – 08/12/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by Nawabi, Aniqa


UPADM-GP 242-000 (3460)
07/08/2024 – 08/12/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by Niemann, Alyson


UPADM-GP 242-000 (3458)
07/08/2024 – 08/12/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by Nawabi, Aniqa


UPADM-GP 242-000 (3461)
07/08/2024 – 08/12/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by Niemann, Alyson

Global Fashion Industry: Britain (PRACT-UG 9250)

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON: The Global Fashion Industry and British Fashion aims to introduce fashion history and theory in its contemporary social and cultural context. The course will examine various aspects of the fashion industry and offer an understanding of critical concepts such as social identity, consumer culture and globalization. Students will explore aspects of the British fashion industry, including fashion media, retail environments, fashion exhibitions and the impact of sub and counter culture.

Practicum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PRACT-UG 9250-000 (4039)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Khan, Nathalie

Digital Media: Context and Practice (MCC-UE 1031)

This course offers students a foundational understanding of the technological building blocks that make up digital media & culture, & of the ways they come together to shape myriad facets of life. Students will acquire a working knowledge of the key concepts behind coding, & survey the contours of digital media architecture, familiarizing themselves with algorithms, databases, hardware, & similar key components. These technological frameworks will be examined as the basic grammar of digital media & related to theories of identity, privacy, policy, & other pertinent themes.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1031-000 (14053)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by Santos, Leonard

Performing Online (ITPG-GT 3022)

This course explores the ways that we perform on and for the Internet. We’ll take a look at how artists have used social media, live-streaming, and multi-user online spaces as a site for performance. Students will conduct their own interventions with the web as a virtual stage. Note: Performance is a broad and amorphous term! You are encouraged to take this course even if you do not consider yourself a performer or someone who wants to be in front of a camera.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3022-000 (15731)
10/28/2024 – 12/09/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Soto, Amalia

Editing I (FMTV-UT 1016)

This is a hands-on course designed to introduce the student to narrative and documentary editing techniques, and to the role of the editor in shaping the final form of film and video productions. Good editing is crucial to the success of every film and video. This class is recommended to students pursuing directing or producing who want a better understanding of how the post-production workflow functions, as well as to any student, from sophomore to senior, who would like to gain a clearer understanding of the role of the editor as an artist, a technician and a collaborator. To achieve this, the class will delve into the methods, objectives, and technical aspects of post-production. It will thoroughly explore two major editing programs (Avid Media Composer and Adobe Premiere Pro) used in today’s professional post-production environment, and acquaint the student with every stage of the editing workflow from capture to final output. Students will learn to approach these and other non-linear programs as variations on common themes rather than as completely new and foreign tools. In addition, the class will present examples of edited sequences from both narrative and documentary films for discussion, and have invited guests who will share their experiences in bringing films to completion. There will also be a course pack of assigned readings. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19414)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lewis, Emir


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19415)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Frank


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19416)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lewis, Emir


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19417)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pollard, Jason


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19418)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Weinstein, Yonatan

Portrait of an Artist: Walter Murch (OART-UT 901)

This course examines the artistic career and creative work of Walter Murch, Oscar-winning film editor and sound designer, and the first and only artist to win Academy Awards for both film editing and sound mixing on a single film (The English Patient, 1997). The class will provide an unprecedented inside look into Mr. Murch’s processes of sound designing, editing, mixing, writing, and directing on such acclaimed and memorable films as THX 1138, American Graffiti, The Conversation, Apocalypse Now, The Godfather, Return to Oz, The English Patient, Touch of Evil, and Cold Mountain. Through interviews, articles, and materials from his private archives never before publicly available, students learn about the creative world of an artist who has brought the importance of sound and editing to a new level. In addition to his work in film and his inventions used in the filmmaking process, two additional areas of interest of Mr. Murch will be examined: translations of Curzio Malaparte’s writings and his passion for astronomy. Mr. Murch will participate on several occasions in the course as a guest lecturer by visiting the class and/or via video conferencing.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


OART-UT 901-000 (15488)09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Zivkovic, Brane

Experiential Learning Seminar: Fashion Industry: Creativity & Business (MULT-UB 104)

Fashion companies, as business entities, have always been faced with balancing technological and operational necessities with creative and imaginative artistry. Today, this challenge is even more difficult to manage, as the industry’s traditional modes of operation (e.g. a multitude of physical retail locations, seasonally driven creation & distribution of products, near total dependency on foreign production, and the producer’s sense of fashion trend entitlement) has given way to omnichannel retailing, merchandise “drops” and smaller collections, reimagining production systems (aka “Supply Chains”)and the ascendency of the consumer as the controlling factor in confirming fashion trends and determining market outcomes, to name just a few of the disruptive changes. This has been underscored by the industry struggling to contain its role as a major source of global pollution, and global warming. The ESG/CSR Sustainability challenge has intensified Fashion’s need to manage these disruptive changes and incorporate new operational modes while, in the same space and time, embracing the new digital ways of thinking about business and fashion, including the impact of the Metaverse, NFT’s, Blockchain and virtual try-on processes and platforms. This course and this class is charged with finding new, untried but business-driven, solutions to these challenges placed within the Sustainability context.

Multidisciplinary (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


MULT-UB 104-000 (10943)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carr, Jeffrey

Craft & Commerce of Cinema: Tribeca Film Fest (MKTG-UB 51)

This is a specialized EMT course, designed in coordination with the Tribeca Film Festival Board, that provides students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of the global film industry including the complete film production process from crafting the idea for a script, hiring or becoming a producer, financing the project, selling it to a studio or independent production company, building a team, production elements, post-production including music acquisition, and the selling or distribution to a global marketplace. The course includes learning about distribution and exhibition, marketing and building audience awareness, research applications, international licensing, and preparation for careers in the industry. Students attend and fully participate in the panels offered during the two week period of the Tribeca Film Festival.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MKTG-UB 51-000 (10655)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

History of French Philosophy (PHIL-UA 9026)

An overview of important developments in French philosophy from the 16th century to the 1950s. We will look at the epistemological and metaphysical debates that followed the rediscovery of Ancient philosophy and the Copernican revolution, with Montaigne’s skepticism, Descartes’ rationalist theory of knowledge, and Condillac’s empiricism. We will then focus on developments in French political philosophy in the 18th and 19th centuries, closely intertwined with political events. We will read Rousseau, an important influence on the French revolutionaries, before turning to 19th-century debates about equality, with Proudhon’s anarchist criticism of property rights, and Tocqueville’s cautious liberal perspective on the political consequences of equality. Finally, we will look at two key movements in French philosophy in the first half of the 20th century, Bergson’s attempt at understanding the temporal duration conscious beings inhabit, and Sartre and de Beauvoir’s distinctive development of existentialism, a philosophy that grapples with the consequences of human freedom.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


PHIL-UA 9026-000 (8710)
01/26/2023 – 05/05/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by Lusson, Philippe

Global Culture Wars (HSED-UE 1033)

This course will examine the origins, development, and meanings of so-called cultural conflict in the United States. Topics will include abortion, gay rights, bilingualism, and the teaching of evolution in public schools. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Cultures & Contexts

History of Education (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


HSED-UE 1033-000 (18428)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Storyboarding (FMTV-UT 1033)

Students will create a storyboard from an assigned literary property (i.e., fairy tales, folk tales, famous short stories, etc.) and research the chosen material visually in picture libraries, print and photo archives, museum/gallery libraries and online. From this basic research, the student will create and develop all the visual elements that lead to a final production storyboard; these elements include character model drawings; styling sketches for costumes and sets; experimental “inspirational” sketches exploring mood, color, and character relationships and experiments in animation and color test footage. Each week, students will “pitch,” (i.e. present material) as it is being developed. Through weekly critiques from the instructor and students, elements and shape of the production storyboard is refined to its final form. The approved storyboard at the end of the semester should be ready to go into production, and must reflect character ,attitude, design, entertainment, mood, expressions, feeling and type of action. It must use dialogue, music/sound effects, and tell the story in the best possible way. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19436)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moore, William


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19437)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baker, Zoya


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19438)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baker, Zoya


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19439)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Organizational Behavior (MG-UY 2104)

This course focuses on the study of human behavior in innovative organizations. Emphasis is on teams, leadership, communication theory and organizational culture and structure. The course includes analyses of organizational behavior problems through case studies and participation in experiential learning.

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 2104-000 (14068)


MG-UY 2104-000 (14069)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at ePoly
Instructed by Bowens, Carla

History of Italian Cinema (ICINE-UT 1103)

The Italian Cinema is a good way to study the whole Italian history, society, ideology and behaviours. The students will have the opportunity to know such authors as Rossellini, De Sica, Fellini, Antonioni, Visconti, Pasolini, Bertolucci, who are well known in the US. The course will also focus on the difference between auteur films and genre films (comedy, roman-mythological, western, melodrama); it will stress the gender point of view, the problem of a national identity, the role of the film industry. Strong attention will be paid to the relationship between Italian film and literature, art history, television and other disciplines.

Int`l Pgms, Cinema Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ICINE-UT 1103-000 (4946)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Catanese, Rossella


ICINE-UT 1103-000 (20197)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Catanese, Rossella

Topics in Conversational Chinese (EAST-UA 207)

This is a 2-credit repeatable course designed for students who have completed Intermediate Chinese II or equivalent, and wish to get additional opportunities to further expand their vocabulary and grammatical knowledge with a focus on strengthening their conversational skills and/or get more chance to practice speaking outside of their regular Advanced Chinese I/II classes. Students will perform in various conversational tasks, such as presenting, discussing, debating, etc. and improve the description and narration skills that the advanced level learners are expected to have. Students will engage in conversation in a clearly participatory manner in order to communicate information on autobiographical topics, as well as topics of community, national, or international interest.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


EAST-UA 207-000 (9264)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hou, Xiaohong


EAST-UA 207-000 (9265)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


EAST-UA 207-000 (24496)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hou, Xiaohong

Intro Theory of Probability (STAT-UB 14)

Covers the basic concepts of probability. Topics include the axiomatic definition of probability; combinatorial theorems; conditional probability and independent events; random variables and probability distributions; expectation of functions of random variables; special discrete and continuous distributions, including the chi-square, t, F, and bivariate normal distributions; law of large numbers; central limit theorem; and moment generating functions. The theory of statistical estimation is introduced with a discussion on maximum likelihood estimation.

Statistics & Operations Research (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


STAT-UB 14-000 (20243)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tenenbein, Aaron

Management and Organizations (MGMT-UB 1)

In this course you will attain an understanding of the key factors that contribute to organizational success and the role that managers play in helping their organizations become more successful. The better that you understand these issues, the more effective you will be in your future careers. More specifically, the course will explore how organizational leaders develop winning strategies, and then design their organization in a way that aligns structures, social relationships, tasks, human resource practices, and people to achieve those strategies. In exploring these issues, you will identify the challenges that organizational leaders and managers face as they try to make good decisions in the face of a constantly evolving industry environment, competing goals and agendas, and an increasingly diverse and global workforce.

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19615)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Hee


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19616)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Hee


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19617)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Steiner, Jeff


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19618)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Steiner, Jeff


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19620)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kern, Molly


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19624)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Howard, Elizabeth


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19627)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Howard, Elizabeth

Cultures & Contexts: Topics (CORE-UA 500)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CORE-UA 500-000 (10506)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Igsiz, Asli


CORE-UA 500-000 (10507)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10508)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10509)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10510)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10511)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Juette, Daniel


CORE-UA 500-000 (10512)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10513)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10514)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10515)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10516)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10517)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10518)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bottex-Ferragne, Ariane


CORE-UA 500-000 (10519)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10520)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10521)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10522)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10523)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stark, Soren


CORE-UA 500-000 (10524)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Jingyi


CORE-UA 500-000 (10525)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Jingyi


CORE-UA 500-000 (10526)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fiorio, Soraya


CORE-UA 500-000 (10527)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fiorio, Soraya


CORE-UA 500-000 (10528)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cordivari, Braden


CORE-UA 500-000 (10529)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cordivari, Braden


CORE-UA 500-000 (10530)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10531)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Designing For: (GAMES-GT 310)

“Designing for” classes focus on working with a real-world client or partner, preparing students for professional collaborations with institutions, publishers and media companies beyond the game industry who partner with game developers on playable experiences. Outside partners have included museums, non-profit organizations, non-digital publishers and digital media platforms. In each version of this class, students will interact directly with representatives from one outside partner and collaborate with other students on a single semester-long project tailored to the client’s goals, developing an initial idea from conceptualization through pitching and prototyping, based on criteria and feedback provided by the partner. Students will learn to follow a structured process for ideation, collaboration and prototyping, while taking care to understand the audience, content and goals of the partner organization’s industry and the context of play. The semester culminates in a final presentation of playable prototypes to the partner.

Game Design (Graduate)
2-4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


GAMES-GT 310-000 (25338)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by


GAMES-GT 310-000 (25353)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by Corbetta, Ramiro


GAMES-GT 310-000 (25349)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by Parker, Matthew

Human Development I (APSY-UE 20)

Introduction to research and theory of human development across the life span. Seminal theories & basic research of individual growth & development are analyzed & critiqued. Emphasis is on the range in human development with discussion of normative & non-normative development. Emphasis is also placed on the importance of understanding the influence of normative & non-normative contexts of development, including the impact of culture, heritage, socioeconomic level, personal health, & safety. Relations between home, school, & community and their impact on development are also explored via readings, lectures, discussions, & weekly observations in the field. Interrogation of implicit folk theories as a foundation for exploration of formal knowledge of human development.

Applied Psychology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


APSY-UE 20-000 (11334)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hogan, Frances


APSY-UE 20-000 (11789)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Copeland, Cynthia


APSY-UE 20-000 (11405)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Online
Instructed by Hogan, Frances


APSY-UE 20-000 (21980)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Online
Instructed by Strom, Carolyn

R&D Studio: Feature, Smart, and Super Phones (ITPG-GT 3009)

In this special format studio class, students will investigate techniques and frameworks to challenge the socioeconomics of planned obsolescence. We will research, design, and develop projects that rethink our strained relationship with smartphones and re-imagine the future of “old” devices. This is a production-heavy, four-credit course, where students will contribute to original research, and develop projects that combine HCI, design, and critical theory. Prerequisites include an open mind, the drive to make, and graduate-level Physical Computing.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3009-000 (14800)
01/23/2024 – 04/30/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Galvao Cesar de Oliveira, Pedro

Platforms and Society (MCC-UE 1039)

Platforms are instrumental in mediating a wide range of phenomena, including social interaction, economic transactions, resource access, information circulation, cultural experiences, and more. Their ubiquity in everyday life is documented in concepts of platformization and platform capitalism and an emerging discipline of platform studies. This course explores the metaphors, histories, logics, and materialities of platforms. Through lenses of media studies, political economy, and anthropology, students investigate the implications of platforms in contemporary life.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1039-000 (11429)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Serpe, Joaquin

History of Computing (MCC-UE 1170)

This umbrella course focuses on specific time periods, technological developments and cultural contexts relevant to understanding the development of digital computing technology over the course of the 20th century and into the 21st. This course familiarizes students with the social forces and techno-cultural innovations that shaped the computing industry. Specific themes may include: personal computing; Cold War computing; computing and globalization; the quantified self; computational aesthetics; artificial intelligence and machine learning; computing and gender.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1170-000 (14061)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassein, Nabil

Digital Media: Theory and Practice (MCC-UE 1031)

This course offers students a foundational understanding of the technological building blocks that make up digital media & culture, & of the ways they come together to shape myriad facets of life. Students will acquire a working knowledge of the key concepts behind coding, & survey the contours of digital media architecture, familiarizing themselves with algorithms, databases, hardware, & similar key components. These technological frameworks will be examined as the basic grammar of digital media & related to theories of identity, privacy, policy, & other pertinent themes.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1031-000 (11419)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Santos, Leonard

Inquiry Seminar (MCC-UE 1200)

MCC Research Inquiry Seminars, taken early in the major, expose students to the department’s culture of scholarly inquiry. Course topics reflect faculty research interests, offering students a chance to explore emerging issues in the field of media studies.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13990)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Benson, Rodney


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13991)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fleetwood, Nicole


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13992)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gitelman, Lisa


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13993)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hegde, Radha


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13994)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Robles, Erica


MCC-UE 1200-000 (5470)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ross, Andrew · Tawil-Souri, Helga


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13995)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13996)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Huda


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13997)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Intro to Marketing (MKTG-UB 9001)

This course evaluates marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and a catalyst of business activity. It presents a comprehensive framework that includes a) researching and analyzing customers, company, competition, and the marketing environment, b) identifying and targeting attractive segments with strategic positioning, and c) making product, pricing, communication, and distribution decisions. Cases and examples are utilized to develop problem-solving abilities.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4953)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Thu
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Donvito, Raffaele


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4981)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (21443)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4834)
08/29/2024 – 12/04/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Magarino, Victor


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (3462)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Anton, Muriel


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (21026)
at NYU Tel Aviv (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (3380)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by West, Andrew

Entertainment Law (MULT-UB 48)

This two-credit course is about key legal aspects of the entertainment industry. Entertainment law is not a separate legal discipline. There is really no such thing as entertainment law. Instead, it lies at the intersection of several areas of law and applies those disciplines to the diverse entertainment industry of products and services. The course will involve a foundational coverage of the following areas: contract, advertising, protection of ideas by contract, copyright and trademark (including the concepts of parody and fair use), rights of publicity and privacy, defamation, and artist representation. This course should prepare you to analyze a wide variety of entertainment law issues at a general level. Entertainment law does not tend towards an orderly system because it lacks overriding organizational principles that would tie together its myriad facets. As such, this course will appear to lack a logical outline in its progression and instead, will examine this corner of law in separate pieces, which will cover doctrine, analytical problem-solving, practical skills related to law (e.g., analytical writing, reasoning skills, argument structure, etc.), and the particular contexts in which issues arise in the entertainment industry. Dealing with more narrow topics, such as constitutional concerns or union representation, or obtaining a much deeper knowledge of specific topics discussed in class, will require additional, specialized study. This class also helps students further develop their reasoning, communication, and listening skills.

Multidisciplinary (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MULT-UB 48-000 (10639)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MULT-UB 48-000 (10725)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

The Beat: (JOUR-UA 201)

This course is designed to hone the student journalist?s ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test their ideas with the strength of their reporting and research, and then present them in story form.

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2023)


JOUR-UA 201-000 (2398)05/22/2023 – 07/05/2023 Tue,Thu11:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Morning)at OnlineInstructed by Flaherty, Francis


JOUR-UA 201-000 (2491)06/06/2023 – 06/29/2023 Tue,Wed,Thu3:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Mihai, Adrian

Documenting the African City (ANTH-UA 9087)

This interdisciplinary course combines ethnographic readings, representations, and interpretations of city and urban cultures with a video production component in which students create short documentaries on the city of Accra. The interpretative classes will run concurrently with production management, sights and sound, and post-production workshops. The course will have three objectives: (1) teach students the documentary tradition from Flaherty to Rouch; (2) use critical Cinema theory to define a document with a camera; and (3) create a short documentary film.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ANTH-UA 9087-000 (2318)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Accra (Global)
Instructed by Suberu, Yahaya

Documenting The African City (SCA-UA 9124)

This interdisciplinary course combines ethnographic readings, representations, and interpretations of city and urban cultures with a video production component in which students create short documentaries on the city of Accra. The interpretative classes will run concurrently with production management, sights and sound, and post-production workshops. The course will have three objectives: (1) teach students the documentary tradition from Flaherty to Rouch; (2) use critical Cinema theory to define a document with a camera; and (3) create a short documentary film.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


SCA-UA 9124-000 (10094)
01/26/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Accra (Global)
Instructed by Suberu, Yahaya

Religions of India (RELST-UA 337)

Investigates religious developments in India within their historical context. Familiarizes students with the religions of the subcontinent—including Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Islam, Sikhism, Christianity, and Judaism—through secondary source readings and English translations of primary source materials. Rather than survey religious traditions as closed systems divorced from time or place, students grapple with the central theories and historiographical challenges pertaining to religion in India, especially those that impact our ability to understand everyday religious experience, both past and present.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RELST-UA 337-000 (23005)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Film Story Analysis: (DWPG-UT 1105)

This text analysis course is designed to provide a platform for an in-depth study of how the story of a film is presented, what choices are made by the author, how information is offered or withheld and what effect this has on the drama. This class will be an “anthology” of different works, each selected for a different aspect of storytelling, exploring how the stylistic choices, themes, and dramatic devices reveal themselves within the body of work. The course is designed to better help students organize their own narratives by analyzing the techniques employed by various screenwriters in constructing their screenplays. A selection of films will be screened and discussed in terms of continuity of theme; delineation of plot, development of structure, protagonist’s story purpose, dialogue as action and character. After each screening, the instructor will lead a group discussion and analysis of the film, focusing further on the techniques, conventions and devices employed by the screenwriter to both tell a good story and satisfy the demands of the audience.

Dramatic Writing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DWPG-UT 1105-000 (9511)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bogle, Donald

Writing as Critical Inquiry (WRCI-UF 102)

The second in a two-course series, Writing as Critical Inquiry introduces students to advanced reading, writing, and critical thinking skills with an explicit emphasis on developing complex and nuanced skills of inquiry. The course also introduces more indepth research skills necessary for academic work and writing beyond academic contexts. After having learned in Writing as Exploration how to present and interpret or otherwise respond to different types of subject material—for example, personal experiences, written and visual texts, objects, public events and/or social phenomena—students in Writing as Critical Inquiry learn more complex methods for engaging these skills through individualized, research-based writing. Writing as Critical Inquiry courses are themed—most sections devote the semester to a specific realm of inquiry around an interdisciplinary topic. Each course engages global issues and perspectives through its theme and, by extension, its reading and writing assignments.

Writing as Critical Inquiry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12698)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moore, Carley


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12552)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, David


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12553)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hartman, Amie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12554)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dunks, Robert


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12555)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fortuna, Devereux


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12712)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tomlinson, Timothy


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12556)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williams, Deborah


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12557)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, David


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12558)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Langer, Irina


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12559)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tobin, Elayne


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12560)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tobin, Elayne


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12561)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Alessandro, Nina


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12818)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lin, Cammie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12562)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Policoff, Stephen


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12563)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hartman, Amie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (20633)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fortuna, Devereux


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12564)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williams, Deborah


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12565)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Corcoran, Jonathan


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12566)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hendrickson, Janet


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12567)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Manko, Vanessa


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12568)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Roma, Mary


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12569)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by del Rosso, Lisa


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12570)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kolisnyk, Mary Helen


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12571)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Langer, Irina


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12572)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Alessandro, Nina


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12573)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Alessandro, Nina


WRCI-UF 102-000 (20634)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cordon Hornillos, Sara


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12780)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Polchin, James


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12574)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Jason


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12575)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Buck, Marie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (20635)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cordon Hornillos, Sara


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12576)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heiser, Erin


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12725)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by del Rosso, Lisa


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12577)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heiser, Erin


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12578)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rzonca, Christopher


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12579)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lin, Cammie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12601)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Eve, Sean


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12820)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Datcher, Michael


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12729)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Datcher, Michael


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12841)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bishop, Jacqueline


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12730)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12580)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Banks, Danis


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12581)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ray, Montana


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12582)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Colonna, Joseph


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12583)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moore, Carley


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12584)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Jason


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12585)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ray, Montana


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12854)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williams, Deborah


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12596)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bishop, Jacqueline


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12586)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rzonca, Christopher


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12731)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Eve, Sean


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12587)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shivers, Kaia


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12732)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tomlinson, Timothy


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12588)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moore, Carley


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12589)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ray, Montana


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12590)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12591)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hendrickson, Janet


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12592)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hendrickson, Janet


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12602)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Datcher, Michael


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12593)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wilkinson, Amy


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12594)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tobin, Elayne


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12710)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Roma, Mary


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12595)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Buck, Marie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12597)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Colonna, Joseph


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12598)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12699)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Banks, Danis


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12599)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tomlinson, Timothy


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12600)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Jason


WRCI-UF 102-000 (20636)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Corcoran, Jonathan

Global Works and Society in a Changing World (GWC-UF 102)

The second semester of Social Foundations spans a thousand years, from the rise of Islam and the reunification of China under the Tang dynasty (in the 7th century C.E.) through the Scientific Revolution and the decline of the Mogul empire in India. This course invites students to consider great ideas that have often helped earlier peoples organize their lives–but which have also set them in conflict, sometimes with other communities, sometimes among themselves. Such ideas have sparked movements for ethical and social reform, for conquest, for the recovery of lost classics, and for religious renewal.

Global Works and Society in a Changing World (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


GWC-UF 102-000 (13378)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13379)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13380)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22751)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13608)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22752)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13382)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13477)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22753)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22754)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13384)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13385)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22755)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22756)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13387)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13388)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13478)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13389)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13390)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13391)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13392)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13393)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13394)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13395)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13396)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13503)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13397)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13398)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13399)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13400)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13401)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13504)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13403)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13407)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13404)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13406)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13405)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13582)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13381)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13383)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13386)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13402)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22757)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Global Works and Society: Antiquity (GWA-UF 101)

The first semester of Social Foundations introduces students to the ancient world and ends with the dissolution of the Western Roman Empire, of the Gupta Empire in India, and of the Han Dynasty in China. This course takes a global perspective and uses an interdisciplinary approach, and part of its aim is to explore enduring questions such as the relation between the individual and society, between justice and power, and between humanity and the divine.

Global Works and Society: Antiquity (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


GWA-UF 101-000 (12770)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Katz, Gal


GWA-UF 101-000 (12771)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Katz, Gal


GWA-UF 101-000 (12866)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Browning, Jacob


GWA-UF 101-000 (12772)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bonakdarian, Mansour


GWA-UF 101-000 (12786)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bonakdarian, Mansour


GWA-UF 101-000 (12787)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Karavitis, Gerasimos


GWA-UF 101-000 (12803)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Browning, Jacob


GWA-UF 101-000 (12867)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wagnon, Daniel


GWA-UF 101-000 (12868)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hewitt, Anne


GWA-UF 101-000 (12869)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Karavitis, Gerasimos


GWA-UF 101-000 (12870)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Altonji, Alexander


GWA-UF 101-000 (12871)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Prichea, Andreea


GWA-UF 101-000 (12872)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Prichea, Andreea

Ethnicity & The Media (SCA-UA 232)

Examines media images in relation to the making of ethnic and racial identities in the United States. Surveys some of the theoretical approaches to the study of images, paying particular attention to the intersection of history and ideologies or representation. Looks into the nature and politics of stereotypes; inquires into their reproduction through discourses, representations, and practices; and then moves to a comparative examination of media images in relation to the making of African American, Latino, Asian, and Native American images in the media, looking specifically at changes and continuities in the representation of these four minority groups in the media.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


SCA-UA 232-000 (20866)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Davila, Arlene

Marx and the Culture of Capitalism (GERM-UA 242)

The course serves as an introduction to the thought and legacy of Karl Marx. Marx’s theory of capitalism centers on the concept of value. Value is the interface between culture and commerce, the hinge on which Marx’s theory and Marxism turn. Although Marx sometimes distinguished between an economic “base” and a legal-cultural “superstructure,” he managed to depict the culture of capitalism as a whole. This method forms one of his crucial legacies, which we will explore in and after Marx. Organized around a slow reading of Capital, Volume 1, the course will also feature short readings from those who inspired Marx (David Ricardo, G. W. F. Hegel, Charles Babbage and Ada Lovelace) and those his work influenced (Rosa Luxemburg, Theodor W. Adorno, Stuart Hall, Donna Haraway). We will follow the trajectory that Capital itself takes, from the commodity and the concept of value to machinery, cooperation, and accumulation.

German (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


GERM-UA 242-000 (20010)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Weatherby, Leif

Urban Ethnography (SCA-UA 9868)

Through a focus on contemporary Paris, this course aims to explore the insights offered by anthropological approaches to cities and urban life. We will consider the relationships between urban spatial organization and an array of social, economic and political phenomena; the relevance of consumption and display to the shaping of urban identities; and the shifting dynamics of social groups and boundaries within the urban context. This will be accomplished through course readings and also through training in urban ethnographic research methods, supporting each student’s own systematic observation over the semester of one locus of everyday Parisian life. The final project for the course will be a piece of ethnographic analysis based on this field research.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


SCA-UA 9868-000 (18401)
09/01/2023 – 12/06/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by Epstein, Beth

Introduction to Mechanical Engineering (ME-UY 1012)

This course introduces students to the range of mechanical engineering and emphasizes the basic principles and devices for storing and using energy, directing motion and satisfying needs. Case studies look at design issues and related ethical and professional practice issues. Emphasis is on a mindset of exploration. Engineering standards and standard parts. Teams work on and present two design challenges. | Prerequisite: Only first-year students are permitted to enroll in this course.

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 1012-000 (12688)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Wilson-Small, Nialah

BioDesigning the Future of Food (ITPG-GT 3030)

For centuries, food production practices such as permaculture fostered ecosystems intended to be sustainable and self-sufficient, while producing nutrient-dense food. Modern farming has introduced harmful monoculture practices proven to cause collateral destruction of biodiversity and seasonal harvesting, distancing us from our food ecosystems. The future of food can be regenerative or continue to contribute to massive health and environmental issues. How can we challenge ourselves to regain connection to our food system? How might we use innovation, personal prowess, design, and biotechnology to reimagine healthier ecosystems? This course examines the historical context of the food ecosystems and encourages students to identify with these systems that we (in urban settings) are disconnected with. Students will build a project around exploring innovative approaches to the future of food and our relationships with it. These projects will incorporate design, technology, science, and research elements.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3030-000 (15738)
09/06/2024 – 12/11/2024 Fri
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Huggins, Nikita

Multisensory Storytelling in Virtual Reality and Original Flavor Reality (ITPG-GT 3026)

“In this course, we will explore how to create narratives that leverage our lesser used senses like touch, taste and smell as well as lesser-known ones like space, time, balance and scale. We will dig into the history of experiential storytelling, starting from immersive theater and Smell-O-vision to cutting-edge haptics and mind-bending illusions of proprioception. To help center this back in practical applications, we will also explore how this evolving art is commonly used in exhibition design, experiential marketing and brick and mortar retail. The class will be a healthy mixture of game theory as well as experienced based learning (meaning there will be a couple field trips and multisensory VR projects to explore). A basic knowledge of game engines is ideal but not mandatory because we will be using predesigned templates in Unreal engine to be experienced and manipulated in real-time through virtual reality hardware.”

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3026-000 (15735)
09/05/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Porter, Winslow

Text-to-Image Ais (ITPG-GT 3020)

“Over the past few years, the unprecedented advancement in text-to-image artificial intelligence models has sparked widespread attention, discussion, and mainstream adoption of these innovative co-creative interfaces, which has resulted in novelty, excitement, and curiosity, as well as concern, anger, and insult. Alongside this, the booming open-sourced text-to-image model development contributes to expanding access to working with AI tools beyond experts, tech giants, and professional technologists. In this 14-week course, we will go over the landscape of text-to-image AIs and dive deep into some of the most well known ones (such as Stable Diffusion and its variants), to see what potential they have in terms of exploring new modes of content creation and helping us re-examine our language pattern. This will be a practice technique course – in the first half, we’ll focus on building good prompting practices, and in the second half, we’ll explore different image synthesis skills related to text-to-image AIs, use Python to train our own models to create customized visuals, and create animations from text. We’ll also discuss how such tools could intervene in the workflows of artists and technologists, what they can provide for researchers, and what are the caveats and things we should look out for when we’re creating with these AIs. Pre-requisites: Introduction to Computational Media (ICM) or the equivalent.” Prerequisite: ICM / ICM: Media (ITPG-GT 2233 / ITPG-GT 2048)

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3020-000 (15729)
09/06/2024 – 12/11/2024 Fri
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Zhang, Yuguang

Digital Audio Workstations: Ableton Live (REMU-UT 1022)

We live in an age of digital production where so much of today’s music is produced with comparatively few tools, and at the heart of the modern production set up, whether in the bedroom of the studio, is software that uses MIDI. One of the most versatile of today’s platforms which can be used in production, live performance, and even as a visual tool is Ableton Live. Ableton is unique amongst the contemporary software programs making music in that it is the only one that was created by working musicians who were looking for a tool that allowed for both the seamless creation of ideas and could also serve as a performance instrument. In the past 15 years, Ableton has played an important role in creating countless tracks and records in numerous genres and the go-to software for live performance, whether for vocalists and bands or for massive spectacles like Cirque du Soleil. In this course, we will cover Ableton’s unique abilities to manipulate audio which make it the preferred platform for remixing and mash-ups. We will cover the fundamentals of the software, explore techniques to program beats, chordal and melodic ideas, as well as cover creative workflow – how to use Ableton to quickly generate ideas for producers and songwriters. Finally, we will discuss its use as a live performance tool for use with live instrumentalists and vocalists, as a DJ tool and even as a VJing tool. 

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


REMU-UT 1022-000 (13316)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Carrero, Joanne


REMU-UT 1022-000 (21555)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Carrero, Joanne


REMU-UT 1022-000 (21556)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Freeman, Dan


REMU-UT 1022-000 (21557)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Freeman, Dan


REMU-UT 1022-000 (21558)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Freeman, Dan


REMU-UT 1022-000 (21559)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Freeman, Dan

Digital Audio Workstations: ProTools (REMU-UT 1020)

During this course, students will acquire an in-depth, theoretical and practical knowledge of Digital Audio Workstations using the industry standard Pro Tools software through a weekly, lab-based workshop. Each class will be a combination of lecture and immediate application. An emphasis will be placed on getting to know Pro Tools, getting inside Pro Tools, creating sessions, working with media in sessions, audio recording, audio editing, file management techniques, MIDI recording, editing techniques, mixing techniques, backups and stereo mix-down.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 3 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


REMU-UT 1020-000 (3226)
06/11/2024 – 07/02/2024 Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Painson, Phil

Augmented Hacking (ITPG-GT 2356)

With recent advances in hardware and software, millions of us now carry unprecedented spatial computing and world sensing technologies in our pockets. With these technologies in hand, how do we design AR experiences that are contextual at the core – that are sensitive to the spaces we inhabit and the behaviors of people in those spaces? How do we augment this better understanding of reality? This course will be a hands-on workshop where we create spatially aware, contextually driven AR applications unique to particular situations. We will examine the opportunities and challenges when designing for site-specific experiences – museums, live events, retail, medical settings, industrial environments, schools, and others. Topics will include image and object recognition, world mapping, people tracking, location anchors, the ARKit “depth api” (LiDAR enabled features), spatial audio, scene understanding and semantics, and more. For design and development, we’ll primarily use Apple technologies – ARKit, RealityKit and RealityComposer. We’ll also tap a variety of cloud services to store, move, process, and bring intelligence to the data generated and consumed in our experiences. 3D modeling skills are helpful but not required. While we’ll cover the basics, students should expect to spend additional time outside of class learning Swift and other related programming concepts. Full-time access to an iOS device (LiDAR-enabled is ideal but not required) and a Mac laptop running the latest operating systems are required. As part of the design process, we’ll host workshops and guest critiques with designers from top studios around New York City as well as directly interfacing with various teams at Apple.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ITPG-GT 2356-000 (21868)
09/07/2023 – 12/14/2023 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Lam, Nien · Buys, Sebastian

The Art of Sound (FMTV-UT 1007)

This is a critical studies course exploring the aesthetics and psycho-acoustics of sound: how sound works in art and life; how it affects emotions and stimulates the imagination; and how it is used in film, radio, television and other creative or artistic contexts, particularly its application as a key element in storytelling. This course examines the meaning and character of the soundscape (the acoustic environment) and the ways it has technically and aesthetically evolved throughout film history from the Kinetophone to the iPhone. The course includes reading in the theory of sound, and listening to examples of sound work by composers and sound designers. In previous semesters we have looked at the soundtrack in such films as: Playtime; Apocalypse Now, The Conversation, Aliens, The Evil Dead II, Saving Private Ryan, and Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Class meetings will be devoted to: 1) lecture and discussion based on assigned readings and listening and viewing assignments; and 2) screening of selected audio and video works. Students are graded on class participation, journals, a paper, and exams. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1007-000 (19411)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McKeever, Marsha

The Black Image in Cinema (FMTV-UT 1216)

This is a critical analysis of the Black image in cinema through film screenings, discussions, and selected readings. Film is an art form whose influence dictates how we see others and ourselves. It shapes our worldview and, yet, it is one of the youngest and most misunderstood art forms. On the surface, film viewing might seem like a passive form of learning, but effective films engage us on emotional, intellectual, spiritual, cultural, and political levels. Film is one of the most powerful mediums ever invented and since it’s invention, the Black image and experience has been distorted, demonized, romanticized, erased, appropriated as well as exalted and reified. So, it is our duty and responsibility to know its history, understand its present effects, so we can dictate its future and participate in how the Black image evolves and is treated over time. This course will survey and critically explore an historical range of the Black image on screen and Black films in relation to inspiration, narrative, a scene, set, and site of production. Screening will include a sampling of important Black independently made, and/or Black cast and narrative feature films. We will discuss and analyze specific technical elements (direction, editing, framing and composition, mise-en-scene, music, etc.) that reinforce and demonstrate these larger themes. Accordingly, our discussions and readings will cover the full range of current issues and debates in Black cinema studies, from independence vs. mainstream filmmaking; gender and sexuality; class and color caste; the ghettoization and upwardly mobile integration of urban zones; cooptation and the rise of the bourgeois story as genre, and so on.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1216-000 (19573)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pollard, Jason

Consumer Behavior (MKTG-UB 2)

This course presents a comprehensive, systematic, and practical conceptual framework for understanding people as consumers—the basic subject matter of all marketing. It draws on the social sciences to evaluate the influence of both individual and ecological factors on market actions. Students discuss relevant psychological and sociological theories and study how they can be used to predict consumers’ reactions to strategic marketing decisions. Basic methodologies for research in consumer behavior are developed and applied. Course emphasis is on developing applications of behavioral concepts and methods for marketing actions.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 2-000 (18452)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Watson, Jared


MKTG-UB 2-000 (18466)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Watson, Jared


MKTG-UB 2-000 (18486)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pham, Ngoc

Foundations: What is Philosophy? (PHIL-SHU 101)

This course is an introduction to the problems and methods of contemporary philosophy. Topics may include: 1. What is the relationship between mind and body? 2. Can belief in the existence of the external world be justified? 3. Are there any good arguments for the existence of God? 4. Can we act freely if everything that we do is determined by laws of nature? 5. Is there a theory of how we ought to live? Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: Humanities Foundational/Introductory Courses (18-19: Critical Concepts).

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


PHIL-SHU 101-000 (20186)
01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yuan, Yuan

Intro to 3D Character Design using Zbrush (FMTV-UT 1071)

This course explores the Art of Character Creation using the powerful digital sculpting program ZBRUSH. Students will learn the ins and outs of the program to create their own 3d characters from scratch. Sculpting, detailing, Polypainting, rendering and compositing in Photoshop will all be covered. The class will encourage learning while doing as I find it’s the best way to learn a new art. Zbrush is a unique program that allows users to manipulate 3D shapes in a quick fashion without having to model polygons like other 3D programs such as Maya. In effect you are using “digital clay” in Zbrush to push and pull primitive forms into fantastic creatures and characters. Zbrush is the perfect tool for traditional artists to transition to artmaking in the digital realm. Zbrush is an extremely feature-rich piece of software, with a unique interface unlike any other computer graphics program. While the interface may seem quite intimidating at first, rest assured we will explore the interface together and learn all the most important tools to get started and having fun with organic character creation! Some benefits of using Zbrush for Character and Creature Design over other computer design software: -The ability to quickly create concepts as if you were manipulating real clay -Great for rough character concepts or more finished painted renders -Transition is much smoother from practical to digital art using Zbrush because it feels like you are using an artistic tool rather than a technical tool – Zbrush offers such a deep diverse toolset, you can create stylized cartoon-like characters, realistic animals and humans! The possibilities are endless. You can use it for everything from organic characters to hard surface robots and props! -Once you learn the interface and tools, you can simply sculpt without worrying as much about technical aspects like polygons, faces, points and edges like other traditional polygon modelling programs

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1071-000 (20242)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Benevides, Rob

Philosophy of Technology: Thinking Machines (PHIL-SHU 130)

This course aims to train students to think philosophically about our rapidly changing—and ever more intimate—relationship with machines. We focus in particular on the following subjects: artificial intelligence, robots, cyborgs, automation and science fiction speculation. Prerequisite: Global Perspectives on Society (GPS) Fulfillment: CORE STS; Humanities Interdisciplinary or Advanced course; IMA/IMB elective.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


PHIL-SHU 130-000 (20189)
01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Weslake, Brad · Greenspan, Anna

Electronic Rituals, Oracles and Fortune-Telling (IMNY-UT 289)

According to anthropologists Filip de Boeck and René Devisch, divination “constitutes a space in which cognitive structures are transformed and new relations are generated in and between the human body, the social body and the cosmos.” In this class, students will learn the history of divination, engage in the practice of divination, and speculate on what forms divination might take in a world where the human body, the social body, and even the cosmos(!) are digitally mediated. Starting with an understanding of ritual and folk culture, we will track the history of fortune-telling from the casting of lots to computer-generated randomness to the contemporary revival of Tarot; from reading entrails to astrology to data science; from glossolalia to surrealist writing practices to the “ghost in the machine” of artificial intelligence. Weekly readings and assignments culminate in a final project.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


IMNY-UT 289-000 (21942)
09/07/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Parrish, Allison

Mobile App Development Lab (ITPG-GT 2372)

One of the most transformative consumer products in history, the iPhone remains the standard bearer for great design and user experience. With the latest versions of iOS and iPhone, Apple puts depth sensing and augmented reality in our pockets. How do we take advantage of this incredible platform to produce our own compelling experiences? This course will be a hands-on workshop where we explore the world beyond generic apps and push the boundaries of what’s possible on iOS hardware. Each week, you’ll be asked to complete a programming exercise meant to foster your understanding of iOS application development. We’ll leverage existing open source libraries to quickly build out your app with features such as real time communication and cloud storage. We aim to create distributed instruments for computed expression. Full-time access to an iOS device and a Mac laptop computer running the latest operating system and development tools are required. Prereq: Some programming experience (such as ICM) and willingness to learn Apple’s Swift programming language.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2372-000 (14786)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Thompson, John

Serious Games (ITPG-GT 3001)

This introductory course will focus on giving students a practical understanding of how to make ‘serious’ video games. That is, games that challenge the player to think and learn. This is a class where we will be ideating and producing playable games each week over 7 weeks using the open-source Godot game engine. By the end of the course, you’ll have a small portfolio of ‘serious’ games to show and build upon. Throughout the course, students will become familiar with concepts such as iterative design, play testing, object-oriented programming, user-interface design, animation and basic art for 2D games. They will take a design-based approach to content creation, developing a proficiency in the Godot game engine and the overall indie-game development pipeline.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ITPG-GT 3001-000 (22327)
01/23/2023 – 03/20/2023 Mon
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Grewell, Christian

R&D Studio: Dumb, Smart, and Super Phones (ITPG-GT 3009)

In this special format studio class, students will investigate techniques and frameworks to challenge the socioeconomics of planned obsolescence. We will research, design, and develop projects that rethink our strained relationship with smartphones and re-imagine the future of “old” devices. This is a production-heavy, four-credit course, where students will contribute to original research, and develop projects that combine HCI, design, and critical theory. Prerequisites include an open mind, the drive to make, and graduate-level Physical Computing.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ITPG-GT 3009-000 (22335)
01/26/2023 – 05/04/2023 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Galvao Cesar de Oliveira, Pedro

Media-making as Healing Practice (ITPG-GT 2358)

Where does healing reside in media-making? How do we approach creating artistic processes and tools that move towards minimizing harm, supporting collective care, and understanding what healing means for ourselves and with one another? This course examines socially-engaged artistic processes and frameworks that reconstruct, reclaim, and decolonize ‘healing.’ Together, we will gather embodied data from our bodyminds, build language through readings, and map out artists in the field exploring disability, racial trauma, queerness, and diaspora within media and performing arts. Subsequently, we will develop our own processes as our final project: weaving together storytelling, embodied strategies, tool-making, performances, and/ or space-making.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ITPG-GT 2358-000 (22317)
01/25/2023 – 05/03/2023 Wed
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Lin, Yo-Yo

Performance in Virtual Space (ITPG-GT 2999)

Focusing on motion capture (ak. MoCap), this class introduces basic performance skills alongside 3d graphic manipulation to create real-time virtual experiences. In this class we will have the opportunity to build sets, produce interactive props, and design unique characters to tell stories or engage with audiences. Utilizing Optitrack Motion Capture system, Blender, Motionbuilder, and Unreal Gaming Engine; we will create, rig, animate, and perform as avatars.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2999-000 (14791)
03/15/2024 – 05/03/2024 Fri
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Truxillo, Marcel

CAD for Virtual and Reality (ITPG-GT 2086)

The goal of this class is to gain an understanding and proficiency with Computer Aided Design (CAD). We will become familiar with CAD software, mechanical design, and simulation. The class will cover common CAD modeling techniques. We will use our designs to get physical parts made as well as use them in virtual projects. We will create parts both real and impossible.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2086-000 (14782)
01/25/2024 – 05/02/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Siman

The COVID-19 Impact Project: Extracting Stories From Data (ITPG-GT 2338)

This course will use the open source COVID-19 Impact Dashboard as a basis to explore ways to humanize the unfolding data on the coronavirus pandemic. Students are invited to collaborate on the COVID-19 Impact Project. Students will discover how data flows from public github repositories and tools needed to visualize the data. We will review other data-centric open source projects related to COVID-19 and discuss the questions they are trying to answer or problems they are trying to solve. We will examine historical and contemporary data visualizations. Using data visualization as a scaffold, we will explore ways to support community driven mourning and memorialization. Students can choose to participate as javascript coders, p5js explorers, UI/UX designers, citizen journalists, or data science explorers.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ITPG-GT 2338-000 (22314)
01/23/2023 – 03/20/2023 Mon
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Thompson, John · Jones, Shindy

Sound Art: Listening (ITPG-GT 2328)

Listening is not something we do through hearing alone. Engaging with multiple perspectives, from Deaf studies and critiques of ableist hearing ideologies, to the possibilities and pitfalls presented through machine listening and imaginative sonic speculation, we will playfully deconstruct and question what it means to listen at all. Each week, readings will be assigned and students are asked to respond to prompts in the form of light-weight exercises that will orient most of our in-class discussion. Time will be spent discussing readings, presenting, and providing critique for each other’s projects in order to help draw connections between theory and practice. Through in-class presentations, we will encounter works by Christine Sun Kim, George Lewis, Pauline Oliveros and read from Jennifer Lynn Stoever, Tina Campt, and François Bonnet. The class has no technical prerequisites, and students are welcome to respond with works using tools and techniques from other classes (audio/video presentation, programming and physical computing, installation and fabrication, etc.). Through this work, we will unpack how the way in which we attend to the physical world and its inhabitants through our listening has real consequences. In much the same way our interpretation of the world is informed and influenced by factors outside of ourselves, our capacity to listen is conditioned through societal, political, economic, historical, and racial dimensions. We will disentangle listening from hearing and consider listening as a practice that begins not with how we hear sounds but how it allows us to (or prevents us from) interfacing and relating to our exteriors (and interiors). By the end of the class we will attempt to converge and coalesce our own ideas and perspective of what it means to listen.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ITPG-GT 2328-000 (22308)
03/24/2023 – 05/05/2023 Fri
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Diedrick, Johann

Design with Climate Change (ARTS-UG 1636)

The course explores how design can respond to environmental problems and climate change. In analyzing past attempts, the course starts with decolonizing turn of the century admirations for primitivism and ends with the cyber punks planning new environments online. Following the work of architects, artists, urban planners, graphic designers and fashionista, the course will review histories of adaptation and ways to design with climate. The class will decolonize modernist design schemes, and focus on better ways to design with climate. We will also devote time to discuss topics such as building closed ecological systems, counterculture designs, cyber environments, sick building syndrome, biomimetics, eco-fashion, earth art, and other methods to design within the realm of nature. The overall objective is twofold; to survey the larger historical context of ecological design and define specific contributions to the climate change debate. Ultimately, the students will be asked to design, develop, and participate in an ecologically driven conceptual final design project of their choice.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ARTS-UG 1636-000 (12489)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Anker, Peder · Joachim, Mitchell

FOUNDATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT (MG-UY 1002)

This course introduces the principles and practices of management. Management is viewed as a system of tasks and activities, including environmental scanning, planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Within each major task, is a series of processes, which show how to do what has to be done. Management is a science and an art; both aspects of management are covered in this course. Areas covered are management history, philosophy and the theory and practice of management planning, decision making, organizing, motivating and leading. Special emphasis is on providing the technical and managerial challenges presented by emerging and transformative technologies. Particular consideration is given to the managerial options available to both legacy and entrepreneurial organizations.

Management (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 1002-000 (14075)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by COHEN, MATHIAS


MG-UY 1002-000 (14076)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Driscoll, Michael

Social Media Practicum (MCC-UE 9032)

In this workshop-based course, students will become well versed in contemporary debates on social media and its impact on self and society, share their own experiences and observations in this area, design an original research project (using methods such as discourse analysis, virtual ethnography, and interviewing), and write a long-form analysis paper.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9032-000 (2831)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Druker, Jeremy

Advertising and Consumer Society (MCC-UE 9015)

This course will examine the emergence of advertising as a form of communication, its influence upon other forms of mediated communication and its impact upon culture and society.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9015-000 (2561)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Murad, Salim

Rethinking Public Relations (MCC-UE 1750)

Public relations means different things to different things to different people but it has one undeniable element: communication. This course is concerned with arranging, handling, and evaluating public relations programs. Students work with actual case histories and deal with contemporary topics such as the use of the computer in public relations.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1750-000 (14007)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Devitt, James


MCC-UE 1750-000 (14008)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gabrielski, Jo Temah

Going Live: Real-Time Streaming and Interactive Media (IMBX-SHU 9501)

This course explores the disruptions and creative possibilities that realtime emerging media provides through the lens of learning how to design, create, produce and perform in realtime. Students will be learning how to design and produce for realtime interactive audiences, understand the modern streaming media pipeline, the fundamentals of virtual production, digital content creation and the basics of game engines and other software – all in the service of delivering a more engaging and intimate connection between audience and performer. Students will design and perform 2 distinct realtime performances as well as work together with peers to conceptualize, design and produce a short realtime ‘pilot’ using the tools and techniques you’ve learned in the first two projects. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: Interactive Media Business Elective ; Interactive Media Arts Elective

Interactive Media and Business (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IMBX-SHU 9501-000 (4975)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by Prasanna Kumar, Archana


IMBX-SHU 9501-000 (20268)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
5:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by Prasanna Kumar, Archana

World Dance and Global Perspectives (ARTS-UG 1212)

Dance reflects cultural heritage and is a key to understanding diverse societies. In this arts workshop, students explore dance as it appears on several continents. Dance can be seen as encoded forms of a society’s religious, artistic, political, economic, and familial values. Readings cover issues of globalization, fusion and authenticity. Migration, missionaries, trade routes and the diaspora have led to the creation of new dance forms like “Bollywood” and “Tribal” that are a synthesis of earlier forms. Students are introduced to different dance forms through selected readings, rich collection of video footage and studio practice often lead by various guest artists. After a brief warm-up, the class learns simple steps, floor plans and rhythms from the music and dance cultures being studied. Students choose a dance form as their project and themselves become researchers, performers and creators of new forms.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ARTS-UG 1212-000 (12074)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Posin, Kathryn

DIGITAL LOGIC AND STATE MACHINE DESIGN (ECE-UY 2204)

This course covers combinational and sequential digital circuits. Topics: Introduction to digital systems. Number systems and binary arithmetic. Switching algebra and logic design. Error detection and correction. Combinational integrated circuits, including adders. Timing hazards. Sequential circuits, flipflops, state diagrams and synchronous machine synthesis. Programmable Logic Devices, PLA, PAL and FPGA. Finite-state machine design. Memory elements. A grade of C or better is required of undergraduate computer-engineering majors. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 1114 (C- or better) or CS-UY 1133 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UH 1001 (C- or better) or ENGR-UH 1000 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 101 (C- or better)

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11545)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11546)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11547)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11548)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11549)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Reagen, Brandon

Data Structures (CSCI-SHU 210)

Data structures are fundamental programming constructs which organize information in computer memory to solve challenging real-world problems. Data structures such as stacks, queues, linked lists, and binary trees, therefore constitute building blocks that can be reused, extended, and combined in order to make powerful programs. This course teaches how to implement them in a high-level language, how to analyze their effect on algorithm efficiency, and how to modify them to write computer programs that solve complex problems in a most efficient way. Programming assignments. Prerequisite: ICS or A- in ICP. Equivalency: This course counts for CSCI-UA 102 Data Structures (NY). Fulfillment: CS Required, Data Science Required, CE Required.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20398)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Tue3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)at ShanghaiInstructed by Tam, Yik-Cheung


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20399)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Thu3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)at ShanghaiInstructed by Simikin, Sven


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20400)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Wed3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)at ShanghaiInstructed by Simikin, Sven


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20401)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Mon11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at ShanghaiInstructed by Tam, Yik-Cheung


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20402)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Wed11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at ShanghaiInstructed by Simikin, Sven


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20403)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Fri11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at ShanghaiInstructed by Simikin, Sven

Germany and East Central Europe (HIST-UA 9514)

This course will focus on the history of the culturally rich region of “Mitteleuropa” through analysis of the parallel evolution of Germany and the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia and Hungary. Mitteleuropa as a region produced such important figures as Franz Kafka, Gustav Mahler, Sigmund Freud, Theodor Herzl and Milan Kundera; historical personalities whose influence internationally is indisputable. We’ll delve into the history of the region and on the central role played by German politics and culture from the end of the 19th century, through the turbulent 20th century to the present day. Emphasis will be on the evolution of the concept of nationalism as well as on Germany’s foreign policy in the “concert of nations”, especially towards its Eastern neighbors. The aim is to achieve an understanding of the complex evolution of national entities and their interaction between the birth of the modern German state and the integration of the Visegrád countries in NATO and the European Union.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


HIST-UA 9514-000 (3470)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Vassogne, Gaelle

The Bible as Literature (HBRJD-UA 23)

Over the past few decades, many readers have come to a fuller appreciation of the emotional and imaginative power of the Bible?s narratives, which still speak with remarkable clarity to our own sensibilities, leading one critic to characterize the Bible as a ?full-fledged kindred spirit? of modernism. The course pursues this ?kindred spirit,? using a broadly literary approach as its guide. While the focus is on narrative?the Pentateuch (Genesis?Deuteronomy) and the Former Prophets (Joshua?Kings), as well as shorter narrative books (Ruth, Jonah, and Esther)?it also studies Ecclesiastes and Job as ancient precursors to modern skepticism. Finally, it studies one modernist engagement with the Bible: Kafka?s Amerika.

Hebrew & Judaic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


HBRJD-UA 23-000 (21860)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Feldman, Liane

Islam and Spain (SPAN-UA 9466)

From the 8th century until the 17th century, Islam played a crucial role in the history of the Iberian Peninsula. Today this period is often portrayed as one of inter-religious harmony, while al-Andalus is simultaneously mourned in contemporary Islamist discourse as a lost paradise. While we look at the history of Al-Andalus and assess the importance of the contributions of Al-Andalus to Europe and America, we evaluate the significance of its legacy in modern Spain. Furthermore, we will study the protagonist role that Spain has played in relations between Europe and the Mediterranean Islamic countries during the Modern Age. Students will gain further understanding and contextualization of current Arab-Muslim geopolitics. As a case study, we will address the Spanish Protectorate in Morocco, as well as its ensuing process of decolonization and the consequences that shape the current international relations between the two neighboring countries, Spain and Morocco.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


SPAN-UA 9466-000 (18390)
08/31/2023 – 12/12/2023 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Armada, Almudena Ariza

The Virtual Producer: Beats & Beatmaking (REMU-UT 1016)

This course will cover various professional Music Production Techniques & Strategies such as: Sampling (& Sample Chopping), Drum Programming / Drum Design, Synthesis & Sound Design, Music Theory (in the context of Music Production), MIDI Editing, as well as numerous Mixing Techniques. Over the course of the class, through the utilization and knowledge of these various skills, students will learn how to create Original Music Compositions & Productions. The primary DAW platform for the course is Ableton. While a Beatmaker / Composer / Producer must be well versed in the application of various software and hardware tools, as well as the many Production skills & techniques, they must also have artistic vision and creative efficacy. So while the course is about Music / Beat Construction and the tools involved, there will also be a strong emphasis on innovative envision, inventive mobility, and how to think / strategize like a Music Producer.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 2 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


REMU-UT 1016-000 (3269)
06/11/2024 – 06/27/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sarfehjooy, Kayvon

The Performing Arts in Global Cultures (MPATC-UE 1505)

The study of the intersection of key philosophical and ethical systems with the analysis of performing art works and the music industry. Students learn an “Eclectic Method” of analysis to holistically explore and study works of art from cultures from around the world while studying ethical complexities and analytical systems in relation to the performing arts industries.

Music Theory and Composition (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MPATC-UE 1505-000 (16548)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by White, Leonard · Bush, Christopher

Machine Design (ME-UY 3233)

This course introduces students to fundamentals of machine elements, enabling them to employ this knowledge to design machines for various practical applications. The course begins with a brief review of stress, deformation and failure, followed by friction and wear. Subsequently, loaded columns, pressurized cylinders and shafts are presented. Bearings, gears, screws, springs, brakes, clutches and belts are discussed. The course ends with an introduction to MEMS, Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: ME-UY 3213 | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-UH 3210

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 3233-000 (12694)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Park, Kee

Sports Management (MKTG-UB 39)

This course provides an overview of the key components of the global sports management ecosystem. Managing the myriad moving parts that make up the sports industry requires an understanding of general management principles and their special applications to the sports industry. From technology and marketing innovations to improved delivery systems, sports and sports-related content are one of the key drivers of the changing media landscape. The course will explore the critical elements of delivering sports content to viewers in the U.S. and abroad, taking into account constituencies which include the rights holders (e.g. leagues, conferences, teams, national governing bodies) the performers or talent (e.g. players, coaches, general managers) the media the sponsors and the consumer. For each component the course will examine the strategies, history and management perspectives that have informed this massive and evolving sector of media industries.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 39-000 (18484)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Leisure Marketing (MKTG-UB 80)

This is a specialty marketing course designed to provide students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of marketing several leading sectors within the leisure industry. The focus is on understanding the development and application of marketing strategies and tactics for leisure companies competing for a share of the consumers discretionary spending. Key marketing concepts such as segmentation, branding, life-time value, and CRM are examined in the context of leisure industries. The course will also cover recent activities including mergers, acquisitions in those key sectors of the leisure industry: casinos, cruise ships, theme parks, eco-tourism, themed restaurants, resorts, leisure hotels, time shares. The course will explore marketing techniques that apply across the leisure companies, including licensing, sponsorships, line extensions and promotion. Discussion of evolution, and current status in these sectors through lectures, case studies, text and article readings and project work will be included.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 80-000 (18462)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Business of Producing (MKTG-UB 49)

A specialized EMT course within the Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies designed to provide students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of producing (as a business profession) a finished creative product in the entertainment and media industries, developing a business model, and generating an income stream to repay and provide investors with a profit. Educates the student in the process of feature film and long-form television production from the initial concept of the story, through script development, to completion of the project. Covers the most important steps in the production of an independent film, a studio project, a network TV or cable show, a radio program, a Broadway production, and an advertising television commercial. Explores all the elements a producer must know, understand, and eventually become skilled with through mastery of development, including script selection, finance, budgeting, timetable development, team building, talent selection, sales, contract and union negotiation, regulations, technology, and other relevant core competencies.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 49-000 (18459)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 49-000 (18458)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

The Business of Broadway (MKTG-UB 25)

This is a specialty marketing course designed to provide students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of Broadway and live theater, as an important business enterprise within the entertainment industry. The focus is on understanding the development and application of the economics, finance, structure, implementation and staging of performances, as well as the marketing strategies and tactics for gaining audience awareness and decision to purchase. The course will examine funding, marketing, branding, product positioning and the global distribution of live theatrical entertainment. The course will cover the history, venues, vocabulary, players, business and creative structures, budget development, supplementary revenue streams, successes and failures, relationship with the movie and music industries, the important figures and support systems that make the system work, global reach, and other topics. Lecture, discussions, site visits, and project work will be included.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MKTG-UB 25-000 (10616)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Globalization of The Entertainment Industry (MKTG-UB 46)

Provides a framework for understanding the global expansion of media and entertainment companies. Examines the impact that the significant export growth of American leisure products and services has on the U.S economy. Analyzes the strategies of several leading entertainment and media multinational companies and the development of their entertainment businesses within the major world economic zones. International speakers, cases and readings are used in this course.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


MKTG-UB 46-000 (22222)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Brown, Colin


MKTG-UB 46-000 (22228)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)at Washington SquareInstructed by Brown, Colin


MKTG-UB 46-000 (23357)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Maheswaran, Durairaj

Photograph New York at the Water’s Edge (ARTS-UG 1481)

Down by the water’s edge we find the color contrast delineating wet and dry to the rhythm of nature’s tidal flux. The ebb relinquishes 12 hours of waterborne mystery; the flow’s 12 hours blanket refreshes the shore’s human impositions. New York City’s 578 coastal miles inspire this photojournalist/ documentary workshop to explore ongoing changes in commercial development, political innovation and environmental climate. The gradual cleansing of New York City waterways has encouraged neighborhood communities to revive their historical, artistic, and literary traditions along shorelines once occupied by industry. Now attracting vibrant cultural activity, New York City coastal communities are again looking at the water, seeking inspiration in its beauty. Embarking on a photographic project of their design, students will develop their own personal viewpoint on society’s relationship to New York waterlines, determine their own perception (vantage point, angle, point of view, framing) and establish a unique relationship with the audience (through scale, rhythm sequence, position, color). Classes will offer technical instruction, critiques of student work, and visual analysis. Open to highly motivated students with experience in photography; digital or film cameras welcome.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1481-000 (16955)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Day, Jeff

Rites of Passage into Contemporary Art Practice (ARTS-UG 1420)

Modern art has been a balancing act between control and letting go. This course focuses on the psychological interface between the two, the “liminal” zone. We will survey modern artists’ techniques for tapping sources of creativity, including Dada collagists’ free-associations; Surrealists’ automatic writing, doodles, and “cadavres exquises”; and Abstract Expressionists’ embrace of chaos. We will engage in simple exercises: doodling, speed drawing, painting an abstract mural as a group, keeping a liminal journal, collaging, and exploring ritualistic techniques. We will follow up with discussions, take a trip to the Met to dialogue with an African oracle sculpture,and conclude the course reexamining modern art in light of the inner journey threshold drama each of us has taken during the course. Readings include van Gennep’s Rites of Passage, Chipp’s Theories of Modern Art, R.D. Laing, Federico Garcia Lorca on duende, Victor Turner on liminal, Mircea Eliade on Shamanism Techniques of Ecstasy, James Elkins on alchemy and art, and Frida Kahlo’s journal.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1420-000 (16715)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ruhe, Barnaby

Mixing in the Digital Audio Workstation (MPATE-UE 1135)

This course explores the art and craft of mixing records, with special attention to “mixing in the box” (via a digital audio workstation). Focus on methodology and technique, with particular emphasis on establishing balances, using such tools as compression and automation to enhance dynamics and develop unique coloration. Examines intersection of technology, budgets, and the marketplace. Students execute their own mixes, with guidance and critique from the instructor. Basic level of DAW proficiency required.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1135-000 (13050)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Killen, Kevin


MPATE-UE 1135-000 (13051)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Killen, Kevin

Midi Technology II (MPATE-UE 1014)

Programming for MIDI, C, and other appropriate techniques. Design and implementation of software sequencers, interface drivers, and hardware applications will be the focus.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1014-000 (12979)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krauss, Briggan

Analog Recording Technology (MPATE-UE 1001)

The physical aspects of sound, analog recording technology & studio production techniques are explained & demonstrated. Lecture topics include microphones, stereo recording, analog consoles, multi-track tape recording, equalization, compression, reverberation & mixing. Studio lab assignments are performed outside of class reinforcing weekly lecture topics

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1001-000 (10647)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Filadelfo, Gary


MPATE-UE 1001-000 (10650)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Filadelfo, Gary

Real Time Media: Concepts and Production (IMBX-SHU 9501)

This course explores the disruptions and creative possibilities that realtime emerging media provides through the lens of learning how to design, create, produce and perform in realtime. Students will be learning how to design and produce for realtime interactive audiences, understand the modern streaming media pipeline, the fundamentals of virtual production, digital content creation and the basics of game engines and other software – all in the service of delivering a more engaging and intimate connection between audience and performer. Students will design and perform 2 distinct realtime performances as well as work together with peers to conceptualize, design and produce a short realtime ‘pilot’ using the tools and techniques you’ve learned in the first two projects. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: Interactive Media Business Elective ; Interactive Media Arts Elective

Interactive Media and Business (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IMBX-SHU 9501-000 (24204)
01/25/2022 – 05/10/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by Kumar, Archana


IMBX-SHU 9501-000 (24205)
01/25/2022 – 05/10/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by Kumar, Archana

Making Virtual Sense: 3D Graphic Studio for Critically-Driven Creative Applications (ARTS-UG 1647)

Until recently, the creation of interactive 3D graphics was only possible for large and capital-intensive uses: the armed forces, large-scale architectural/engineering work, mass entertainment. Now, open-source applications and powerful personal and portable computers are making it practical for individuals and small groups to independently build and share alternative visions. Whether you are interested in exploring new ways to construct complex networks of ideas in the present, or to imagine physical spaces to reflect and support new ways of life, this arts workshop provides a blend of critical orientation and hands-on experience. In this open project studio, the majority of course time and work will be taken up with the development of student-built individual or small team concepts, to be developed as 3D graphic “fly-through” models. Theoretical discussions will be initiated with a mix of relevant writings and media. Here is a representative sampling of sources: Douglas Engelbart, Eric Raymond, William Gibson, Zaha Hadid, Judith Donath, the Athenian Acropolis, the Kalachakra mandala, Salisbury Cathedral, the Schindler house, Artigas gardens, the 1958 World’s fair Philips pavilion, the Seagram’s building, Grant Theft Auto IV, the monastery of La Tourette, the Mangin plan, compendium.org, Betaville.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1647-000 (16961)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Skelton, Carl

The Meme: Images and Words Make Ideas (ARTS-UG 1664)

This course explores image making, writing and their juxtaposition, as a method of thinking through and evoking ideas. At times, images lead, and text follows, providing descriptions of images, and at other times, text leads and images illustrate that text. In the realm of the contemporary American meme, just about every time images and words are present they have an effect upon each other in the mind of the viewer, which changes the meaning of both, producing something which is more than what is present in both image and text. That third and phantasmic image exists in the mind. The examples of Chinese Literati painting, and Surrealism will provide a historical point of departure, from which we to engage 21st century examples of image and word juxtapositions that create new ideas. This course will provide students with a general history of the relationship between the image and word, and a critical understanding of the composition and decomposition of image-word printed and digital matter. Along with skills in Lino-cut printmaking, Risograph printmaking, and publication design, students will also write poetry, short essays, and art criticism. Students will participate in the content production, design, and publishing of a book and magazine, zine and poster.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1664-000 (17074)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bryant, Ernest

Computer Programming for Engineers (ENGR-UH 1000)

The objective of the course is for students to acquire the fundamental knowledge of computer programming, develop transferable programming skills, and learn to solve engineering problems via programming. The course is primarily based on the C programming language and an introduction to another programming language such as MATLAB (to demonstrate transferring programming knowledge from one language to another). The course explores the application of engineering computation in various engineering domains including mechanical, civil, computer, and electrical engineering. The following topics are covered: introduction to computer systems, standard input/output, file input/output, decision structures, loop structures, functions, arrays, addressing, dynamically allocated memory, structures, introduction to object oriented programming, problem solving via programming algorithm design, and applications in another programming language such as MATLAB.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3554)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3555)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Jamil, Muhammad Hassan · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3567)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Negoiu, Elena · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3588)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Negoiu, Elena · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3991)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Jamil, Muhammad Hassan · Eid, Mohamad

Memoir and Anti-Memoir: Experiments in Text and Image (CADT-UH 1027)

How does one attempt to write or portray the self? If we associate that practice with traditional memoir and self-portraiture forms, what happens when subjectivity is fundamentally unstable or under attack? Is the genre also simultaneously deconstructed? How is subjectivity literally made and remade through the exploration of new forms? In this course we will look at text and image projects across cultures, eras, locations, and across art forms that raise questions about the self and the collective, representation and memory, and about the remarkable as well as the everyday. Sometimes the doubt about attempts at portrayals is philosophical, but it may also be cultural-historical and context-dependent. To explore this question, and to develop skills in art, to experiment with the studio habits of artists, and to generate our own poetics of memoir/anti-memoir we will generate text and image experiments that both create and investigate an anti-memoir body of work.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CADT-UH 1027-000 (5220)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Magi, Jill

Introduction to Cryptography (CSCI-SHU 378)

The study of modern cryptography investigates mathematical techniques for securing information, systems and distributed computations against adversarial attacks. We introduce fundamental concepts of this study. Emphasis will be placed on rigorous proofs of security based on precise definitions and assumptions. Topics include: one-way functions, encryption, signatures, pseudorandom number generators and zero-knowledge proofs. Prerequisite: Algorithms, theory of probability, or permission of the instructor. Fulfillment: Mathematics Additional Electives; Honors Mathematics Electives; CS Electives.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CSCI-SHU 378-000 (18506)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Mon,Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Guo, Siyao

Introduction to Computer Programming (CSCI-SHU 11)

An introduction to the fundamentals of computer programming. Students design, write, and debug computer programs. No prior knowledge of programming is assumed. Students will learn programming using Python, a general purpose, cross-platform programming language with a clear, readable syntax. Most class periods will be part lecture, part lab as you explore ideas and put them into practice. This course is suitable for students not intending in majoring in computer science as well as for students intending to major in computer science but having no programming experience. Students with previous programming experience should instead take Introduction to Computer Science. Prerequisite: Either placed into Calculus or at least a C in Pre-Calculus Fulfillment: Core Curriculum Requirement Algorithmic Thinking; EE Required Major Courses. Note: Students who have taken ICS in NY, Abu Dhabi, and Shanghai cannot take ICP.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (17503)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (17504)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23632)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23633)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Liu, Yijian


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23634)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23767)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Liu, Yijian


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (26252)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
9:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Spathis, Promethee


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (26253)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
9:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Spathis, Promethee

Discrete Mathematics (CS-UH 1002)

Discrete mathematics concerns the study of mathematical structures that are discrete rather than continuous, and provides a powerful language for investigating many areas of computer science. Discrete structures are characterized by distinct elements, which are often represented by integers. Continuous mathematics on the other hand deals with real numbers. Topics in this course include: sets, counting techniques, logic, proof techniques, solving recurrence relations, number theory, probability, statistics, graph theory, and discrete geometry. These mathematical tools are illustrated with applications in computer science.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 1002-000 (3526)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fernandes, Joao Paulo · Ahmad, Liza


CS-UH 1002-000 (3624)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Mumtaz, Sara


CS-UH 1002-000 (3917)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Ahmed, Dena


CS-UH 1002-000 (19983)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 1002-000 (19984)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 1002-000 (19985)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

VFX in the Age of Virtual Production (INTM-SHU 257T)

In this era of virtual production, time-based media faces new opportunities and challenges in terms of pipelines, workflows, and distribution. Decentralizing, hybridizing, and outsourcing among film studios, production houses, broadcast design, interactive studios, and the gaming industry have become major topics of discourse in academia and industry. This course focuses on the history/context, present practice, and the emerging trends of VFX studies and its applications. Through collaborative research with academia and industry, the course investigates the theory and practice of VFX studies and further examines the feasibility of emerging technologies through the spirit of entrepreneurship. Prerequisite: Interaction Lab / Creative Coding Lab / Communications Lab / Application Lab Fulfillment: IMA Major Electives; IMB Major Interactive Media Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


INTM-SHU 257T-000 (20125)
08/30/2021 – 12/10/2021 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Chen, Wu Wei

Artificial Intelligence (CSCI-UA 9472)

There are many cognitive tasks that people can do easily and almost unconsciously but that have proven extremely difficult to program on a computer. Artificial intelligence is the problem of developing computer systems that can carry out these tasks. We will focus on three central areas in AI: representation and reasoning, machine learning, and natural language processing.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CSCI-UA 9472-000 (2636)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


CSCI-UA 9472-000 (2637)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
7:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

PROBLEM SOLVING AND PROGRAMMING I (CS-UY 1113)

This course introduces problem solving and computer programming and is for undergraduate engineering students who do not have prior experience in programming in any language. The course covers fundamentals of computer programming and its underlying principles using the Python programming language. Concepts and methods introduced in the course are illustrated by examples from engineering and other disciplines. | Co-requisite: EX-UY 1; Anti-requisite: CS-UY 1114

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 1113-000 (12329)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Romero Cruz, Sebastian


CS-UY 1113-000 (12330)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Romero Cruz, Sebastian


CS-UY 1113-000 (12331)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12332)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12333)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12334)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12335)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12336)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12337)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter

French/African Relations (SCA-UA 9914)

A historical and political inquiry into the French system of relations with Francophone Africa from the ‘race to Empire’ in the 19th century to the current day. The main goals of the course are: to describe the historical development of French-African relations from the colonial to the post-independence era; to investigate the political, economic and cultural mechanisms of French influence in contemporary Francophone Africa; to understand the consequences for France of complex developments subsequent to colonialism, such as African immigration in France. Conducted in French.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


SCA-UA 9914-000 (18471)
09/01/2023 – 12/06/2023 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by Taraud, Christelle

Elementary Swahili I (SCA-UA 121)

Provides students with an elementary understanding of Swahili, a Bantu language with a rich oral and written tradition that is spoken by about 100 million people from Somalia to Mozambique and Zanzibar. After a short presentation of Swahili?s history, codification, and relation to other languages, students are drilled in phonetics and grammar. They are also introduced to poems, songs, and oral narratives.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


SCA-UA 121-000 (9390)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nanji, Abdul

Social and Cultural Analysis 101 (SCA-UA 101)

Introduces theories, methods, and political trajectories central to the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis (SCA). SCA 101 addresses how individuals and populations structure their worlds and navigate the resulting social, cultural, and political terrain. It privileges scholarly work with an intersectional approach, drawing on theoretical insights from such fields as social geography, feminism and queer studies, ethnic studies, urban and metropolitan studies, critical race theory, labor studies, and cultural studies.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


SCA-UA 101-000 (9221)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patros, Tyson


SCA-UA 101-000 (9222)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grimaldi, Nicole


SCA-UA 101-000 (9223)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grimaldi, Nicole


SCA-UA 101-000 (9224)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ghabin, Tamar


SCA-UA 101-000 (9225)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ghabin, Tamar

Intro to Soviet Cinema (RUSSN-UA 850)

Iampolski. Offered every year. 4 points. An examination of the history of Russian cinema from its beginnings. The main focus is on landmarks of cinematic art and on the cultural specificity of Russian cinema. The survey also includes questions of cinema and politics (cinema as a propaganda tool), and cinema and the market. Artists discussed include Eisenstein, Vertov, Pudovkin, Kuleshov, Barnet, Shub, Kozintsev, Trauberg, and Tarkovsky. Topics include cinema and revolution, the cinema of the Russian avant-garde and constructivism, cinema and totalitarianism, and socialist realism in film.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


RUSSN-UA 850-000 (23815)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Iampolski, Mikhail

Russian Grammar & Composition I (RUSSN-UA 5)

Designed for students who speak some Russian at home but have virtually no reading and writing skills. Does not satisfy the College Core Curriculum language requirement.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


RUSSN-UA 5-000 (8293)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Korsounskaia, Ekaterina


RUSSN-UA 5-000 (8850)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Belodedova, Irina

Elementary Russian II (RUSSN-UA 2)

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


RUSSN-UA 2-000 (8535)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Korsounskaia, Ekaterina


RUSSN-UA 2-000 (8536)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Korsounskaia, Ekaterina


RUSSN-UA 2-000 (9240)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Danilin, Michael


RUSSN-UA 2-000 (20392)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Efremova, Tatiana

Industrial Organizat’L Psychology (PSYCH-UA 62)

Personal, social, and environmental factors related to people?s attitudes and performance in industry and other organizations. Topics include personnel selection and evaluation, training and development, attitudes and motivation, leadership, group dynamics, organizational structure and climate, and job design and working conditions.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


PSYCH-UA 62-000 (9065)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldenberg, Liz

Lab in Personality & Social Psychology (PSYCH-UA 39)

Methodology and procedures of personality and social psychological research and exercises in data analysis and research design. Statistical concepts such as reliability and validity, methods of constructing personality measures, merits and limitations of correlational and experimental research designs, and empirical evaluation of theories. Student teams conduct research projects.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2022)


PSYCH-UA 39-000 (2400)
05/23/2022 – 07/06/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vega, Melissa · Abrams, Ellie

Advanced Psychological Statistics (PSYCH-UA 11)

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9029)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hilford, Andrew


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9030)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sun, Siqi


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9031)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sun, Siqi


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9134)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Judy


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9135)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Judy


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9363)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Qingqing


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9364)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Qingqing

Social Psychology (PSYCH-UA 32)

Gollwitzer, Trope, Uleman. Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduction to theories and research about the social behavior of individuals, such as perception of others and the self, attraction, affiliation, altruism and helping, aggression, moral thought and action, attitudes, influence, conformity, social exchange and bargaining, group decision making, leadership and power, and environmental psychology.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8510)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gollwitzer, Peter


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8511)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Adjei Boateng, Fiona


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8512)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwak, Jasmine


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8513)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tao, Bradley


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8514)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tao, Bradley


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8515)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwak, Jasmine


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8516)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liaquat, Usman


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (25991)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Adjei Boateng, Fiona


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (25995)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liaquat, Usman

Cognitive Neuroscience (PSYCH-UA 25)

Curtis, Davachi. Offered every semester. 4 points. Provides students with a broad understanding of the foundations of cognitive neuroscience, including dominant theories of the neural underpinnings of a variety of cognitive processes and the research that has led to those theories. In doing so, students also learn about the goals of cognitive neuroscience research and the methods that are being employed to reach these goals.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8500)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Curtis, Clayton


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8501)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Babu, Deepika


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8502)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Babu, Deepika


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8503)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yan, Dongni


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8504)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yan, Dongni

Cognition (PSYCH-UA 29)

McElree, Murphy, Rehder. Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduction to theories and research in some major areas of cognitive psychology, including human memory, attention, language production and comprehension, thinking, and reasoning.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8505)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ausch, Robert


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8506)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Muhareb, Samer


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8507)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Muhareb, Samer


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8508)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vaghani, Jhanvi Bharatbhai


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8509)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Muhareb, Samer


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (26096)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vaghani, Jhanvi Bharatbhai


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (26111)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vaghani, Jhanvi Bharatbhai

The Politics of Administrative Law (POL-UA 354)

Offered every other year. 4 points. Examines legal, political, and economic issues in government regulation. Covers such classic debates and issues as the historical origins of regulation, the legal philosophy of administrative regulation, the relationship between courts and agencies, the political and social conflicts surrounding regulatory politics, and the role of law in state formation.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


POL-UA 354-000 (20278)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harrington, Christine · Madson, Nathan

The Election Process (POL-UA 344)

Provides an understanding of election processes in the United States through different theoretical approaches to the study of campaigns and elections and the testing of empirical hypotheses. Analyzes campaign strategies of political candidates, the use of polls and media in campaigns, and the effects of issues and personalities on election outcomes. Evaluates the role of presidential primaries and elections in the functioning of a democracy.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


POL-UA 344-000 (20604)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nagler, Jonathan

Civil Liberties (POL-UA 332)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Interpretation of the Bill of Rights, the Civil War amendments, and other rights in the U.S. Constitution through the reading of Supreme Court opinions. Topics include freedom of speech and press; free exercise of religion and separation of church and state; the right of privacy; rights of the criminally accused; equal protection of the law against race, gender, and other discrimination; and the rights of franchise and citizenship. Cases are read and discussed closely for their legal and philosophical content.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


POL-UA 332-000 (10012)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harrington, Christine · Holfeuer, Kristen

Games, Strategy, and Politics (POL-UA 844)

Offered every year. 4 points. Theories of political strategy with emphasis on the theory of games. Uses of strategy in defense and deterrence policies of nations, guerrilla warfare of revolutionaries and terrorists, bargaining and negotiation processes, coalitions and the enforcement of collective action, and voting in committees and elections. Secrecy and deception as political strategies and uses of power, with some applications outside political science.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


POL-UA 844-000 (9366)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brams, Steven


POL-UA 844-000 (9369)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


POL-UA 844-000 (9370)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Comparative Politics of South Asia (POL-UA 562)

Introduces the comparative politics of South Asia. Analyzes the politics of South Asian countries, including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Nepal, individually and in a comparative framework. Readings are chosen from across disciplines, including political science, anthropology, economics, and history. The course also uses novels and films on South Asia to illustrate themes highlighted in the readings.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


POL-UA 562-000 (20838)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chandra, Kanchan

Gender in Law (POL-UA 336)

Examines the relationship between gender politics, legal theory, and social policy. Studies the role that the legal arena and certain historical conditions have played in creating, revising, and protecting particular gender identities and not others and examines the political effects of those legal constructions. Analyzes the major debates in feminist legal theory, including theories of equality, the problem of essentialism, and the relevance of standpoint epistomology. In addition to examining how the law understands sex discrimination in the workplace and the feminization of the legal profession, also addresses to what extent understandings of the gender affect how law regulates the physical body by looking at the regulation of reproduction and of consensual sexual activity. In light of all of the above, considers to what extent law is or is not an effective political resource in reforming notions of gender in law and society.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


POL-UA 336-000 (20835)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harrington, Christine

Int’L Pol of Middle East (POL-UA 760)

Systematic study of the international politics of the Middle East, emphasizing the period since World War II. Emphasis on the relationship among patterns of inter-Arab, Arab-Israeli, and great-power politics, and on the relationship between domestic and external politics. Attempts to relate the Arab-Israeli conflict to interregional politics, the place and role of Turkey and Iran, and the problems in the Persian Gulf.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2022)


POL-UA 760-000 (2364)
05/23/2022 – 07/06/2022 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Erbal, Ayda

Introduction to Research Methods for Politics (POL-UA 850)

New research is the most exciting and important aspect of political science: we are able to pose novel questions, construct fresh theories, and provide new evidence about the way the world works. But before we start doing research, we have to learn how it is done. With this in mind, this class will introduce students to quantitative techniques used for research in the study of politics. Part of this task is conceptual: helping students to think sensibly and systematically about research design. To this end, students will learn how data and theory fit together, and how to measure the quantities we care about. But part of the task is practical too: students will learn a `toolbox’ of methods–including statistical software–that enable them to execute their plans.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 850-000 (9156)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harvey, Anna


POL-UA 850-000 (9238)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by López Peceño, Alejandro


POL-UA 850-000 (9157)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by López Peceño, Alejandro


POL-UA 850-000 (9158)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pulejo, Massimo


POL-UA 850-000 (9159)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pulejo, Massimo


POL-UA 850-000 (9734)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Demin, Sasha


POL-UA 850-000 (25687)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Melnick, Justin

Western European Politics (POL-UA 9510)

Study of the politics of Britain, Ireland, France, and Germany. Compares the historical origins of these systems and analyzes their institutions as manifestations of their social and political culture and traditions. Treats each country’s current politics and political trends. Attempts to introduce the basic concepts of comparative political analysis in developing cross-cultural theory.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


POL-UA 9510-000 (3989)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Harmon, Josephine

Doing Political Economy: Apprs to Public Policy (POL-UA 842)

Political economy is a field of inquiry that has made great strides in recent years in explaining political and economic behavior by characterizing the incentives of actors and the context in which these actors make decisions and influence outcomes. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to these theoretical approaches and show how they can be used to address contemporary policy questions.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 842-000 (8877)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lee, Sukwon

International Politics (POL-UA 700)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Analysis of state behavior and international political relations; how things happen in the international state system and why. Emphasizes the issue of war and how and in what circumstances states engage in violence. Topics include different historical and possible future systems of international relations, imperialism, the Cold War, game theory and deterrents, national interests, and world organization.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 700-000 (8260)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bueno De Mesquita, Bruce


POL-UA 700-000 (8261)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Becker, Michael


POL-UA 700-000 (8262)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Becker, Michael


POL-UA 700-000 (8263)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yildirim, Mikdat


POL-UA 700-000 (8264)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yildirim, Mikdat


POL-UA 700-000 (8265)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schwarz, Christopher


POL-UA 700-000 (8266)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schwarz, Christopher


POL-UA 700-000 (8267)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ge, Zoe


POL-UA 700-000 (9112)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ge, Zoe


POL-UA 700-000 (10194)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by MEDA, Francis William


POL-UA 700-000 (10195)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by MEDA, Francis William

Comparative Politics (POL-UA 500)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Major concepts, approaches, problems, and literature in the field of comparative politics. Methodology of comparative politics, the classical theories, and the more recent behavioral revolution. Reviews personality, social structure, socialization, political culture, and political parties. Major approaches such as group theory, structural-functionalism, systems analysis, and communications theory and evaluation of the relevance of political ideology; national character; elite and class analysis; and problems of conflict, violence, and internal war.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 500-000 (8257)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Slough, Tara


POL-UA 500-000 (8258)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Mark


POL-UA 500-000 (8259)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Mark


POL-UA 500-000 (10534)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Niu, He


POL-UA 500-000 (9210)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Niu, He


POL-UA 500-000 (9360)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by He, Ning


POL-UA 500-000 (9361)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by He, Ning


POL-UA 500-000 (25686)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cheng, Mengfan

Power & Politics in America (POL-UA 300)

A survey of national political institutions and behavior in the United States, which introduces students to a variety of analytical concepts and approaches useful for the study of domestic politics. Concepts typically covered include public goods and collective action; preference aggregation and the median voter theorem; delegation, representation, and accountability; agenda control; inter-branch bargaining; and the mechanisms of private influence on public policy.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 300-000 (8252)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dawes, Christopher Todd


POL-UA 300-000 (8253)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wirsching, Elisa


POL-UA 300-000 (8254)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, Lexi


POL-UA 300-000 (8255)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, Lexi


POL-UA 300-000 (8256)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wirsching, Elisa


POL-UA 300-000 (8796)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heo, Kun


POL-UA 300-000 (8797)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heo, Kun


POL-UA 300-000 (10192)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McGrath, David

Political Theory (POL-UA 100)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduces students to some outstanding theories of politics. The theories treated offer alternative conceptions of political life, and they are examined from both theoretical and historical perspectives. Among the theorists included are Plato, Aristotle, Locke, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Rousseau, Mill, and Marx.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 100-000 (9202)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pevnick, Ryan


POL-UA 100-000 (9203)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bose, Amartya


POL-UA 100-000 (9204)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bose, Amartya


POL-UA 100-000 (9205)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yi, Sophie


POL-UA 100-000 (9206)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yi, Sophie

Astrophysics (PHYS-UA 150)

Introduction to modern astrophysical problems with an emphasis on the physical concepts involved?radio, optical, and X-ray astronomy; stellar structure and evolution; white dwarfs, pulsars, and black holes; and galaxies, quasars, and cosmology.

Physics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


PHYS-UA 150-000 (10148)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scoccimarro, Roman


PHYS-UA 150-000 (10149)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Electricity & Magnet I (PHYS-UA 131)

Introduction to Maxwell’s equations with applications to physical problems. Topics include electrostatics, magnetostatics, the solution of the Laplace and Poisson equations, dielectrics and magnetic materials, electromagnetic waves and radiation, Fresnel equations, transmission lines, wave guides, and special relativity.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHYS-UA 131-000 (8212)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gruzinov, Andrei


PHYS-UA 131-000 (8213)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 131-000 (9331)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Computational Physics (PHYS-UA 210)

Introduction to computational physics, with an emphasis on fields of current research interest where numerical techniques provide unique physical insight. Topics are chosen from various branches of physics, including numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations, eigenvalue problems, Monte Carlo methods in statistical mechanics, field theory, dynamical systems, and chaos.

Physics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHYS-UA 210-000 (8214)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sels, Dries


PHYS-UA 210-000 (8871)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Quantum Mechanics I (PHYS-UA 123)

Designed to deepen the insights into quantum mechanics introduced in PHYS-UA 103, 104 and to provide an introduction to the more formal mathematical structure of quantum mechanics. The Schr?dinger and Heisenberg description of quantal systems; perturbation theory; spin and statistics; coupling of angular momenta; scattering theory; and applications to atomic, molecular, nuclear, and elementary particle physics.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHYS-UA 123-000 (8210)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grier, David


PHYS-UA 123-000 (8211)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 123-000 (9336)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Physics II (PHYS-UA 93)

Continuation of PHYS-UA 91. Topics include electrostatics; dielectrics; currents and circuits; the magnetic field and magnetic materials; induction; AC circuits; Maxwell’s equations.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8451)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hogg, David


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8452)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lant, Caspar


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8453)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lant, Caspar


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8454)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Dynamics (PHYS-UA 120)

Topics include conservation laws, central force motion, Lagrange’s and Hamilton’s equations, non-inertial frames, inertia tensor, rigid body dynamics, coupled oscillators and particles, eigenvalues, eigenvectors and normal modes.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHYS-UA 120-000 (9318)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moscatelli, Frank


PHYS-UA 120-000 (9319)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Loizeau, Nicolas


PHYS-UA 120-000 (9503)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Loizeau, Nicolas

General Physics II (PHYS-UA 12)

Continuation of PHYS-UA 11. Topics include electric charge, field, and potential; magnetic forces and fields; resistive, capacitive, and inductive circuits; electromagnetic induction; wave motion; electromagnetic waves; geometrical optics; interference, diffraction, and polarization of light; relativity; atomic and nuclear structure; elementary particle physics.

Physics (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10171)


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10172)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Somawanshi, Prajwal Prakshep


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10173)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (23490)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10175)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (23495)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10177)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10178)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10179)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10180)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10181)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10182)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10183)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Engstler, Justin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10184)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by La Madrid, Joan


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10185)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by La Madrid, Joan


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10186)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10187)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10188)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10642)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (25702)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Somawanshi, Prajwal Prakshep

Existentialism and Phenomenology (PHIL-UA 36)

Examines the characteristic method, positions, and themes of the existentialist and phenomenological movements and traces their development through study of such thinkers as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Sartre.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


PHIL-UA 36-000 (19900)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jauernig, Anja


PHIL-UA 36-000 (19901)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Barat, Alan


PHIL-UA 36-000 (19902)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Barat, Alan

Philosophy of Physics (PHIL-UA 94)

We will investigate different approaches to understanding space and time, and how the account of space-time structure has evolved in physics. One of the main objectives is to have a clear and accurate understanding of the Special Theory of Relativity, detailed enough to allow the student to solve some physics problems. This will require a bit of mathematics, but not more than algebra. We will discuss the General Theory of Relativity in a more qualitative way, including an account of the structure of black holes. Philosophy students do not need any further background in physics or mathematics, and physics students will not benefit from greater mathematical sophistication. We will also study the relevant history of physics and philosophy, particularly the debate between Newton and Leibniz about the nature of space and time. There will be two lectures each week and a recitation section.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


PHIL-UA 94-000 (19175)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Maudlin, Tim


PHIL-UA 94-000 (19176)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher


PHIL-UA 94-000 (19177)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher

Set Theory (PHIL-UA 73)

An introduction to the basic concepts and results of set theory.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


PHIL-UA 73-000 (19544)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fine, Kit


PHIL-UA 73-000 (19545)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher


PHIL-UA 73-000 (19546)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher

History of Ancient Philosophy (PHIL-UA 20)

Examines some of the most important philosophical ideas and developments in Ancient Greece and Rome. Covers major writings by Plato and Aristotle, and a selection of writings by such thinkers as the Presocratics, Stoics, Epicureans, and Skeptics.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8864)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moss, Jessica


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8865)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lingle, Clara


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8866)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lingle, Clara


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8867)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beizaei, Banafsheh


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8868)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beizaei, Banafsheh

Global Ethics (PHIL-UA 6)

This course aims to accomplish two things. The first is to introduce three broad traditions of normative thinking about social issues from around the globe: a Confucian tradition, one based in Islamic legal traditions, and one derived from European liberalism. The second is to address three current areas of normative debate: about global economic inequality, about gender justice and human rights. We shall explore these first-order questions against the background of the three broad traditions. Our aim will be to understand some of differences of approach that shape the global conversation about these issues that concern people around the world.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20339)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Appiah, Kwame Anthony


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20340)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wu, Patrick


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20341)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wu, Patrick


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20342)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zacek, Justin


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20343)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zacek, Justin

Music Theory II (MUSIC-UA 202)

Music Major Distribution Requirement. Chromatic harmony as developed and practiced by composers of the 19th century and beyond. Introduction to score reading and principles of musical analysis applied to larger musical structures. Continuation of species counterpoint and an introduction to invertible counterpoint and fugue.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MUSIC-UA 202-000 (9126)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beeferman, Gordon


MUSIC-UA 202-000 (9127)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zamcheck, Akiva


MUSIC-UA 202-000 (9128)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zamcheck, Akiva

Politics of The Middle East (MEIS-UA 750)

Historical-political background of the Middle East and its contemporary social and political problems, including the impact of the West; religious and liberal reactions; conflict of nationalisms (Arab, Iranian, Turkish, and Zionist); and revolutionary socialism. Specific social, political, and economic problems?using a few selected countries for comparison and analysis?including the role of the military, the intelligentsia, the religious classes, the legitimization of power, urban-rural cleavages, bureaucracy, and political parties.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9142)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Keshavarzian, Arang


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9143)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bell, Robert


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9144)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by ODell, Kelley


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9145)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bell, Robert


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9146)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by ODell, Kelley

Mediterranean Worlds (MEIS-UA 660)

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 660-000 (21873)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Balbale, Abigail


MEIS-UA 660-000 (21874)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cuyler, Zack


MEIS-UA 660-000 (21875)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cuyler, Zack

Elementary Hindi (MEIS-UA 405)

As a part of a two-year curriculum, prepares the student for a high level of proficiency in Hindi. Through a variety of class, small-group, and paired activities, as well as language and computer lab sessions, students are expected to develop reading, speaking, listening, and writing skills. The instructor also takes into consideration individual needs.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 405-000 (10146)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhargava, Rajni


MEIS-UA 405-000 (10147)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhargava, Rajni

Intermediate Arabic I (MEIS-UA 103)

Builds on the skills acquired in Elementary Arabic I and II, with increased emphasis on writing and reading from modern sources, in addition to aural/oral proficiency.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 103-000 (8161)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Alnaemi, Ali


MEIS-UA 103-000 (8162)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Alnaemi, Ali


MEIS-UA 103-000 (8163)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Amani

The Emergence of The Modern Middle East (MEIS-UA 690)

Surveys main political, social, economic, and intellectual currents of the 20th century. Emphasis on historical background and development of current problems in the region. Topics include imperialism, nationalism, religion, Orientalism, women, class formation, oil, the Arab-Israeli crisis, and the Iranian revolution.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2022)


MEIS-UA 690-000 (5389)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MEIS-UA 690-000 (2662)
07/07/2022 – 08/17/2022 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mousavi, Bita


MEIS-UA 690-000 (2671)
07/07/2022 – 08/17/2022 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mousavi, Bita

South Asian Literature (MEIS-UA 717)

Addresses the rich literary product of modern and contemporary South Asia. Offers more advanced undergraduates a window on a rich and culturally varied area of the world, as well as an understanding of aspects of South Asian history and society as represented in translations of modern prose writing (short stories and novels) originally written in South Asian languages.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MEIS-UA 717-000 (9065)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ilieva, Gabriela Nik

Elementary Arabic II (MEIS-UA 102)

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MEIS-UA 102-000 (8421)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badawi, Ghada


MEIS-UA 102-000 (8422)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badawi, Ghada


MEIS-UA 102-000 (8423)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Amani

Elementary Arabic I (MEIS-UA 101)

Builds basic skills in modern standard Arabic, the language read and understood by educated Arabs from Baghdad to Casablanca. Five hours per week of instruction and drills, stressing the proficiency approach, plus work in the language laboratory.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 101-000 (8158)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badawi, Ghada


MEIS-UA 101-000 (8159)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badawi, Ghada


MEIS-UA 101-000 (8160)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Amani


MEIS-UA 101-000 (25871)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Suliman, Anas

Honors Analysis II (MATH-UA 329)

Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in Honors Analysis I (MATH-UA 328), or a grade of A in Analysis (MATH-UA 325) and permission of instructor. Continuation of Honors Analysis I (MATH-UA 328). Topics include: metric spaces, differentiation of functions of several real variables, the implicit and inverse function theorems, Riemann integral on R^n, Lebesgue measure on R^n, the Lebesgue integral.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 329-000 (8889)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gunturk, C Sinan


MATH-UA 329-000 (8890)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mui, Stephanie

Introduction to Fluid Dynamics (MATH-UA 230)

Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in Calculus III (MATH-UA 123) or Math for Economics III (MATH-UA 213) (for economics majors). Recommended: Mathematical Physics (PHYS-UA 106). Fluid dynamics is the branch of physics that can describe the flow of blood in the human body, the flight of an insect, or the motions of weather systems. Key concepts include: the formalism of continuum mechanics; the conservation of mass, energy, and momentum in a fluid; the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations; and viscosity and vorticity. These concepts are applied to such classic problems in fluid dynamics as potential flow around a cylinder, the propagation of sound and gravity waves, and the onset of instability in shear flow.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 230-000 (8755)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sreenivasan, Katepalli Raju


MATH-UA 230-000 (8802)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 230-000 (25084)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dsa, Remston

Functions of a Complex Variable (MATH-UA 282)

Complex numbers and complex functions. Differentiation and the Cauchy-Riemann equations. Cauchy?s theorem and the Cauchy integral formula. Singularities, residues, Taylor and Laurent series. Fractional linear transformations and conformal mapping. Analytic continuation.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 282-000 (8398)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Becker, Simon


MATH-UA 282-000 (8399)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Thoma, Eric


MATH-UA 282-000 (10621)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Thoma, Eric

Numerical Analysis (MATH-UA 252)

In numerical analysis one explores how mathematical problems can be analyzed and solved with a computer. As such, numerical analysis has very broad applications in mathematics, physics, engineering, finance, and the life sciences. This course introduces the subject for mathematics majors. Theory and practical examples using Matlab are combined in the studying of topics ranging from simple root-finding procedures to differential equations and the finite element method.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 252-000 (8390)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 252-000 (8391)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 252-000 (9168)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stadler, Georg


MATH-UA 252-000 (9169)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Toler, Evan


MATH-UA 252-000 (9405)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Potter, Samuel


MATH-UA 252-000 (9406)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Martinez Aguilar, Mariana

Combinatorics (MATH-UA 240)

Techniques for counting and enumeration, including generating functions, the principle of inclusion and exclusion, and Polya counting. Graph theory. Modern algorithms and data structures for graph theoretic problems.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 240-000 (8386)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bogomolov, Fedor


MATH-UA 240-000 (8387)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kazi, Sujay

Theory of Probability (MATH-UA 233)

Introduction to the mathematical techniques of random phenomena occurring in the natural, physical, and social sciences. Axioms of mathematical probability, combinatorial analysis, binomial distribution, Poisson and normal approximation, random variables and probability distributions, generating functions, Markov chains, applications.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 233-000 (8695)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tanzi, Matteo


MATH-UA 233-000 (8696)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Linfeng


MATH-UA 233-000 (8885)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leibovich, Matan


MATH-UA 233-000 (9078)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Liudeng


MATH-UA 233-000 (10636)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dunlap, Alexander


MATH-UA 233-000 (10638)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Liudeng


MATH-UA 233-000 (19808)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Stepp, Elizabeth


MATH-UA 233-000 (19809)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Zhang, Linfeng


MATH-UA 233-000 (26180)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Doshi, Jash Tejaskumar

Mathematical Statistics (MATH-UA 234)

Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in Theory of Probability (MATH-UA 233) or equivalent. Not open to students who have taken Probability and Statistics (MATH-UA 235). Introduction to the mathematical foundations and techniques of modern statistical analysis used in the interpretation of data in quantitative sciences. Mathematical theory of sampling; normal populations and distributions; chi-square, t, and F distributions; hypothesis testing; estimation; confidence intervals; sequential analysis; correlation, regression, and analysis of variance. Applications to the sciences.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 234-000 (8382)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nitzschner, Maximilian


MATH-UA 234-000 (8383)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Plotkin, Ted


MATH-UA 234-000 (9440)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dies, Erik


MATH-UA 234-000 (9441)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Plotkin, Ted

Calculus III (MATH-UA 123)

Prerequisite: MATH-UA.0122 with a grade of C or better, departmental placement exam, or permission of the department. Functions of several variables. Vectors in the plane and space. Partial derivatives with applications. Double and triple integrals. Spherical and cylindrical coordinates. Surface and line integrals. Divergence, gradient, and curl. Theorem of Gauss and Stokes.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 123-000 (8378)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Normand, Raoul


MATH-UA 123-000 (9179)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ristroph, Leif


MATH-UA 123-000 (9180)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Shizhu


MATH-UA 123-000 (8379)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Shizhu


MATH-UA 123-000 (8380)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leingang, Matthew


MATH-UA 123-000 (24839)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Linear Algebra (MATH-UA 140)

Systems of linear equations. Gaussian elimination, matrices, determinants, and Cramer?s rule. Vectors, vector spaces, basis and dimension, linear transformations. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, quadratic forms.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 140-000 (8381)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hammoud, Naima


MATH-UA 140-000 (10125)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qi, Sihan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10126)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qi, Sihan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10127)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Jiarui


MATH-UA 140-000 (10128)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Jiarui


MATH-UA 140-000 (8986)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sia, Charmaine


MATH-UA 140-000 (10129)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Xuenan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10130)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Xuenan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10131)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kotwal, Adit


MATH-UA 140-000 (10132)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kotwal, Adit


MATH-UA 140-000 (10120)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Shizhu


MATH-UA 140-000 (10121)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yap, Ted


MATH-UA 140-000 (10122)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yap, Ted


MATH-UA 140-000 (10123)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stempel, Jordan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10124)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Frank, Natalie


MATH-UA 140-000 (9777)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hammoud, Naima


MATH-UA 140-000 (10469)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Denis, Evan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10468)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harrington, Jeremiah

Calculus II (MATH-UA 122)

Techniques of integration. Further applications. Plane analytic geometry. Polar coordinates and parametric equations. Infinite series, including power series.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 122-000 (8373)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sondjaja, Mutiara


MATH-UA 122-000 (8374)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 122-000 (8375)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shum, Fanny


MATH-UA 122-000 (8376)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sondjaja, Mutiara


MATH-UA 122-000 (8377)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Feklistova, Mariya


MATH-UA 122-000 (8677)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Feklistova, Mariya


MATH-UA 122-000 (10117)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flek, Ruslan


MATH-UA 122-000 (10118)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shum, Fanny


MATH-UA 122-000 (24841)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kalaycioglu, Selin

Discrete Mathematics (MATH-UA 120)

A first course in discrete mathematics. Sets, algorithms, and induction. Combinatorics. Graphs and trees. Combinatorial circuits. Logic and Boolean algebra.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 120-000 (8370)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sia, Charmaine


MATH-UA 120-000 (8371)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flek, Ruslan


MATH-UA 120-000 (8372)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flek, Ruslan


MATH-UA 120-000 (8694)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chikhany, Ralph


MATH-UA 120-000 (8807)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 120-000 (8985)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leingang, Matthew


MATH-UA 120-000 (9437)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sanfratello, Andrew


MATH-UA 120-000 (9476)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sanfratello, Andrew


MATH-UA 120-000 (10639)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chikhany, Ralph


MATH-UA 120-000 (24840)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Oveys, Hesam


MATH-UA 120-000 (24904)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Oveys, Hesam


MATH-UA 120-000 (26350)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Clarkson, Corrin


MATH-UA 120-000 (26380)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Clarkson, Corrin

Calculus I (MATH-UA 121)

Any one of the following: a score of 670 or higher on the mathematics portion of the SAT, a score of 650 or higher on the SAT Subject Test in Mathematics 1, a score of 650 or higher on the SAT Subject Test in Mathematics 2, an ACT mathematics score of 30 or higher, a score of 3 or higher on the AP Calculus AB exam, an AB subscore of 3 or higher on the AP Calculus BC exam, a score of 3 or higher on the AP Calculus BC exam, a grade of C or higher in Algebra and Calculus (MATH-UA 9), or a passing score on a departmental placement exam. Derivatives, antiderivatives, and integrals of functions of one variable. Applications include graphing, maximizing, and minimizing functions. Definite integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Areas and volumes.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 121-000 (10098)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kalaycioglu, Selin


MATH-UA 121-000 (10099)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saha, Shuvadeep


MATH-UA 121-000 (10100)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saha, Shuvadeep


MATH-UA 121-000 (20793)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patki, Sarvesh


MATH-UA 121-000 (20794)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patki, Sarvesh


MATH-UA 121-000 (10102)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Foster, Joseph


MATH-UA 121-000 (10103)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Agostino, Marina


MATH-UA 121-000 (10104)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Agostino, Marina


MATH-UA 121-000 (10105)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Salha, Fatima


MATH-UA 121-000 (10106)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Salha, Fatima


MATH-UA 121-000 (10107)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sia, Charmaine


MATH-UA 121-000 (10108)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vasantha, Rajashekar


MATH-UA 121-000 (10109)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Star, Zachary


MATH-UA 121-000 (10110)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vasantha, Rajashekar


MATH-UA 121-000 (10111)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Star, Zachary


MATH-UA 121-000 (10112)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Foster, Joseph


MATH-UA 121-000 (10113)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cortes, Julian


MATH-UA 121-000 (10114)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cortes, Julian


MATH-UA 121-000 (10115)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gangan, Pradyuman


MATH-UA 121-000 (10116)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gangan, Pradyuman

Algebra and Calculus (MATH-UA 9)

Prerequisite: Three years of high school math or permission of the department. An intensive course in intermediate algebra and trigonometry. Topics include algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their graphs.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 9-000 (8365)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Foster, Joseph


MATH-UA 9-000 (8366)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Haosheng


MATH-UA 9-000 (8367)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Haosheng


MATH-UA 9-000 (8368)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sivakumar, Pranav Kamesh


MATH-UA 9-000 (8369)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sivakumar, Pranav Kamesh

Shakespeare (MEDI-UA 410)

Medieval & Renaissance Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


MEDI-UA 410-000 (10578)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MEDI-UA 410-000 (10579)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MEDI-UA 410-000 (10580)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Neural Bases of Language (LING-UA 43)

A state-of-the-art survey of the cognitive neuroscience of language, a rapidly developing multidisciplinary field at the intersection of linguistics, psycholinguistics, and neuroscience. Covers all aspects of language processing in the healthy brain, from early sensory perception to sentence-level semantic interpretation, as well as a range of neurological and development language disorders.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


LING-UA 43-000 (10444)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pylkkanen, Liina


LING-UA 43-000 (10445)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Blanco-Elorrieta, Esti

Bilingualism (LING-UA 18)

Considers social forces that favor or inhibit bilingualism, as well as the educational consequences of bilingual education (and of monolingual education for bilingual children). Examines the impact of bilingualism on the languages involved. Special attention to code switching, with particular reference to its psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic aspects.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


LING-UA 18-000 (8465)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vrzic, Zvjezdana · Møller Krogh, Simone

Language and Mind (LING-UA 3)

Introduces the field of cognitive science through an examination of language behavior. Begins with interactive discussions of how best to characterize and study the mind. These principles are then illustrated through an examination of research and theories related to language representation and use. Draws from research in both formal linguistics and psycholinguistics.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


LING-UA 3-000 (8921)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cournane, Ailis · McElree, Brian


LING-UA 3-000 (8922)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grosu, Ioana


LING-UA 3-000 (8923)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flower, Nigel

Sound and Language (LING-UA 11)

Phonetic and phonological theory at an elementary level. Topics include the description and analysis of speech sounds, the anatomy and physiology of speech, speech acoustics, and phonological processes. Students develop skills to distinguish and produce sounds used in the languages of the world and to transcribe them using the International Phonetic Alphabet.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


LING-UA 11-000 (8045)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Davidson, Lisa


LING-UA 11-000 (8046)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


LING-UA 11-000 (8047)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Repetti-Ludlow, Chiara

Sex, Gender, & Language (LING-UA 21)

How linguistic practices reflect and shape our gender identity. Do women and men talk differently? Are these differences universal or variable across cultures? How does gendered language intersect with race and class-linked language? What impact does gendered language have on social power relationships?

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LING-UA 21-000 (8360)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shapp, Allison


LING-UA 21-000 (8361)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Akanegbu, Anuli

Phonological Analysis (LING-UA 12)

How languages organize sounds into highly constrained systems. Topics: What do the sound systems of all languages have in common? How can they differ from each other? What is the nature of phonological processes, and why do they occur?

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LING-UA 12-000 (8357)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stanton, Juliet


LING-UA 12-000 (8963)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mason, Alicia

Language (LING-UA 1)

Language is a social phenomenon, but languages share elaborate and specific structural properties. Speech communities exist, exhibit variation, and change within the strict confines of universal grammar, part of our biological endowment. Universal grammar is discovered through the careful study of the structures of individual languages, by cross-linguistic investigations, and the investigation of the brain. Introduces fundamental properties of the sound system and of the structure and interpretation of words and sentences against this larger context.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LING-UA 1-000 (8354)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Champollion, Lucas


LING-UA 1-000 (8355)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grosu, Ioana


LING-UA 1-000 (8356)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Okon, Thaddeus


LING-UA 1-000 (9146)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Thoms, Gary


LING-UA 1-000 (9147)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Blix, Hagen


LING-UA 1-000 (9148)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhao, Zhuoye

Choreography: A Field Guide for Dance (ARTS-UG 1220)

This class is a guide through the works of choreographers who can teach us the elements of making dance and enable us to create our own movement identity. The psychological storytelling of Martha Graham, George Balanchine’s blazing neo-classicism, the chance field dances of Merce Cunningham, Twyla Tharp’s humorous inversions, the deconstructions of William Forsythe, Mathew Bourne’s gay Swan Lake, and the powerful Black gospel songs of Alvin Ailey are observed through video and readings. After a warmup of technique and improvisation, the student begins with small movement studies, leading to group studies of increasing complexity, with teacher and students responding with supportive feedback. New this semester will be a section, “Dance as Protest,” which explores texts such as Hot Feet and Social Change: African Dance and Diaspora Communities. We will study the movie In the Heights, where Afro-Caribbean dance, ballet, contemporary and hip hop convey ideas about community and representation. Texts include The Intimate Art of Choreography and “Dance in the Age of Black Lives Matter.” Students can have studied dance or simply wish to move and compose using their body and imagination. Student works in a final performance in the theater will be recorded.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1220-000 (17011)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Posin, Kathryn

Issues & Ideas: (JOUR-UA 9505)

This course aims to bring together diverse issues and perspectives in the rapidly evolving and changing area of international/global communication. Through a historical perspective, a framework will be established for the appreciation of the development of the immense scope, disparity, and complexity of this rapidly evolving field. Students will be encouraged to critically assess shifts in national, regional, and international media patterns of production, distribution, and consumption over time, leading to a critical analysis of the tumultuous contemporary global communication environment. Essential concepts of international communication will be examined, including trends in national and global media consolidation, cultural implications of globalization, international broadcasting, information flows, international communication law and regulation, and trends in communication and information technologies. The focus of the course will be international, with attention being paid both to Western-based multimedia conglomerates, as well as to the increasing global prominence of media corporations based in other regions, contributing to the reversal of international media flows and challenging the global hegemony of the Western media producers. Particular emphasis will be on the Czech Republic, as an empirical example of a national media system affected by global media flows.

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


JOUR-UA 9505-000 (3457)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Klvana, Tomas

Creative Writing in Italian (ITAL-UA 9103)

Students entering the course should have mastered the fundamental structure of Italian. The course is designed to help students gain confidence and increase their effectiveness in writing present-day Italian. Conducted in Italian.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITAL-UA 9103-000 (3883)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by

Intensive Intermediate Italian (ITAL-UA 20)

Completes the equivalent of Intermediate Italian I and II in one semester.

Italian (Undergraduate)
6 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ITAL-UA 20-000 (10042)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zanobi, Marina


ITAL-UA 20-000 (9538)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Di Domenico, Giorgio

Intermediate Italian I (ITAL-UA 11)

Not equivalent to ITAL-UAV 20. Only by combining ITAL-UA 11 with ITAL-UA 12 can a student complete the equivalent of ITAL-UA 20 and then continue on to the postintermediate level.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ITAL-UA 11-000 (20634)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gualdi, Greta


ITAL-UA 11-000 (8950)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rinaldi, Tiziana

Perception and the Brain (CCEX-SHU 122)

“How do humans and other animals obtain knowledge about the world? It is easy to take perception for granted, but complex processes (only partly understood) underlie our ability to understand the world by seeing, hearing, feeling, tasting, and smelling it. This is not because the scientific study of perception is new. In fact, perception has fascinated philosophers, physicists, and physiologists for centuries. Currently, perception is a central topic in psychology, cognitive science, computer science, and neuroscience. How do scientists approach perception? We seek to discover lawful relations between perceptual experiences and the physical world and to develop models of the processes and mechanisms in the brain that produce these connections. In this course, in the lectures, we will discuss fundamental problems in perception (primarily vision), and in the lab sessions, you will learn about standard experimental methods and their use in the study of perceptual processes and to give you first-hand experience in conducting original research. As part of these activities you will learn to write experimental reports and to think critically about the relation between theory and experiment. You will also be exposed to the use of computers in perception research. Indeed, there will be considerable use of computers in the course, with part of the goal being to provide you with basic computer skills.” Prereq: None Fulfillment: CORE ED

Exper Discovery in Nat World (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CCEX-SHU 122-000 (23960)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Li, Li


CCEX-SHU 122-000 (23961)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Li, Li

Intro to Sociology (SOC-UA 1)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Survey of the field of sociology: its basic concepts, theories, and research orientation. Threshold course that provides the student with insights into the social factors in human life. Topics include social interaction, socialization, culture, social structure, stratification, political power, deviance, social institutions, and social change.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


SOC-UA 1-000 (20398)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Morning, Ann


SOC-UA 1-000 (20399)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martin-Caughey, Ananda


SOC-UA 1-000 (20400)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Um, Sejin


SOC-UA 1-000 (20401)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nelson, Christina


SOC-UA 1-000 (20420)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sieffert, Claire


SOC-UA 1-000 (20403)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martin-Caughey, Ananda


SOC-UA 1-000 (20404)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sieffert, Claire


SOC-UA 1-000 (20405)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cera, Michelle


SOC-UA 1-000 (20406)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Um, Sejin


SOC-UA 1-000 (20407)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nelson, Christina


SOC-UA 1-000 (20408)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cera, Michelle

The Social Challenges of Climate Change (SOC-UA 454)

This seminar examines how sociology can help us understand the challenge of climate change. We will briefly overview the climate science and learn about the rise of “weird weather,” but the core themes of the course concern questions about communication and cognition, cultural values and material consumption, politics and persuasion, mitigation and adaptation, economics and social justice, power and social movements, and the possibility of creating new, more sustainable ways of living on earth. We will dedicate several sessions dedicated to Superstorm Sandy and its aftermath, with a focus on the question of how to rebuild a more resilient city and region in anticipation of more extreme weather events.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


SOC-UA 454-000 (21743)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Klinenberg, Eric


SOC-UA 454-000 (21744)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Haile, Sewheat


SOC-UA 454-000 (21745)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Haile, Sewheat

Environmental Social Movements (ENVST-UA 9481)

How do social movements form in response to environmental concerns? What makes them effective or ineffective? This course analyses the various social movements that organized in response to environmental concerns. Both historical and sociological dimensions of environmental movements are covered, with particular attention given to how issues of environmental protection and social justice intersect. At NYU Berlin, the course includes American (I), European, and in particular German (II), as well as global movements (III).

Environmental Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENVST-UA 9481-000 (2369)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by

African-American History to 1865 (HIST-UA 647)

Survey of the experience of African Americans to 1865, emphasizing living conditions, treatment, images, attitudes, important figures and events, and culture using a chronological and topical approach. Topics include African way of life, initial contact between Africans and Europeans, slave trade, early slavery, freedom and control in slave society, abolitionism, slave resistance, free blacks, and gender.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


HIST-UA 647-000 (19675)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Mon,Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mitchell, Michele · Royster, Briana

Seminar On Modern Greek Culture (HEL-UA 130)

Topics in Hellenic Studies vary; please consult Notes section below for current course offering.

Hellenic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


HEL-UA 130-000 (9294)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Theodoratou, Helen


HEL-UA 130-000 (20589)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Astrinaki, Eleftheria

Dynamics (ME-UY 3223)

The course explores three-dimensional treatment of the kinematics of particles and rigid bodies using various coordinate systems, Newton’s laws, work, energy, impulse, momentum, conservative force fields, impact and rotation and plane motion of rigid bodies. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: ME-UY 2213 | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-UH 2011

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ME-UY 3223-000 (14918)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ME-UY 3223-000 (15064)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

THERMODYNAMICS (ME-UY 3333)

The course centers on properties of pure substances; concepts of work and heat; closed and open systems. Topics: Fundamental laws of thermodynamics. Carnot and Clasius statements of the 2nd law; entropy and entropy production; heat engines, refrigerators, heat pumps; efficiencies, coefficients of performance.| Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: MA-UY 1124 | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: MATH-UH 1020

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 3333-000 (12720)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Haverkamp, Sven


ME-UY 3333-000 (12721)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at ePoly
Instructed by Thorsen, Richard

Intensive Elementary German (GERM-UA 10)

Open to students with no previous training in German and to others on assignment by placement examination or with permission of the department. Completes the equivalent of a year’s elementary work GERM-UA 1 and GERM-UA 2 in one semester. Emphasizes spoken and written communication skills. Introduces students to the basic conventions, idioms, and structures of contemporary spoken German.

German (Undergraduate)
6 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


GERM-UA 10-000 (8246)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wagner, James

Elementary German I (GERM-UA 1)

Open only to students with no previous training in German; others require permission of the department. Offered every semester. 4 points.

German (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


GERM-UA 1-000 (8238)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Samartzi, Foteini


GERM-UA 1-000 (8239)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kaczmar, Maiken

Business of Video Games (MKTG-UB 58)

Video games are now a mainstream form of entertainment. In economic terms, this industry has experienced tremendous growth, despite a grueling recession, growing to an estimated $60 billion worldwide. A key development that has changed the playing field for both the producers and consumers of interactive entertainment is a shift away from physical retail to digital and online game distribution. The audience for games has also shifted—no longer the exclusive practice of hardcore gamers, video games have gained mass appeal in the form of social and casual gaming, on the internet, on consoles, and smartphones. At the same time, the development and publishing of games has become far more accessible. The game behind the game, in a manner of speaking, has changed. In this class, we explore the basic components of the current video game industry. Every week, we review major current events, will hear from people currently working in the industry, examine case studies, and discuss the overall business landscape. Central to each class is the notion that practical business considerations and the design-driven creative process do not have to be in opposition.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MKTG-UB 58-000 (10780)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Entertainment & Media Industries (MKTG-UB 40)

This course provides students with a framework for understanding the economics and key strategic issues facing organizations in the entertainment industry. It establishes a basis for the formulation of marketing tactics and strategies for firms competing for consumers’ discretionary spending. Recent developments in major sectors of the entertainment industry are covered, including movies, television and cable, theatre, and sports. Issues that cut across all types of entertainment industries are examined, including licensing, promotion, and new technologies.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10507)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Tuschman, Robert


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10508)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)at Washington SquareInstructed by Krushel, Kenneth J


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10509)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Hardart, Paul


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10510)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Lieberman, Alvin


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10547)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Lieberman, Alvin


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10601)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Narayanan, Sunder


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10640)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Narayanan, Sunder


MKTG-UB 40-000 (22981)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)at Washington SquareInstructed by

Acting French (FREN-UA 109)

Use of dramatic situations and readings to help students overcome inhibitions in their oral use of language. The graduated series of exercises and activities is designed to improve pronunciation, intonation, expression, and body language. These include phonetic practice, poetry recitation, skits, improvisation, and memorization of dramatic texts. Reading, discussion, and performance of scenes from plays by renowned dramatists. Extensive use of audio and video material.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


FREN-UA 109-000 (21236)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Prost, Anna-Caroline

Intermediate French I (FREN-UA 11)

Not equivalent to FREN-UA 20. Only by combining FREN-UA 11 with FREN-UA 12 can a student complete the equivalent of FREN-UA 20 and then continue on to the post-intermediate level. Offered every semester. 4 points.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


FREN-UA 11-000 (9650)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ait Jafour, Samira


FREN-UA 11-000 (8204)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sellami, Hayet


FREN-UA 11-000 (8205)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krimper, Michael


FREN-UA 11-000 (8206)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Berthe, Olivier


FREN-UA 11-000 (8207)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Berthe, Olivier


FREN-UA 11-000 (8208)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bali, Fatiha

Intermediate French II (FREN-UA 12)

Continuation of FREN-UA 11. In order to fulfill the MAP requirement and continue on to the post-intermediate level, a student must complete both FREN-UA 11 and FREN-UA 12. This sequence is equivalent to FREN-UA 20. Offered every semester. 4 points.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


FREN-UA 12-000 (8209)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Verneret, Nina


FREN-UA 12-000 (8210)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dubois, Stephanie


FREN-UA 12-000 (8211)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dubois, Stephanie


FREN-UA 12-000 (8212)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schwarzer, Pierre


FREN-UA 12-000 (8213)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Root, Jamie


FREN-UA 12-000 (8214)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Root, Jamie

Arts and Cultures of Modernity (ACM-UF 201)

This course explores the arts from the late17th/early18th-century to the post-World War II era, examining how they define and reflect both local cultural views and rapidly shifting global understandings of the world. The course considers how the diverse conceptions and conditions of modernity both shaped and were shaped by the arts around the world. Many of the issues pertinent to the course — industrialization/urbanization; the dislocations, disasters, and opportunities that followed cross-cultural contact; colonialism, decolonization, conflicts of political ideology, and liberation struggles; fundamental redefinitions of mind, language, gender, and sexual identity — have had very different effects in various parts of the world; instructors encourage students to explore what it means to study the arts from global perspectives and what “globalization” itself has meant and means in the context of the arts.

Art and Cultures of Modernity (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ACM-UF 201-000 (19000)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nickowitz, Peter


ACM-UF 201-000 (19001)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Culver, Brian


ACM-UF 201-000 (19002)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nickowitz, Peter


ACM-UF 201-000 (19003)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hatcher, Jessamyn


ACM-UF 201-000 (19004)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hatcher, Jessamyn


ACM-UF 201-000 (19005)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Thomas


ACM-UF 201-000 (19006)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Culver, Brian


ACM-UF 201-000 (19007)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yearous-Algozin, Joseph


ACM-UF 201-000 (19008)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hussein, Linnea


ACM-UF 201-000 (19009)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tharoor, Tilottama


ACM-UF 201-000 (19010)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yearous-Algozin, Joseph


ACM-UF 201-000 (19011)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Squillace, Robert


ACM-UF 201-000 (19012)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schwarzbach, Fredric


ACM-UF 201-000 (19013)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Matos Martin, Eduardo


ACM-UF 201-000 (19014)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Matos Martin, Eduardo


ACM-UF 201-000 (19015)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hatcher, Jessamyn


ACM-UF 201-000 (19016)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hussein, Linnea


ACM-UF 201-000 (19017)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Thomas


ACM-UF 201-000 (19018)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Thomas


ACM-UF 201-000 (19019)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Newman, Roberta


ACM-UF 201-000 (19020)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Matos Martin, Eduardo


ACM-UF 201-000 (19021)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Newman, Roberta


ACM-UF 201-000 (19022)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Paliwoda, Daniel


ACM-UF 201-000 (19023)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tharoor, Tilottama


ACM-UF 201-000 (19024)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Paliwoda, Daniel


ACM-UF 201-000 (19025)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Deutsch, Katherine


ACM-UF 201-000 (19026)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Deutsch, Katherine

Arts and Cultures towards the Crossroads (ACC-UF 102)

This course examines the arts produced within diverse cultural traditions across the globe from the rise of Islam at the beginning of the 7th century to the global empire building of the late17th/early 18th century. The course explores the distinctive conventions and traditions of different media, and the development of cultural traditions from their ancient foundations to the early modern period through successive influences and assimilations, both local and external. Diverse cultural traditions are also considered in relation to one another: by direct comparison of works even in the absence of historical cultural contact; by consideration of mutual interactions, exchanges and contestations; by the assertion of cultural dominance; and by resistance to such assertions.

Art and Cultures towards the Crossroads (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ACC-UF 102-000 (12603)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Benninger, Elizabeth


ACC-UF 102-000 (12798)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bishop, Kathleen


ACC-UF 102-000 (12604)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McCannon, Afrodesia


ACC-UF 102-000 (12605)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Newman, Roberta


ACC-UF 102-000 (12606)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reichert, Martin


ACC-UF 102-000 (12821)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Steen, John


ACC-UF 102-000 (12608)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Simard, Jared


ACC-UF 102-000 (12822)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reale, Nancy


ACC-UF 102-000 (12609)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bishop, Kathleen


ACC-UF 102-000 (12610)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Simard, Jared


ACC-UF 102-000 (12612)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Varnum, Joan


ACC-UF 102-000 (12823)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Newman, Roberta


ACC-UF 102-000 (12824)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krimper, Michael


ACC-UF 102-000 (12614)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lee, Elizabeth


ACC-UF 102-000 (12714)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brosh, Liora


ACC-UF 102-000 (12615)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tharoor, Tilottama


ACC-UF 102-000 (12616)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Karbiener, Karen


ACC-UF 102-000 (12617)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Varnum, Joan


ACC-UF 102-000 (12618)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Thomas


ACC-UF 102-000 (12619)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Karbiener, Karen


ACC-UF 102-000 (12825)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Culver, Brian


ACC-UF 102-000 (12621)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Odnopozova, Dina


ACC-UF 102-000 (12700)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Thomas


ACC-UF 102-000 (12623)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Masri, Heather


ACC-UF 102-000 (12624)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brosh, Liora


ACC-UF 102-000 (12625)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McCannon, Afrodesia


ACC-UF 102-000 (12626)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Masri, Heather


ACC-UF 102-000 (12724)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Simard, Jared


ACC-UF 102-000 (12627)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reale, Nancy


ACC-UF 102-000 (12726)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Culver, Brian


ACC-UF 102-000 (12745)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chapin, Peter


ACC-UF 102-000 (12746)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Olivas, Yvonne


ACC-UF 102-000 (12862)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Karbiener, Karen


ACC-UF 102-000 (12863)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Benninger, Elizabeth


ACC-UF 102-000 (12864)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lee, Elizabeth


ACC-UF 102-000 (12607)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McCannon, Afrodesia


ACC-UF 102-000 (12613)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reale, Nancy


ACC-UF 102-000 (12620)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reichert, Martin


ACC-UF 102-000 (12622)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Masri, Heather


ACC-UF 102-000 (12826)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reichert, Martin

Arts and Cultures across Antiquity (ACA-UF 101)

This course introduces the arts from their origins to the end of antiquity, as defined for these purposes by the roughly coincident dissolutions of the Gupta, Han, and Western Roman empires, focusing on how individuals and social relations are shaped in literature, the visual, plastic, and performing arts, and through music. Conceptions of the divine, the heroic, power and disenfranchisement, beauty, and love are examined within the context of the art and literature of East and South Asia, the Mediterranean world, and contiguous regions (such as Germania, Nubia, and Mesopotamia). Instructors prepare the way for Cultural Foundations II by giving some attention to the modes by which cultural transmission occurred across these regions prior to the rise of Islam.

Art and Cultures across Antiquity (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ACA-UF 101-000 (12767)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Doubrovskaia, Maria


ACA-UF 101-000 (12768)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Boisvere, Joseph


ACA-UF 101-000 (12769)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stokes, Matthew


ACA-UF 101-000 (12855)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fleming, Benjamin


ACA-UF 101-000 (12785)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hsieh, Yu-Yun


ACA-UF 101-000 (12856)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Braico, Giovanni


ACA-UF 101-000 (12801)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Omid, Mehrgan


ACA-UF 101-000 (12802)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stokes, Matthew


ACA-UF 101-000 (12857)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Braico, Giovanni


ACA-UF 101-000 (12858)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kertz, Lydia


ACA-UF 101-000 (12859)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Boisvere, Joseph


ACA-UF 101-000 (12860)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hsieh, Yu-Yun


ACA-UF 101-000 (12861)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Thomas

Limits of The Earth: Issues in Human Ecology (ENVST-UA 333)

Examines the array of environmental problems facing modern society, including global pollution and the impact of human population growth on land-use patterns, earth resources, energy supply and use, water, agriculture, and ecosystems.

Environmental Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


ENVST-UA 333-000 (9896)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Thu
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Volk, Tyler

Ethics & The Environment (ENVST-UA 400)

Environmental philosophy encompasses questions in metaphysics, the philosophy of science, and the history of philosophy, as well as in such normative areas as ethics, aesthetics, and political philosophy. Presents basic concepts in value theory and introduces some major controversies.

Environmental Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


ENVST-UA 400-000 (8289)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jamieson, Dale


ENVST-UA 400-000 (8290)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferguson, Kyle


ENVST-UA 400-000 (8291)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferguson, Kyle

Climate and Society (ENVST-UA 470)

This is an intermediate Environmental Studies elective about how societies understand and respond to climate change. We will analyze the values, assumptions, and perceptions that contribute to our understanding of climate change. The main topics are ethics, justice, and responsibility; definitions of nature; cost-benefit analysis and the precautionary principle; geo-engineering; contrarianism; framing and communication; social engagement; and education. Central questions include: Is climate change a technical or social problem? What makes climate change uniquely challenging to understand and respond to? Which ethical and perceptual frameworks are best suited for both understanding and responding to climate change? Who is responsible, and what moral implications does this have? What assumptions about values, behavior, economics, and nature do we make when discussing climate change? How does climate change challenge our conceptions of nature, morality, society, and economics? Does climate change pose a special challenge to society, or does it simply amplify existing challenges?

Environmental Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ENVST-UA 470-000 (10047)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlottmann, Christopher

Early American Literature (ENGL-UA 548)

Examines the large variety of writing produced in North America between 1600 and 1800, from indigenous/European encounters through the American Revolution and its aftermath. Genres discussed in their cultural contexts include colonization, captivity, slave, and travel narratives; sermons; familiar correspondence; autobiographies; poetry; drama; and the novel.

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


ENGL-UA 548-000 (10617)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Honors Tutorial (ECON-UA 410)

The objective of the course is to train students to write on economic topics and perform economic analysis efficiently and quickly, as well as to develop rhetorical skills. Once a week, two students each present a paper on an assigned topic that has been distributed previously to the other students. The students not presenting that week critique the paper and the presentation, as will the instructor. Each paper is to be revised and submitted to the instructor with a cover sheet that indicates how the student dealt with each of the criticisms.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ECON-UA 410-000 (8061)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saini, Viplav

International Economics (P) (ECON-UA 238)

Focuses on international trade in goods, services, and capital. It serves as an introduction to international economic issues and as preparation for the department’s more advanced course in ECON-UA 324. The issues discussed include gains from trade and their distribution; analysis of protectionism; strategic trade barriers; the trade deficit; exchange rate determination; and government intervention in foreign exchange markets.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECON-UA 238-000 (8028)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lieberman, Marc · Bhunia, Aakash


ECON-UA 238-000 (8029)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhunia, Aakash


ECON-UA 238-000 (8030)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhunia, Aakash


ECON-UA 238-000 (8031)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lieberman, Marc · Kim, Kyle


ECON-UA 238-000 (9295)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Kyle


ECON-UA 238-000 (9296)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Kyle


ECON-UA 238-000 (20198)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Paizis, Andrew · Wang, Ruikang


ECON-UA 238-000 (20199)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Ruikang


ECON-UA 238-000 (20200)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Ruikang

Urban Economics (ECON-UA 227)

The city as an economic organization. Urbanization trends, functional specialization, and the nature of growth within the city; organization of economic activity within the city and its outlying areas, the organization of the labor market, and problems of urban poverty; the urban public economy; housing and land-use problems; transportation problems; and special problems within the public sector.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECON-UA 227-000 (8024)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Storchmann, Karl


ECON-UA 227-000 (8629)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Storchmann, Karl

Interm Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 12)

Study of aggregate economic analysis with special attention paid to the determination of the level of income, employment, and inflation. Critically examines both the theories and the policies associated with them.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECON-UA 12-000 (8001)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McIntyre, Gerald · Kim, Jae · Cattelan, Giacomo


ECON-UA 12-000 (8002)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Jae


ECON-UA 12-000 (8003)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Jae


ECON-UA 12-000 (10559)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cattelan, Giacomo


ECON-UA 12-000 (10560)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cattelan, Giacomo


ECON-UA 12-000 (8004)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Boar, Corina · Ghini, Andres


ECON-UA 12-000 (8005)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ghini, Andres


ECON-UA 12-000 (8006)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ghini, Andres


ECON-UA 12-000 (8007)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McIntyre, Gerald · Covarrubias, Matias


ECON-UA 12-000 (8770)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Covarrubias, Matias


ECON-UA 12-000 (8769)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Covarrubias, Matias

Interm Microeconomics (ECON-UA 10)

Examines the manner in which producers, consumers, and resource owners acting through the market determine the prices and output of goods, the allocation of productive resources, and the functional distribution of incomes. The price system is seen as a network of interrelated decisions, with the market process serving to communicate information to decision makers.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECON-UA 10-000 (7998)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saini, Viplav · GUZMAN, LEON · Baumgartner, Aleida · Wu, Xiaotong


ECON-UA 10-000 (7999)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wu, Xiaotong


ECON-UA 10-000 (8000)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baumgartner, Aleida


ECON-UA 10-000 (8656)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by GUZMAN, LEON


ECON-UA 10-000 (8657)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by GUZMAN, LEON


ECON-UA 10-000 (20195)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wu, Xiaotong


ECON-UA 10-000 (20196)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baumgartner, Aleida


ECON-UA 10-000 (8894)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williams, Basil · Li, Peter · Toledo, Gabriel


ECON-UA 10-000 (8895)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Toledo, Gabriel


ECON-UA 10-000 (8896)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Peter


ECON-UA 10-000 (10242)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Peter

Advanced Organic Chemistry (CHEM-UA 911)

This course focuses on structure and theory in organic chemistry with a particular emphasis on the application of stereoelectronic and conformational effects on reaction mechanisms, catalysis and molecular recognition.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CHEM-UA 911-000 (9647)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Trauner, Dirk


CHEM-UA 911-000 (9648)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Physical Chemistry Laboratory (CHEM-UA 661)

Introduction to the principles and practices of experimental methods widely used in analytical and research laboratories. Emphasizes understanding of background physicochemical theory as well as capabilities and limitations of methods and interpretations of data. Covers instrumental methods, such as UV/visible spectroscopy, FT-IR, NMR, and fluorescence, for the systematic characterization of compounds and the use of interfaced computers for data collection and spreadsheet analysis. Studies also include an introduction to computer modeling of molecular properties. Optional experiments include fluorescence studies of protein denaturation and laser studies of excited state kinetics.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 661-000 (7945)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sabo, Dubravko


CHEM-UA 661-000 (7946)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sabo, Dubravko


CHEM-UA 661-000 (7947)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hopkins, Terrence


CHEM-UA 661-000 (7948)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sabo, Dubravko


CHEM-UA 661-000 (8947)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Katz, Dana

Thermodynamics & Kinetics (CHEM-UA 652)

Continuation of V25.0651. Develops the close connection between the microscopic world of quantum mechanics and the macroscopic world of thermodynamics. Topics include properties of gases, elementary statistical thermodynamics, and thermodynamics of single and multicomponent systems.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 652-000 (7942)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hocky, Glen


CHEM-UA 652-000 (7943)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Weiss, Philip


CHEM-UA 652-000 (7944)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Weiss, Philip

Sonic Utopia: Unconventional Applications for Sound (OART-UT 1096)

Sound is physical. It can move objects, vibrate surfaces, perceptually alter our emotions, and shape the way viewers engage with spaces. As artists, we are conditioned to aspire to situate our work within traditional settings. How can we reposition sound as a main element of a work within unconventional contexts? This course will use the question of a sonic utopia as a platform to create interdisciplinary projects that exist between installation, sculpture, video, performance, movement, and music. Students will learn sound theories through lectures and in-class workshops and are encouraged to incorporate their individual interests into each of the four main projects that aim to position sound as a primary element of a work in order to expand the possibilities of working with sound.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OART-UT 1096-000 (13635)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Elementary Chinese for Advanced Beginners (EAST-UA 231)

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


EAST-UA 231-000 (9307)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Catherine


EAST-UA 231-000 (8905)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Xin


EAST-UA 231-000 (8906)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Xin


EAST-UA 231-000 (21453)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jiao, Xiao-Xiao

Elementary Korean for Advanced Speakers (EAST-UA 281)

This intensive elementary course covers the first-year Korean material in a single semester. The course is designed for students with some Korean-speaking background, who can understand and speak basic to intermediate conversational Korean but do not have previous formal language training in reading and writing. It aims to develop students’ correct pronunciation, grammatical accuracy and overall competence in reading and writing.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 281-000 (8901)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Cheun Mi

Advanced Korean I (EAST-UA 258)

This course is designed to assist advanced students of Korean language as they continue to learn skills in conversation, reading, and writing. Reading Korean newspapers and visiting Korean Web sites are integrated as part of the course’s instruction.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 258-000 (9074)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ji, Eun-Jung

Elementary Korean I (EAST-UA 254)

First-year Korean designed to introduce the Korean language and alphabet, Hangul. This course provides a solid foundation in all aspects of the language, including speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students study the language’s orthographic and phonetic systems, grammar, syntax, and vocabulary within social and cultural contexts.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 254-000 (9018)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Choi, Yongjun


EAST-UA 254-000 (9045)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jang, Kyungmi


EAST-UA 254-000 (9170)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Park, Jeesun


EAST-UA 254-000 (9426)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Park, Jeesun


EAST-UA 254-000 (9730)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jung, Su

Intermediate Japanese II (EAST-UA 250)

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 250-000 (8048)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kinjo, Masaki


EAST-UA 250-000 (8049)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nonaka, Kayo


EAST-UA 250-000 (9634)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yamamoto, Tsumugi

Elementary Japanese II (EAST-UA 248)

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 248-000 (8046)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kinjo, Masaki


EAST-UA 248-000 (8047)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kinjo, Masaki


EAST-UA 248-000 (9312)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nonaka, Kayo


EAST-UA 248-000 (9044)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yamamoto, Tsumugi


EAST-UA 248-000 (9633)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hanawa, Yukiko

Intermediate Japanese I (EAST-UA 249)

Continuing study of Japanese at the intermediate level. Stresses reading comprehension, spoken fluency, and composition, with materials organized around social and cultural topics; continues to introduce new Kanji characters.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 249-000 (8641)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Matsumoto, Mayumi


EAST-UA 249-000 (8704)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yamamoto, Tsumugi


EAST-UA 249-000 (9724)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hanawa, Yukiko

Advanced Chinese II (EAST-UA 206)

Designed to further develop proficiency in speaking and writing through readings on and discussions of socio-cultural topics relevant to today’s China. Focuses on improving reading comprehension and writing skills. The objectives are: to further improve oral communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages; to acquire vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting semi-formal or formal discussions of socio-cultural topics; to increase reading speed of texts with more advanced syntax; to learn to make context-based guess about the meaning of a new word, conduct sentence analysis and solve textual problems with the aid of dictionaries; to write and present more fully developed narratives or reasoned and structured arguments in length; to learn to employ basic rhetoric methods; to learn to appreciate stylistic usage of Chinese language.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 206-000 (8042)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shao, Wenteng


EAST-UA 206-000 (8043)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shao, Wenteng


EAST-UA 206-000 (9299)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liao, Shiqi

Elementary Japanese I (EAST-UA 247)

Introductory course in modern spoken and written Japanese, designed to develop fundamental skills in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Gives contextualized instructions to develop both communicative and cultural competency. Systematically introduces the Japanese writing system (Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji).

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 247-000 (8045)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kurahara, Kazue


EAST-UA 247-000 (8747)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Matsumoto, Mayumi


EAST-UA 247-000 (9070)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Omori, Toshiko


EAST-UA 247-000 (9072)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Takeda, Shuichiro


EAST-UA 247-000 (9409)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Takeda, Shuichiro


EAST-UA 247-000 (9427)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kurokawa, Kazue


EAST-UA 247-000 (20184)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kurokawa, Kazue


EAST-UA 247-000 (20185)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Omori, Toshiko

Intermediate Chinese I (EAST-UA 203)

Designed to consolidate the student’s overall aural-oral proficiency. Focuses gradually on the written aspect of Chinese. The objectives are: to be able to obtain information from extended conversation; to both express and expound on, in relative length, feelings and opinions on common topics; to expand vocabulary and learn to decipher meaning of compound words; to develop reading comprehension of extended narrative, expository and simple argumentative passages; to solve non-complex textual problems with the aid of dictionaries; to write in relative length personal narratives, informational narratives, comparison and discussion of viewpoints with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 203-000 (8037)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sun, Jing Ying


EAST-UA 203-000 (9311)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Cong


EAST-UA 203-000 (8038)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Cong

Intermediate Chinese II (EAST-UA 204)

Designed to consolidate the student’s overall aural-oral proficiency. Focuses gradually on the written aspect of Chinese. The objectives are: to be able to obtain information from extended conversation; to both express and expound on, in relative length, feelings and opinions on common topics; to expand vocabulary and learn to decipher meaning of compound words; to develop reading comprehension of extended narrative, expository and simple argumentative passages; to solve non-complex textual problems with the aid of dictionaries; to write in relative length personal narratives, informational narratives, comparison and discussion of viewpoints with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 204-000 (8039)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hao, Guangyu


EAST-UA 204-000 (8040)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xu, Jiayi


EAST-UA 204-000 (9578)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xu, Jiayi

Intermediate Poetry Workshop (CRWRI-UA 817)

The intermediate workshops offer budding fiction writers and poets an opportunity to continue their pursuit of writing through workshops that focus on a specific genre. The workshops also integrate in-depth craft discussions and extensive outside reading to deepen students’ understanding of the genre and broaden their knowledge of the evolution of literary forms and techniques.

Creative Writing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8090)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rohrer, Matthew


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8091)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Popa, Maya


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8692)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fitterman, Robert


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8092)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gallagher, Jean


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8628)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nutter, Geoffrey


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (20174)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Eye, David

Intermediate Fiction Workshop (CRWRI-UA 816)

The intermediate workshops offer budding fiction writers and poets an opportunity to continue their pursuit of writing through workshops that focus on a specific genre. The workshops also integrate in-depth craft discussions and extensive outside reading to deepen students’ understanding of the genre and broaden their knowledge of the evolution of literary forms and techniques.

Creative Writing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CRWRI-UA 816-000 (8084)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lieu, Jocelyn


CRWRI-UA 816-000 (8085)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mesmer, Sharon


CRWRI-UA 816-000 (8086)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kingsley-Ma, Hannah


CRWRI-UA 816-000 (8087)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hood, Ann


CRWRI-UA 816-000 (8088)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Price, Eliza


CRWRI-UA 816-000 (8627)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Price, Eliza


CRWRI-UA 816-000 (8691)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bock, Charles

ATB: Applied Cell Biology (BIOL-UA 37)

Introduction to the methodology used to study cell structure and function. In the laboratory, students study the fundamentals of cell biology and the experimental approaches used to examine the cell. Experimental topics cover cellular, subcellular, and macromolecule localization; biochemical analysis of the cell; and cell culture techniques.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


BIOL-UA 37-000 (9087)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tan, Ignatius


BIOL-UA 37-000 (24196)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tan, Ignatius

Principles of Biology Laboratory (BIOL-UA 123)

Biology (Undergraduate)
1 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8768)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bijou, Christopher


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8776)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Bessie


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8777)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Murray, Sean


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8778)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Creighton, Kathryn


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8779)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mestvirishvili, Tamara


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8780)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bijou, Christopher


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8781)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Meng


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8782)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vikraman, Pooja


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8783)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Hailey


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8784)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lisi, Brianna


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8790)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Akum, Barbara Fei


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8785)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Meng


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8786)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tuncer, Alara


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8787)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tuncer, Alara


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8788)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lisi, Brianna


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8789)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mestvirishvili, Tamara


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8791)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vikraman, Pooja


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8792)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8793)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Hailey


BIOL-UA 123-000 (10308)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Bessie


BIOL-UA 123-000 (10309)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Murray, Sean


BIOL-UA 123-000 (25642)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Molecular and Cell Biology II (BIOL-UA 22)

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


BIOL-UA 22-000 (7840)


BIOL-UA 22-000 (10390)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mason, Guy


BIOL-UA 22-000 (10391)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mason, Guy


BIOL-UA 22-000 (7842)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chen, Yu-Chieh


BIOL-UA 22-000 (7843)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Garcia, Jeremy


BIOL-UA 22-000 (7844)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Elorza, Setiembre


BIOL-UA 22-000 (8746)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 22-000 (7841)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Osmundson, Joseph


BIOL-UA 22-000 (8987)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Elorza, Setiembre


BIOL-UA 22-000 (10568)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Podolska, Natalia


BIOL-UA 22-000 (20118)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Osmundson, Joseph


BIOL-UA 22-000 (25732)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chen, Yu-Chieh


BIOL-UA 22-000 (25734)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Podolska, Natalia

Principles of Biology II (BIOL-UA 12)

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7826)


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7827)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xu, Winnie


BIOL-UA 12-000 (10442)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7828)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gilligan, Conor


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7829)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7830)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7831)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7832)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nguyen, Emma


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7833)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7834)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krishnamurthi, Smrthi


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7835)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abulimiti, Akida


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7836)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krishnamurthi, Smrthi


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7837)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bamidele, Ifeoluwa


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7838)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mieles, Dave


BIOL-UA 12-000 (8681)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rangel Valenzuela, Jesus


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7839)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gilligan, Conor


BIOL-UA 12-000 (8800)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 12-000 (8801)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rangel Valenzuela, Jesus


BIOL-UA 12-000 (10305)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abulimiti, Akida


BIOL-UA 12-000 (10607)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mieles, Dave


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20130)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xu, Winnie


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20131)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gupta, Selena


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20113)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bamidele, Ifeoluwa


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20114)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gupta, Selena


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20115)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20116)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20117)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nguyen, Emma

Molecular and Cell Biology I (BIOL-UA 21)

In-depth study of cell biology, with an emphasis on the molecular aspects of cell function. Topics include protein structure and synthesis, gene expression and its regulation, cell replication, and specialized cell structure and function. The course provides an introduction to genomics and bioinformatics and examines developmental biology, evolution, and systems biology.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7841)


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7842)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7843)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7844)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7845)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferreira, Amanda


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7846)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 21-000 (8866)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferreira, Amanda


BIOL-UA 21-000 (8867)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mathis, Sallie


BIOL-UA 21-000 (8985)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Obaji, Daniel


BIOL-UA 21-000 (8986)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lou, Karen


BIOL-UA 21-000 (9398)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mathis, Sallie


BIOL-UA 21-000 (10649)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferreira, Amanda


BIOL-UA 21-000 (10723)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Obaji, Daniel


BIOL-UA 21-000 (21108)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 21-000 (21109)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aharonoff, Avrami


BIOL-UA 21-000 (21110)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 21-000 (21111)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aharonoff, Avrami


BIOL-UA 21-000 (21112)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mathis, Sallie

Principles of Biology I (BIOL-UA 11)

Introductory course mainly for science majors, designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental principles and processes of biological systems. Subjects include the basics of chemistry pertinent to biology, biochemistry and cell biology, genetics and molecular biology, anatomy and physiology, neurobiology, ecology, population genetics, and history and classification of life forms and evolution. Laboratory exercises illustrate the basics of experimental biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, and genetics, as well as the diversity of life forms and organ systems.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7819)


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7820)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Savin, Avital


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7821)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Hailey


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7822)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nguyen, Emma


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7823)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jallad, Raya


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7824)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jin, Dongmin


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7825)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lotka, Lauren


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7826)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jin, Dongmin


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7827)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gupta, Selena


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7828)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gupta, Selena


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7829)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jallad, Raya


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7831)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by De, Titir


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7832)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sookdeo, Akash


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7833)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Podolska, Natalia


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7834)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hart, Sydney


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7835)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nguyen, Emma


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7836)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lisi, Brianna


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7837)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nikulkova, Maria


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7838)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Podolska, Natalia


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7839)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by De, Titir


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7840)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hart, Sydney


BIOL-UA 11-000 (9211)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Hailey


BIOL-UA 11-000 (9212)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lisi, Brianna


BIOL-UA 11-000 (9213)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sookdeo, Akash


BIOL-UA 11-000 (21100)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nikulkova, Maria


BIOL-UA 11-000 (21101)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 P