IMA Fall 2019 Courses

IMA Fall 2019 Courses

 

Creative Computing (IMNY-UT 101)

4pt – Staff – 14 weeks

Section 001: Tu/Th 3:00pm – 4:30pm

Section 002: Tu/Th 9:00am – 10:30am

Prerequisites: None

Physical Computing is an approach to learning how humans communicate through computers that starts by considering how humans express themselves physically. In this course, we take the human body as a given, and attempt to design computing applications within the limits of its expression.

To realize this goal, you’ll learn how a computer converts the changes in energy given off by our bodies (in the form of sound, light, motion, and other forms) into changing electronic signals that it can read and interpret. You’ll learn about the sensors that do this, and about simple computers called microcontrollers that read sensors and convert their output into data. In the other direction you will learn how to actual physical things in the world with devices like speakers, lights and motors.  Finally, you’ll learn how microcontrollers communicate with other computers.

To learn this, you’ll watch people and build devices. You will spend a lot of time building circuits, soldering, writing programs, building structures to hold sensors and controls, and figuring out how best to make all of these things relate to a person’s body.

 

 

Communications Lab (IMNY-UT 102)

4pt – Staff – 14 weeks

Section 001: Mo/We 3:00pm – 4:30pm

Section 002: Mo/We 4:45pm – 6:15pm

Section 003: Mo/We 12:30pm – 2:00pm

Prerequisites: None

An introductory course designed to provide students with hands-on experience using various technologies including time based media, video production, digital imaging, audio, video and animation. The forms and uses of new communications technologies are explored in a laboratory context of experimentation and discussion. The technologies are examined as tools that can be employed in a variety of situations and experiences. Principles of interpersonal communications, media theory, and human factors are introduced. Weekly assignments, team and independent projects, and project reports are required

 

 

Quick Introduction to Physical Computing (IMNY-UT 103)

Dan O’Sullivan – 1pt – 3 weeks (First portion of semester) 

Tues/Thur: 3:00 PM – 4:30 PM

Prerequisites: Prior classwork or experience programming – May not have taken Creative Computing (IMNY-UT 101)

Physical Computing is an approach to learning how humans communicate through computers that starts by considering how humans express themselves physically. In this course, we take the human body as a given, and attempt to design computing applications within the limits of its expression.

To realize this goal, you’ll learn how a computer converts the changes in energy given off by our bodies (in the form of sound, light, motion, and other forms) into changing electronic signals that it can read and interpret. You’ll learn about the sensors that do this, and about simple computers called microcontrollers that read sensors and convert their output into data. In the other direction you will learn how to actual physical things in the world with devices like speakers, lights and motors.  Finally, you’ll learn how microcontrollers communicate with other computers.

To learn this, you’ll watch people and build devices. You will spend a lot of time building circuits, soldering, writing programs, building structures to hold sensors and controls, and figuring out how best to make all of these things relate to a person’s body.

Note: This course is for students who have not taken Creative Computing (IMNY-UT 101) but who have prior classwork or experience programming.  Taking this course enables the waiving of Creative Computing (IMNY-UT 101) in order to take higher level courses in Physical Computing and Experimental Interfaces which otherwise have Creative Computing (IMNY-UT 101) as a prerequisite.

 

 

Introduction to 3D Printing (IMNY-UT 244)

Xuedi Chen – 2pt – 7 weeks (First half of semester)

Thu 3:15 PM – 6:15 PM

Category: Physical Computing and Experimental Interfaces

Prerequisites: Communications Lab (IMNY-UT 102) OR equivalent coursework

3D environments and objects are powerful prototyping tools. This class will introduce the basics of 3D modeling techniques in Rhino and students will learn to create assets for prototyping and 3D printing. The class will take an industrial design approach to design and build with specifications and materials in mind. Students will learn to think, plan, design, and produce well thought out objects to fit their specific needs. (examples: motor mounts, enclosures, wearables etc.)

 

 

Performative Avatars (IMNY-UT 284)

Matt Romein – 2pt – 7 weeks (First half of semester)

Tues/Thur 10:15 AM – 11:45 AM

Category: Entertainment and Media

Prerequisites: Communications Lab (IMNY-UT 102) OR equivalent coursework

Whether it’s through photo realistic scans found in current-gen video games or the cartoonish and low-fi aesthetic of Bitmoji there is no limit to ways in which the body and the self are represented in digital spaces.

This 2 credit class will look at how avatars have been historically used in the realm of art, commerce, and entertainment and utilize existing avatar creation tools to develop projects that examine identity, body politics, and contemporary performance. In class we will cover the basics of Unreal Engine, photogrammetry, 3D scanning, and model rigging although students will be encouraged to use existing skill sets and creative thinking to complete some of the smaller week-by-week assignments. The class will culminate with a short performance, small installation or single/multi-channel video piece using one or more of the techniques covered in class. This can be a solo project or a group project.

In this class students will:

– Explore how avatars can be utilized in your creative practice

– Gain an introductory understanding of Unreal Engine, photogrammetry, model rigging, and 3D scanning.

– Learn how to re-contextualize digital spaces for the purposes of art, installation, and performance.

– Broaden your thinking of what performance can be, both in a physical setting and digital setting.

– Think critically about how physical bodies inhabit digital spaces and how our the hardware and software we use reinforces the acceptance and value of certain kinds of bodies.

 

 

Collective Play (IMNY-UT 225)

Mimi Yin – 4pt – 14 weeks

Tues/Thur 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

Category: Computation and Data

Prerequisites: Creative Computing (IMNY-UT 101) OR equivalent coursework

Rules of play shape competitive games from checkers to football. But how do the rules of interaction shape non-competitive play? In this course, we will explore, code and test design strategies for playful group interactions while at the same time interrogating both what it means to play and how individual identities and group behaviors.

Some of the questions we will ask and attempt to answer:

What motivates participation? What hinders it?

When does participation become oppressive?

What’s the difference between self-consciousness and self-awareness?

Who has power? Who doesn’t?

Are leaders necessary?

What’s the difference between taking turns and engaging in conversation?

What happens when the slowest person sets the pace?

Interaction inputs we will play with will include: mouse, keyboard, mobile device sensors, and microphone. Outputs will include, visuals, text and sound. We will use p5, websockets and node.js for real-time interaction. Class time will be split between playing with and critiquing examples and translating design strategies into code and logic.

 

 

Design Fundamentals (IMNY-UT 261)

Katherine Dillon – 4pt – 14 weeks

Fri 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Category: Art and Design

Prerequisites: None

This class aims to provide students with the critical thinking and practical skills to explore and communicate ideas visually. This foundational course is a combination of lecture and studio format that will introduce the fundamental principles of design including typography, color, composition, branding and product design, and offer hands-on application of those principles through both in-class exercises and weekly assignments. The course will serve as a solid foundation of skills relevant to pursuing a degree in Interactive Media Arts and expose students to the myriad of opportunities a grounding in design principles opens up for them.

The format is a once per week 3-hour class. The structure of the class time will include the introduction of a topic each week including an in-class exercise, the introduction of a related assignment, followed by in-class presentations/discussion/critique of student work.

Week by week:

what is visual communication

signage

wayfinding and information systems

typography

color

grids

composition

logo

branding

quantitative information design

qualitative information design

design research

UX mapping

product design

 

 

Internet Famous (IMNY-UT 201)

Zoe Fraade-Blanar – 4pt – 14 weeks

Tues/Thur 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM

Category: Studies (aka “Seminar”)

Prerequisites: None

How does someone become famous on the internet? What does it take to capture our digital attention? While movie stars, rock gods, and other mainstream A-listers struggle to find their place in a sea of emerging technologies and platforms, a new swarm of micro celebrities and influencers has coasted into the cultural space they once filled. Riding a wave of viral content and memes, the newly-famous rule an internet where anyone can have adoring fans… for a price. They are nimble, niche, obnoxious, empowering, and sometimes disturbing.

This class explores what happens when fame is freed from the traditional intermediaries of print, television, and radio, when social media provides everyone with the tools to be their own marketing studio and PR department. It examines the transformation of celebrity, from a 19th century sales gimmick to the formidable cultural, social, and technological force it is today. Students will study a wide array of fame-related topics, from the privacy effects of trolling to the class implications of selfies. And we will engage in practices and exercises that produce real-world instances of celebrity in case we, too, wish to join the ranks of the internet famous.

 

 

Introduction to Machine Learning for the Arts (IMNY-UT 224)

Daniel Shiffman – 4pt – 14 weeks

Mon/Wed 10:15 AM – 11:45 AM

Category: Computation and Data

Prerequisites: Creative Computing (IMNY-UT 101) OR equivalent coursework

An introductory course designed to provide students with hands-on experience developing creative coding projects with machine learning. The history, theory, and application of machine learning algorithms and related datasets are explored in a laboratory context of experimentation and discussion. Examples and exercises will be demonstrated in JavaScript using the p5.js, ml5.js, and TensorFlow.js libraries. In addition, students will learn to work with open source pre-trained models in the cloud using Runway. Principles of data collection and ethics are introduced. Weekly assignments, team and independent projects, and project reports are required.

 

 

Research Methods in Art and Design (IMNY-UT 204)

Mitchell Joachim – 4pt – 14 weeks

Wed. 12:00 PM – 3:00 PM

Category: Studies (aka “Seminar”)

Prerequisites: None

This course is intended for students planning to conduct qualitative research in a variety of different operational settings. Its topics include- case studies, data, documentary evidence, participant observation, surveys, and supportive technologies. The primary goal of this course is to assist students in preparing their thesis proposals/ projects.

Description: A survey of creative and qualitative research methods applicable to the design, media and visual arts in practice.

Purpose: To assist current graduate students in comprehensive research processes and practices and, additionally, to initiate students’ preparation for executing scholarly activities and descriptive analysis. A third objective is for aspirants in the field to learn to critically unpack both quantitative and qualitative research.

Methodologies: Research requires persistence, creativity, ingenuity, and refinement. There are several different types of design-based research directions that include experimental, analytical, investigative, and etc. Students will be introduced to a full range of possibilities and worldviews. The course supports advanced students at ITP to evaluate and develop novel methods and methodologies specific and appropriate to their personal research projects at this level and in the context of a practice-led research environment. A key objective is to promote innovative, experimental and ambitious research that relates to academic study and creative practice at the forefront of the field of contemporary art/ media/ design and related disciplines.