Intro to Marketing (MKTG-UB 9001)

This course evaluates marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and a catalyst of business activity. It presents a comprehensive framework that includes a) researching and analyzing customers, company, competition, and the marketing environment, b) identifying and targeting attractive segments with strategic positioning, and c) making product, pricing, communication, and distribution decisions. Cases and examples are utilized to develop problem-solving abilities.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4953)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Thu
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Donvito, Raffaele


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4981)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (21443)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4834)
08/29/2024 – 12/04/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Magarino, Victor


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (3462)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Anton, Muriel


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (21026)
at NYU Tel Aviv (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (3380)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by West, Andrew

Global Media Seminar: Sydney, Australia (MCC-UE 9456)

In this seminar- based subject, students will discuss the latest global media developments in the context of key theoretical frameworks. Central topics include: the increasing disruption of established information flows; challenges facing the fourth estate and democracy itself; the role of soft power and popular culture; trust in journalism and traditional media; the rise of social platforms as near-sovereign technocracies; gender and diversity biases in media and emerging media tech; ethics and regulation; the proliferation of fake news and deep fakes; the potential erosion of privacy; the emergence of citizen journalism; the phenomenon of cancel culture; the influence of hacktivism and digital activism; inequality after #metoo and #blacklivesmatter; the emerging architectures of the metaverse and VR/AR; advancements in Web 3.0 and blockchain; as well as the suite of emerging implications resulting from generative AI, including the intensifying and sometimes intimate relationships between humans and machines. The focus will be international, with an emphasis on Australia. Ultimately, the course will examine the ways in which global communication is undergoing a ceaseless paradigm shift.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9456-000 (2843)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by Varga, David

Anthropology of Indigenous Australia (ANTH-UA 9037)

This course offers an introduction to some of the classical and current issues in the anthropology of Indigenous Australia. The role of anthropology in the representation and governance of Indigenous life is itself an important subject for anthropological inquiry, considering that Indigenous people of Australia have long been the objects of interest and imagination by outsiders for their cultural formulations of kinship, ritual, art, gender, and politics. These representations—in feature films about them (such as Rabbit-Proof Fence and Australia), New Age Literature (such as Mutant Message Down Under), or museum exhibitions (such as in the Museum of Sydney or the Australian Museum)—are now also in dialogue with Indigenous forms of cultural production, in genres as diverse as film, television, drama, dance, art and writing. The course will explore how Aboriginal people have struggled to reproduce themselves and their traditions on their own terms, asserting their right to forms of cultural autonomy and self-determination. Through the examination of ethnographic and historical texts, films, archives and Indigenous life-writing accounts, we will consider the ways in which Aboriginalities are being challenged and constructed in contemporary Australia. The course will consist of lectures interspersed with discussions, student presentations, and films/other media; we may also have guest presenters.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ANTH-UA 9037-000 (2844)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by

Texts and Ideas: (CORE-UA 9400)

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CORE-UA 9400-000 (4853)
08/29/2024 – 12/04/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Buenos Aires (Global)
Instructed by Orellana, Patricio


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2609)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9400-000 (4939)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Giglioli, Matteo


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2508)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2510)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2512)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2520)
08/29/2024 – 12/04/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Soto, Teresa


CORE-UA 9400-000 (3460)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Thorne, Vanda


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2849)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by Hallsworth, Djuna

Expressive Culture: Film (CORE-UA 9750)

The course description for this CORE class varies on the location where taught. Please view the course description in the course notes below.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CORE-UA 9750-000 (4855)
at NYU Buenos Aires (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9750-000 (2814)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9750-000 (2654)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by Dadak, Muzeyyen


CORE-UA 9750-000 (2505)
08/29/2024 – 12/04/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Vela, Carlos


CORE-UA 9750-000 (2845)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by Barnes, Annette


CORE-UA 9750-000 (2846)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by Barnes, Annette

Media and the Environment (MCC-UE 9027)

This course will investigate the dominant critical perspectives that have contributed to the development of Environmental Communication as a field of study. This course explores the premise that the way we communicate powerfully impacts our perceptions of the “natural” world, and that these perceptions shape the way we define our relationships to and within nature. The goal of this course is to access various conceptual frameworks for addressing questions about the relationship between the environment, culture and communication. Students will explore topics such as nature/ wildlife tourism, consumerism, representations of the environment in popular culture and environmental activism.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


MCC-UE 9027-000 (14132)
08/31/2020 – 12/10/2020 Tue
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by

Global Media: Sydney, Australia (MCC-UE 9456)

This course examines the fast-changing landscape of global media. Historical and theoretical frameworks will be provided to enable students to approach the scope, disparity and complexity of current developments. These frameworks will be supplemented with the latest news and developments. In short, we ask: what is going on in the hyperlinked and hyper-turbulent realm of blogs, Buzzfeed and The Sydney Morning Herald? Key issues examined include: shifts in patterns of production, distribution and consumption; the implications of globalisation; the disruption of established information flows and emergence of new information channels; the advent of social media; the proliferation of mobile phones; the ethics and regulation of modern media; the rise of celebrity culture; the demise (?) of privacy; the entertainment industry and its pirates; Edward Snowden and the NSA; and the irrepressible octogenarian Rupert Murdoch. The focus will be international, with an emphasis on Australia.Ultimately, the course will examine the ways in which global communication is undergoing a paradigm shift, as demonstrated by the Arab spring and its uncertain legacy, as well as the creeping dominance of Google, Facebook and Twitter. In other words Toto, I’ve a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


MCC-UE 9456-000 (12301)
08/31/2020 – 12/10/2020 Wed
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by