Innovations in Arts Publications (ARTS-UG 1655)

The ever-inventive world of arts publications encompasses a dazzling range of subjects, mediums, materials, and methods: from ancient illuminated manuscripts, political manifestos, and one-of-a-kind artists books to high-end glossies, handmade zines, posters and print multiples to the infinite possibilities of the digital realm. This workshop will introduce and explore many of these forms through guest lecturers, field trips to specialized collections and museums, directed readings, and hands-on work, which will culminate in final group and individual projects. Readings may include Posters: A Global History; Action Time Vision; and Design: the Invention of Desire.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1655-000 (17149)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Friedman, Lise

Making Dance: Space, Place and Technology (ARTS-UG 1211)

In this workshop, students will explore the possibilities of dancing across spatial categories, making dances in “real” and digital space. Taking our cues from contemporary experimental and primarily post-modern choreographers, we will examine how our arts practices and beliefs about bodies and space are linked to evolving ideas and cultural systems; we will ask questions that tug at the assumptions of what dance is, what bodies are, what space is, and how these elements are significant as components of choreography and of our dance experiences. We will make and watch dances ranging from low-tech works to high-tech experiments. In addition to making dances, we will read about contemporary dance, technology, and other practices and disciplines (e.g., architecture, philosophy, neuroscience), view performances of choreographers and visual artists, and meet with practitioners engaged in the questions and practices of our study. We will join with CultureHub, an organization housed at La MaMa E.T.C. (one of New York’s most noted experimental theaters) and working at the intersection of art, technology, and community. Readings might include work by Gaston Bachelard, Victoria Hunter, Matthew Frederick, Merce Cunningham, Steve Paxton, Andrew Gurian, Yi-Fu Tuan, and other artists and scholars. The course is open to all students: anyone interested in dance and/or technology is welcome. Note: all workshop members will be expected to participate as movers!

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1211-000 (16949)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Satin, Leslie

Cultures & Contexts: Multicultural France (CORE-UA 9547)

With an important history of immigration, France has long been a site of cultural contact and exchange. This course considers the country’s multicultural make-up and the ideologies, institutions, conflicts, and paradoxes that shape how that diversity has taken form through time. Conflicts and controversies of the past 40 years, which include the rise of the extreme right, the problem of the disadvantaged suburbs, the question of Islamic headscarves, and more, have in particular pushed these questions to the front of the country’s domestic agenda. Looking historically and across several case studies, we ask as well as what the French example can add to our understanding of culture, diversity, and race. Conducted in English.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CORE-UA 9547-000 (2551)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Editing I (FMTV-UT 1016)

This is a hands-on course designed to introduce the student to narrative and documentary editing techniques, and to the role of the editor in shaping the final form of film and video productions. Good editing is crucial to the success of every film and video. This class is recommended to students pursuing directing or producing who want a better understanding of how the post-production workflow functions, as well as to any student, from sophomore to senior, who would like to gain a clearer understanding of the role of the editor as an artist, a technician and a collaborator. To achieve this, the class will delve into the methods, objectives, and technical aspects of post-production. It will thoroughly explore two major editing programs (Avid Media Composer and Adobe Premiere Pro) used in today’s professional post-production environment, and acquaint the student with every stage of the editing workflow from capture to final output. Students will learn to approach these and other non-linear programs as variations on common themes rather than as completely new and foreign tools. In addition, the class will present examples of edited sequences from both narrative and documentary films for discussion, and have invited guests who will share their experiences in bringing films to completion. There will also be a course pack of assigned readings. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19414)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lewis, Emir


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19415)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Frank


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19416)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lewis, Emir


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19417)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pollard, Jason


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19418)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Weinstein, Yonatan

Stats F/Bus Cntl Regress & Forecasting Models (STAT-UB 103)

This course examines modern statistical methods as a basis for decision making in the face of uncertainty. Topics include probability theory, discrete and continuous distributions, hypothesis testing, estimation, and statistical quality control. With the aid of computers, these statistical methods are used to analyze data. Also presented are an introduction to statistical models and their application to decision making. Topics include the simple linear regression model, inference in regression analysis, sensitivity analysis, and multiple regression analysis.

Statistics & Operations Research (Undergraduate)
6 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


STAT-UB 103-000 (2538)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Giloni, Avi.


STAT-UB 103-000 (2539)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Duan, Yaqi


STAT-UB 103-000 (2540)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chen, Elynn


STAT-UB 103-000 (2541)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kovtun, Vladimir


STAT-UB 103-000 (2542)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Turetsky, Jason


STAT-UB 103-000 (2995)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Turetsky, Jason

Writing London (SCA-UA 9886)

This course will study a variety of texts written at particular times in the history of London. The aims of the course are to encourage the student to think historically, in terms of the way London and representations of the city have changed and developed over time; and theoretically, in terms of the way the city is mediated through different forms and genres (e.g. poetry, novels, essays, film; satire, detective and crime fiction), and the interrelationship of literary and material spaces. We will also examine the significance of gender, the definition of the modern metropolis as a labyrinthine city of Babylon, the influence of metropolitan culture on Modernism and Modernity, assimilation versus multiculturalism, immigration, and the effects of new modern spaces on individuals.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


SCA-UA 9886-000 (4067)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Landau, Leya


SCA-UA 9886-000 (4068)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Landau, Leya

Science in Our Lives: Environmental Issues (SCIED-UE 212)

Introducing the notion of citizen science, this course provides students with opportunities to use scientific information to solve real-world problems related to environmental & public health. By exploring the practices of science from observing & measurement to analyzing & explaining data, students learn to use data & produce scientific knowledge for the public. Liberal Arts Core/MAP Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Natural Sciences

Science Education (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


SCIED-UE 212-000 (18146)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Milne, Catherine

Global Media Seminar: Media Activism and Democracy (ITAL-UA 9513)

The course on “Media, Activism & Democracy” aims at, first, introducing students to the complex and fascinating topic of civil society activism; second, at illustrating them the linkages between activism and media; third, at showing them the impact of civil society’s advocacy on contemporary political systems. In a nutshell, the course aims at providing students with a closer understanding of the civil society activism-media-politics conundrums at the national and global levels.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITAL-UA 9513-000 (2451)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Masrani, Rahoul

Storyboarding (FMTV-UT 1033)

Students will create a storyboard from an assigned literary property (i.e., fairy tales, folk tales, famous short stories, etc.) and research the chosen material visually in picture libraries, print and photo archives, museum/gallery libraries and online. From this basic research, the student will create and develop all the visual elements that lead to a final production storyboard; these elements include character model drawings; styling sketches for costumes and sets; experimental “inspirational” sketches exploring mood, color, and character relationships and experiments in animation and color test footage. Each week, students will “pitch,” (i.e. present material) as it is being developed. Through weekly critiques from the instructor and students, elements and shape of the production storyboard is refined to its final form. The approved storyboard at the end of the semester should be ready to go into production, and must reflect character ,attitude, design, entertainment, mood, expressions, feeling and type of action. It must use dialogue, music/sound effects, and tell the story in the best possible way. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19436)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moore, William


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19437)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baker, Zoya


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19438)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baker, Zoya


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19439)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Journalistic Inquiry: The Written Word (JOUR-UA 101)

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


JOUR-UA 101-000 (8832)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


JOUR-UA 101-000 (23456)


JOUR-UA 101-000 (10147)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by De La Hoz Arias, Felipe


JOUR-UA 101-000 (9303)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Borak, Donna


JOUR-UA 101-000 (8735)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reed, Anika


JOUR-UA 101-000 (8677)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


JOUR-UA 101-000 (9796)


JOUR-UA 101-000 (20665)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Surico, John

Florentine Villas: An Interpretation Based on Historical and Social Factors (ARTH-UA 9308)

This course introduces to the many villas surrounding the city of Florence. It aims at illustrating their origins, their history from the Middle-Age to the twentieth century, as well as their economic and ideological factors in the relationship with the city of Florence. The course draws on many disciplines, such as architecture, history, economy, social history, history of art, and landscape art.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTH-UA 9308-000 (2680)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Edelstein, Bruce

Images (PHIL-UH 2416)

Images depict, words describe. A picture of the cat of the mat depicts the cat as being on the mat. The sentence ’the cat is on the mat’ describes the cat as being on the mat. Both represent the world as being in a certain state, but they do so in different ways. What is the difference in these ways of representing? What does it take for an image to depict? This course covers most major theories of depiction, including resemblance, experience, recognition, pretense, and structural theories. We then expand the scope of inquiry to include topics such as systems of depiction, analog vs. digital representation, maps, film, comics, maps, mental imagery, and relations to the cognitive science of vision.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PHIL-UH 2416-000 (5805)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rabin, Gabriel

The Meaning of Life (PHIL-UH 1110)

Is there a point or significance to life as a whole? That is the question about the “meaning of life.” Though this question is notoriously hard to make precise, in one form or another it has animated much literature and art, and also much philosophy. Some philosophers have provided disheartening answers: life is suffering, and then it ends; life is absurd and never gains any meaning. But other philosophers have provided more uplifting answers that support the quest for personal significance. Bot h kinds of answers deserve scrutiny. After reviewing various pessimistic and more optimistic approaches to the meaning of life, we will turn to the subject of death. We will all die eventually. We normally encounter the death of our family and friend s before we must deal with our own. These themes too are the subject of philosophical reflection. We finish the semester with a discussion of the connection between individual significance and the future of humanity. This class will integrate references to art and literature as well as to science where appropriate, but its main focus is on contributions by recent thinkers in the analytical tradition of philosophy.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


PHIL-UH 1110-000 (18561)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Paul, Sarah

Management and Organizations (MGMT-UB 1)

In this course you will attain an understanding of the key factors that contribute to organizational success and the role that managers play in helping their organizations become more successful. The better that you understand these issues, the more effective you will be in your future careers. More specifically, the course will explore how organizational leaders develop winning strategies, and then design their organization in a way that aligns structures, social relationships, tasks, human resource practices, and people to achieve those strategies. In exploring these issues, you will identify the challenges that organizational leaders and managers face as they try to make good decisions in the face of a constantly evolving industry environment, competing goals and agendas, and an increasingly diverse and global workforce.

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19615)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Hee


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19616)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Hee


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19617)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Steiner, Jeff


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19618)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Steiner, Jeff


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19620)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kern, Molly


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19624)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Howard, Elizabeth


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19627)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Howard, Elizabeth

Cultures & Contexts: Topics (CORE-UA 500)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CORE-UA 500-000 (10506)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Igsiz, Asli


CORE-UA 500-000 (10507)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10508)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10509)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10510)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10511)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Juette, Daniel


CORE-UA 500-000 (10512)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10513)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10514)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10515)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10516)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10517)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10518)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bottex-Ferragne, Ariane


CORE-UA 500-000 (10519)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10520)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10521)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10522)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10523)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stark, Soren


CORE-UA 500-000 (10524)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Jingyi


CORE-UA 500-000 (10525)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Jingyi


CORE-UA 500-000 (10526)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fiorio, Soraya


CORE-UA 500-000 (10527)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fiorio, Soraya


CORE-UA 500-000 (10528)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cordivari, Braden


CORE-UA 500-000 (10529)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cordivari, Braden


CORE-UA 500-000 (10530)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10531)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Expressive Culture: Topics (CORE-UA 700)

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CORE-UA 700-000 (10544)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ganti, Tejaswini


CORE-UA 700-000 (10545)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 700-000 (10546)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 700-000 (10547)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 700-000 (10548)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 700-000 (10549)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hay, Jonathan


CORE-UA 700-000 (10550)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xie, Vivi Fupeng


CORE-UA 700-000 (10551)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xie, Vivi Fupeng


CORE-UA 700-000 (10552)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Deng, Zhilong


CORE-UA 700-000 (10553)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Deng, Zhilong

Writing with AI: Philosophy and Practice (INTM-SHU 142)

In this class, we will use AI as a writing and editing tool and study the history and philosophy of augmented and automated writing. Through a combination of lectures and hands-on workshops, we will explore the theoretical aspects of AI and writing with case studies and examples, as well as experiment with different AI tools and techniques. Prerequisite: None.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


INTM-SHU 142-000 (19975)
03/18/2024 – 05/10/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Konior, Bogna

Designing For: (GAMES-GT 310)

“Designing for” classes focus on working with a real-world client or partner, preparing students for professional collaborations with institutions, publishers and media companies beyond the game industry who partner with game developers on playable experiences. Outside partners have included museums, non-profit organizations, non-digital publishers and digital media platforms. In each version of this class, students will interact directly with representatives from one outside partner and collaborate with other students on a single semester-long project tailored to the client’s goals, developing an initial idea from conceptualization through pitching and prototyping, based on criteria and feedback provided by the partner. Students will learn to follow a structured process for ideation, collaboration and prototyping, while taking care to understand the audience, content and goals of the partner organization’s industry and the context of play. The semester culminates in a final presentation of playable prototypes to the partner.

Game Design (Graduate)
2-4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


GAMES-GT 310-000 (25338)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by


GAMES-GT 310-000 (25353)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by Corbetta, Ramiro


GAMES-GT 310-000 (25349)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by Parker, Matthew

Human Development I (APSY-UE 20)

Introduction to research and theory of human development across the life span. Seminal theories & basic research of individual growth & development are analyzed & critiqued. Emphasis is on the range in human development with discussion of normative & non-normative development. Emphasis is also placed on the importance of understanding the influence of normative & non-normative contexts of development, including the impact of culture, heritage, socioeconomic level, personal health, & safety. Relations between home, school, & community and their impact on development are also explored via readings, lectures, discussions, & weekly observations in the field. Interrogation of implicit folk theories as a foundation for exploration of formal knowledge of human development.

Applied Psychology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


APSY-UE 20-000 (11334)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hogan, Frances


APSY-UE 20-000 (11789)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Copeland, Cynthia


APSY-UE 20-000 (11405)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Online
Instructed by Hogan, Frances


APSY-UE 20-000 (21980)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Online
Instructed by Strom, Carolyn

Designing Your Voice: Synthetic Sounds From Circuits (ITPG-GT 3046)

Course Description: In this 14-week course, students will explore sound design fundamentals through modular synthesizers, leveraging the capabilities of microcontrollers. Modular synthesizers are a type of electronic musical instrument used to generate, manipulate, and shape sound through the interconnection of individual modules, or components. This course is designed to equip students with the skills and creative prowess required to craft their own unique devices that adhere to the Eurorack design format; a popular modular synthesizer standard. The curriculum blends the art of sound design with the technical aspects of hardware synthesizer architecture, building skills so that by the end of this course students will have the competence to bring their sonic visions to life in physical form through thoughtful interaction. By harnessing the modular nature of these components, students will work independently, taking into consideration the designs of their peers to ensure seamless compatibility between their devices, resulting in a distinct ‘voice’; a term used to describe a collection of components that define the signal path of a synthesizer. The first half of the course will focus on sound design coding techniques utilizing the Teensy microcontroller, with the second half dedicated to developing tangible hardware design skills. Prerequisites: Intro to Physical Computing No sound design/musical experience is required.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3046-000 (14811)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Magazines, Art, and Public Culture (CEH-GA 3028)

This course examines magazines as collaborative sites for artists and writers internationally, leading the way to a global, networked cultural sphere. We will consider periodicals as both commercial and artist-driven enterprises and as material objects to be studied through the lens of the history of photography, journalism, and design.

Center for Experimental Humanities (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CEH-GA 3028-000 (10923)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cole, Lori

Photography through the Lens of Magnum (IDSEM-UG 2930)

Learn the history of some of the most widely known works of journalistic and documentary photography over the last seventy years through the lens of a globally preeminent photo collective, Magnum Agency. Photographers at this collective have created iconic documentary images and helped define the field of photojournalism as we know it today, setting an influential tone for style and content. Students will examine this in a variety of topics, including the documentation of war, social justice concerns, women’s issues, and sex work. Along the way, students study the business model of this agency to grasp how its differences, from other photographic enterprises, influence the work produced. We use this agency as a lens through which to address a recent history of photography, the trajectory of visual journalism, and the place of advocacy in documentary photography. We also ask critical questions of this visual documentation, assessing power imbalances, ethical complications, and more. Our studies take us through time and around the world via the medium of photography. Specific photographers we may explore include: Robert Capa, Susan Meiselas, Jonas Bendiksen, Nanna Heitmann, Bieke Depoorter, and Eli Reed. Readings include theory, journalistic accounts, history, and other critical literature. Naturally, we spend a lot of time looking at photos, and may have the opportunity to meet some of these photographers. Students visit NYC galleries, write academic papers, and produce a photo project.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IDSEM-UG 2930-000 (17099)
09/03/2024 – 10/22/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Walsh, Lauren

History of Cinematography (FMTV-UT 1206)

This course deals with the history of the art and science of cinematography. A working Director of Photography will relate a perspective that is unique and factual to a theoretical discussion, which is traditionally academic. Cinematography has a strong tradition of adapting its tools to enhance the storytelling experience. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES. “Non-majors must process a “Permission Notice for Non-Majors” form” to register for the course (subject to availability).

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1206-000 (19531)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carmine, Michael

Social Impact: Advertising for Social Good (MCC-UE 1051)

With the COVID-19 pandemic and the rise of social movements like Black Lives Matter and #metoo, the field of social good advertising has rapidly expanded as brands seek social relevance, governments and nonprofits look to inform, and activists try to persuade. In this course, students will learn to plan and execute powerful social advertising campaigns, while thinking critically about the blurred lines between advertising and information, and branding and politics, in what Sarah Banet-Weiser calls “Shopping for Change.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1051-000 (14065)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Railla, Jean

Inquiry Seminar (MCC-UE 1200)

MCC Research Inquiry Seminars, taken early in the major, expose students to the department’s culture of scholarly inquiry. Course topics reflect faculty research interests, offering students a chance to explore emerging issues in the field of media studies.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13990)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Benson, Rodney


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13991)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fleetwood, Nicole


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13992)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gitelman, Lisa


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13993)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hegde, Radha


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13994)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Robles, Erica


MCC-UE 1200-000 (5470)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ross, Andrew · Tawil-Souri, Helga


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13995)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13996)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Huda


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13997)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Ethics and Media (MCC-UE 1028)

Students who plan on pursuing careers in the media (professional and academic) will be faced with difficulty choices that carry with them potent ethical repercussions, choices that practical training does not properly equip them to approach in a critical and informed manner. The purpose of this course is therefore twofold: 1) to equip future media professional with sensitivity to moral values under challenge as well as the necessary skills in critical thinking and decision making for navigating their roles and responsibilities in relation to them; and 2) honing those same skills and sensitivities for consumers of media and citizens in media saturated societies.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1028-000 (20074)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cormier, Robert

Management & Organizations (BUSOR-UH 1003)

Why do some organizations succeed while others flounder? Whether it be as an employee within a traditional for-profit business, or within one of the wide spectrum of alternative career paths, all of us will ultimately be a part of organizations. This course will help illuminate the key processes and factors that determine why organizations function as they do, drawing upon the fields of management, strategy, sociology, and psychology in the process. Specific topics covered include: Corporate strategy and achieving competitive advantage, Organizational structure and design, Organizational and national culture, Leadership, Motivation and incentives, Groups dynamics, Power & politics within organizations, including a discussion of persuasion & influence and social networks, Judgment and decision-making.

Business & Organizational Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


BUSOR-UH 1003-000 (3759)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Tekeste, Milena · Kailas, Lakshmi


BUSOR-UH 1003-000 (4139)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Tekeste, Milena · Kailas, Lakshmi

Introduction to Creative Writing (LITCW-UH 1003)

This workshop introduces the basic elements of poetry, fiction, and personal narrative with in-class writing, take-home reading and writing assignments, and substantive discussions of craft. The course is structured as a workshop, which means that students receive feedback from their instructor and their fellow writers in a roundtable setting, and that they should be prepared to offer their classmates responses to their work.

Literature & Creative Writing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


LITCW-UH 1003-000 (3504)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Handal, Nathalie

Elementary Arabic 1 (ARABL-UH 1110)

This course is designed for learners with no prior knowledge of Arabic. Students who have studied Arabic before or who have prior knowledge of Arabic are required to take a placement test. This is a full semester (or equivalent session) course during which students first learn the Arabic alphabet, then move on to work on the sentence and paragraph levels. It is an interactive course designed to build the student’s abilities in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. At the end of the semester students should be able to carry on a short conversation; ask and answer questions; introduce themselves and others; provide simple biographical information; interact in simple daily life situations; ask for assistance; express likes and dislikes; read short texts; and gain a basic understanding of Arab culture. Types of tasks and assignments required for this course include daily homework assignments, periodic quizzes, brief presentations, short essay writing, and a final exam.

Arabic Language (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARABL-UH 1110-000 (3501)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Kittaneh, Khulood


ARABL-UH 1110-000 (3502)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by El Araby, Omima


ARABL-UH 1110-000 (3518)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by El Araby, Omima


ARABL-UH 1110-000 (3623)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Kittaneh, Khulood

Intro to Marketing (MKTG-UB 9001)

This course evaluates marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and a catalyst of business activity. It presents a comprehensive framework that includes a) researching and analyzing customers, company, competition, and the marketing environment, b) identifying and targeting attractive segments with strategic positioning, and c) making product, pricing, communication, and distribution decisions. Cases and examples are utilized to develop problem-solving abilities.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4953)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Thu
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Donvito, Raffaele


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4981)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (21443)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4834)
08/29/2024 – 12/04/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Magarino, Victor


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (3462)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Anton, Muriel


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (21026)
at NYU Tel Aviv (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (3380)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by West, Andrew

The Beat: (JOUR-UA 201)

This course is designed to hone the student journalist?s ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test their ideas with the strength of their reporting and research, and then present them in story form.

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2023)


JOUR-UA 201-000 (2398)05/22/2023 – 07/05/2023 Tue,Thu11:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Morning)at OnlineInstructed by Flaherty, Francis


JOUR-UA 201-000 (2491)06/06/2023 – 06/29/2023 Tue,Wed,Thu3:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Mihai, Adrian

The City and the Writer: New York City and Abu Dhabi (LITCW-UH 1509)

New York City and Abu Dhabi is a laboratory for studying NYC and AD, works written about them, as well as creating new works inspired by them. New works – poems, short stories, short plays, visual essays, or films – that will serve as a map for possible journeys as they reinvent and talk back to debates on immigration and space, culture and literature. A cross-disciplinary and cross-border conversation that examines how urban life and the cityscape create imaginative spaces, and the way words create cities. NYC & AD as global spaces will be explored in the works of writers with backgrounds from Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Latin America, and the Caribbean. How does the city shape the form of writing and language? How has literature challenged certain theories on space, and narratives constructed around urban identities? Students get the unique opportunity to meet numerous residents, from theater makers, designers, architects, artists, filmmakers, feminists, actors, comedians, chefs and bodega owners as well as be part of a podcast series and/or publish in one of the most important international literary magazines, Words Without Borders.

Literature & Creative Writing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


LITCW-UH 1509-000 (4206)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Handal, Nathalie

Science in Our Lives: Biodiversity and the Earth (SCIED-UE 215)

In this course students explore the Earth as an integrated, dynamic system involving the material world and diversity of living things which we call biodiversity. Specifically, this course explores the flow of energy and materials through the Earth System and potential human impact on this system. Through the practices of science students learn to use data to produce scientific knowledge for themselves and the public while exploring the question of what it means to engage in citizen science.

Science Education (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


SCIED-UE 215-000 (11814)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Milne, Catherine

Writing as Critical Inquiry (WRCI-UF 102)

The second in a two-course series, Writing as Critical Inquiry introduces students to advanced reading, writing, and critical thinking skills with an explicit emphasis on developing complex and nuanced skills of inquiry. The course also introduces more indepth research skills necessary for academic work and writing beyond academic contexts. After having learned in Writing as Exploration how to present and interpret or otherwise respond to different types of subject material—for example, personal experiences, written and visual texts, objects, public events and/or social phenomena—students in Writing as Critical Inquiry learn more complex methods for engaging these skills through individualized, research-based writing. Writing as Critical Inquiry courses are themed—most sections devote the semester to a specific realm of inquiry around an interdisciplinary topic. Each course engages global issues and perspectives through its theme and, by extension, its reading and writing assignments.

Writing as Critical Inquiry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12698)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moore, Carley


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12552)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, David


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12553)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hartman, Amie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12554)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dunks, Robert


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12555)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fortuna, Devereux


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12712)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tomlinson, Timothy


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12556)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williams, Deborah


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12557)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, David


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12558)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Langer, Irina


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12559)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tobin, Elayne


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12560)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tobin, Elayne


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12561)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Alessandro, Nina


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12818)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lin, Cammie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12562)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Policoff, Stephen


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12563)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hartman, Amie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (20633)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fortuna, Devereux


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12564)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williams, Deborah


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12565)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Corcoran, Jonathan


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12566)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hendrickson, Janet


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12567)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Manko, Vanessa


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12568)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Roma, Mary


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12569)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by del Rosso, Lisa


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12570)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kolisnyk, Mary Helen


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12571)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Langer, Irina


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12572)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Alessandro, Nina


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12573)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Alessandro, Nina


WRCI-UF 102-000 (20634)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cordon Hornillos, Sara


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12780)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Polchin, James


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12574)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Jason


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12575)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Buck, Marie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (20635)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cordon Hornillos, Sara


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12576)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heiser, Erin


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12725)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by del Rosso, Lisa


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12577)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heiser, Erin


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12578)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rzonca, Christopher


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12579)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lin, Cammie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12601)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Eve, Sean


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12820)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Datcher, Michael


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12729)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Datcher, Michael


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12841)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bishop, Jacqueline


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12730)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12580)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Banks, Danis


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12581)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ray, Montana


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12582)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Colonna, Joseph


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12583)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moore, Carley


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12584)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Jason


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12585)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ray, Montana


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12854)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williams, Deborah


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12596)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bishop, Jacqueline


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12586)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rzonca, Christopher


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12731)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Eve, Sean


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12587)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shivers, Kaia


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12732)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tomlinson, Timothy


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12588)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moore, Carley


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12589)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ray, Montana


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12590)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12591)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hendrickson, Janet


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12592)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hendrickson, Janet


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12602)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Datcher, Michael


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12593)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wilkinson, Amy


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12594)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tobin, Elayne


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12710)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Roma, Mary


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12595)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Buck, Marie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12597)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Colonna, Joseph


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12598)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12699)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Banks, Danis


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12599)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tomlinson, Timothy


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12600)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Jason


WRCI-UF 102-000 (20636)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Corcoran, Jonathan

Global Works and Society in a Changing World (GWC-UF 102)

The second semester of Social Foundations spans a thousand years, from the rise of Islam and the reunification of China under the Tang dynasty (in the 7th century C.E.) through the Scientific Revolution and the decline of the Mogul empire in India. This course invites students to consider great ideas that have often helped earlier peoples organize their lives–but which have also set them in conflict, sometimes with other communities, sometimes among themselves. Such ideas have sparked movements for ethical and social reform, for conquest, for the recovery of lost classics, and for religious renewal.

Global Works and Society in a Changing World (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


GWC-UF 102-000 (13378)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13379)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13380)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22751)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13608)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22752)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13382)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13477)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22753)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22754)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13384)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13385)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22755)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22756)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13387)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13388)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13478)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13389)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13390)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13391)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13392)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13393)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13394)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13395)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13396)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13503)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13397)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13398)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13399)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13400)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13401)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13504)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13403)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13407)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13404)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13406)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13405)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13582)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13381)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13383)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13386)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (13402)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


GWC-UF 102-000 (22757)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Global Works and Society: Antiquity (GWA-UF 101)

The first semester of Social Foundations introduces students to the ancient world and ends with the dissolution of the Western Roman Empire, of the Gupta Empire in India, and of the Han Dynasty in China. This course takes a global perspective and uses an interdisciplinary approach, and part of its aim is to explore enduring questions such as the relation between the individual and society, between justice and power, and between humanity and the divine.

Global Works and Society: Antiquity (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


GWA-UF 101-000 (12770)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Katz, Gal


GWA-UF 101-000 (12771)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Katz, Gal


GWA-UF 101-000 (12866)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Browning, Jacob


GWA-UF 101-000 (12772)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bonakdarian, Mansour


GWA-UF 101-000 (12786)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bonakdarian, Mansour


GWA-UF 101-000 (12787)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Karavitis, Gerasimos


GWA-UF 101-000 (12803)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Browning, Jacob


GWA-UF 101-000 (12867)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wagnon, Daniel


GWA-UF 101-000 (12868)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hewitt, Anne


GWA-UF 101-000 (12869)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Karavitis, Gerasimos


GWA-UF 101-000 (12870)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Altonji, Alexander


GWA-UF 101-000 (12871)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Prichea, Andreea


GWA-UF 101-000 (12872)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Prichea, Andreea

Film, Literature and Mental Health (UNDSW-US 89)

Artists often explore powerful issues of mental health through literature and film. “No form of art goes beyond ordinary consciousness as film does, straight to our emotions, deep into the twilight room of the soul.” (Ingmar Bergmann 1918-2007) In this course, we will draw on classic examples from literature and film to highlight and understand aspects of mental health in ways that are more vivid and visceral than any text book can illustrate. Materials will be chosen from novels, poems, and films to illustrate various mental health issues, such as anxiety, depression, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), dissociative identity disorder (DID), and schizophrenia. We will look at how some of the disorders fare in psychological treatments that either succeed or fail. Guest speakers may be invited to highlight some topics.

Undergrad Social Work (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


UNDSW-US 89-000 (13644)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Michaels, Vera

Principles of Macroeconomics (ECI-UF 101)

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental topics in macroeconomics, the analysis of the economy as a whole. After an overview of introductory economic concepts, such as comparative advantage, opportunity costs, and supply and demand, the course focuses on the determinants of aggregate income, employment, and prices. Other topics include the study of long-run economic growth, the business cycle, the financial system, as well as monetary and fiscal policy. *ECI-UF 101 and ECII-UF 102 may meet some of the equivalent course requirements for the College of Arts and Science. Students may take ECI-UF 101 and ECII-UF 102 in any order; neither course is a pre-requisite for the other.

Economics I (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECI-UF 101-000 (19798)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mejorado, Ascension


ECI-UF 101-000 (13426)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mejorado, Ascension


ECI-UF 101-000 (13352)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mejorado, Ascension


ECI-UF 101-000 (19799)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ECI-UF 101-000 (19800)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Living a Good Life: Greek and Jewish Perspectives (RELST-UA 422)

Key questions: Does living well require acquiring knowledge and wisdom? What is the place of moral responsibility in the good life? Is the good life a happy life, or does it require sacrificing happiness? Does religion lead to living well or does it hinder it? What is friendship and how does it contribute to the good life? Study of primary texts by Plato, Aristotle, Seneca, Avot, Maimonides, Spinoza, and Hermann Cohen.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RELST-UA 422-000 (20451)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gottlieb, Michah

Engaging Early Christian Theology (RELST-UA 840)

What does it mean to say that Jesus Christ was both human and divine? How can the Christian divinity be one yet three? How are the sacraments such as baptism effective? Do we have freewill? These were some of the pressing questions the Church Fathers addressed in the early centuries of Christian history and their answers contributed to the Christian theological tradition for centuries to come. In this course we will examine some of the classic works of early Christian theology. Despite the often highly rhetorical and polemical character of their writings the Church Fathers nevertheless developed an intellectually rigorous field of knowledge, one that has had a significant intellectual historical as well as socio-political impact in the history of the Church. This is not a theological course but rather an introduction to some of the key texts in a historically significant mode of theological inquiry.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RELST-UA 840-000 (19704)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Becker, Adam

Monsters and Their Humans (RELST-UA 649)

Humanity has long imagined monstrous transformations of ourselves. What do these creatures mean to us, historically and today? What do we think we are becoming? Investigates the supernatural in popular culture through vampires and zombies. Places them in the context of our imagination of the divine through history and ethnography, and also alongside our intimate problems of managing sex, gender, race, and class. The archives of religions, psychologies, philosophy, film, TA, and novels provide rich source material, Requires a short midterm essay and a longer final project, while posting to a forum most weeks.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


RELST-UA 649-000 (20380)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zito, Angela · Rubino, Rena

Dancing in the Here and Now: Making Dances, Knowing Bodies (ARTS-UG 1221)

Both dancing and everyday movement offer continual opportunities for embodied experience. Those who regularly dance or engage in movement practices such as yoga, jogging, cycling, and walking typically develop an appetite, even a need, for moving and the breadth of experience it brings. Whether you already feel this appetite or want to explore embodied experience for the first time, this Arts Workshop offers the opportunity for deep investigation of movement, focusing on active and contemplative exploration of bodies in space and time. We will be guided by several research strands linked to the existence and power of embodiment, noting experimental choreographer Susan Rethorst’s term, “the body’s mind”: ways of knowing (individually, culturally) through our bodies. Through many movement options, including dancing and somatic practices, walking and other everyday actions, and personal/cultural/political movement histories, we will encounter or create relationships between what we do and who we are. In the studio and elsewhere, we will consider how our lives as movers, and our sense of ourselves as embodied, bring us into contact with others—walkers, dancers, friends and family—and with our spaces, places, and sociocultural worlds. In this course (open to anyone with/without previous training), our research-in-action will be supported by interdisciplinary scholarship engaged with dance, embodiment, space, everyday culture, phenomenology, environmental studies, and life writing. Readings may include works by Thomas DeFrantz, Anna Halprin, Victoria Hunter, Einav Katan, Marcel Mauss, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Andrea Olsen, Steve Paxton, Georges Perec, Yvonne Rainer, Susan Rethorst, Kathleen Stewart, and Yi-Fu Tuan.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ARTS-UG 1221-000 (12594)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Satin, Leslie

Conserving Our Global Heritage through Science (CCOL-UH 1006)

What is “global heritage”? Is it simply our collective legacy as human societies – how we want to be remembered by future generations – or must we confront more difficult questions about identity, the ownership of culture, and conflicts between local and global stewardship of the cultural treasures and historical evidence? With time, negligence, and even military conflict working to erase the past, we must ask: Can a better understanding of our shared heritage assist us in addressing cultural differences in the present day? And how can science both help us understand the historic record and work to preserve it? This class examines ways in which scientific methods can help define “global heritage” and protect it for future generations. Students explore the history and the science behind the creation of paintings, frescoes, parchments, sculptures, ancient mummies, historical buildings, musical instruments, and other artifacts. They will also examine the methods used to differentiate between an authentic object and a fake and ask how some objects come to be valued more than others: distinctions that can lead, and have led, to cultural conflict in recent years.

Core: Colloquium (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


CCOL-UH 1006-000 (17210)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Arneodo, Francesco · Parthesius, Robert

Composing Music with Max (OART-UT 1097)

The foundations of Max, a powerful visual programming language for music and multimedia, will be covered in this course. We will examine how computers can be utilized to create situations for music creation, performance, and collaborative improvisation as well as applied to building interactive, generative music. In addition to learning Max’s fundamental building blocks, we will also use fundamental music theory as a tool to better understand music making. We will create programs that examine rhythm, melodies, chords, scales, and recognize other qualities of music like timbre, texture, and dynamics while taking into consideration the principles of harmony, melody, and rhythm defined in basic music theory. The final will require you to develop a collaborative piece of interactive computer music, a collaborative performance environment, or another final project that has been discussed and agreed upon together. This class does not require any prerequisite programming skills or prior music theory knowledge.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 3 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


OART-UT 1097-000 (5611)
05/20/2024 – 06/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aguilar, Gustavo

City Photography and Architecture: Discovering Urban Treasures (IPHTI-UT 1210)

City, territory and architecture have been, from the beginning of photography, privileged objects for its practice. Photography has become a tool to strengthen the understanding of architecture, to highlight aesthetic and design ideas and to critically interpret the space. This class focuses on architectural photography and the photography of urban space, both in relation to their historical roots and contemporary practice. Florence offers a perfect environment to develop one’s artistic talent while learning the art of photography and discovering the secrets of one of the most fascinating cities in the world. Assignments are designed to help explore options for technical control as well as visual experimentation and individual style. Keeping in mind the inseparability of photographic technique and expression, students are expected to articulate their particular choices in relation to the overall conceptual approach of the projects. Critiques of assignments are important to the progress of each individual in the class, to help verbalize visual concepts, and to learn to see actively. The final exam consists of the presentation of a portfolio of photographs and an artist’s statement. Students are expected to work on their projects to develop an aesthetic and coherent photographic language and a personal approach to the photographic medium in a different environment. An emphasis is also placed on refining craft in relation to ideas, and to research on an individual basis, since it is crucial in developing an artistic practice. The course includes lectures, shooting sessions and field trips, discussions and critiques of the photographs. Each student must have a camera with manually adjustable aperture and shutter speed.

Int`l Pgms, Photography (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IPHTI-UT 1210-000 (4947)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Capodacqua, Alessandra

ELECTRICITY AND LIGHT (PH-UY 1223)

Second of two introductory courses in general physics for non science or engineering majors. (Not an acceptable substitute for PH-UY 2023 or PH-UY 2033) Electric forces and fields. Electric potential and capacitance. Electric current. Magnetic forces and fields. Faradays law and inductance. Maxwell’s Theory of Electromagnetism. Electromagnetic waves. Light and Color. Geometrical optics. Image Formation. Interference and diffraction. | Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 1213 or PH-UY 1013; Co-requisite: EX-UY 1.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PH-UY 1223-000 (17458)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Di Bartolo, John


PH-UY 1223-000 (17459)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


PH-UY 1223-000 (17460)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Di Bartolo, John


PH-UY 1223-000 (17461)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Di Bartolo, John

Re-decentralizing the Internet (ITPG-GT 3032)

Decentralization has become a buzzword in the technology space, and there is much more to decentralized technology than NFTs and cryptocurrency. In this course, we will examine the fundamental concepts of the existing internet infrastructure, work to define what decentralization means, learn about the “why” of decentralization, survey the landscape of decentralized, distributed, and p2p protocols, and develop decentralized applications. We learn about will examine the implementation of decentralized technology and throughout the course, we will look at different use cases of decentralization such as evading censorship, protecting privacy, and creating resilient applications. We will also consider ethical questions about the decentralization movement—how will it grow, who benefits from decentralization, and whether a decentralized internet is even a good solution at all. We will examine the underlying technologies that enable decentralization, as well as looking at the current implementations of decentralized protocols and apps built on top of decentralized protocols. Finally, we will touch on adjacent topics such as local networks, mesh networking, and p2p networks. While this course will cover a breadth of decentralized and self-hosted applications, we will steer away from decentralized financing and NFTs and instead focus on decentralized information sharing. The goal of the class is to challenge students to think critically about the future of the decentralized web and develop applications that leverage these technologies. Students with or without a background in networking are both highly encouraged to enroll.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ITPG-GT 3032-000 (21891)09/08/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by

Fabricating Mechanical Automatons (Batteries Not Included) (ITPG-GT 3034)

How do we make things move, produce sounds, or maybe even emit light without batteries? Through this course, each student will design their own purely mechanical automaton. We will learn how to use simple materials and tools to hand prototype mechanisms in their early stages. CAD software will be used to refine the designs and then a series of traditional and digital fabrication tools (various wood shop tools, laser cutter, CNC, 3D printers, etc.) will be used to produce the final pieces. We will learn how to work iteratively in the shop through weekly exercises, and a midterm and final project.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ITPG-GT 3034-000 (21893)
09/07/2023 – 12/14/2023 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Hedonomic VR Design: Principles & Practices (ITPG-GT 3025)

To be a VR creator, it’s not enough to learn the hard skills—it’s also our responsibility to prime ourselves for the human impact of our work. As a means to design VR that is both enjoyable and accountable, this class proposes we borrow design principles from Hedonomics, a branch of ergonomic science that facilitates pleasurable human-technology interaction. Through the Hedonomic Pyramid, we’re able to section our thinking off into regions (Safety, Function, Usability, Pleasure and Individuation) and map out industry-tested VR design guidance for each. The result is a hierarchical checklist of proven principles, specifications and practices—that promote a culture of inclusive and holistic design—built to serve as a quickstart guide to designing accountable VR interfaces and systems. This class, divided into units that represent each level of the Hedonomic pyramid, will unpack both technical and conceptual strategies for creating VR, from visual interface fidelity to avoiding locomotion cybersickness to designing safer social VR spaces.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3025-000 (15734)
09/05/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Cortese, Michelle

The Medium of Memory (ITPG-GT 3019)

“What is the medium of memory? In this 14-week studio class, we will dig into this question through creative storytelling. Starting from a lens-based practice, this class will introduce traditional and bleeding-edge documentary methods to inform our own varied approaches to activating archival material. Through weekly “readings” (articles, podcasts, films), written reflections, and creative assignments, we’ll explore: • how technology has impacted our relationship to memory; • how visual interventions can can surface alternative narratives; • how to make under- and unrecorded histories visible, and call into question the power dynamics embedded in “official” records; and • how we might recast objects and sites of memory-keeping, like heirlooms, journals, and memorials, as a mode of engaged preservation. Mid-way through the course, students will identify either personal or collective histories to open up to their own individual creative reexamination, memorialization, or transformation––each producing a final project with the technology and approaches of their choosing that serves to answer the question we started with––what is the medium of memory?”

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3019-000 (15728)
10/23/2024 – 12/04/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Salvo, Simone

Digital Audio Workstations: Ableton Live (REMU-UT 1022)

We live in an age of digital production where so much of today’s music is produced with comparatively few tools, and at the heart of the modern production set up, whether in the bedroom of the studio, is software that uses MIDI. One of the most versatile of today’s platforms which can be used in production, live performance, and even as a visual tool is Ableton Live. Ableton is unique amongst the contemporary software programs making music in that it is the only one that was created by working musicians who were looking for a tool that allowed for both the seamless creation of ideas and could also serve as a performance instrument. In the past 15 years, Ableton has played an important role in creating countless tracks and records in numerous genres and the go-to software for live performance, whether for vocalists and bands or for massive spectacles like Cirque du Soleil. In this course, we will cover Ableton’s unique abilities to manipulate audio which make it the preferred platform for remixing and mash-ups. We will cover the fundamentals of the software, explore techniques to program beats, chordal and melodic ideas, as well as cover creative workflow – how to use Ableton to quickly generate ideas for producers and songwriters. Finally, we will discuss its use as a live performance tool for use with live instrumentalists and vocalists, as a DJ tool and even as a VJing tool. 

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


REMU-UT 1022-000 (13316)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Carrero, Joanne


REMU-UT 1022-000 (21555)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Carrero, Joanne


REMU-UT 1022-000 (21556)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Freeman, Dan


REMU-UT 1022-000 (21557)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Freeman, Dan


REMU-UT 1022-000 (21558)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Freeman, Dan


REMU-UT 1022-000 (21559)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Freeman, Dan

Bio-sensors and Biochips (ENGR-UH 4142)

This course covers the principles, technologies, methods and applications of biosensors and bioinstrumentation beginning with an examination of the ethical, legal, cultural, religious, and social implications of nanotechnologies. The objective of this course is to link engineering principles to understanding of biosystems in sensors and bioelectronics. The course provides students with detail of methods and procedures used in the design, fabrication, and application of biosensors and bioelectronic devices. The fundamentals of measurement science are applied to optical, electrochemical, mass, and pressure signal transduction. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to be able to explain biosensing and transducing techniques; design and construct biosensors instrumentation.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ENGR-UH 4142-000 (19903)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Song, Yong-Ak (Rafael)


ENGR-UH 4142-000 (19904)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Song, Yong-Ak (Rafael)

Introduction to Psychology and Its Principles (APSY-UE 2)

Introduction to the fundamental principles of psychology, emphasizing both the unity & the diversity of a field that spans major theoretical & research areas, including biological bases of human behavior, learning, development, motivation, & social and abnormal behavior. Links between theory & classic as well as contemporary research are a recurrent theme. Liberal Arts Core/MAP Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Society & the Social Sciences

Applied Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


APSY-UE 2-000 (11013)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brito, Natalie


APSY-UE 2-000 (12169)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
7:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Collado, Amarfi


APSY-UE 2-000 (12170)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
8:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Collado, Amarfi


APSY-UE 2-000 (12171)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


APSY-UE 2-000 (12172)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


APSY-UE 2-000 (12337)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sanchez, Nathalia


APSY-UE 2-000 (12338)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sanchez, Nathalia


APSY-UE 2-000 (21776)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Disability Justice and Radical Inclusion (OT-UE 1403)

Explores the implications and meaning of having a disability in global contexts by introducing students to experts’ voices, especially disabled activists, as they seek to advance disability justice and inclusion and demand systemic change in spheres of influence including education, politics, healthcare, the arts, culture, social welfare, and everyday life. Examines how public (government) and private (outside of the government) policies and practices in these sectors affect the inclusion of persons with disabilities. Students explore and identify how international trends in disability and inclusion, local cultural beliefs, and biases influence inclusion.

Occupational Therapy (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OT-UE 1403-000 (11793)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patten, Kristie

Introduction to Science and Technology Studies (STS-UY 1002)

This course introduces contemporary topics in Science and Technology Studies, emphasizing the relations among science, technology and society from philosophical, historical, and sociological points of view. This course is required for STS majors and satisfies an HuSS General Education Elective for all other majors.

Science and Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


STS-UY 1002-000 (3854)
07/03/2024 – 08/15/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at ePoly
Instructed by Alvarez-Maldonado, Mel


STS-UY 1002-000 (3853)
07/03/2024 – 08/15/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at ePoly
Instructed by Alvarez-Maldonado, Mel

Art and Architecture of the Islamic World (ARTH-UH 1810X)

A broad survey, we will consider works of architecture, ceramics, metalwork, textiles and the arts of the book. Given the span of centuries embraced by the term ’Islamic art’ – from the 7th century up to the present day – and the expanse of geography – from Spain to China and beyond – this course cannot be a complete survey within the constraints of a single semester. Instead, this course will present a select group of materials within a chronological and dynastic framework, with an emphasis on specific case studies. These selections will highlight important internal developments as well as ’points of contact’ between cultural entities. This approach – at once global and local – speaks to the dynamic and fluid qualities of many of the arts produced in the regions under scrutiny.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


ARTH-UH 1810X-000 (18559)
01/17/2021 – 05/03/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Teece, Denise

Abrupt Climate Change (OART-UT 1058)

Combining science and the art of storytelling, this course will tackle one of the most pressing issues facing the future of humanity: Abrupt Climate Change. In a unique collaboration with NYU physical climate scientist Professor David Holland, students will research and create work that bridges the divide between science and the public through accurate, creative science-based storytelling. This highly multidisciplinary, hands-on course welcomes students from all backgrounds and fields of study to imagine and invent creative ways of telling stories about this global phenomenon and to investigate solutions. Weekly assignments will lead to a final collaborative project and an exhibition open to the public.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OART-UT 1058-000 (13226)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Terezakis, Peter

American Cinema: 1960 to Present (FMTV-UT 324)

Offered in the spring semester only. Course level: Intermediate. 4 points. No prerequisite. Over the last 50 years the American Cinema has produced a remarkably rich abundance of entertaining, exciting, and challenging films. This course is designed to provide a survey of the wealth of styles, forms, purposes, and approaches to filmmaking that developed and emerged in this era. While Hollywood has obviously served as the dominant mode of filmmaking in this country, a significant of other filmmaking practices have continued to operate and sometimes thrive outside of it. Beyond the attention paid to Hollywood narrative cinema as it has changed and evolved over this half-century, we will also consider documentaries, avant-garde and experimental works, independent narraive cinema, and “cult” films. Consequently, we will be screening a variety of films, including works by such notable American filmmakers as Steven Spielberg, Francis Ford Coppola, Quentin Tarantino, George Romero, John Singleton, and Michael Moore.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


FMTV-UT 324-000 (23683)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
6:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brasiskis, Lukas


FMTV-UT 324-000 (23684)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Banfi, Ryan


FMTV-UT 324-000 (23685)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Banfi, Ryan


FMTV-UT 324-000 (23686)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Banfi, Ryan

Feminist Filmmakers (FMTV-UT 1156)

Feminist Filmmakers examines gender constructs in narrative film and episodic work. We will explore how gender constructs in film and television influence societal views of gender roles, as well as contextualize gender in the era and cultures specific films were made. The vehicle through which this course will examine gender will be the history and work of female directors around the world. Screenings, critical reading in film and gender studies, articles and interviews on current debates regarding gender and diversity inclusion in the film industry, make this class valuable for everyone.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1156-000 (20466)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zentelis, Enid

Consumer Behavior (MKTG-UB 2)

This course presents a comprehensive, systematic, and practical conceptual framework for understanding people as consumers—the basic subject matter of all marketing. It draws on the social sciences to evaluate the influence of both individual and ecological factors on market actions. Students discuss relevant psychological and sociological theories and study how they can be used to predict consumers’ reactions to strategic marketing decisions. Basic methodologies for research in consumer behavior are developed and applied. Course emphasis is on developing applications of behavioral concepts and methods for marketing actions.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 2-000 (18452)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Watson, Jared


MKTG-UB 2-000 (18466)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Watson, Jared


MKTG-UB 2-000 (18486)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pham, Ngoc

International Cinema: 1960 to Present (CINE-UT 56)

Cinema Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CINE-UT 56-000 (13919)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
6:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dominguez, Anthony


CINE-UT 56-000 (13920)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CINE-UT 56-000 (13921)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CINE-UT 56-000 (13922)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Electronics (ENGR-UH 3611)

This course focuses on fundamentals of electronics theory and design. The topics covered include semiconductor physics, diodes, diode circuits such as limiters, clamps; bipolar junction transistors; small-signal models; cut-off, saturation, and active regions; common emitter, common base and emitter-follower amplifier configurations; field-effect transistors (MOSFET and JFET); biasing; small-signal models; common-source and common gate amplifiers; and integrated circuit MOS amplifiers. The laboratory experiments include the design, building and testing of diode circuits, including rectifiers, BJT biasing, large signal operation and FET characteristics, providing hands-on experience of design, theory and applications, with emphasis on small signal analysis and amplifier design. The course also covers the design and analysis of small-signal bipolar junction transistor and field-effect transistor amplifiers; and, diode circuits. The students are introduced to designing and analyzing circuits using the LTPSpice or Cadence simulation tool.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3611-000 (3595)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ha, Sohmyung


ENGR-UH 3611-000 (3596)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sheikh, Muhammad Faraz · Ha, Sohmyung

Introduction to Data Analysis for Engineers (ENGR-UH 2027)

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of data analysis. The course starts with tools used to summarize and visualize data. The focus then shifts to fitting and parameter estimation. The derivation of estimators of parameters using both maximum likelihood and least-squares techniques are covered. Analysis of the statistical properties of estimators is also covered. The course includes hands-on exercises using MATLAB.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ENGR-UH 2027-000 (17233)
10/26/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Jabari, Saif Eddin Ghazi


ENGR-UH 2027-000 (17234)
10/26/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Transgender Youth (CAMS-UA 154)

Transgender and gender non-conforming (TGNC) youth are quickly becoming more visible in society. Parents of gender non-conforming children are coming to mental health providers in increasing numbers and are often met with stigma and bias and a lack of education on TGNC health. TGNC youth are turned out of their homes at disproportionate rates and harassed and bullied in school at higher rates than their gender conforming peers. They have higher rates of suicide, depression and substance abuse and face unique medical, legal and social barriers. They also have produced their own cultures and communities to face these challenges. This course will examine the scientific research on TGNC youth in the context of the practical challenges faced by these individuals and their families. Students will hear from experts in the field, receive personal accounts from TGNC teens and transgender adults, and take field trips to social services agencies and events produced by TGNC teens themselves.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CAMS-UA 154-000 (8893)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Glaeser, Elizabeth

Gender and Sexuality in Modern Visual Culture (HUMN-SHU 181)

This course examines how ideas of gender and sexuality have shaped the production and consumption of visual culture from the late nineteenth century. We will examine a variety of visual and material texts that shape, criticize, and/or negotiate with contemporaneous gender and sexual norms. Focusing on these expressions’ cultural and historical specificities, the students will assess gender and sexuality—and as an extension, the notions of normality, healthfulness, and self—as ideas that continuously evolve in response to social discourses. The course proceeds roughly chronologically. It starts with the nineteenth-century Euro-American context, in which modern ideas of gender and sexuality began to circulate authoritatively in medical and legal terms. It then moves onto more globalized contemporary perspectives that critique and/or expand the pronouncedly “Western” conceptions of identity and identity categories. Prerequisite: None.

Humanities (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


HUMN-SHU 181-000 (23103)
01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Kong, Hyoungee

Human Genetics: Genes in Human Health & Disease (CCEX-SHU 136)

The goal of the first half of the course is to build a basic understanding of how information about traits is encoded in our genes, how this “blueprint” is interpreted by cellular machinery to build a complex human being, and how our heredity has resulted in our evolution. In the senond half of the course, we will continue the exploration of how environment, experience and random errors affect the process of building our traits, what happens when these processes fail, and the promise and possible peril of genetic technologies for human life. Fulfillment: CORE ED (with CCEX-SHU 137)

Exper Discovery in Nat World (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CCEX-SHU 136-000 (21479)
01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yu, Danyang


CCEX-SHU 136-000 (21480)
01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yu, Danyang

Printmaking in an Expanded Field (ART-SHU 255)

This Praxis course is an exploration of contemporary and traditional artistic printmaking practices, with an emphasis on expanding notions of conventional printmaking techniques and forms. Students will be introduced to various printmaking techniques, and experiment with traditional and non-traditional forms, in conjunction with their histories and consider what constitutes a hand-made print in an artistic framework. Students will gain an understanding of printmaking – its history based in China, development across the globe and inventive contemporary practices which include sculptural forms. They will learn techniques, modes, forms, and applications of printmaking – with an emphasis on relief prints (stamps and wood cuts) – in a conceptual framework of contemporary printmaking practices and global visual culture. Note: attendance in the first class meeting is mandatory, otherwise you will be dropped from the course. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: This course satisfies IMA/IMB elective.

Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ART-SHU 255-000 (19570)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Lin, Monika

Foundations of Art History (ARTH-UA 10)

Introduces students to the skills and concepts they will need in order to develop a meaningful engagement with the visual arts and art history as a global discipline. Rather than providing a chronological survey of great works, it covers examples and perspectives from a wide array of regions, periods, and societies. Topics include materials and techniques of production; formal analysis; subject matter and iconography; historical and cultural contexts; the social role and formation of artists; and the history of art history as a discipline. Pitched for students who have little or no background in the study of art and architecture, this course provides a rigorous introduction to the foundations of the discipline. It is required of all art history majors.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ARTH-UA 10-000 (9715)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flood, Finbarr


ARTH-UA 10-000 (9716)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ARTH-UA 10-000 (9717)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ARTH-UA 10-000 (9718)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ARTH-UA 10-000 (9719)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Interactive Multi-Screen Experiences (ITPG-GT 3002)

We experience screens daily in many forms: in our hands, on our desktops, on walls and public installations as we travel. This course will explore the creative possibilities of real-time interactive and reactive art on screens in various forms. Using the recently developed p5VideoKit we will create standalone installations. p5VideoKit is a new library of live video effects – building on p5js – presented as a dashboard for mixing video in the browser. This library allows the user to apply visual effects to live video from connected cameras and sensors or streaming from devices on the internet. p5VideoKit is open source and can be extended with the user’s p5js code for a plethora of visual effects and interactivity. One possible application of p5Videokit would be a public facing installation allowing anonymous people on the street to use their hand held devices to interact with large street facing screens, thereby collaborating on real time creation of “digital graffiti”. Building on ICM, students will learn how to adapt simple sketches into components of p5VideoKit so that algorithms can be quickly composited and orchestrated into more complex works. Students will also learn how to edit and share code beyond the p5js editor, use nodejs/javascript to automate deployment of installations, and remotely configure dedicated computers with long running installations. Several dedicated computers and screens will be available to preview installations on the floor and street facing areas of the 370 Jay Street campus. Prerequisites: ICM or equivalent coding experience. About John Henry Thompson: http://johnhenrythompson.com

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3002-000 (14793)
03/14/2024 – 05/02/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Thompson, John

Modern Artifacts: Interactive Public Art for the People (ITPG-GT 3005)

In an era of remote everything, how can we create artwork that brings us back together IRL? This course explores our connection to physical objects within the context of community. How can sculpture, installation, immersive, and public art nurture our neighborhoods via collaboration, play, ritual, self-expression, and awe? Students will work collaboratively to radically imagine bold, sculptural, immersive works using innovative and lo-if techniques integrated with technology. Hands-on workshops include experiments creating found sculptures, AR prototypes, projection mapping, real-time interactive multimedia content, and more. We’ll reference ancient monuments, sacred objects, NYC relics, street art and contemporary works to envision new artifacts that create awareness by reflecting the needs of our communities. Prerequisite: Comm Lab: Hypercinema About Ali Santana: http://www.alisantana.com/bio

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3005-000 (14796)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Santana, Ali

Code Your Way (ITPG-GT 3007)

This course provides students an opportunity to sharpen their coding skills in several ways: by reviewing fundamental programming concepts, acquiring techniques to systematically develop code-driven projects, and then implementing those to develop an independent project with the structure and support of a classroom learning community. The first part of the semester consists of weekly exercises to practice strategies for learning new algorithms, writing pseudocode, pair programming, debugging, refactoring, version control, and more. Screen-based code examples for the activities and assignments draw inspiration from the history of creative coding. The second part of the semester shifts to a project development studio format for students to apply these strategies to a self-directed project. This could be an existing idea or one devised during the course. Ultimately this course aims to empower students to reflect on their process and teach themselves how to program with greater efficiency and independence. It is a direct follow-up to Introduction to Computational Media (ICM) or for anyone interested in advancing their coding practice. Examples and exercises will be provided in JavaScript using the p5.js library. However, students are welcome to consult the instructor about working with another programming library, framework, or language with which they have interest or prior experience. Prerequisite: ICM or equivalent experience

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3007-000 (14798)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Nickles, Ellen

Future Mapper (ITPG-GT 2362)

As you know, projection mapping and Light Art are becoming popular again because of large-scale pop-up installations worldwide: ARTECHOUSE, SuperReal, Meow Wolf, and TeamLab. Technology has advanced over the years, but how people enjoy light art have not changed so much. How do your ideas and artwork fit into these site-specific installations? This class is for anyone interested in creating a site-specific installation using mapping technologies to create new experiences for the public audience. This class guides students through conceptual and technical processes of project and artist development. It consists of three parts: Project & Artist Development, Projection Mapping, and LED Mapping. We will research and discuss the history of visual artwork, public engagement, and technical exercises using real international contests and festival sites. The student will learn the latest Projection and LED Mapping techniques using Madmapper. And we will also focus on advanced techniques like multi-projector projection, projector calculation, Interactive Mapping, and software & hardware to culminate in a final project. The class will also invite guest speakers to discuss the nuts and bolts of their art and business. About Chika Iijima: www.mappathon.com, www.imagima.com

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2362-000 (14784)
01/23/2024 – 04/30/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Iijima, Chika

Reverse Engineering: New Paradigm Shifts in Art, Curatorial and Technological Practices (ITPG-GT 2097)

This course provides critical and curatorial insight into global art practices and interactive technologies from a post colonial perspective. Designed to provide a critique of imperialism the course is underpinned by ideas pertaining to the rise of the Global South, decoupling, indigenous knowledge and ancient and contemporary innovation through contemporary art, emergent technologies, new media and exhibition practices. Students will also investigate the role of shifting digital landscapes and conservation of new media coupled with museum collecting practices, from both a deconstructive and ethical lens, providing regular opportunities to reflect upon their own respective practices. Presented as a combination of presentations/ critiques, seminars, readings, virtual field trips as well as special guest visits with noted experts, the course presents a compact and timely overview of globalization, and the effects of rapid interactive and technological innovative, in lieu with ideating towards a more equitable and diverse art and technological ecosystem.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ITPG-GT 2097-000 (22306)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Raza, Sara

How to Count Birds (ITPG-GT 2085)

On October 8th, 2015, a team in Ecuador identified 431 species of birds – the world record for number counted in a single day. Earlier that year in Myanmar, a scientist counted one Jerdon’s babbler, the first in nearly eight decades. In December of 2019, eBird announced that its database held over 737 million bird observations. This morning, in Brooklyn Bridge park, I counted 38 house sparrows, 4 black-and-white warblers and an ovenbird. This course will consider birding as a practice, and will dive deep into the processes by which observations become data. As a collective, we will investigate how crowd-sourced data is transforming ornithology, and will explore ways to tell stories about the natural world through visualization and more radical forms of data representation.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ITPG-GT 2085-000 (22309)
03/23/2023 – 05/04/2023 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Thorp, Jeremy

FOUNDATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT (MG-UY 1002)

This course introduces the principles and practices of management. Management is viewed as a system of tasks and activities, including environmental scanning, planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Within each major task, is a series of processes, which show how to do what has to be done. Management is a science and an art; both aspects of management are covered in this course. Areas covered are management history, philosophy and the theory and practice of management planning, decision making, organizing, motivating and leading. Special emphasis is on providing the technical and managerial challenges presented by emerging and transformative technologies. Particular consideration is given to the managerial options available to both legacy and entrepreneurial organizations.

Management (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 1002-000 (14075)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by COHEN, MATHIAS


MG-UY 1002-000 (14076)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Driscoll, Michael

Paper Engineering and Interactive Play (ITPG-GT 2187)

The class will focus on the many overlooked aspects of paper, and how it can be used as a three-dimensional material. We will learn the disciplines of making Pop-Ups, Origami, Paper Crafting, and Visual Design. Using these methods as a starting point, students will build prototypes to explore new ways to tell stories, inform, interact, play with, engage, and challenge a younger audience. Most classes are hands – on. The rest, dedicated to criticism (including from children), analysis, and refinement, technical and conceptual. We will discuss how they could be mass produced and distributed. Students will build three prototypes, during the semester. From these, each student will select a favorite to fully develop as the final.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2187-000 (14760)
01/25/2024 – 03/07/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Ita, Sam

Introduction to 3D (FMTV-UT 1110)

This is an introductory course to the fundamentals of 3D computer animation. Through in-depth discussions and hands-on assignments, students will gain a thorough beginner’s understanding of the 3D production process. Using industry-leading Autodesk Maya running on high-end Mac Pro workstations, students will learn the basics of modeling and proceed through UV layout, texturing, rigging, animation, lighting and final render. At the end of the class students will have completed a series of exercises that will culminate in a final scene that showcases all they learned.This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1110-000 (19491)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McNagny, Phil


FMTV-UT 1110-000 (19492)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Guevara, Cesar

Fundamentals of Machine Learning (CSCI-UA 9473)

Machine learning is an exciting and fast-moving field of computer science with many recent consumer applications (e.g., Microsoft Kinect, Google Translate, Iphone’s Siri, digital camera face detection, Netflix recommendations, Google news) and applications within the sciences and medicine (e.g., predicting protein-protein interactions, species modeling, detecting tumors, personalized medicine). This course introduces undergraduate computer science students to the field of machine learning. Students learn about the theoretical foundations of machine learning and how to apply machine learning to solve new problems. Assuming no prior knowledge in machine learning, the course focuses on two major paradigms in machine learning which are supervised and unsupervised learning. In supervised learning, we learn various methods for classification and regression. Dimensionality reduction and clustering are discussed in the case of unsupervised learning

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CSCI-UA 9473-000 (2626)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


CSCI-UA 9473-000 (2627)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Introduction to Engineering and Design (EG-UY 1004)

This course introduces selected aspects of the history, philosophy, methodology, tools, and contemporary topics in engineering. Also included are basic engineering experimentation, data analysis, and a team-design project. This course will provide an understanding of what professional engineers do. In this context, an emphasis will be placed on developing oral and written communication skills. EG1004 is a survey course that introduces students to NYU Tandon academic opportunities, professional and career development, and teamwork skills. Design and project management skills are developed throughout a semester-long design project. Disciplines within engineering will be introduced during lecture, and explored through practice in laboratory assignments.

General Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


EG-UY 1004-000 (12431)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12432)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12433)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12434)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12435)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12436)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12437)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12438)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12439)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12440)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12441)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12442)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12443)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12444)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12445)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12446)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12447)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12448)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12449)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12450)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12451)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12452)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12453)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12454)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rom, Cindy


EG-UY 1004-000 (12455)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12456)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12598)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12457)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12458)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12459)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12460)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12461)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12462)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12463)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12464)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12465)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Clenance, Pamela


EG-UY 1004-000 (12466)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12467)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12468)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter · Röhr, Jason


EG-UY 1004-000 (12469)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12470)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12471)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12472)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12473)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12474)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12475)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12476)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12477)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12478)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12479)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12480)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rom, Cindy


EG-UY 1004-000 (12481)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12482)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12483)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12484)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12485)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12486)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12487)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12488)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12489)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12490)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12491)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12492)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid

DIGITAL LOGIC AND STATE MACHINE DESIGN (ECE-UY 2204)

This course covers combinational and sequential digital circuits. Topics: Introduction to digital systems. Number systems and binary arithmetic. Switching algebra and logic design. Error detection and correction. Combinational integrated circuits, including adders. Timing hazards. Sequential circuits, flipflops, state diagrams and synchronous machine synthesis. Programmable Logic Devices, PLA, PAL and FPGA. Finite-state machine design. Memory elements. A grade of C or better is required of undergraduate computer-engineering majors. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 1114 (C- or better) or CS-UY 1133 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UH 1001 (C- or better) or ENGR-UH 1000 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 101 (C- or better)

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11545)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11546)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11547)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11548)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11549)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Reagen, Brandon

Data Structures (CSCI-SHU 210)

Data structures are fundamental programming constructs which organize information in computer memory to solve challenging real-world problems. Data structures such as stacks, queues, linked lists, and binary trees, therefore constitute building blocks that can be reused, extended, and combined in order to make powerful programs. This course teaches how to implement them in a high-level language, how to analyze their effect on algorithm efficiency, and how to modify them to write computer programs that solve complex problems in a most efficient way. Programming assignments. Prerequisite: ICS or A- in ICP. Equivalency: This course counts for CSCI-UA 102 Data Structures (NY). Fulfillment: CS Required, Data Science Required, CE Required.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20398)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Tue3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)at ShanghaiInstructed by Tam, Yik-Cheung


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20399)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Thu3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)at ShanghaiInstructed by Simikin, Sven


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20400)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Wed3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)at ShanghaiInstructed by Simikin, Sven


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20401)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Mon11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at ShanghaiInstructed by Tam, Yik-Cheung


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20402)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Wed11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at ShanghaiInstructed by Simikin, Sven


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20403)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Fri11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at ShanghaiInstructed by Simikin, Sven

Human-Centered Data Science (CDAD-UH 1044Q)

Data science is changing our lives. While the importance of data science is widely acknowledged, there are also great concerns around it. How are data generated? How can they be used to make predictions and inform insights? What can be the potential dangers of applying data science techniques? What are the social and human implications of their uses? This multidisciplinary course explores these questions through hands-on experience on key technical components in data science and critical reviews of human and social implications in various real-world examples, ranging from social science to arts and humanities to engineering. In the course, students will 1) learn basic concepts and skills in data science (e.g., crawling and visualization); 2) apply these skills in a creative project; 3) discuss social and human implications of data science, including data privacy; algorithmic bias, transparency, fairness, and accountability; research ethics; data curation and reproducibility; and societal impacts. This course encourages students to reconsider our common-place assumptions about how data science works and be critical about the responsible use of data.

Core: Data and Discovery (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CDAD-UH 1044Q-000 (4632)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Park, Minsu

Culture, Hist/Imaging Photography Studies (PHTI-UT 1003)

Offered Fall Only. Required of all freshmen majors and highly recommended for incoming transfers. Students are required to register for the lecture and the recitation sections. No prerequisites for this course. The course will consist of a series of weekly lectures, discussions, readings and field trips to museums and galleries in the city. Lectures will present historic and contemporary art and photography and it’s ideation as a basis for understanding the work the students are viewing on their weekly field trips. Students will visit selected exhibitions chosen for their quality and relevance and arranged by geographic area of the city (One week the Whitney, the next Chelsea, etc). Students will be required to monitor the daily press and periodicals for reviews of work they’ve seen and to highlight exhibitions the class should see. Additional readings of historic material will be assigned and short papers will be required.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


PHTI-UT 1003-000 (13385)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kobielski, Lili


PHTI-UT 1003-000 (13386)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Aesthetic History of Photography (PHTI-UT 1102)

Open only to Photography & Imaging majors. Sophomore Standing. This class will chronicle the history of photography?s complex and symbiotic relationship to the other visual arts: painting, sculpture, architecture, installation and performance, among others. Beginning with the medium?s invention and the early fights of its practitioners to establish themselves as fine artists, the course will describe photographers? unique attempts to negotiate their relationships with both artistic movements and the media culture of which they are a part. Robinson, Cameron, Emerson, F. Holland Day, Stieglitz, Moholy-Nagy, Rodchenko, Weston, Alvarez Bravo, Lartigue, De Carava, Cahun, Robert Frank, Diane Arbus and Cindy Sherman (among others) will be seen within the context of their respective art worlds, so the impact of art movements, cultural attitudes and new technologies on photographers during different historical periods can be assessed.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PHTI-UT 1102-000 (7498)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rice, Shelley

Comp Modern Societies: Pol & Soc in 20C Germany (HIST-UA 9133)

The history of Germany in the twentieth century offers rich material to explore various approaches to organizing modern society. Beginning with Imperial Germany in 1900 and moving forward to today’s reunited Germany, we will look at different ways in which the relationship between the state and the individual, and relationship between politics, economy, and society developed over five different political systems. We will interrogate how these institutional arrangements were envisioned and structured and how they were experienced in everyday negotiations. In this course, principle narratives and events will be situated in a European and global context, allowing us to place the concept of German modernity in a comparative framework. Lectures will provide an overview of Germany in the twentieth century; readings and in-class discussions will explore different approaches to analyzing German history and society. During museum visits and walking tours, we will analyze contestations over the various attempts to integrate – both in concerted efforts to memorialize as well as to forget and erase – Germany’s oft-problematic pasts within the narrative of Germany’s present.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


HIST-UA 9133-000 (2797)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by

Philosophical Approaches to Race and Racism (PHIL-UA 8)

This introductory-level course is needed to provide students with a firm understanding of distinctively philosophical approaches to issues concerning race and racism. This course has two themes. The first is an exploration of the concept of race. This is a question in social ontology, which is the philosophical study of the nature of social entities. The second is an examination of some of the normative and conceptual issues surrounding the most morally significant of the ways in which “race” has mattered for social life, namely as the concept that defines the object of the attitudes, practices, institutions and beliefs we call “racist.” We shall ask what racism is, what sorts of things can be racist, and what makes racism wrong.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHIL-UA 8-000 (10079)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Appiah, Kwame Anthony


PHIL-UA 8-000 (10080)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ulerie, Jodell


PHIL-UA 8-000 (10081)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ulerie, Jodell


PHIL-UA 8-000 (10082)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grabelsky, Dana


PHIL-UA 8-000 (10083)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grabelsky, Dana

British Art in London (ARTH-UA 9011)

The principal aim of this course is to familiarize students with the history of British art from the Stuarts to the early Victorian era. Teaching will be conducted entirely on sites in London or its immediate vicinity. The course will begin with the elite patronage of the Stuart court and end with the development of public institutions of art from the mid-eighteenth century. The social significance of portraiture, the cult of antiquity, the art market and the rise of landscape will all be studied as themes. There will be a strong emphasis on the European sources of British visual culture and the emergence of a distinctive national tradition of painting from Hogarth through to Turner.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTH-UA 9011-000 (2722)
09/02/2024 – 12/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Schuster, Jana


ARTH-UA 9011-000 (2723)
09/02/2024 – 12/06/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Weiner, Julia

Advanced Seminar: (SOC-UA 9942)

This interdisciplinary course examines the works of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud, three German speaking writers who pioneered radically different and influential interpretations of modern life, which continue to shape our contemporary understanding of society and individuality. The seminar not only delves into the origins of these prominent traditions of modern Western thought, but also underscores their relevance in modern social theories and poetics. Hence, the course will also include references to the writings of their contemporaries, as well as explications of the direct and indirect influences of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud on other writers.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


SOC-UA 9942-000 (3750)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Wed
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by Michaelis-König, Andree

Contemporary Music Performance I (ARTS-UG 1305)

This course is designed to help students develop a better understanding of music by presenting the opportunity to experience music as a musician. Students review basic music theory and develop rudimentary musicianship skills; learn how to utilize the basic functionality of common digital audio workstations; and use that experience to create music. The goal is for each student to be able to compose, rehearse, and then perform, original contemporary pieces of music, individually and in a group setting, in a wide range of musical idioms. The course culminates in a public recital of works written and performed by students.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ARTS-UG 1305-000 (12193)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Castellano, John

TrendingMentalHealth (CAMS-UA 504)

Addresses current problems facing our society and threatening our mental health, such as the opioid epidemic, gun violence, video game addiction, legal use of marijuana, and prolonged separation of children from their parents. Students contrast what is scientifically understood with what is commonly believed and learn critical reading and thinking skills as they parse fact from fiction, reality from supposition. Given the topical nature of this course, themes may vary by semester and instructor expertise (including a focus on social and cultural issues, novel neuroscience, digital health technology, etc.).

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CAMS-UA 504-000 (9479)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Waugh, Whitney


CAMS-UA 504-000 (9700)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Castellanos, Francisco · Baroni, Argelinda


CAMS-UA 504-000 (19793)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gerson, Ruth · Marsh, Akeem · Chhabra, Divya

Introduction to Computer Programming (Limited Prior Experience) (CSCI-UA 3)

This course introduces object-oriented programming, recursion, and other important programming concepts to students who already have had some exposure to programming in the context of building applications using Python. Students will design and implement Python programs in a variety of applied areas.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CSCI-UA 3-000 (9289)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Arias Hernandez, Mauricio

Cultural History of Spain (SPAN-UA 9260)

This course provides an introduction to the making of modern Spain through the study of key cultural practices in literature, visual art, film, and performance from the 19th century to the present. The course is organized around key concepts, which may vary by semester and by instructor.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


SPAN-UA 9260-000 (18385)
08/31/2023 – 12/12/2023 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by

Intensive Interm Spanish (SPAN-UA 9020)

SPAN-UA 9020.002 (Intensive Intermediate Spanish) is a six-credit course that continues and reviews the introductory level Spanish learned in SPAN-UA.1 and SPAN-UA.2, or in SPANUA. 10, while introducing literary readings, short films, and more complex composition exercises. The course involves an integration of the four basic skills: listening, speaking,reading and writing with the aim to improve communication in Spanish. Through this integrated approach, you will participate in a practical application of vocabulary, grammar,and culture. The course emphasizes mastery of language skills through specific contexts and dialogical situations.At the end of the course students will read a novel which will also be used to review many of the grammatical points covered in the textbook and class work, to improve analytical thinking and literary criticism skills, as well as to verbally express opinions about the situations presented in the novel. The goals of this course are to provide you with the opportunity to improve your oral and written communication skills in the language, by applying all the grammar rules you have learned and will be reviewing. You will be expected to substantially increase your working vocabulary and make solid progress in reading and writing skills.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
6 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


SPAN-UA 9020-000 (2585)
at NYU Buenos Aires (Global)
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 9020-000 (2608)
05/21/2024 – 07/01/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
10:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Castillo, Maria

Advanced Spanish for Spanish-Speaking Students (SPAN-UA 9051)

For native and quasi-native speakers of Spanish whose formal training in the language has been incomplete or otherwise irregular.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


SPAN-UA 9051-000 (3938)
at NYU Buenos Aires (Global)
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 9051-000 (3957)
05/21/2024 – 07/01/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Figueroa-Rojas, Armando

Immigration (SOC-UA 9452)

To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


SOC-UA 9452-000 (4016)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Busch, Nicky


SOC-UA 9452-000 (4017)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Busch, Nicky

Legal Aspects of The Entertainment Industry (FMTV-UT 1195)

A course that tracks the filmmaking process from its inception, at the idea phase and follows the creative process through development, pre-production, principal photography and post-production. The class will focus on the business and legal issues that arise during every phase of filmmaking. Key topics covered will include: copyright law; option agreements for underlying rights such as books, plays, magazine and newspaper articles; sources of financing; distribution agreements; licensing of music; agreements for actors, directors, producers and writers. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. Students must have Junior or Senior standing. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1195-000 (19505)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lichter, Rosalind

Industrial Revolutions and the Future of Work (CCOL-UH 1074)

How has the automation economy changed the ways we live and work? What challenges and opportunities does automation pose for the future? This multidisciplinary colloquium draws on materials in social science, science, and the humanities to explore how societies have organized themselves relative to technology in the past, and what changes are currently taking place. As we are now in the midst of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, what lessons can be learned from its predecessors? What consequences might new technologies pose for global challenges such as peace, education, equality, or sustainable development? How does the very definition of the “human” stand to be affected? Students will examine the wave of technology-driven transformations occurring on a global scale, including artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, and virtual reality. They will consider the Fourth Industrial Revolution as an opportunity to critique theories of technological change and construct their own narratives of change in individual case study analysis assignments.

Core: Colloquium (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


CCOL-UH 1074-000 (16829)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Gleason, Nancy

Ethics, Technology, and Business (BUSOR-UH 1009)

This course examines the ethical issues that arise in the context of the rapid development of technology and the increasing power of business corporations. In recent years, technological progress has allowed us to achieve many things, including the creation of intelligent machines that can surpass human capabilities. Yet, for all these benefits, the development of science and technology has spawned a host of problems such as: conflict between individual rights and social welfare; clash between respect for personal autonomy and expertise; automation and unemployment; and the replication of human bias by algorithms. Along with technological progress, the social role of businesses and corporations are also becoming increasingly important. How should corporations, for example, balance the pursuit of profit with respect for employees’ rights and liberties? Should the state refuse to enforce unconscionable contracts, even when enforcing those contracts would make both parties better off? What is the social role of corporations in the context of increasing inequality?

Business & Organizational Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


BUSOR-UH 1009-000 (17905)
08/29/2022 – 12/13/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Kim, Soo Jin

Advanced Circuits (ENGR-UH 2311)

This course builds on the foundations of the Circuits Fundamentals Course. The topics covered include sinusoidal steady-state response, complex voltage, current and the phasor concept; impedance, admittance; average, apparent and reactive power; polyphase circuits; node and mesh analysis for AC circuits; frequency response; parallel and series resonance; and, operational amplifier circuits.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ENGR-UH 2311-000 (4721)
01/22/2024 – 03/08/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rasras, Mahmoud


ENGR-UH 2311-000 (4722)
01/22/2024 – 03/08/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rasras, Mahmoud · Mulugeta, Tadesse


ENGR-UH 2311-000 (4723)
03/20/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ha, Sohmyung


ENGR-UH 2311-000 (4724)
03/20/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ha, Sohmyung · Mulugeta, Tadesse

Nanoelectronic devices and circuits (ECE-UY 4513)

Concepts of nanoelectronic materials, devices, and circuits. Fundamental and practical limits on the performance and energy dissipation of nanoelectronic devices. Physical, electrical and optical properties of semiconductor materials and how they are used in circuits. Relation of the properties of semiconductors to the fundamental limits at various levels of design hierarchy. Connections between the physical design and circuit-level performance of nanoelectronic circuits. | Prerequisites: MA-UY 2114 and PH-UY 2023 and EE-UY 3114

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


ECE-UY 4513-000 (21245)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Introduction to Very Large Scale Integrated Circuits (ECE-UY 3193)

The course offers an overview of integrated circuit-design process: planning, design, fabrication and testing; device physics: PN junction, MOSFET and Spice models; inverter static and dynamic behavior and power dissipation; interconnects: cross talk, variation and transistor sizing; logic gates and combinational logic networks; sequential machines and sequential system design; subsystem design: adders, multipliers, static memory (SRAM), dynamic memory (DRAM). Topics include floor planning, clock distribution, power distribution and signal integrity; Input/Output buffers, packaging and testing; IC design methodology and CAD tools; implementations: full custom, application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), field programmable gate arrays (FPGA). The course provides foundations of VLSI design and custom VLSI design methodology and state-of-the-art CAD tools. | Prerequisites: CS-UY 2204 (C- or better) and EE-UY 3114. ABET competencies: a,c,e,k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ECE-UY 3193-000 (17965)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Selesnick, Ivan


ECE-UY 3193-000 (17966)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Bhavnagarwala, Azeez

COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN (ME-UY 2112)

The course covers sketching, drawing and computer-aided drafting. Topics: Projection theory—multiview, axonometric, oblique. Auxiliaries, sections, isometrics, dimensions, fasteners, detail and assembly drawings. Introduction to blueprint reading. Overview of CIM and CAD integration with other CIM concepts. A design project incorporates developed skills in visualization, drawing techniques, standards and CAD.

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ME-UY 2112-000 (15822)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Benbelkacem, Ghania


ME-UY 2112-000 (15906)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Benbelkacem, Ghania


ME-UY 2112-000 (15823)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
10:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Benbelkacem, Ghania

Intro to Marketing (MKTG-UB 1)

This course evaluates marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and a catalyst of business activity. It presents a comprehensive framework that includes (1) researching and analyzing customers, company, competition, and the marketing environment; (2) identifying and targeting attractive segments with a strategic positioning; and (3) making product, pricing, communication, and distribution decisions. Cases and examples are utilized to develop problem-solving abilities.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 2 Weeks

Sections (January 2021)


MKTG-UB 1-000 (1219)
01/05/2021 – 01/21/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 4:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Movie Marketing (MKTG-UB 22)

This course gives students a basic understanding of key business issues relating to producing, distributing, marketing, and exploiting feature films. The course examines key aspects of the movie business, including managing a creative enterprise, deal making, acquiring rights, building a library, branding, and all aspects of effective marketing. The concepts developed in the course are applied in a group project presentation.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 22-000 (18448)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 22-000 (18473)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 22-000 (18479)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Info Technology in Business & Society (TECH-UB 9001)

Provides the background necessary to make decisions about computer-based information systems and to be an “end-user”. Two major parts of the course are hands-on experience with personal computers and information systems management. Group and individual computer assignments expose students to electronic spreadsheet analysis and database management on a personal computer. Management aspects focus on understanding computer technology, systems analysis and design, and control of information processing by managers.

Computing and Data Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


TECH-UB 9001-000 (18394)
08/31/2023 – 12/12/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Sarasua, Asier


TECH-UB 9001-000 (18374)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by

COMPUTING IN CIVIL ENGINEERING (CE-UY 3013)

This course aims to introduce the modern computing methods, tools, and best practices for students in civil and urban engineering. The course uses Python as the programming language for solving a series of fundamental computational problems in civil and urban engineering, such as solving linear equations, data interpolation, curve fitting, root finding, numerical differentiation and integration, probability and statistics, linear programming and optimization. The course also introduces a series of generic computation tools and best practices for the students’ future study and research in computing applications in civil and urban engineering, including how to debug a program, visualize data, manage source codes, collaborative programming project management, etc. It aims at laying a solid foundation for civil and urban engineering students to better understand the modern programming workflow and utilize the computing tools. Students are first introduced with the fundamental concepts through the lecture, and then guided step-by-step via the in-class lab session in each weak. There will be multiple homework assignments and in-class quizzes for the evaluating the students’ performances. | Prerequisite: (CS-UY 1113 or CS-UY 1114 or CS-UY 1133) and MA-UY 2034 and MA-UY 2224 or Adviser’s approval.

Civil & Urban Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CE-UY 3013-000 (11388)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Ozturk, Baturalp

Projects in Photography (ART-UE 1380)

Students work directly with internationally recognized figures in photography. Topics for workshops range from the techniques of established photographers to discussions of issues in photographic theory, history, & criticism.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 1380-000 (9681)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harouni, Shadi

Applied Studio Production (MPATE-UE 1006)

Hands-on studio course with an emphasis on ear training to increase understanding of different technical & artistic practices in the recording studio. Students will explore use of microphone placement techniques, balancing natural & artificial acoustics as well as dynamic audio effects & filters.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MPATE-UE 1006-000 (18222)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by O’Reilly, Michael

Electronic Product Design for Music and Audio (MPATE-UE 1017)

This is a multidisciplinary course in which students with previous experience with analog and digital electronics create a novel hardware–based electronic musical instrument, controller, effects unit, or other device related to their interests in music and audio. Student projects may be analog, digital, or a hybrid, and should be unique in some way from devices currently in the commercial marketplace. Students present their designs and functioning physical prototypes with the class as they evolve throughout the semester for feedback.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1017-000 (13044)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven


MPATE-UE 1017-000 (13045)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven

Fundamentals of Music Technology (MPATE-UE 1801)

A general introduction to the fundamental concepts of music technology, including: MIDI and sequencing, the basics of digital audio, sound recording, mixing and sound synthesis,. The course will also briefly overview advanced topics and applications in the field.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (12129)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Geluso, Paul


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (10670)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Las Heras, Diego


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (10673)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mueller, Charles


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (12130)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mann, Mason

Rcdg Tech for Non Majors (MPATE-UE 1022)

Introduction to the physical aspects of sound, psychoacoustics, basic electricity, principles and practice of magnetic recording and an overview of the recording studio, including an introduction to multi-track recording techniques. Students perform various duties just as they would in a professional recording session with live musicians in the recording studio. Open to students without previous experience in recording technology.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10658)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Filadelfo, Gary


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10660)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Griffin, J Chris


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10662)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Losada, Juan

Concert Recording (MPATE-UE 1011)

Introduction to the concepts of live concert recording. Microphone selection, characteristics & placement as well as acoustic problems encountered in concert halls will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to apply the lecture material by recording undergraduate rehearsals & recitals.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1011-000 (12977)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MPATE-UE 1011-000 (12978)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Studio Production Techniques (MPATE-UE 1005)

Principles covered in MPATE-UE1001 & MPATE-UE-1003 are put into practice with additional theory & techniques. Students perform various duties just as they would in a professional recording session. Studio Lab assignments are performed outside of class reinforcing weekly topics.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1005-000 (12127)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by O’Reilly, Michael

Hardware Security (ENGR-UH 4320)

This course covers topics related to security and trustworthiness of electronic hardware. Lectures and in-class discussions on recent research papers cover the following topics: Trustworthiness of integrated circuits; counterfeit chips, hardware Trojans, reverse engineering and IP piracy. Design-for-Trust; hardware metering, logic encryption, split manufacturing, IC camouflaging. Encryption hardware; AES, DES, etc. Testability vs Security; misuse of test infrastructure to attack encryption hardware and countermeasures. Encrypted architectures; homomorphic encryption, privacy-preserving computation. Signal processing in the encrypted domain. Malware detection through hardware structures, side channel attacks, cyber-security for the smart grid. Lectures are complemented by hands-on lab exercises.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ENGR-UH 4320-000 (17229)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


ENGR-UH 4320-000 (17230)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Computer Vision (ENGR-UH 3331)

An important goal of artificial intelligence (AI) is to equip computers with the capability of interpreting visual inputs. Computer vision is an area in AI that deals with the construction of explicit, meaningful descriptions of physical objects from images. It includes the techniques for image processing, pattern recognition, geometric modeling, and cognitive processing. This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and techniques used in computer vision, which includes image representation, image pre-processing, edge detection, image segmentation, object recognition and detection, and neural networks and deep learning. In addition to learning about the most effective machine learning techniques, students will gain the practical implementation of applying these techniques to real engineering problems.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ENGR-UH 3331-000 (22825)
01/24/2023 – 03/10/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi


ENGR-UH 3331-000 (22826)
01/24/2023 – 03/10/2023 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi

Thermodynamics (ENGR-UH 3710)

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of thermodynamics and their applications to engineering problems. The following topics are covered in this course: properties of pure substances; concepts of work and heat; closed and open systems; the fundamental laws of thermodynamics; Carnot and Clausius statements of the 2nd law; entropy and entropy production; heat engines, refrigerators, heat pumps; efficiencies, coefficients of performance.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3710-000 (3597)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ryu, Je Ir


ENGR-UH 3710-000 (3598)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Al-Chalabi, Mohammed · Ryu, Je Ir

Transportation and Traffic Engineering (ENGR-UH 3413)

The course introduces students to fundamental concepts that underlie highway design, traffic operations and control, and transportation systems. The course begins with vehicle performance and the role it has on road design. We later cover the fundamentals of traffic flow theory and operations. In combination with such fundamentals we also discuss the use and collection of traffic data, as well as more advanced concepts on traffic safety, public transportation, and traffic management and control. Moreover, we look at clear applications of the concepts covered in class with a real-world student led project.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3413-000 (3541)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Menendez, Monica


ENGR-UH 3413-000 (3542)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zekar, Aicha · Menendez, Monica

Bio-sensors and Bio-chips (ENGR-UH 4142)

This course covers the principles, technologies, methods and applications of biosensors and bioinstrumentation beginning with an examination of the ethical, legal, cultural, religious, and social implications of nanotechnologies. The objective of this course is to link engineering principles to understanding of biosystems in sensors and bioelectronics. The course provides students with detail of methods and procedures used in the design, fabrication, and application of biosensors and bioelectronic devices. The fundamentals of measurement science are applied to optical, electrochemical, mass, and pressure signal transduction. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to be able to explain biosensing and transducing techniques; design and construct biosensors instrumentation.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


ENGR-UH 4142-000 (23421)
08/29/2022 – 12/13/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Song, Yong-Ak


ENGR-UH 4142-000 (23422)
08/29/2022 – 12/13/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Song, Yong-Ak

Computer Organization and Architecture (ENGR-UH 3511)

The course introduces the principles of computer organization and basic architecture concepts. It discusses the basic structure of a digital computer and study in details formal descriptions, machine instruction sets design, formats and data representation, addressing structures, mechanization of procedure calls, memory management, arithmetic and logical unit, virtual and cache memory organization, I/O processing and interrupts, fundamental of reliability aspects. The course also covers performance and distributed system models. The labs emphasize experiential learning of computer organization and architecture concepts, and require students to use learned knowledge to create and build prototypes and evaluate their performance.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3511-000 (3593)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Maniatakos, Michail


ENGR-UH 3511-000 (3594)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Maniatakos, Michail · Annor, Prince

Engineering Statics (ENGR-UH 2011)

This course introduces students to the field of mechanics through study of rigid bodies in static equilibrium. Knowledge and understanding of static equilibrium is essential for future study of topics as diverse as dynamics, solid mechanics, structures, robotics, and fluid mechanics. The methods, techniques, theory, and application of equilibrium in the solution of engineering problems are presented for two-dimensional systems. Topics covered include collinear forces, coincident forces, general equilibrium, moments and torques, analysis of trusses, frames and machines, Coulomb friction, centroid, center of mass, and moments of inertia.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3556)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sousa, Rita Leal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3557)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sousa, Rita Leal · Mengiste, Eyob


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3792)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Celik, Kemal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (4361)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sousa, Rita Leal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3793)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ayed, Lana Odeh · Celik, Kemal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (4362)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mengiste, Eyob

Senior Design Capstone Project I (ENGR-UH 4011)

Students learn about the process of design with measurable metrics, and how to incorporate appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints in the design process. Students learn how to clearly frame the design problem and follow the design process to result in an optimized solution. Students perform a review of the relevant literature, develop a preliminary design, generate solution concepts and selection criteria, and review and evaluate the chosen design. Students must consider social, economic, lifecycle, environmental, ethical, and other constraints, and must document the design process and the evolution of their design. This project culminates with a final report and presentation that proposes the actual design selected for further development and/or prototyping and testing in the subsequent semester.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 4011-000 (3947)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by George, Pradeep


ENGR-UH 4011-000 (4045)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by George, Pradeep

Computer Programming for Engineers (ENGR-UH 1000)

The objective of the course is for students to acquire the fundamental knowledge of computer programming, develop transferable programming skills, and learn to solve engineering problems via programming. The course is primarily based on the C programming language and an introduction to another programming language such as MATLAB (to demonstrate transferring programming knowledge from one language to another). The course explores the application of engineering computation in various engineering domains including mechanical, civil, computer, and electrical engineering. The following topics are covered: introduction to computer systems, standard input/output, file input/output, decision structures, loop structures, functions, arrays, addressing, dynamically allocated memory, structures, introduction to object oriented programming, problem solving via programming algorithm design, and applications in another programming language such as MATLAB.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3554)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3555)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Jamil, Muhammad Hassan · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3567)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Negoiu, Elena · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3588)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Negoiu, Elena · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3991)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Jamil, Muhammad Hassan · Eid, Mohamad

Bioimaging (ENGR-UH 2812)

This introductory course to Bioimaging is designed to provide an understanding on how images of organs, tissues, cells and molecules can be obtained using different forms of penetrating radiation and waves. Students will learn the imaging techniques used for soft and hard tissue visualization such as X-ray, Computed Tomography (CT), Ultrasound (US), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Spectroscopy and Optical Imaging. The course will give students an insight into the theoretical physics of imaging, real-life clinical applications of these modalities and demonstration of post-processing of the images using high-level programming.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2812-000 (4287)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zam, Azhar


ENGR-UH 2812-000 (4288)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zam, Azhar · Sabah, Shafiya

Applied Machine Learning (ENGR-UH 3332)

Machine Learning is the basis for the most exciting careers in data analysis today. This course introduces students to the concepts of machine learning and deep learning. This course covers a broad introduction to machine learning techniques, which include both supervised learning and unsupervised learning techniques such as classification, support vector machines, decision trees, ensemble learning and random forests, dimensionality reduction, and neural networks and deep learning. In addition to learning about the most effective machine learning techniques, you will gain the practical implementation of applying these techniques to real engineering problems.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3332-000 (4110)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi · Annor, Prince


ENGR-UH 3332-000 (20903)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi · Fang, Yi

Circuits Fundamentals (ENGR-UH 2019)

This module provides an introduction to electrical circuits. The topics covered include DC circuits, passive DC circuit elements, Kirchoff’s laws, electric power calculations, analysis of DC circuits, nodal and loop analysis techniques, voltage and current division, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems, and source free and forced responses of RL, RC and RLC circuits.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (3560)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Gyorgy, Andras


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (3561)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mulugeta, Tadesse · Gyorgy, Andras


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (3812)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rasras, Mahmoud


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (4062)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (3813)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mulugeta, Tadesse


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (4063)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Avdeev, Alexander

Computer-Aided Design (ENGR-UH 3720)

This course provides an introduction to computer-aided design (CAD) using solid modeling. Students learn to create solid object models using extrusions, revolutions, and swept paths, and learn to modify parts using cutting, patterns, fillets, chamfers, and other techniques. Assemblies of multiple parts are used to demonstrate the need for geometric tolerances, and students spend a large portion of class in hands-on use of software tools. The labs emphasize experiential learning of CAD concepts and applications using software tools.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3720-000 (4030)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Montalvo Navarette, Jorge


ENGR-UH 3720-000 (4031)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Montalvo Navarette, Jorge

Probability and Statistics for Engineers (ENGR-UH 2010Q)

Introductory course in probability and statistics with an emphasis on how these topics are relevant in engineering disciplines. Topics in probability theory include sample spaces, and counting, random variables (discrete and continuous), probability distributions, cumulative density functions, rules and theorems of probability, expectation, and variance. Topics in statistics include sampling, central limit theorem, and linear regression. The course emphasizes correct application of probability and statistics and highlights the limitations of each method presented. NOTE: This course may be replaced with MATH-UH 1003Q or MATH-UH 2011Q

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2010Q-000 (3562)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain


ENGR-UH 2010Q-000 (4098)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Diabat, Ali


ENGR-UH 2010Q-000 (3628)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain · Ayed, Lana Odeh


ENGR-UH 2010Q-000 (4099)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ayed, Lana Odeh · Diabat, Ali

Numerical Methods (ENGR-UH 2017)

This course provides an introduction to the methods, techniques, theory, and application of numerical methods in the solution of engineering problems. Topics to be covered include the following: finding roots of equations, numerical differentiation and integration, time marching methods in solving ordinary differential equations, and optimization. MATLAB software is the primary computing environment.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2017-000 (3651)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Karathanasopoulos, Nikolaos


ENGR-UH 2017-000 (4055)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Karathanasopoulos, Nikolaos


ENGR-UH 2017-000 (3652)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Khalifa, Duoaa Magdi


ENGR-UH 2017-000 (4056)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Khalifa, Duoaa Magdi

Object-Oriented Programming (ENGR-UH 2510)

This intermediate-level programming course focuses on object oriented programming using C . Classes and objects including constructors, destructors, member functions and data members. Topics in this course include data representation, pointers, dynamic memory allocation and recursion, inheritance and templates, polymorphism, the process of compiling and linking using makefiles, memory management, exceptional control flow, introduction to performance evaluation, and optimization.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2510-000 (3818)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alhanai, Tuka


ENGR-UH 2510-000 (3819)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alhanai, Tuka

Conservation Laws in Engineering (ENGR-UH 2012)

Conservation laws play a fundamental role in the analysis of engineering problems by providing a framework to derive the relationships between various physical properties of isolated systems. This course aims to introduce the students to these laws, namely, the conservation of mass, conservation of linear momentum, conservation of angular momentum, conservation of energy, and conservation of charge. These laws of conservation will be derived in integral forms and applied to selected case studies involving electrical, chemical, thermal, and fluid mechanical systems. In addition to the development of a unified framework for analysis of engineering problems, this course will also help the students develop a deeper understanding of the concepts of control volume and mass, work and heat, fluid pressure and hydrostatics, properties of pure substances, and the fundamental laws of thermodynamics.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (3794)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Hashaikeh, Raed


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (20078)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Julias, Margaret


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (3795)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Hashaikeh, Raed · Salim, Wahib


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (4364)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Julias, Margaret


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (3558)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Hashaikeh, Raed


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (3559)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Al-Chalabi, Mohammed

Digital Logic (ENGR-UH 2013)

This module provides a rigorous introduction to topics in digital logic design mostly focusing on combinational circuits but also touching upon basic concepts in sequential circuits. Introductory topics include: classification of digital systems, number systems and binary arithmetic, error detection and correction, and switching algebra. Combinational design analysis and synthesis topics include: logic function optimization, arithmetic units such as adders and subtractors, and control units such as decoders and multiplexers. A brief overview of sequential circuits by introducing basic memory elements such as flip-flops, and state diagrams concludes the module.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (3810)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (3811)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (3660)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (4060)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (3661)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (4061)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur

Instrumentation, Sensors, Actuators (ENGR-UH 3110)

The course focuses on theory of measurement systems, selected electrical circuits and components for measurement, including passive and active filtering for signal conditioning, dynamic measurement system response characteristics, analog signal processing, analog to digital conversion, data acquisition, sensors, actuators and actuator characteristics. The laboratory involves topics related to the design of measurement systems pertaining to all disciplines of engineering such as data acquisition, operational amplifiers, sensors for the measurement of force, vibration, temperature etc. In addition, actuators will also be introduced, including electric motors and pneumatics. Design of virtual instrumentation systems using LabVIEW is also included.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ENGR-UH 3110-000 (17388)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Tzes, Anthony


ENGR-UH 3110-000 (17389)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Autonomous and Social Robots (CADT-UH 1038)

How do we feel about robots? With technological developments in capability, performance, autonomy, ease of use, and cost-effectiveness, robots have arrived in everyday life. This course considers the history and ethics of human-robot interaction and explores unsolved hurdles we face as robots assume a ubiquitous presence in our lives. How are robots currently integrating into human-centered, civic industries such as education, heath, and smart cities? What roles might robots play in the future of these industries? What are the economic and labor implications associated with robotic integration? How will consumers respond to the increased use of robots in daily life? How have popular media representations over the last century influenced the way we experience these changes? Topics will also include the miniaturization of robots and their use in situations such as focused drug delivery within the human body, save-and-rescue missions, or military combat. Students will assemble and program several Lego Mindstorm robots capable of carrying prefabricated objects and will also assemble a small house.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CADT-UH 1038-000 (3704)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by García de Soto, Borja


CADT-UH 1038-000 (7562)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by García de Soto, Borja

Designing Health (CADT-UH 1053)

What constitutes innovation in medical technology? Is it always necessary? How is its value determined? How would we know if innovation has peaked, or reached a point of diminishing returns? What do global perspectives reveal about medical devices and healthcare in general? In what ways are cultural contexts important to consider? How can the med-tech innovation process address issues of diversity, inclusion, and accessibility? This course takes up the above questions through several case studies and examples, including bioprinting and COVID-19 vaccines — two topics with current relevance — as well as two of the most important historical med-tech innovations that have gone wrong in the past: The Malaria Project and The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. How can current design and innovation avoid repeating past mistakes? Working in cross-disciplinary teams, students will engage in design projects that will apply what we have learned from this course and address some of the paradoxes present in our ongoing quest to design healthier bodies and societies.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CADT-UH 1053-000 (3840)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sanjairaj, Vijayavenkataraman

Machines in Islamic Civilization (CADT-UH 1037X)

Is automation a science or a tool? Muslim contributions in automation, overlooked in the history of science, were long regarded as means for caliphs and the rich to impress the masses. But Muslim engineers excelled in creating complex automated systems, using them as gifts to foreign leaders, as public attractions, or to augment religious ceremony such as daily calls to prayer. Mainly powered by kinetic energy, these automata drew on scholars’ deep knowledge of hydraulics and complex levers and included musical instruments, horologia, automated drinking fountains, and clocks that told time using complex audiovisual tools. This course draws on historical sources and foundational science to explore Muslim advancements in automation. What roles did translation play as Muslim scientists encountered and documented the work of previous scholars? What were the basic automatic systems they developed and how do they compare to current technologies? How did they draw on environmental resources to develop automated systems without the need for non-renewable energy? Students will address such questions as they explore implications for their own projects in design and engineering.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CADT-UH 1037X-000 (3919)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Qasaimeh, Mohammad

Bioinspiration (CADT-UH 1033)

In the 3.8 billion years since life began on Earth, nature has evolved. Inspired by this process, humans have replicated key design features to develop novel materials, devices, and structures in fields such as the arts, design, engineering, and the social sciences by replicating key design principles and features. This course asks how biology has inspired human design and thinking across different cultures and fields. Students will examine various examples in engineering, art, architecture, music, and social science to discuss how the human capacity for analogical reasoning has enabled the transfer of properties, mechanisms, and ideas from biology to design principles such as shape, surface, structure, making, information-processing, and social behavior. Using bio-inspired products such as gecko tape, Velcro, self-cleaning surfaces, and neuromorphic chips for inspiration, students will develop their own designs to address some of the 21st century’s most pressing issues, such as energy, water, environment, food, and health.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CADT-UH 1033-000 (3918)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Song, Yong-Ak (Rafael)

Introduction to Computer Programming (CSCI-SHU 11)

An introduction to the fundamentals of computer programming. Students design, write, and debug computer programs. No prior knowledge of programming is assumed. Students will learn programming using Python, a general purpose, cross-platform programming language with a clear, readable syntax. Most class periods will be part lecture, part lab as you explore ideas and put them into practice. This course is suitable for students not intending in majoring in computer science as well as for students intending to major in computer science but having no programming experience. Students with previous programming experience should instead take Introduction to Computer Science. Prerequisite: Either placed into Calculus or at least a C in Pre-Calculus Fulfillment: Core Curriculum Requirement Algorithmic Thinking; EE Required Major Courses. Note: Students who have taken ICS in NY, Abu Dhabi, and Shanghai cannot take ICP.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (17503)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (17504)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23632)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23633)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Liu, Yijian


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23634)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23767)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Liu, Yijian


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (26252)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
9:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Spathis, Promethee


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (26253)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
9:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Spathis, Promethee

Introduction to Computer and Data Science (CSCI-SHU 101)

This course has three goals. First, the mastering of a modern object-oriented programming language, enough to allow students to tackle real-world problems of important significance. Second, gaining an appreciation of computational thinking, a process that provides the foundations for solving real-world problems. Finally, providing an overview of the very diverse and exciting field of computer science – a field which, arguably more than any other, impacts how we work, live, and play today. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Programming or placement exam. Equivalency: This course counts for CSCI-UA 101. Fulfillment: Core Curriculum Requirement Algorithmic Thinking; Computer Science Major Required Courses; Computer Systems Engineering Major Required Courses; Data Science Major Foundational Courses; Electrical and Systems Engineering Major Required Major Courses.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CSCI-SHU 101-000 (17449)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Gu, Xianbin


CSCI-SHU 101-000 (17509)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yin, Wen


CSCI-SHU 101-000 (17572)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
8:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yin, Wen


CSCI-SHU 101-000 (17596)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Gu, Xianbin


CSCI-SHU 101-000 (17751)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yin, Wen

Computational Social Science (CS-UH 2219E)

This course introduces students to various techniques and concepts that are essential for data scientists. It also provides an in-depth survey of the latest research methodology and topics that prepare the students to produce high quality research in Data Science. This seminar-based course will cover applications from different fields, such as sociology, psychology, network analysis, and artificial intelligence. In this context, the course will cover the use of computational techniques to model and predict various phenomena using real data. Students will be required to complete a course project, and to write up the results in a short article.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 2219E-000 (4282)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rahwan, Talal

Discrete Mathematics (CS-UH 1002)

Discrete mathematics concerns the study of mathematical structures that are discrete rather than continuous, and provides a powerful language for investigating many areas of computer science. Discrete structures are characterized by distinct elements, which are often represented by integers. Continuous mathematics on the other hand deals with real numbers. Topics in this course include: sets, counting techniques, logic, proof techniques, solving recurrence relations, number theory, probability, statistics, graph theory, and discrete geometry. These mathematical tools are illustrated with applications in computer science.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 1002-000 (3526)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fernandes, Joao Paulo · Ahmad, Liza


CS-UH 1002-000 (3624)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Mumtaz, Sara


CS-UH 1002-000 (3917)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Ahmed, Dena


CS-UH 1002-000 (19983)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 1002-000 (19984)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 1002-000 (19985)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Computer Networks (CS-UH 3012)

Have you ever wondered how the internet or Facebook is able to support a billion simultaneous users? This course teaches students the design and implementation of such Internet-scale networks and networked systems. Students learn about the principles and techniques used to construct large-scale networks and systems. Topics in this course include routing protocols, network congestion control, wireless networking, network security, and peer-to-peer systems. Upon completing this course, students are able to initiate and critique research ideas, implement their own working systems, and evaluate such systems. To make the issues more concrete, the class includes several multi-week projects requiring significant design and implementation. The goal is for students to learn not only what computer networks are and how they work today, but also why they are designed the way they are and how they are likely to evolve in the future. Examples are drawn primarily from the internet.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 3012-000 (3752)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zaki, Yasir


CS-UH 3012-000 (3791)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zaki, Yasir · Ahmed, Dena

Introduction to Computer Science (CS-UH 1001)

Computer Science is an innovative and exciting field that focuses on producing efficient solutions for solving problems in any field. This course introduces students to the foundations of computer science. Students learn how to design algorithms to solve problems and how to translate these algorithms into working computer programs using a high-level programming language. The course covers core programming concepts including basic computation, data structures, decision structures, iterative structures, file input/output, and recursion. Students also learn the elements of Object Oriented Programming (OOP), such as objects, classes, inheritance, abstraction, and polymorphism. A final project allows students to combine these concepts to produce a large program of their design.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 1001-000 (3489)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Pötsch, Thomas · Zeeshan, Faisal


CS-UH 1001-000 (3512)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Pötsch, Thomas · Mumtaz, Sara


CS-UH 1001-000 (3587)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Mumtaz, Sara

Network Everything (IM-UH 2112)

This course explores the possibilities and challenges of designing alternate physical network interfaces. Through weekly readings, class discussions, and a series of projects, students will create physical objects that talk to each other over distance. Various wireless communication mechanisms such as radio (Bluetooth, Zigbee, WiFi, and raw), infrared, and ultrasonic are used in the context of creating novel “smart” devices. Topics of discussion in this course include networking protocols and network topologies; network time versus physical time; mobile objects; and wireless networks. Opportunities to build collaborative and creative campus-wide networked projects and systems will also be explored.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


IM-UH 2112-000 (24975)
01/29/2019 – 05/16/2019 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


IM-UH 2112-000 (18392)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


IM-UH 2112-000 (24976)
01/29/2019 – 05/16/2019 Thu
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


IM-UH 2112-000 (18550)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Advanced Lab: Open Project (INTM-SHU 301)

This course offers students the opportunity to develop a self-initiated project with close mentorship from a faculty member. Projects undertaken can span the areas of conceptual research, business development, creative practice, and media production. The course includes structured weekly workshop and critique times with peers and special guests. It is expected that students will be invested in the work of their peers by providing feedback and carefully consider the feedback they receive during critiques. In addition to weekly meeting times, students are expected to also participate in regular one-on-one meetings with faculty, peers, and guests. A formal project proposal, weekly assignments and documentation, a final project presentation, and participation in the IMA End of Semester show are all required. Although students are encouraged to continue work they may have initiated in a prior class, they may not combine or in any way double count work from this class in another class taken in the same semester. Group work is allowed assuming all group members are enrolled in this class. Students may take this course in either the first or second 7 weeks for 2 credits or repeated across 14 weeks for 4 credits. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Fulfilment: IMA/IMB elective; IMA advanced elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


INTM-SHU 301-000 (19667)
at Shanghai
Instructed by


INTM-SHU 301-000 (25298)
03/28/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Parren, Eric

Design Project (CS-UY 4523)

Students or several students work with a faculty member and/or graduate students on a current topic in computer science. Each term, a project course with a particular theme is offered by the Department of Computer and Information Science. A faculty member assigns individual or group projects. The project course is highly structured and supervised closely by faculty. Students are expected to use the design and project-management skills they learned in CS-UY 4513 Software Engineering. Alternatively, students may work with a faculty member on an individual project of mutual interest. A written report and oral presentation are required. | Prerequisite: CS-UY 4513 or CS-UY 3513.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4523-000 (12266)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred


CS-UY 4523-000 (12267)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred

PROBLEM SOLVING AND PROGRAMMING I (CS-UY 1113)

This course introduces problem solving and computer programming and is for undergraduate engineering students who do not have prior experience in programming in any language. The course covers fundamentals of computer programming and its underlying principles using the Python programming language. Concepts and methods introduced in the course are illustrated by examples from engineering and other disciplines. | Co-requisite: EX-UY 1; Anti-requisite: CS-UY 1114

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 1113-000 (12329)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Romero Cruz, Sebastian


CS-UY 1113-000 (12330)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Romero Cruz, Sebastian


CS-UY 1113-000 (12331)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12332)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12333)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12334)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12335)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12336)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12337)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter

Elementary Yoruba I (SCA-UA 182)

Yoruba is a language spoken in West Africa by approximately 20 million people. This course is an introduction to Yoruba language, people and culture and is designed for students without prior knowledge. The main goal is to develop elementary communicative competence in the language. It is designed to enable students read, write, listen to and talk about simple concepts, ensuring that they can minimally understand and be understood in the language, while developing a fundamental knowledge of the Yoruba culture. Emphases are on Yoruba as used by contemporary native speakers in the present day West Africa. Skills are developed through intensive interactive conversations, grammar exercises, and classroom activities designed for a learner to use the language in various daily activities.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


SCA-UA 182-000 (9690)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mabayoje, Moses

History & Literatures of The So Asian Diaspora (SCA-UA 313)

America is not always the answer. This class offers an introduction to the many and varied fictions that have been produced by diasporic South Asians across the globe over the last 150 years: in Australia, Africa, Europe, Caribbean. Our exploration of the poetics and politics of immigration will attend to different types of traveller (inc. soldiers, students, athletes, medics, cosmonauts) and draw on a wide range of media (inc. literature, cinema and music). Particular attention will be paid to the diverse geographies of Asian migration – be they plantations, dance Floors, restaurants, call centres. Themes to be addressed include coolietude, globalization, the impact of 9/11 and techno-servitude.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


SCA-UA 313-000 (9910)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sandhu, SS

Amer Dilemmas: Race, Ineq, Unful Prm Pub Educ (SCA-UA 755)

Historically, education has been the most accessible and effective means for groups to achieve social mobility in American society. However, access to public education has never been equal for all segments of society, and there continues to be considerable variability in the quality of education provided to students. As a result of both explicit and subtle discrimination, racialized minority groups have at various times been denied access to education or been relegated to inferior schools or classrooms. Yet education has also been the arena where the greatest advances in social justice and racial equality have been achieved. Understanding the contradictions created by the hope and unfulfilled promise of American education is a central theme of this course.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


SCA-UA 755-000 (24950)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Andrea Martínez, Pamela


SCA-UA 755-000 (25163)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Andrea Martínez, Pamela

Social and Cultural Analysis 101 (SCA-UA 101)

Introduces theories, methods, and political trajectories central to the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis (SCA). SCA 101 addresses how individuals and populations structure their worlds and navigate the resulting social, cultural, and political terrain. It privileges scholarly work with an intersectional approach, drawing on theoretical insights from such fields as social geography, feminism and queer studies, ethnic studies, urban and metropolitan studies, critical race theory, labor studies, and cultural studies.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


SCA-UA 101-000 (9221)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patros, Tyson


SCA-UA 101-000 (9222)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grimaldi, Nicole


SCA-UA 101-000 (9223)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grimaldi, Nicole


SCA-UA 101-000 (9224)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ghabin, Tamar


SCA-UA 101-000 (9225)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ghabin, Tamar

Elementary Russian II (RUSSN-UA 2)

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


RUSSN-UA 2-000 (8535)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Korsounskaia, Ekaterina


RUSSN-UA 2-000 (8536)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Korsounskaia, Ekaterina


RUSSN-UA 2-000 (9240)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Danilin, Michael


RUSSN-UA 2-000 (20392)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Efremova, Tatiana

American Religion (RELST-UA 480)

Explores the relationship between religion and American identity. We will analyze the role of religion in American culture, politics, and law and question if the United States has a secular government, what the separation of church and state means, and if religious freedom exists for everyone. Considers the role of religion in slavery, settler colonialism, Native American and immigrant assimilation, and also how religion has influenced the U.S. political system. Examines the role of religion within movements for racial justice, reproductive choice, and LGBTQ equality.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


RELST-UA 480-000 (20867)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Theories & Methods in The Study of Religion (RELST-UA 1)

Offered in the fall. 4 points. Focuses on fundamental theoretical and methodological issues pertaining to the academic study of religion. Exposes students to, and familiarizes them with, some of the more important theories of the origin, character, and function of religion as a human phenomenon. Students are given an opportunity to encounter and test an assortment of the main scholarly approaches to understanding and interpreting religious phenomena, including psychological, sociological, anthropological, and hermeneutical perspectives.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


RELST-UA 1-000 (9385)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McGrath, William

Advanced Psychological Statistics (PSYCH-UA 11)

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9029)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hilford, Andrew


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9030)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sun, Siqi


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9031)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sun, Siqi


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9134)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Judy


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9135)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Judy


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9363)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Qingqing


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9364)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Qingqing

Social Psychology (PSYCH-UA 32)

Gollwitzer, Trope, Uleman. Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduction to theories and research about the social behavior of individuals, such as perception of others and the self, attraction, affiliation, altruism and helping, aggression, moral thought and action, attitudes, influence, conformity, social exchange and bargaining, group decision making, leadership and power, and environmental psychology.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8510)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gollwitzer, Peter


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8511)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Adjei Boateng, Fiona


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8512)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwak, Jasmine


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8513)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tao, Bradley


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8514)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tao, Bradley


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8515)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwak, Jasmine


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8516)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liaquat, Usman


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (25991)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Adjei Boateng, Fiona


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (25995)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liaquat, Usman

Personality (PSYCH-UA 30)

AndersenAndersen. Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduction to research in personality, including such topics as the self-concept; unconscious processes; how we relate to others; and stress, anxiety, and depression.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9269)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Andersen, Susan


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9270)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ganapathy, Rheanna


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9271)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qin, Joyce


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9272)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qin, Joyce


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9273)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ganapathy, Rheanna

Cognitive Neuroscience (PSYCH-UA 25)

Curtis, Davachi. Offered every semester. 4 points. Provides students with a broad understanding of the foundations of cognitive neuroscience, including dominant theories of the neural underpinnings of a variety of cognitive processes and the research that has led to those theories. In doing so, students also learn about the goals of cognitive neuroscience research and the methods that are being employed to reach these goals.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8500)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Curtis, Clayton


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8501)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Babu, Deepika


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8502)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Babu, Deepika


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8503)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yan, Dongni


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8504)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yan, Dongni

Cognition (PSYCH-UA 29)

McElree, Murphy, Rehder. Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduction to theories and research in some major areas of cognitive psychology, including human memory, attention, language production and comprehension, thinking, and reasoning.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8505)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ausch, Robert


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8506)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Muhareb, Samer


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8507)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Muhareb, Samer


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8508)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vaghani, Jhanvi Bharatbhai


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8509)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Muhareb, Samer


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (26096)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vaghani, Jhanvi Bharatbhai


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (26111)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vaghani, Jhanvi Bharatbhai

Socialist Theory (POL-UA 140)

Concentrates on those socialist schools?Christian socialism, utopian socialism, Marxism, Fabianism, and anarchism?that have proved to be the most successful. Presents their major theories and examines the usefulness of such theories in helping us to understand and, in some cases, alter the world in which we live.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


POL-UA 140-000 (10065)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ollman, Bertell

Games, Strategy, and Politics (POL-UA 844)

Offered every year. 4 points. Theories of political strategy with emphasis on the theory of games. Uses of strategy in defense and deterrence policies of nations, guerrilla warfare of revolutionaries and terrorists, bargaining and negotiation processes, coalitions and the enforcement of collective action, and voting in committees and elections. Secrecy and deception as political strategies and uses of power, with some applications outside political science.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


POL-UA 844-000 (9366)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brams, Steven


POL-UA 844-000 (9369)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


POL-UA 844-000 (9370)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Democracy & Dictatorship (POL-UA 160)

Democracy and dictatorships have traditionally been analyzed in terms of their apparently different institutional characteristics and legal foundations. Examines these traditional interpretations but leans heavily toward ideological and contextual factors. Challenges traditional distinctions between democracy and dictatorship.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2022)


POL-UA 160-000 (2363)
05/23/2022 – 07/06/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Erbal, Ayda

Introduction to Research Methods for Politics (POL-UA 850)

New research is the most exciting and important aspect of political science: we are able to pose novel questions, construct fresh theories, and provide new evidence about the way the world works. But before we start doing research, we have to learn how it is done. With this in mind, this class will introduce students to quantitative techniques used for research in the study of politics. Part of this task is conceptual: helping students to think sensibly and systematically about research design. To this end, students will learn how data and theory fit together, and how to measure the quantities we care about. But part of the task is practical too: students will learn a `toolbox’ of methods–including statistical software–that enable them to execute their plans.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 850-000 (9156)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harvey, Anna


POL-UA 850-000 (9238)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by López Peceño, Alejandro


POL-UA 850-000 (9157)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by López Peceño, Alejandro


POL-UA 850-000 (9158)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pulejo, Massimo


POL-UA 850-000 (9159)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pulejo, Massimo


POL-UA 850-000 (9734)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Demin, Sasha


POL-UA 850-000 (25687)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Melnick, Justin

Social Choice & Politics (POL-UA 845)

Introduces students to social choice theory applied to political science. It focuses on (1) individual choice, (2) group choice, (3) collective action, and (4) institutions. It looks at models of individuals’ voting behavior, the incentive structures of interest groups, and the role of institutions. The emphasis is analytical, though students are not expected to have a background in formal mathematics.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 845-000 (20351)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lee, Sukwon

International Politics (POL-UA 700)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Analysis of state behavior and international political relations; how things happen in the international state system and why. Emphasizes the issue of war and how and in what circumstances states engage in violence. Topics include different historical and possible future systems of international relations, imperialism, the Cold War, game theory and deterrents, national interests, and world organization.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 700-000 (8260)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bueno De Mesquita, Bruce


POL-UA 700-000 (8261)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Becker, Michael


POL-UA 700-000 (8262)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Becker, Michael


POL-UA 700-000 (8263)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yildirim, Mikdat


POL-UA 700-000 (8264)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yildirim, Mikdat


POL-UA 700-000 (8265)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schwarz, Christopher


POL-UA 700-000 (8266)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schwarz, Christopher


POL-UA 700-000 (8267)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ge, Zoe


POL-UA 700-000 (9112)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ge, Zoe


POL-UA 700-000 (10194)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by MEDA, Francis William


POL-UA 700-000 (10195)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by MEDA, Francis William

Comparative Politics (POL-UA 500)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Major concepts, approaches, problems, and literature in the field of comparative politics. Methodology of comparative politics, the classical theories, and the more recent behavioral revolution. Reviews personality, social structure, socialization, political culture, and political parties. Major approaches such as group theory, structural-functionalism, systems analysis, and communications theory and evaluation of the relevance of political ideology; national character; elite and class analysis; and problems of conflict, violence, and internal war.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 500-000 (8257)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Slough, Tara


POL-UA 500-000 (8258)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Mark


POL-UA 500-000 (8259)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Mark


POL-UA 500-000 (10534)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Niu, He


POL-UA 500-000 (9210)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Niu, He


POL-UA 500-000 (9360)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by He, Ning


POL-UA 500-000 (9361)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by He, Ning


POL-UA 500-000 (25686)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cheng, Mengfan

Power & Politics in America (POL-UA 300)

A survey of national political institutions and behavior in the United States, which introduces students to a variety of analytical concepts and approaches useful for the study of domestic politics. Concepts typically covered include public goods and collective action; preference aggregation and the median voter theorem; delegation, representation, and accountability; agenda control; inter-branch bargaining; and the mechanisms of private influence on public policy.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 300-000 (8252)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dawes, Christopher Todd


POL-UA 300-000 (8253)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wirsching, Elisa


POL-UA 300-000 (8254)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, Lexi


POL-UA 300-000 (8255)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, Lexi


POL-UA 300-000 (8256)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wirsching, Elisa


POL-UA 300-000 (8796)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heo, Kun


POL-UA 300-000 (8797)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heo, Kun


POL-UA 300-000 (10192)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McGrath, David

Political Theory (POL-UA 100)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduces students to some outstanding theories of politics. The theories treated offer alternative conceptions of political life, and they are examined from both theoretical and historical perspectives. Among the theorists included are Plato, Aristotle, Locke, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Rousseau, Mill, and Marx.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 100-000 (9202)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pevnick, Ryan


POL-UA 100-000 (9203)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bose, Amartya


POL-UA 100-000 (9204)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bose, Amartya


POL-UA 100-000 (9205)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yi, Sophie


POL-UA 100-000 (9206)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yi, Sophie

Astrophysics (PHYS-UA 150)

Introduction to modern astrophysical problems with an emphasis on the physical concepts involved?radio, optical, and X-ray astronomy; stellar structure and evolution; white dwarfs, pulsars, and black holes; and galaxies, quasars, and cosmology.

Physics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


PHYS-UA 150-000 (10148)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scoccimarro, Roman


PHYS-UA 150-000 (10149)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Electricity & Magnet I (PHYS-UA 131)

Introduction to Maxwell’s equations with applications to physical problems. Topics include electrostatics, magnetostatics, the solution of the Laplace and Poisson equations, dielectrics and magnetic materials, electromagnetic waves and radiation, Fresnel equations, transmission lines, wave guides, and special relativity.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHYS-UA 131-000 (8212)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gruzinov, Andrei


PHYS-UA 131-000 (8213)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 131-000 (9331)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

20th Cent Concepts of Space, Time, & Matter (PHYS-UA 20)

The 20th century has been witness to two major revolutions in man’s concepts of space, time, and matter. Einstein’s special and general theories of relativity: implications of the special theory, for our understanding of the unity of space and time, and the general theory, for our understanding of the nature of gravity. Quantum mechanics: a new picture of the basic structure and interactions of atoms, molecules, and nuclei. Topics include the uncertainty principle, wave-particle duality, and the continuing search for the fundamental constituents of matter.

Physics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHYS-UA 20-000 (8204)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wray, Lewis Andrew

Quantum Mechanics I (PHYS-UA 123)

Designed to deepen the insights into quantum mechanics introduced in PHYS-UA 103, 104 and to provide an introduction to the more formal mathematical structure of quantum mechanics. The Schr?dinger and Heisenberg description of quantal systems; perturbation theory; spin and statistics; coupling of angular momenta; scattering theory; and applications to atomic, molecular, nuclear, and elementary particle physics.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHYS-UA 123-000 (8210)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grier, David


PHYS-UA 123-000 (8211)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 123-000 (9336)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

General Physics II (PHYS-UA 12)

Continuation of PHYS-UA 11. Topics include electric charge, field, and potential; magnetic forces and fields; resistive, capacitive, and inductive circuits; electromagnetic induction; wave motion; electromagnetic waves; geometrical optics; interference, diffraction, and polarization of light; relativity; atomic and nuclear structure; elementary particle physics.

Physics (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10171)


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10172)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Somawanshi, Prajwal Prakshep


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10173)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (23490)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10175)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (23495)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10177)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10178)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10179)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10180)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10181)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10182)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10183)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Engstler, Justin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10184)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by La Madrid, Joan


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10185)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by La Madrid, Joan


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10186)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10187)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10188)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10642)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (25702)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Somawanshi, Prajwal Prakshep

Existentialism and Phenomenology (PHIL-UA 36)

Examines the characteristic method, positions, and themes of the existentialist and phenomenological movements and traces their development through study of such thinkers as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Sartre.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


PHIL-UA 36-000 (19900)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jauernig, Anja


PHIL-UA 36-000 (19901)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Barat, Alan


PHIL-UA 36-000 (19902)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Barat, Alan

Philosophy of Physics (PHIL-UA 94)

We will investigate different approaches to understanding space and time, and how the account of space-time structure has evolved in physics. One of the main objectives is to have a clear and accurate understanding of the Special Theory of Relativity, detailed enough to allow the student to solve some physics problems. This will require a bit of mathematics, but not more than algebra. We will discuss the General Theory of Relativity in a more qualitative way, including an account of the structure of black holes. Philosophy students do not need any further background in physics or mathematics, and physics students will not benefit from greater mathematical sophistication. We will also study the relevant history of physics and philosophy, particularly the debate between Newton and Leibniz about the nature of space and time. There will be two lectures each week and a recitation section.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


PHIL-UA 94-000 (19175)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Maudlin, Tim


PHIL-UA 94-000 (19176)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher


PHIL-UA 94-000 (19177)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher

Set Theory (PHIL-UA 73)

An introduction to the basic concepts and results of set theory.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


PHIL-UA 73-000 (19544)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fine, Kit


PHIL-UA 73-000 (19545)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher


PHIL-UA 73-000 (19546)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher

History of Ancient Philosophy (PHIL-UA 20)

Examines some of the most important philosophical ideas and developments in Ancient Greece and Rome. Covers major writings by Plato and Aristotle, and a selection of writings by such thinkers as the Presocratics, Stoics, Epicureans, and Skeptics.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8864)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moss, Jessica


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8865)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lingle, Clara


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8866)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lingle, Clara


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8867)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beizaei, Banafsheh


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8868)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beizaei, Banafsheh

History of Modern Philosophy (PHIL-UA 21)

Examines some of the most important philosophical ideas and developments in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe. Covers some of the major writings of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, and Hume, and concludes with a brief examination of some aspects of Kant’s philosophy. (Kant is examined in more detail in PHIL-UA 30.) May also include writings of Hobbes, Malebranche, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Conway, Berkeley, and Shepherd, among others.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


PHIL-UA 21-000 (8744)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 21-000 (8745)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 21-000 (8746)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 21-000 (8747)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 21-000 (8748)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Consciousness (PHIL-UA 7)

Examines conceptual and empirical issues about consciousness. Issues covered may include the explanatory gap, the hard and harder problems of consciousness, concepts of consciousness, phenomenal concepts, the mind-body problem and neural correlates of consciousness, higher-order thought theories of consciousness, the inverted spectrum, views of phenomenality as representation, and arguments for dualism.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


PHIL-UA 7-000 (19756)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 7-000 (19771)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 7-000 (19772)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 7-000 (19773)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 7-000 (19774)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Advanced Logic (PHIL-UA 72)

An introduction to the basic concepts, methods, and results of metalogic, i.e., the formal study of systems of reasoning.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHIL-UA 72-000 (20815)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dorr, Cian


PHIL-UA 72-000 (20816)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Roth, Richard


PHIL-UA 72-000 (20817)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Roth, Richard

Global Ethics (PHIL-UA 6)

This course aims to accomplish two things. The first is to introduce three broad traditions of normative thinking about social issues from around the globe: a Confucian tradition, one based in Islamic legal traditions, and one derived from European liberalism. The second is to address three current areas of normative debate: about global economic inequality, about gender justice and human rights. We shall explore these first-order questions against the background of the three broad traditions. Our aim will be to understand some of differences of approach that shape the global conversation about these issues that concern people around the world.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20339)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Appiah, Kwame Anthony


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20340)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wu, Patrick


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20341)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wu, Patrick


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20342)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zacek, Justin


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20343)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zacek, Justin

Epistemology (PHIL-UA 76)

Considers questions such as the following: Can I have knowledge of anything outside my own mind?for example, physical objects or other minds? Or is the skeptic’s attack on my commonplace claims to know unanswerable? What is knowledge, and how does it differ from belief?

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHIL-UA 76-000 (20336)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Xueyin


PHIL-UA 76-000 (20337)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ballarini, Cristina


PHIL-UA 76-000 (20338)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ballarini, Cristina

Medical Ethics (PHIL-UA 50)

Examines moral issuExamines moral issues in medical practice and research. Topics include euthanasia and quality of life; deception, hope, and paternalism; malpractice and unpredictability; patient rights, virtues, and vices; animal, fetal, and clinical research; criteria for rationing medical care; ethical principles, professional codes, and case analysis (for example, Quinlan, Willowbrook, Baby Jane Doe).

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHIL-UA 50-000 (9403)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beardman, Stephanie


PHIL-UA 50-000 (23793)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wills, David Clinton

Cellular & Molecular Neurobiology (NEURL-UA 210)

Lecture and laboratory course that provides students with broad exposure to current questions and experimental approaches in cellular neuroscience. Lectures and laboratories are organized into three areas: cell structure aLecture and laboratory course that provides students with broad exposure to current questions and experimental approaches in cellular neuroscience. Lectures and laboratories are organized into three areas: cell structure and organization of the vertebrate central nervous system, mechanisms underlying neural signaling and plasticity, and control of cell form and its developmental determinants. Laboratory instruction in anatomical, physiological, and biochemical methods for investigating the biology of nerve cells.

Neural Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


NEURL-UA 210-000 (9291)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aoki, Chiye · Shapley, Robert


NEURL-UA 210-000 (9292)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NEURL-UA 210-000 (9293)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NEURL-UA 210-000 (9343)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NEURL-UA 210-000 (10246)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Music Theory III (MUSIC-UA 203)

Analysis of music of the late 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries, and the creation of imitative compositional models based on works studied as well as on principles acquired earlier in the sequence. Additional topics will include whole-tone and octatonic scale systems, atonality, serialism, and an introduction to post-modern and spectral techniques. Weekly lab sections are devoted to skills in musicianship and are required throughout the sequence.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


MUSIC-UA 203-000 (10371)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rust, Joel


MUSIC-UA 203-000 (10372)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krimitza, Vasiliki

Music of New York (MUSIC-UA 100)

This course is designed to take advantage of New York’s dynamic music community. There are in-class presentations by local musicians and scholars, and students regularly attend performances throughout the city. The focus is on the everyday practices of musical life in New York City by both performers and listeners in a number of the City’s musical constituencies: immigrant communities; amateur and professional music-makers; and popular, classical, and avant-garde scenes. Examination of these processes of music-making will be enhanced by a look at the histories of these different kinds of music-making. There will also be a historical discussion of the vibrant musical life of New York in the 19th and early 20th centuries, which will contribute to an understanding of why New York is seen, and sees itself, as a musical city.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2022)


MUSIC-UA 100-000 (2384)
07/07/2022 – 08/17/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yuditskaya, Sonya


MUSIC-UA 100-000 (2475)
07/07/2022 – 08/17/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fairley, Brian


MUSIC-UA 100-000 (2458)
07/07/2022 – 08/17/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yuditskaya, Sonya


MUSIC-UA 100-000 (2476)
07/07/2022 – 08/17/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fairley, Brian

Music Theory II (MUSIC-UA 202)

Music Major Distribution Requirement. Chromatic harmony as developed and practiced by composers of the 19th century and beyond. Introduction to score reading and principles of musical analysis applied to larger musical structures. Continuation of species counterpoint and an introduction to invertible counterpoint and fugue.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MUSIC-UA 202-000 (9126)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beeferman, Gordon


MUSIC-UA 202-000 (9127)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zamcheck, Akiva


MUSIC-UA 202-000 (9128)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zamcheck, Akiva

Elements of Music (MUSIC-UA 20)

Explores the underlying principles and inner workings of the tonal system, a system that has guided all of Western music from the years 1600 to 1900. It includes a discussion of historical background and evolution. Focuses on concepts and notation of key, scale, tonality, and rhythm. Related skills in sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard harmony are stressed in the recitation sections.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MUSIC-UA 20-000 (8415)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ha, Moon Young


MUSIC-UA 20-000 (8416)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rose, Michael


MUSIC-UA 20-000 (8417)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rose, Michael

Music Theory I (MUSIC-UA 201)

Students study principles of tonal music composition including 18th and 19th century harmonic, formal, and contrapuntal practices. Exercises in four-part voice-leading and species counterpoint are supplemented by analyses of music from around the world and from a variety of genres, including concert and popular music. Weekly lab sections are devoted to skills in musicianship and are required throughout the sequence.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MUSIC-UA 201-000 (9130)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hoffman, Elizabeth


MUSIC-UA 201-000 (9132)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vlasis, Konstantine


MUSIC-UA 201-000 (9133)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vlasis, Konstantine

Politics of The Middle East (MEIS-UA 750)

Historical-political background of the Middle East and its contemporary social and political problems, including the impact of the West; religious and liberal reactions; conflict of nationalisms (Arab, Iranian, Turkish, and Zionist); and revolutionary socialism. Specific social, political, and economic problems?using a few selected countries for comparison and analysis?including the role of the military, the intelligentsia, the religious classes, the legitimization of power, urban-rural cleavages, bureaucracy, and political parties.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9142)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Keshavarzian, Arang


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9143)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bell, Robert


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9144)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by ODell, Kelley


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9145)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bell, Robert


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9146)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by ODell, Kelley

Mediterranean Worlds (MEIS-UA 660)

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 660-000 (21873)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Balbale, Abigail


MEIS-UA 660-000 (21874)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cuyler, Zack


MEIS-UA 660-000 (21875)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cuyler, Zack

Elementary Persian I (MEIS-UA 401)

Grammar, phonetics, and pronunciation of modern standard Persian, reading simple texts, and writing short compositions. Builds basic skills in modern standard Persian in preparation for reading classical Persian literature.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 401-000 (8166)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Alizadeh, Yass

Elementary Hindi (MEIS-UA 405)

As a part of a two-year curriculum, prepares the student for a high level of proficiency in Hindi. Through a variety of class, small-group, and paired activities, as well as language and computer lab sessions, students are expected to develop reading, speaking, listening, and writing skills. The instructor also takes into consideration individual needs.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 405-000 (10146)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhargava, Rajni


MEIS-UA 405-000 (10147)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhargava, Rajni

Intermediate Arabic I (MEIS-UA 103)

Builds on the skills acquired in Elementary Arabic I and II, with increased emphasis on writing and reading from modern sources, in addition to aural/oral proficiency.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 103-000 (8161)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Alnaemi, Ali


MEIS-UA 103-000 (8162)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Alnaemi, Ali


MEIS-UA 103-000 (8163)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Amani

Elementary Arabic II (MEIS-UA 102)

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MEIS-UA 102-000 (8421)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badawi, Ghada


MEIS-UA 102-000 (8422)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badawi, Ghada


MEIS-UA 102-000 (8423)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Amani

Elementary Arabic I (MEIS-UA 101)

Builds basic skills in modern standard Arabic, the language read and understood by educated Arabs from Baghdad to Casablanca. Five hours per week of instruction and drills, stressing the proficiency approach, plus work in the language laboratory.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 101-000 (8158)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badawi, Ghada


MEIS-UA 101-000 (8159)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badawi, Ghada


MEIS-UA 101-000 (8160)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Amani


MEIS-UA 101-000 (25871)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Suliman, Anas

Partial Differential Equations (MATH-UA 9263)

Many laws of physics are formulated as partial differential equations. This course discusses the simplest examples of such laws as embodied in the wave equation, the diffusion equation, and Laplace?s equation. Nonlinear conservation laws and the theory of shock waves. Applications to physics, chemistry, biology, and population dynamics. Prerequisite: prerequisite for MATH-UA 263

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MATH-UA 9263-000 (10132)
01/26/2023 – 05/05/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by Lebovits, Joachim


MATH-UA 9263-000 (10310)
01/26/2023 – 05/05/2023 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by Lebovits, Joachim

Honors Linear Algebra (MATH-UA 148)

This honors section of Linear Algebra is a proof-based course intended for well-prepared students who have already developed some mathematical maturity and ease with abstraction. Its scope will include the usual Linear Algebra (MATH-UA 140) syllabus; however this class will be faster, more abstract and proof-based, covering additional topics. Topics covered are: Vector spaces, linear dependence, basis and dimension, matrices, determinants, solving linear equations, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization, inner products, applications.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 148-000 (9196)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cao, Norman


MATH-UA 148-000 (10147)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rilloraza, Paco

Honors Algebra II (MATH-UA 349)

Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in Honors Algebra I (MATH-UA 348), or a grade of A in Algebra (MATH-UA 343) and permission of instructor. Principal ideal domains, polynomial rings in several variables, unique factorization domains. Fields, finite extensions, constructions with ruler and compass, Galois theory, solvability by radicals.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 349-000 (8887)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goodman, Jonathan


MATH-UA 349-000 (8888)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Charyyev, Jumageldi

Mathematics for Economics III (MATH-UA 213)

Further topics in vector calculus. Vector spaces, matrix analysis. Linear and nonlinear programming with applications to game theory. This course will provide economics students who have taken MATH-UA 211 Mathematics for Economics I and MATH-UA 212 Mathematics for Economics II with the tools to take higher-level mathematics courses.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 213-000 (8764)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Majmudar, Trushant S.


MATH-UA 213-000 (8765)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kreiner, Aaron


MATH-UA 213-000 (8766)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kreiner, Aaron


MATH-UA 213-000 (10146)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 213-000 (25303)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Normand, Raoul


MATH-UA 213-000 (25304)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chen, Zhe


MATH-UA 213-000 (25305)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chen, Zhe

Introduction to Computer Simulation (MATH-UA 144)

Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in Calculus I (MATH-UA 121) or Math for Economics II (MATH-UA 212) (for economics majors), and General Physics (PHYS-UA 11). Simulations of such phenomena as orbits (Kepler problem and N-body problem), epidemic and endemic disease (including evolution in response to the selective pressure of malaria), musical stringed instruments (piano, guitar, and violin), and traffic flow in a city (with lights, breakdowns, and gridlock). Simulations are based on mathematical models, numerical methods, and Matlab programming techniques taught in class. Emphasizes use of animation (and sound where appropriate) to present the results of simulations.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 144-000 (8767)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sprinkle, Brennan


MATH-UA 144-000 (8771)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Guanchun

Algebra (MATH-UA 343)

Introduction to abstract algebraic structures, including groups, rings, and fields. Sets and relations. Congruences and unique factorization of integers. Groups, permutation groups, homomorphisms and quotient groups. Rings and quotient rings, Euclidean rings, polynomial rings. Fields, finite extensions.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 343-000 (8402)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pigati, Alessandro


MATH-UA 343-000 (8403)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cortes, Julian


MATH-UA 343-000 (8756)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chiarelli, John


MATH-UA 343-000 (8757)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cortes, Julian

Differential Geometry (MATH-UA 377)

The differential properties of curves and surfaces. Introduction to manifolds and Riemannian geometry.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 377-000 (9183)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Deane


MATH-UA 377-000 (9184)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Han, Hancya

Functions of a Complex Variable (MATH-UA 282)

Complex numbers and complex functions. Differentiation and the Cauchy-Riemann equations. Cauchy?s theorem and the Cauchy integral formula. Singularities, residues, Taylor and Laurent series. Fractional linear transformations and conformal mapping. Analytic continuation.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 282-000 (8398)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Becker, Simon


MATH-UA 282-000 (8399)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Thoma, Eric


MATH-UA 282-000 (10621)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Thoma, Eric

Analysis (MATH-UA 325)

This course is an introduction to rigorous analysis on the real line. Topics include: the real number system, sequences and series of numbers, functions of a real variable (continuity and differentiability), the Riemann integral, basic topological notions in a metric space, sequences and series of functions including Taylor and Fourier series.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 325-000 (8400)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by De Philippis, Guido


MATH-UA 325-000 (8401)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Peilen, Luke


MATH-UA 325-000 (10138)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Peilen, Luke


MATH-UA 325-000 (10139)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Weilin


MATH-UA 325-000 (10140)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beekie, Raj


MATH-UA 325-000 (10141)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beekie, Raj


MATH-UA 325-000 (10135)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cao, Yu


MATH-UA 325-000 (10136)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hess-Childs, Elias


MATH-UA 325-000 (10137)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hess-Childs, Elias


MATH-UA 325-000 (10627)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Weilin


MATH-UA 325-000 (10628)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Semenov, Vadim


MATH-UA 325-000 (10629)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Semenov, Vadim

Chaos & Dynamical Systems (MATH-UA 264)

Topics include fixed points of one-dimensional maps; linear operators and linear approximations; stability and bifurcation; logistic maps. Cantor set, fractal sets, symbolic dynamics, conjugacy of maps. Dynamics in two dimensions. Introduction for students with little preparation to the recent discovery that, in certain regimes, fully deterministic mechanics can produce chaotic behavior.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 264-000 (8396)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ampatzoglou, Ioakeim


MATH-UA 264-000 (8397)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Guanchun

Numerical Analysis (MATH-UA 252)

In numerical analysis one explores how mathematical problems can be analyzed and solved with a computer. As such, numerical analysis has very broad applications in mathematics, physics, engineering, finance, and the life sciences. This course introduces the subject for mathematics majors. Theory and practical examples using Matlab are combined in the studying of topics ranging from simple root-finding procedures to differential equations and the finite element method.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 252-000 (8390)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 252-000 (8391)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 252-000 (9168)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stadler, Georg


MATH-UA 252-000 (9169)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Toler, Evan


MATH-UA 252-000 (9405)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Potter, Samuel


MATH-UA 252-000 (9406)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Martinez Aguilar, Mariana

Probability & Statistics (MATH-UA 235)

Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in Calculus II (MATH-UA 122) or Math for Economics II (MATH-UA 212) (for economics majors) or equivalent. Not open to students who have taken Theory of Probability (MATH-UA 233) or Mathematical Statistics (MATH-UA 234). Combination of MATH-UA 233 and 234 at a more elementary level to acquaint students with both probability and statistics in a single term. In probability: mathematical treatment of chance; combinatorics; binomial, Poisson, and Gaussian distributions; law of large numbers and the normal distribution; application to coin-tossing; radioactive decay. In statistics: sampling; normal and other useful distributions; testing of hypotheses; confidence intervals; correlation and regression; applications to scientific, industrial, and financial data.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 235-000 (8384)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cerfon, Antoine


MATH-UA 235-000 (8385)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vasantha, Rajashekar


MATH-UA 235-000 (10585)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vasantha, Rajashekar


MATH-UA 235-000 (20795)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Falconet, Hugo


MATH-UA 235-000 (20796)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Sixian


MATH-UA 235-000 (20797)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Sixian


MATH-UA 235-000 (26181)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Doshi, Jash Tejaskumar

Theory of Probability (MATH-UA 233)

Introduction to the mathematical techniques of random phenomena occurring in the natural, physical, and social sciences. Axioms of mathematical probability, combinatorial analysis, binomial distribution, Poisson and normal approximation, random variables and probability distributions, generating functions, Markov chains, applications.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 233-000 (8695)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tanzi, Matteo


MATH-UA 233-000 (8696)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Linfeng


MATH-UA 233-000 (8885)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leibovich, Matan


MATH-UA 233-000 (9078)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Liudeng


MATH-UA 233-000 (10636)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dunlap, Alexander


MATH-UA 233-000 (10638)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Liudeng


MATH-UA 233-000 (19808)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Stepp, Elizabeth


MATH-UA 233-000 (19809)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Zhang, Linfeng


MATH-UA 233-000 (26180)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Doshi, Jash Tejaskumar

Calculus III (MATH-UA 123)

Prerequisite: MATH-UA.0122 with a grade of C or better, departmental placement exam, or permission of the department. Functions of several variables. Vectors in the plane and space. Partial derivatives with applications. Double and triple integrals. Spherical and cylindrical coordinates. Surface and line integrals. Divergence, gradient, and curl. Theorem of Gauss and Stokes.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 123-000 (8378)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Normand, Raoul


MATH-UA 123-000 (9179)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ristroph, Leif


MATH-UA 123-000 (9180)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Shizhu


MATH-UA 123-000 (8379)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Shizhu


MATH-UA 123-000 (8380)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leingang, Matthew


MATH-UA 123-000 (24839)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Linear Algebra (MATH-UA 140)

Systems of linear equations. Gaussian elimination, matrices, determinants, and Cramer?s rule. Vectors, vector spaces, basis and dimension, linear transformations. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, quadratic forms.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 140-000 (8381)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hammoud, Naima


MATH-UA 140-000 (10125)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qi, Sihan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10126)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qi, Sihan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10127)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Jiarui


MATH-UA 140-000 (10128)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Jiarui


MATH-UA 140-000 (8986)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sia, Charmaine


MATH-UA 140-000 (10129)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Xuenan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10130)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Xuenan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10131)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kotwal, Adit


MATH-UA 140-000 (10132)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kotwal, Adit


MATH-UA 140-000 (10120)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Shizhu


MATH-UA 140-000 (10121)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yap, Ted


MATH-UA 140-000 (10122)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yap, Ted


MATH-UA 140-000 (10123)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stempel, Jordan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10124)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Frank, Natalie


MATH-UA 140-000 (9777)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hammoud, Naima


MATH-UA 140-000 (10469)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Denis, Evan


MATH-UA 140-000 (10468)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harrington, Jeremiah

Calculus II (MATH-UA 122)

Techniques of integration. Further applications. Plane analytic geometry. Polar coordinates and parametric equations. Infinite series, including power series.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 122-000 (8373)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sondjaja, Mutiara


MATH-UA 122-000 (8374)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 122-000 (8375)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shum, Fanny


MATH-UA 122-000 (8376)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sondjaja, Mutiara


MATH-UA 122-000 (8377)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Feklistova, Mariya


MATH-UA 122-000 (8677)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Feklistova, Mariya


MATH-UA 122-000 (10117)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flek, Ruslan


MATH-UA 122-000 (10118)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shum, Fanny


MATH-UA 122-000 (24841)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kalaycioglu, Selin

Discrete Mathematics (MATH-UA 120)

A first course in discrete mathematics. Sets, algorithms, and induction. Combinatorics. Graphs and trees. Combinatorial circuits. Logic and Boolean algebra.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 120-000 (8370)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sia, Charmaine


MATH-UA 120-000 (8371)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flek, Ruslan


MATH-UA 120-000 (8372)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flek, Ruslan


MATH-UA 120-000 (8694)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chikhany, Ralph


MATH-UA 120-000 (8807)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 120-000 (8985)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leingang, Matthew


MATH-UA 120-000 (9437)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sanfratello, Andrew


MATH-UA 120-000 (9476)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sanfratello, Andrew


MATH-UA 120-000 (10639)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chikhany, Ralph


MATH-UA 120-000 (24840)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Oveys, Hesam


MATH-UA 120-000 (24904)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Oveys, Hesam


MATH-UA 120-000 (26350)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Clarkson, Corrin


MATH-UA 120-000 (26380)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Clarkson, Corrin

Calculus I (MATH-UA 121)

Any one of the following: a score of 670 or higher on the mathematics portion of the SAT, a score of 650 or higher on the SAT Subject Test in Mathematics 1, a score of 650 or higher on the SAT Subject Test in Mathematics 2, an ACT mathematics score of 30 or higher, a score of 3 or higher on the AP Calculus AB exam, an AB subscore of 3 or higher on the AP Calculus BC exam, a score of 3 or higher on the AP Calculus BC exam, a grade of C or higher in Algebra and Calculus (MATH-UA 9), or a passing score on a departmental placement exam. Derivatives, antiderivatives, and integrals of functions of one variable. Applications include graphing, maximizing, and minimizing functions. Definite integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Areas and volumes.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 121-000 (10098)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kalaycioglu, Selin


MATH-UA 121-000 (10099)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saha, Shuvadeep


MATH-UA 121-000 (10100)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saha, Shuvadeep


MATH-UA 121-000 (20793)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patki, Sarvesh


MATH-UA 121-000 (20794)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patki, Sarvesh


MATH-UA 121-000 (10102)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Foster, Joseph


MATH-UA 121-000 (10103)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Agostino, Marina


MATH-UA 121-000 (10104)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Agostino, Marina


MATH-UA 121-000 (10105)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Salha, Fatima


MATH-UA 121-000 (10106)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Salha, Fatima


MATH-UA 121-000 (10107)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sia, Charmaine


MATH-UA 121-000 (10108)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vasantha, Rajashekar


MATH-UA 121-000 (10109)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Star, Zachary


MATH-UA 121-000 (10110)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vasantha, Rajashekar


MATH-UA 121-000 (10111)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Star, Zachary


MATH-UA 121-000 (10112)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Foster, Joseph


MATH-UA 121-000 (10113)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cortes, Julian


MATH-UA 121-000 (10114)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cortes, Julian


MATH-UA 121-000 (10115)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gangan, Pradyuman


MATH-UA 121-000 (10116)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gangan, Pradyuman

Algebra and Calculus (MATH-UA 9)

Prerequisite: Three years of high school math or permission of the department. An intensive course in intermediate algebra and trigonometry. Topics include algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their graphs.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 9-000 (8365)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Foster, Joseph


MATH-UA 9-000 (8366)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Haosheng


MATH-UA 9-000 (8367)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Haosheng


MATH-UA 9-000 (8368)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sivakumar, Pranav Kamesh


MATH-UA 9-000 (8369)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sivakumar, Pranav Kamesh

Shakespeare (MEDI-UA 410)

Medieval & Renaissance Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


MEDI-UA 410-000 (10578)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MEDI-UA 410-000 (10579)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MEDI-UA 410-000 (10580)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Neural Bases of Language (LING-UA 43)

A state-of-the-art survey of the cognitive neuroscience of language, a rapidly developing multidisciplinary field at the intersection of linguistics, psycholinguistics, and neuroscience. Covers all aspects of language processing in the healthy brain, from early sensory perception to sentence-level semantic interpretation, as well as a range of neurological and development language disorders.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


LING-UA 43-000 (10444)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pylkkanen, Liina


LING-UA 43-000 (10445)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Blanco-Elorrieta, Esti

Field Methods (LING-UA 44)

Analysis (LING-UA 13), or permission of the instructor. Offered every year. Collins, Gallagher, Gouskova. 4 points. Students interview a native speaker of an unfamiliar language to study all aspects of the language’s grammar: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics. We evaluate and organize real, nonidealized linguistic data and formulate generalizations that serve as the basis for research.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


LING-UA 44-000 (9373)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gallagher, Gillian · Collins, Christopher

Linguistics as Cognitive Science (LING-UA 48)

Approaches from linguistics, philosophy, and psychology. Topics: the evidence for constructing grammars, the interpretation of grammatical rules as cognitive or neural operations, the significance of neo-behaviorist approaches to language and computational modeling for a cognitive theory of language, the connection between linguistics theory and genetics, and the importance of sociocultural and historical variation for understanding the nature of language.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


LING-UA 48-000 (9629)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Marantz, Alec

Structure of The Russian Language (LING-UA 10)

An introduction to the morphosyntax of Russian. Students learn how to analyze the underlying structures of this language by using formal tools in syntactic theory. The core areas of Russian grammar: case, aspect, argument structure alternations, topic/ focus structure, negation, binding, control, and wh-movement. No knowledge of Russian required.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LING-UA 10-000 (20310)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harves, Stephanie

Morphology (LING-UA 29)

Introduces rules for composing words and sentences from the smallest units of linguistic combination (morphemes). Why can the same message be expressed in one word in some languages but require an entire sentence in others? Why do the shapes of prefixes, suffixes, and roots change depending on their semantic and phonological context? What rules do different languages use for forming new words? No previous background in linguistics is required.