A thoughtful exploration and reflection into architecture's biophilic design and its applicability to textile design.

Currently, nature is used as a basis for decision-making in both architecture and textiles. Nature-influenced architecture can be found across the world, examples include the Lotus Temple in Delhi, India where the erected building is in the shape of a giant lotus flower. Nature-influenced textiles can be found in your closet and home, floral patterns [8] or natural imagery are the most common expression of nature in textiles. Using floral or natural textile patterns as wall decor in architecture is a common practice as textiles begin to add more intricacy to a space. Architecture can also shape textiles in the form, structure, or pattern motif of a garment. Nature, architecture, and textiles have a symbiotic relationship that continues to evolve over our collective practice of expressing nature through art.

This paper describes a collection of unique patterns based on architectural structures that explore the causal relationship between architecture and textiles. More specifically, the collection utilizes the principles of an architectural practice called biophilic design, direct or indirect sources, and principles of nature to increase connectivity in the architectural space [1]. This project attempts to apply these biophilic principles to textile design and patternmaking to create a new genre of natural analogue patterns that could evoke similar feelings and connectivity to its design. While reflecting on this process, it was found that the 2D expression of the collection evoked a subtle or moderate reaction from viewers, possibly indicating the essentiality of ‘space’ to evoke feeling when exercising biophilic design principles. Thus, “Architextile” offers a thoughtful exploration and reflection into architecture's biophilic design and its applicability to textile design.