Notice: add_custom_image_header is deprecated since version 3.4.0! Use add_theme_support( 'custom-header', $args ) instead. in /var/www/html/shows/wp-includes/functions.php on line 4334 2011 ITP Thesis » Christopher Langer

Portrait of Susan Casagrande

Christopher Langer

Portrait of Susan Casagrande reimagines a portrait as a living image, mixing traditional portraiture with the reality of time-based media, evoking intimate presence for loved ones not present.

www.clanger.org/portrait



Portrait of Susan Casagrande” is a small, site specific, interactive video installation for a living room. It re-imagines a portrait as a living image, mixing traditional portraiture with the reality of time-based media, evoking an intimate presence for a loved one not present. Like all portraits that hang on a wall, it represents someone who is important to the portrait’s owner, and who is presently distant, showing images and video captured at an earlier time. The subject of the portrait is captured and memorialized in video, giving the ability for subject to appear to live within the bounds of the frame. The portrait employs disparate presentational approaches- -both formal and mundane--yet always emotionally charged. The subject goes about the routine rituals of the day, and also sits formally for the portrait. By seamlessly editing between video loops of routine rituals and formal portrait sittings at random intervals with the help of a computer hidden within the frame casing, the video portrait creates a familiar world for its owner to watch unfold, discover and re-remember. “Portrait of Susan Casagrande” redefines a static, nostalgic media into a more intimate depiction or keepsake. While it never promises to recreate the subject in reality, it sparks hope for its owner by always leaving the possibility for an unpredictable or unseen “loop.” As time progresses, however, the portrait ticks away through its own pre-programmed lifespan and as with any life, it has an end. One day the subject will exit the frame and never return, leaving only the empty room.

Background
The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde
Blade Runner, Philip K. Dick

Wei
Gerhard Richter: Writings

W.T. Mitchell, What do Pictures Want?

2001: A Space Odyssey
Bill Viola’s work

John Baldessari at the Met.

Audience
me.