Category Archives: Liberal Arts & Sciences

Law, Business & Society (SOIM-UB 6)

Every professional businessperson must be aware of how legal systems work and affect business decisions. Furthermore, the interaction between law and business is multidimensional, involving international, ethical, and technological considerations. In this course, students examine how key areas of business law, including contracts, torts, and business organizations, influence the structure of business relationships. Students actively participate in legal studies designed to enhance business skills such as analytical thinking, written communication, oral presentation, conflict resolution, and teamwork problem solving.

Social Impact (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 2 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


SOIM-UB 6-000 (4174)

Sustainability and Health (FOOD-UE 1184)

The concept of sustainability is important in our current moment, yet we use the term in a variety of ways and via different frameworks of understanding. This course explores how we talk about and understand the concept of sustainability, including as environment and climate change, food production and consumption, and individual and community health. Students will examine the concept of sustainability through these different lenses, exploring the connections among them.

Food Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

The Making of Economic Policy in the White House (ECON-UB 217)

This course shows students how economic policy gets made, and should get made, at the highest levels of federal government. It draws upon almost fifty years of economic policy-making, and the challenges that have confronted the men and women who have sat in positions of power in the Treasury, the Office of Management and Budget, the Council of Economic Advisers, and the National Economic Council. These challenges include the breakdown of the Bretton Woods system and the transition to a predominantly floating exchange rate world, the era of rampant inflation, the collapse of the Soviet Union and the transition to market economies, the shock of 9/11, the financial crisis of 2008, and the Great Recession that followed. Lectures and discussions will lead to in-class exercises, in which students will role- play as advisers to US presidents from Richard Nixon to Donald Trump. What is it like to sit in the Oval Office and discuss policy with the president? To know that your input into his decisions will impact millions of people? To know that the wrong advice could be calamitous? Students will learn how to analyze policy problems and design solutions, taking into account the multi-dimensional aspects of making federal policy and the many constraints upon those decisions, including of course the influence of Congress. As part of the learning process, students will also have the opportunity to hear from guest speakers who have worked at the very top of economic policy-making in the executive branch of government, and played a role in the policy-making process through their work in the media.

Economics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Content and Meaning (ASPP-GT 2045)

The class is to consider the depth of grief and loss within artistic responses and to inspire love and hope with our creative transformation. How does the artist process or respond to the emotions and events of loss? What are cultural heritage examples? What are ways we were taught in our families? What traditions do we wish to reimagine? Who needs to be commemorated? Is creative transformation possible? Is there a space for hope, love and joy within the complexity of these emotions? The course will have creative exercises and conceptual prompts that can be developed in the medium of your choice. We will consider creative texts such as visual, film, music, media, performance, installation, and poetic examples to broaden and inspire our understanding of ways to respond. There are other forms of expression to contemplate such as fashion, outsider art, architecture, archives, memorials, gardening, and cultural movements. We will have discussion, guests, field trips, and presentations. Is there a way to create an archive? How do we document or forget? Together we will be a collective of considering, contemplating and creating. Some of the strategies we will be considering are: metaphor, expression within nature, fairy tales, abstraction, fragments, love, celebration and the space of silence for restoration. Some of the artists /writers will be Maya Angelou, Dunbar, David Wognarowicz, Krishnamurti, Pamela Sneed, Barthes, Rilke and bell hooks. We will look at films such as the 1926 silent film, Page of Madness by Kunsuga, Let me Come in by Bill Morrison, or News From Home by Chantal Ackerman. I look forward to being your guide for the seminar, Grief, Loss , Love, Hope and Creative Transformation. Feel free to contact me with any questions karen.finley@nyu.edu

Ctr for Art, Society & Pub Pol (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Fashion, Culture & the Body (IDSEM-UG 9254)

This is a course that explores the relationship between ideas, the body and the way that fashion can be understood to mediate between the two. Through a range of disciplines and media this course considers the body as an aspect of not only medical and scientific exploration, but crucially as a vital element of culture and society. Bodies affect the ways in which the social world and power relations are organized, and they even arguably condition the way that we understand reality itself. Our physical form is constantly shaped according to both philosophies and fashions. Body ideals and broader ideals often interrelate strongly through bodily practices and with what we wear. There are meanings and fashions in all bodily forms (skinny, buxom, muscular, ideas of ’whiteness’) and body practices (dieting, hair management, cleansing rituals, plastic surgery and genital cutting). Over the sessions, we will take a conceptual approach to fashion, as a strident condition of modern life, that incorporates politics, science and aesthetics and we will closely read a number of cultural texts against a number of theoretical models. Attitudes towards the body can vary widely according to historical period, and this course will explore how, in different moments, and via different media, we have been preoccupied with the aesthetics of different body zones, with displaying identity (gender, class and ethnicity), and also with power. Different cultural forms (literary, visual, material etc) will provide the focus of our discussions as they all engage with the different ways that we make meaning out of our bodies. Students will be invited to investigate in their written work set texts from class in addition to primary material of their own choice.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Global Fashion Industry: Britain (PRACT-UG 9250)

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON: The Global Fashion Industry and British Fashion aims to introduce fashion history and theory in its contemporary social and cultural context. The course will examine various aspects of the fashion industry and offer an understanding of critical concepts such as social identity, consumer culture and globalization. Students will explore aspects of the British fashion industry, including fashion media, retail environments, fashion exhibitions and the impact of sub and counter culture.

Practicum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PRACT-UG 9250-000 (4039)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Khan, Nathalie

Science in Our Lives: Facts and Lies in the Name of Science (SCIED-UE 218)

Students explore how science became a global form of knowledge making about the natural world, how European notions of science contributed to its growth as a form of systematic knowledge, how some people were excluded from this process, and how bias and discrimination were made real. By observing, measuring, analyzing and explaining data, students learn to produce and evaluate the quality of scientific knowledge and to recognize how science understanding helps to interrogate the construction of difference between facts and lies. Fulfills Life Science Core requirement.

Science Education (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

History of Documentary Film (OART-UT 1701)

The course traces the documentary film from its origins to the present day. Pioneer documentarians like Dziga Vertov and Robert Flaherty saw in documentary film the ability to portray life with a kind of truthfulness never before possible. Early Polish filmmaker Boleslaw Matuszewski wrote that while “the cinematograph does not give the whole truth at least what it gives is unquestionable and of an absolute truth.” Since those heady days, it has become all too clear that documentaries have no special access to the truth. Nevertheless, as this still-young art evolved, documentarians of different schools constantly sought new means to tell the human story. Documentary filmmaking has always been a blend of artistry and technical means and we will also explore this critical relationship. The course explores the development of the documentary and the shifting intentions of documentary filmmakers through the evolution of narrative approach and structure paying special attention to the documentary tradition’s relationship to journalism. Students examine how different filmmakers have gone about trying to convey “reality” on screen both through the use and avoidance of narration, through interviews, editing and dramatizations. Throughout the semester, students investigate how image-driven medium attempts to report stories and the ways an emotion-driven art can be problematic for journalistic objectivity. Finally, the ethical and journalistic responsibilities the documentary filmmaker are discussed. Special attention is given to dramatic re-creations, the filmmaker’s relationship to his/her subjects and the construction of narrative through editing.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


OART-UT 1701-000 (7218)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dorman, Joseph

Stats F/Bus Cntl Regress & Forecasting Models (STAT-UB 103)

This course examines modern statistical methods as a basis for decision making in the face of uncertainty. Topics include probability theory, discrete and continuous distributions, hypothesis testing, estimation, and statistical quality control. With the aid of computers, these statistical methods are used to analyze data. Also presented are an introduction to statistical models and their application to decision making. Topics include the simple linear regression model, inference in regression analysis, sensitivity analysis, and multiple regression analysis.

Statistics & Operations Research (Undergraduate)
6 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


STAT-UB 103-000 (2538)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Giloni, Avi.


STAT-UB 103-000 (2539)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Duan, Yaqi


STAT-UB 103-000 (2540)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chen, Elynn


STAT-UB 103-000 (2541)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kovtun, Vladimir


STAT-UB 103-000 (2542)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Turetsky, Jason


STAT-UB 103-000 (2995)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Turetsky, Jason

Climate Change and Environmental Justice (SCA-UA 632)

Readings from climatologists, economists, anthropologists, geographers, cultural analysts, and activists. Examines the natural and social impact of global warming in the context of the climate justice movement, which is modeled on American-derived principles of environmental justice in the 1990s and poses a legal and humanitarian challenge to those who place their faith in market-driven solutions. Examines how populations are unevenly affected by climate change, and how this imbalance is being addressed by advocates of decarbonization.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


SCA-UA 632-000 (10318)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ross, Andrew

Introduction to the Study of Literature (ENGL-UA 9101)

Gateway course to the major that introduces students to the demands and pleasures of university-level investigation of English literature. Develops the tools necessary for advanced criticism: close-reading skills, knowledge of generic conventions, mastery of critical terminology, and skill at a variety of modes of analysis, from the formal to the historical. Also emphasizes frequent writing.

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ENGL-UA 9101-000 (4062)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Hopf, Courtney

Writing London (SCA-UA 9886)

This course will study a variety of texts written at particular times in the history of London. The aims of the course are to encourage the student to think historically, in terms of the way London and representations of the city have changed and developed over time; and theoretically, in terms of the way the city is mediated through different forms and genres (e.g. poetry, novels, essays, film; satire, detective and crime fiction), and the interrelationship of literary and material spaces. We will also examine the significance of gender, the definition of the modern metropolis as a labyrinthine city of Babylon, the influence of metropolitan culture on Modernism and Modernity, assimilation versus multiculturalism, immigration, and the effects of new modern spaces on individuals.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


SCA-UA 9886-000 (4067)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Landau, Leya


SCA-UA 9886-000 (4068)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Landau, Leya

Media History of NY (MCC-UE 1151)

New York has played a crucial role in the history of media, and media have placed a crucial role in the history of New York. New York has been represented by media since Henry Hudson wrote his reports to the Dutch. Media institutions have contributed centrally to its economy and social fabric, while media geographies have shaped the experiences of city living. This course explores media representations, institutions, and geographies across time and is organized around the collaborative production of an online guidebook to the media history of New York.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1151-000 (20991)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ramirez, George

Bodies in Cultural Landscapes (OART-UT 706)

This course examines the Western fascination with the moving body in different cultural environments and throughout colonial and postcolonial historical periods until the present time. It will begin by investigating early images and artistic representation of the body in motion captured by European ethnographers at the turn of the 19th century, and continue tracing it to current trends of contemporary culture. The goal of this course is to develop a critical understanding of the culture built around the body as subject as well as a marker of otherness. This course will offer students an opportunity to study and articulate, intellectually and physically, the legibility of bodies in motion within different cultural landscapes. Bodies in Cultural Landscapes will provide an open forum in which to investigate human movement within the specific aesthetic system and cultural practice of early ethnographic representation to contemporary culture’s engagement with the moving body. It will offer insight into personal and cultural identity, stimulating an expanded recognition and appreciation of difference. This course offers students the opportunity to explore simultaneously their intellect (in class viewing, readings and discussions), as well as in the presentation of their own version of ethnographic research and representation based on a topic of their choice discussed with instructor. Students will engage weekly with exercises and assignments based on course material.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Portrait of an Artist: Walter Murch (OART-UT 901)

This course examines the artistic career and creative work of Walter Murch, Oscar-winning film editor and sound designer, and the first and only artist to win Academy Awards for both film editing and sound mixing on a single film (The English Patient, 1997). The class will provide an unprecedented inside look into Mr. Murch’s processes of sound designing, editing, mixing, writing, and directing on such acclaimed and memorable films as THX 1138, American Graffiti, The Conversation, Apocalypse Now, The Godfather, Return to Oz, The English Patient, Touch of Evil, and Cold Mountain. Through interviews, articles, and materials from his private archives never before publicly available, students learn about the creative world of an artist who has brought the importance of sound and editing to a new level. In addition to his work in film and his inventions used in the filmmaking process, two additional areas of interest of Mr. Murch will be examined: translations of Curzio Malaparte’s writings and his passion for astronomy. Mr. Murch will participate on several occasions in the course as a guest lecturer by visiting the class and/or via video conferencing.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


OART-UT 901-000 (15488)09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Zivkovic, Brane

Poetics of Witnessing (OART-UT 829)

Today, many documentarians consider themselves working within a well-defined human rights framework where images and film are used to raise awareness about social injustice. On the far edge of this movement, however, there are writers, photographers and filmmakers whose work calls attention to the traditional documentary ethics of bearing witness but whose modes of representation blur the lines between fact and fiction. This body of work is more open-ended to interpretation and multiple readings, which also include more personal themes such as loss and melancholy, the ephemeral nature of time and memory, nostalgia and change. While not a production course per se, most students create short poetic films for their midterms and finals. The course is a great opportunity for students to open this door on short-form media production for the first time even if they wish to shoot on their smartphones. We will study several different kinds of visual poetics such as combining documentary photos with literature, artists working with archives and found images, the essay film, the personal diary and journal film, the performance film, ethnographic poetics, and new trans-media platforms and webdocs. Some of the writers and artists we will study include Roland Barthes, W.G. Sebald, Chris Marker, Christian Boltanski, Forough Farrokhzad, RaMell Ross, Roland Barthes, Miguel Rio Branco Charles Burnett, William Greaves, Agnes Varda, Margaret Tait, Robert Gardner, Jean Rouch, and Jonas Mekas.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


OART-UT 829-000 (15164)

Science of Movement (DANC-UT 1605)

The Science of Movement will introduce students to the multidisciplinary field of how the human brain controls movements, how we learn new movements, and the rehabilitation of various movement disorders and injuries. This course is appropriate for undergraduate students with an interest in human movement, neuroscience and behavior, physical medicine, dance and/or athletics. No prior course of study in neuroscience is necessary to successfully engage with the course material. This course will count towards general education requirements for social science for Tisch undergraduate students.

Dance (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Food and Nutrition Global Society (FOOD-UE 1180)

This course unites the liberal arts experience with a specialization in food and nutrition. It contains three areas of focus: food and nutrition history; ethical issues in food and nutrition; and emerging technologies as they related to food and nutrition.

Food Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


FOOD-UE 1180-000 (18285)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Arab Theatre & Film: (MEIS-UA 747)

Examines recent trends in contemporary Arab theatre and film, contextualizing these within a broader history of Arab performance. Particular attention is given to how experimental practitioners have explored issues of human rights and the control of territories under the modern state. Strategies addressed include the conflation of the past and present as a means of exploring the persistence of the colonial power structure in the modern Arab world; the use of the parable to speak truth to power; the incorporation of the populist entertainment forms that directly engage the audience; and the use of familiar tales to explore new political realities.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MEIS-UA 747-000 (13271)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Atrach, Naila

Science in Our Lives: Environmental Issues (SCIED-UE 212)

Introducing the notion of citizen science, this course provides students with opportunities to use scientific information to solve real-world problems related to environmental & public health. By exploring the practices of science from observing & measurement to analyzing & explaining data, students learn to use data & produce scientific knowledge for the public. Liberal Arts Core/MAP Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Natural Sciences

Science Education (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


SCIED-UE 212-000 (18146)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Milne, Catherine

Ruins, Fragments, and Archives (IDSEM-UG 1748)

Traces of time passing, ruins are time that has turned into space, duration ossified and broken up into fragments. Fragments are things we carry out of ruins, relics rescued from the abyss of lost time. We create archives to organize the rescued and the abandoned, compiling catalogs and designing systems that are often ruins themselves. Drawing on literature, painting, film, and installation art, this class will explore the entanglement of nature and history and of the recent and deep past in representations of architectural and social decay—in stories and images of ruined cottages, “picturesque” abbeys and castles, partially buried woodsheds. We will examine representations of objects redeemed from the ruins of history as well as the ruined sites in which such objects find refuge (arcades, museums, libraries). And we will consider what it means for something to outlive its usefulness, to survive itself and live on in its own afterlife. Students will write several analytic essays, building toward a research project in which they will explore and interpret a ruin of their choice. Texts may include essays by Uvedale Price, Walter Benjamin, Siegfried Kracauer, Sigmund Freud, Michel Foucault, Douglas Crimp, Robert Smithson, Marguerite Yourcenar, and Hal Foster; engravings, films, and installations by Giovanni Battista Piranesi, Jacques Tourneur, Chantal Akerman, Ilya Kabakov, Tacita Dean, and Pat O’Neill; poetry and prose by William Cowper, William Wordsworth, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Virginia Woolf, H.D., Louis Aragon, Susan Howe, and Theresa Hak Kyung Cha.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

History of French Philosophy (PHIL-UA 9026)

An overview of important developments in French philosophy from the 16th century to the 1950s. We will look at the epistemological and metaphysical debates that followed the rediscovery of Ancient philosophy and the Copernican revolution, with Montaigne’s skepticism, Descartes’ rationalist theory of knowledge, and Condillac’s empiricism. We will then focus on developments in French political philosophy in the 18th and 19th centuries, closely intertwined with political events. We will read Rousseau, an important influence on the French revolutionaries, before turning to 19th-century debates about equality, with Proudhon’s anarchist criticism of property rights, and Tocqueville’s cautious liberal perspective on the political consequences of equality. Finally, we will look at two key movements in French philosophy in the first half of the 20th century, Bergson’s attempt at understanding the temporal duration conscious beings inhabit, and Sartre and de Beauvoir’s distinctive development of existentialism, a philosophy that grapples with the consequences of human freedom.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


PHIL-UA 9026-000 (8710)
01/26/2023 – 05/05/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by Lusson, Philippe

Senior Seminar: (JOUR-UA 401)

An elective for students who wish to explore concentrated issues such as sex and American politics, literary nonfiction, and photojournalism and war. Each section concentrates on a different topic chosen by the instructor, a member of the full-time faculty. Such offerings include Ethnography for Journalists; The Art of Opinion Writing and Polemic; and The Journalism of Empathy.

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Global Media Seminar: Media Activism and Democracy (ITAL-UA 9513)

The course on “Media, Activism & Democracy” aims at, first, introducing students to the complex and fascinating topic of civil society activism; second, at illustrating them the linkages between activism and media; third, at showing them the impact of civil society’s advocacy on contemporary political systems. In a nutshell, the course aims at providing students with a closer understanding of the civil society activism-media-politics conundrums at the national and global levels.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITAL-UA 9513-000 (2451)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Masrani, Rahoul

Global Culture Wars (HSED-UE 1033)

This course will examine the origins, development, and meanings of so-called cultural conflict in the United States. Topics will include abortion, gay rights, bilingualism, and the teaching of evolution in public schools. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Cultures & Contexts

History of Education (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


HSED-UE 1033-000 (18428)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Fashion as Art: Contemporary Collaborations (ARTS-UG 1437)

Presently, the distinctions between fashion and art have begun to fray, revealing a dynamic cultural nexus that has propelled new concepts, processes, materials and modes of presentation. Artists, designers, curators and critics alike recognize the wide-ranging appeal of locating fashion within Fine Art and vice versa. This malleable exchange between the two mediums is illuminated in landmark exhibitions like Alexander McQueen’s Savage Beauty and in the profusion of artist to brand collaborations that continue to transform the fashion world. In this arts workshop, students will have the opportunity to explore fashion as art through a range of material investigations. Questions that the course will engage include: how has the confluence of fashion and Fine Art both challenged and enriched the cultural significance of dress, shifting the industries course and altering the way the world sees value, gender and even identity? Additionally, how can merging these mediums expand and enhance one’s own studio practice? Students can choose from a variety of mediums, including, but not limited to: illustration, painting, collage, textile design, sculpture, photography and performance. This course is open to students of all artistic backgrounds with an interest in expanding their experiences in visual culture and the visual arts.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

History of Italian Cinema (ICINE-UT 1103)

The Italian Cinema is a good way to study the whole Italian history, society, ideology and behaviours. The students will have the opportunity to know such authors as Rossellini, De Sica, Fellini, Antonioni, Visconti, Pasolini, Bertolucci, who are well known in the US. The course will also focus on the difference between auteur films and genre films (comedy, roman-mythological, western, melodrama); it will stress the gender point of view, the problem of a national identity, the role of the film industry. Strong attention will be paid to the relationship between Italian film and literature, art history, television and other disciplines.

Int`l Pgms, Cinema Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ICINE-UT 1103-000 (4946)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Catanese, Rossella


ICINE-UT 1103-000 (20197)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Catanese, Rossella

The Gardens and Landscapes of Tuscany (ARTH-UA 9653)

To provide the student with an awareness and appreciation of gardens and landscapes of Tuscany from early Roman precedents to the 21st century. The design of the Italian landscape and garden is studied as a means of cultural communication–an expression of a society’s values, philosophy and understanding of the environment. Emphasis is placed on historic precedent, sustainable design techniques utilized in Italian gardens and classic Renaissance design concepts. The format includes lectures, class presentations and field trips.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


ARTH-UA 9653-000 (2596)
05/21/2024 – 07/01/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Bucellii, Claudia

Florentine Villas: An Interpretation Based on Historical and Social Factors (ARTH-UA 9308)

This course introduces to the many villas surrounding the city of Florence. It aims at illustrating their origins, their history from the Middle-Age to the twentieth century, as well as their economic and ideological factors in the relationship with the city of Florence. The course draws on many disciplines, such as architecture, history, economy, social history, history of art, and landscape art.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTH-UA 9308-000 (2680)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Edelstein, Bruce

Global Fashion Industry: Italy (PRACT-UG 9200)

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-FLORENCE. Global Fashion Industry: Italy will provide students with a deep understanding of the contemporary fashion industry in Italy, as well as of Italy’s position in the global fashion arena. The course will drive students through the entire lifecycle of the fashion business, from forecasting trends to retailing, through design, sourcing, product development and production. Particular attention will be dedicated to different marketing aspects of the process, such as: identity building, brand positioning, merchandising, buying, costing, communication. All levels of retail, from luxury to mass market will be covered. The course will end with an analysis of the new challenges, such as sourcing globalization, emerging markets, sustainability and growing significance of technology. A strong effort will be put into organizing site visits to studios, showrooms and factories, as well as meeting with professional players. Each session will be structured to give students an overview of a particular stage of the Industry, through a mix of lectures from the course leader and visiting professionals, studio and showroom visits, walking tours, reading assignments and practical projects. Conducted in English.

Practicum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Images (PHIL-UH 2416)

Images depict, words describe. A picture of the cat of the mat depicts the cat as being on the mat. The sentence ’the cat is on the mat’ describes the cat as being on the mat. Both represent the world as being in a certain state, but they do so in different ways. What is the difference in these ways of representing? What does it take for an image to depict? This course covers most major theories of depiction, including resemblance, experience, recognition, pretense, and structural theories. We then expand the scope of inquiry to include topics such as systems of depiction, analog vs. digital representation, maps, film, comics, maps, mental imagery, and relations to the cognitive science of vision.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PHIL-UH 2416-000 (5805)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rabin, Gabriel

Topics in Conversational Chinese (EAST-UA 207)

This is a 2-credit repeatable course designed for students who have completed Intermediate Chinese II or equivalent, and wish to get additional opportunities to further expand their vocabulary and grammatical knowledge with a focus on strengthening their conversational skills and/or get more chance to practice speaking outside of their regular Advanced Chinese I/II classes. Students will perform in various conversational tasks, such as presenting, discussing, debating, etc. and improve the description and narration skills that the advanced level learners are expected to have. Students will engage in conversation in a clearly participatory manner in order to communicate information on autobiographical topics, as well as topics of community, national, or international interest.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


EAST-UA 207-000 (9264)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hou, Xiaohong


EAST-UA 207-000 (9265)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


EAST-UA 207-000 (24496)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hou, Xiaohong

Topics in East Asian Studies (EAST-UA 302)

This course is designed for students whose levels of Japanese are EAST-UA 248 and EAST-UA 249. The overall goal of this course is to help students build reading speed, reading fluency, and vocabularies and expressions through experiencing the pleasure of reading in Japanese. The focus of the class will be individual reading activity and consultations with the instructor.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


EAST-UA 302-000 (19326)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Catherine


EAST-UA 302-000 (19327)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Philosophy Through Film (IDSEM-UG 1943)

From Casablanca and A Clockwork Orange to Sophie’s Choice and The Matrix, popular films offer surprisingly perceptive insights into complex philosophical concepts. This course begins by exploring the nature of philosophical analysis, argument, and the relevance of thought experiments.It will then draw on a wide range of films – along with a diverse selection of historical and contemporary thinkers – in order to explore many of the central areas of philosophy.Some of the areas under consideration will include perception (the nature of perceptual experience and the status of perceptual data, in particular how they relate to beliefs about, or knowledge of, the world), philosophy of mind (the nature of the mind, mental events, mental functions, mental properties, consciousness, and their relationship to the physical body), determinism (the philosophical idea that every event or state of affairs, including every human decision and action, is the inevitable and necessary consequence of antecedent states of affairs), and the philosophy of religion (the area of philosophy which considers questions about the existence of God and the nature of evil). By merging the cinematic and philosophical worlds, debates will also arise around ethics, free will, and the nature of time.Readings will be drawn from Aristotle, Anselm, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Locke, Nagel, Pascal, Putnam, and Williams, among others.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Intro Theory of Probability (STAT-UB 14)

Covers the basic concepts of probability. Topics include the axiomatic definition of probability; combinatorial theorems; conditional probability and independent events; random variables and probability distributions; expectation of functions of random variables; special discrete and continuous distributions, including the chi-square, t, F, and bivariate normal distributions; law of large numbers; central limit theorem; and moment generating functions. The theory of statistical estimation is introduced with a discussion on maximum likelihood estimation.

Statistics & Operations Research (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


STAT-UB 14-000 (20243)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tenenbein, Aaron

Management and Organizations (MGMT-UB 1)

In this course you will attain an understanding of the key factors that contribute to organizational success and the role that managers play in helping their organizations become more successful. The better that you understand these issues, the more effective you will be in your future careers. More specifically, the course will explore how organizational leaders develop winning strategies, and then design their organization in a way that aligns structures, social relationships, tasks, human resource practices, and people to achieve those strategies. In exploring these issues, you will identify the challenges that organizational leaders and managers face as they try to make good decisions in the face of a constantly evolving industry environment, competing goals and agendas, and an increasingly diverse and global workforce.

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19615)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Hee


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19616)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Hee


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19617)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Steiner, Jeff


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19618)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Steiner, Jeff


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19620)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kern, Molly


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19624)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Howard, Elizabeth


MGMT-UB 1-000 (19627)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Howard, Elizabeth

Zine Scenes (OART-UT 24)

Before the internet artists and enthusiasts found their communities through self-publishing niche small-circulation magazines, usually without profit, with a burning desire to communicate. We’ll discuss the continued relevancy of the culture as we look at zines scenes from the past. For each scene, we’ll have an “object lesson” in which we dissect historical zines with an eye on form, content, aesthetic, publisher motives, and technology required for production. Then we’ll make our own! We’ll learn about historical zine making methods by making our own small-run zines in the same fashion to circulate within class. In addition to this tactile learning, you’ll produce a small body of work and gain an instant collection from your peers.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Expressive Culture: Museum in Washington Field Study (CORE-UA 9723)

With its vast array of institutions dedicated to distinct cultural groupings and its formation inextricably linked to the halls of power, the museum culture in our nation’s capitol is uniquely Washington D.C. Taking advantage of behind-the- scenes access to some of the most prestigious museums in the world and their staff, students will explore various approaches to interpreting art and will develop tools for appreciating their aesthetic experiences. We will also look critically at the ways in which museums—through their policies, programs, exhibitions, and architecture—can define regional or national values, shape cultural attitudes, inform social and political views, and even effect one’s understanding of the meaning of a work of art. Starting our class at The Phillips Collection, America’s first museum of modern art, we will visit other pioneering private and public museums both old and new and have the opportunity to meet with staff members actively involved in different activities. We will explore the collections, learn about the inner workings of the exhibition process, and investigate the diverse educational missions these museums fulfill. Against the backdrop of the Capitol Building where legislation is made influencing museums on the National Mall and beyond, we will examine the political sides of this cultural history and the unusual array of institutions that have been legislated into existence, specifically museums dedicated to defined constituencies.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CORE-UA 9723-000 (4978)
at NYU Washington DC (Global)
Instructed by

Expressive Culture: Topics (CORE-UA 700)

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CORE-UA 700-000 (10544)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ganti, Tejaswini


CORE-UA 700-000 (10545)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 700-000 (10546)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 700-000 (10547)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 700-000 (10548)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 700-000 (10549)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hay, Jonathan


CORE-UA 700-000 (10550)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xie, Vivi Fupeng


CORE-UA 700-000 (10551)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xie, Vivi Fupeng


CORE-UA 700-000 (10552)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Deng, Zhilong


CORE-UA 700-000 (10553)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Deng, Zhilong

Human Development I (APSY-UE 20)

Introduction to research and theory of human development across the life span. Seminal theories & basic research of individual growth & development are analyzed & critiqued. Emphasis is on the range in human development with discussion of normative & non-normative development. Emphasis is also placed on the importance of understanding the influence of normative & non-normative contexts of development, including the impact of culture, heritage, socioeconomic level, personal health, & safety. Relations between home, school, & community and their impact on development are also explored via readings, lectures, discussions, & weekly observations in the field. Interrogation of implicit folk theories as a foundation for exploration of formal knowledge of human development.

Applied Psychology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


APSY-UE 20-000 (11334)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hogan, Frances


APSY-UE 20-000 (11789)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Copeland, Cynthia


APSY-UE 20-000 (11405)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Online
Instructed by Hogan, Frances


APSY-UE 20-000 (21980)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Online
Instructed by Strom, Carolyn

Photography through the Lens of Magnum (IDSEM-UG 2930)

Learn the history of some of the most widely known works of journalistic and documentary photography over the last seventy years through the lens of a globally preeminent photo collective, Magnum Agency. Photographers at this collective have created iconic documentary images and helped define the field of photojournalism as we know it today, setting an influential tone for style and content. Students will examine this in a variety of topics, including the documentation of war, social justice concerns, women’s issues, and sex work. Along the way, students study the business model of this agency to grasp how its differences, from other photographic enterprises, influence the work produced. We use this agency as a lens through which to address a recent history of photography, the trajectory of visual journalism, and the place of advocacy in documentary photography. We also ask critical questions of this visual documentation, assessing power imbalances, ethical complications, and more. Our studies take us through time and around the world via the medium of photography. Specific photographers we may explore include: Robert Capa, Susan Meiselas, Jonas Bendiksen, Nanna Heitmann, Bieke Depoorter, and Eli Reed. Readings include theory, journalistic accounts, history, and other critical literature. Naturally, we spend a lot of time looking at photos, and may have the opportunity to meet some of these photographers. Students visit NYC galleries, write academic papers, and produce a photo project.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IDSEM-UG 2930-000 (17099)
09/03/2024 – 10/22/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Walsh, Lauren

History of Cinematography (FMTV-UT 1206)

This course deals with the history of the art and science of cinematography. A working Director of Photography will relate a perspective that is unique and factual to a theoretical discussion, which is traditionally academic. Cinematography has a strong tradition of adapting its tools to enhance the storytelling experience. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES. “Non-majors must process a “Permission Notice for Non-Majors” form” to register for the course (subject to availability).

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1206-000 (19531)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carmine, Michael

Food and the City (FOOD-UE 1050)

Food is all around us. It influences who we are and how we related to our surroundings. This course explores food in the city from multiple points of view. Students observe and analyze various aspects of food in the city, from personal experiences to large social issues such as gentrification and food insecurity, and examine the cultural, social, and political aspects of food systems. Students acquire familiarity with basic ethnographic skills and methods such as interviews, observations, visual ethnography, and virtual ethnography Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Society & Social Sciences.

Food Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FOOD-UE 1050-000 (10588)
at Online
Instructed by Figueroa, Shayne

Global Media Seminar: Britain and Europe (MCC-UE 9457)

With an emphasis on British and European news and journalism, this course explores globalization from a wide range of theoretical frameworks including political economy, cultural analysis, theories of representation, and critical race and postcolonial studies. It considers how technologies, diasporic and transnational communities, and international institutions impact global communications, and how these networks and organizations are challenging, re-imagining and re-shaping social, cultural and geographic boundaries via mediated discourse.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9457-000 (2753)at NYU London (Global)Instructed by

Journalism Ideas & Practice (JOUR-UA 25)

This intensive, once-a-week course is designed for students with a serious interest in writing about movies for print and digital media. Students practice various forms of film journalism while developing a deeper understanding of the art form through screenings and close readings of works by Brooks Barnes, Pauline Kael, Peter Bogdanovich, Ellen Willis, James Baldwin and Francois Truffaut. Planned class trips include a major film festival and a tour of the Criterion Collection, a film company specializing in art-house cinema. In addition to discussing individual films and film movements, we will cover essential journalism skills, with guest speakers offering guidance on specific topics like reporting and interviewing techniques. Classwork will include writing exercises, presentations and workshops. By the end of the course, students will have raised their cinema I.Q. and written a variety of film articles that inform and engage.

Journalism (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Management & Organizations (BUSOR-UH 1003)

Why do some organizations succeed while others flounder? Whether it be as an employee within a traditional for-profit business, or within one of the wide spectrum of alternative career paths, all of us will ultimately be a part of organizations. This course will help illuminate the key processes and factors that determine why organizations function as they do, drawing upon the fields of management, strategy, sociology, and psychology in the process. Specific topics covered include: Corporate strategy and achieving competitive advantage, Organizational structure and design, Organizational and national culture, Leadership, Motivation and incentives, Groups dynamics, Power & politics within organizations, including a discussion of persuasion & influence and social networks, Judgment and decision-making.

Business & Organizational Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


BUSOR-UH 1003-000 (3759)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Tekeste, Milena · Kailas, Lakshmi


BUSOR-UH 1003-000 (4139)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Tekeste, Milena · Kailas, Lakshmi

Intro to Marketing (MKTG-UB 9001)

This course evaluates marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and a catalyst of business activity. It presents a comprehensive framework that includes a) researching and analyzing customers, company, competition, and the marketing environment, b) identifying and targeting attractive segments with strategic positioning, and c) making product, pricing, communication, and distribution decisions. Cases and examples are utilized to develop problem-solving abilities.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4953)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Thu
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Donvito, Raffaele


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4981)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (21443)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4834)
08/29/2024 – 12/04/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Magarino, Victor


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (3462)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Anton, Muriel


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (21026)
at NYU Tel Aviv (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (3380)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by West, Andrew

Economics of Media and Entertainment (ECON-UB 120)

The media and entertainment industries (including professional sports) share a series of peculiar features: essentially, they (a) produce an intangible output (e.g., a music recording), which can be distributed in a variety of forms and (b) do so based on an input which is extremely idiosyncratic: the creative output of a person or group of persons (e.g., a singer or a band). Finally, (c) recent technological innovation has changed the balance of power between the various players and led various industry segments to re-invent their business model. This course provides an introduction to the businesses of media and entertainment: value chain, key players, significant trends, etc. It takes a distinctive economics perspective to understanding how the forces of supply and demand have changed the business model of various industry segments.

Economics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Entertainment Law (MULT-UB 48)

This two-credit course is about key legal aspects of the entertainment industry. Entertainment law is not a separate legal discipline. There is really no such thing as entertainment law. Instead, it lies at the intersection of several areas of law and applies those disciplines to the diverse entertainment industry of products and services. The course will involve a foundational coverage of the following areas: contract, advertising, protection of ideas by contract, copyright and trademark (including the concepts of parody and fair use), rights of publicity and privacy, defamation, and artist representation. This course should prepare you to analyze a wide variety of entertainment law issues at a general level. Entertainment law does not tend towards an orderly system because it lacks overriding organizational principles that would tie together its myriad facets. As such, this course will appear to lack a logical outline in its progression and instead, will examine this corner of law in separate pieces, which will cover doctrine, analytical problem-solving, practical skills related to law (e.g., analytical writing, reasoning skills, argument structure, etc.), and the particular contexts in which issues arise in the entertainment industry. Dealing with more narrow topics, such as constitutional concerns or union representation, or obtaining a much deeper knowledge of specific topics discussed in class, will require additional, specialized study. This class also helps students further develop their reasoning, communication, and listening skills.

Multidisciplinary (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MULT-UB 48-000 (10639)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MULT-UB 48-000 (10725)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Religions of India (RELST-UA 337)

Investigates religious developments in India within their historical context. Familiarizes students with the religions of the subcontinent—including Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Islam, Sikhism, Christianity, and Judaism—through secondary source readings and English translations of primary source materials. Rather than survey religious traditions as closed systems divorced from time or place, students grapple with the central theories and historiographical challenges pertaining to religion in India, especially those that impact our ability to understand everyday religious experience, both past and present.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RELST-UA 337-000 (23005)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Film Story Analysis: (DWPG-UT 1105)

This text analysis course is designed to provide a platform for an in-depth study of how the story of a film is presented, what choices are made by the author, how information is offered or withheld and what effect this has on the drama. This class will be an “anthology” of different works, each selected for a different aspect of storytelling, exploring how the stylistic choices, themes, and dramatic devices reveal themselves within the body of work. The course is designed to better help students organize their own narratives by analyzing the techniques employed by various screenwriters in constructing their screenplays. A selection of films will be screened and discussed in terms of continuity of theme; delineation of plot, development of structure, protagonist’s story purpose, dialogue as action and character. After each screening, the instructor will lead a group discussion and analysis of the film, focusing further on the techniques, conventions and devices employed by the screenwriter to both tell a good story and satisfy the demands of the audience.

Dramatic Writing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DWPG-UT 1105-000 (9511)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bogle, Donald

Science in Our Lives: Biodiversity and the Earth (SCIED-UE 215)

In this course students explore the Earth as an integrated, dynamic system involving the material world and diversity of living things which we call biodiversity. Specifically, this course explores the flow of energy and materials through the Earth System and potential human impact on this system. Through the practices of science students learn to use data to produce scientific knowledge for themselves and the public while exploring the question of what it means to engage in citizen science.

Science Education (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


SCIED-UE 215-000 (11814)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Milne, Catherine

Writing as Critical Inquiry (WRCI-UF 102)

The second in a two-course series, Writing as Critical Inquiry introduces students to advanced reading, writing, and critical thinking skills with an explicit emphasis on developing complex and nuanced skills of inquiry. The course also introduces more indepth research skills necessary for academic work and writing beyond academic contexts. After having learned in Writing as Exploration how to present and interpret or otherwise respond to different types of subject material—for example, personal experiences, written and visual texts, objects, public events and/or social phenomena—students in Writing as Critical Inquiry learn more complex methods for engaging these skills through individualized, research-based writing. Writing as Critical Inquiry courses are themed—most sections devote the semester to a specific realm of inquiry around an interdisciplinary topic. Each course engages global issues and perspectives through its theme and, by extension, its reading and writing assignments.

Writing as Critical Inquiry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12698)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moore, Carley


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12552)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, David


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12553)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hartman, Amie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12554)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dunks, Robert


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12555)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fortuna, Devereux


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12712)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tomlinson, Timothy


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12556)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williams, Deborah


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12557)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, David


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12558)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Langer, Irina


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12559)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tobin, Elayne


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12560)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tobin, Elayne


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12561)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Alessandro, Nina


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12818)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lin, Cammie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12562)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Policoff, Stephen


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12563)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hartman, Amie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (20633)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fortuna, Devereux


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12564)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williams, Deborah


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12565)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Corcoran, Jonathan


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12566)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hendrickson, Janet


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12567)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Manko, Vanessa


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12568)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Roma, Mary


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12569)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by del Rosso, Lisa


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12570)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kolisnyk, Mary Helen


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12571)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Langer, Irina


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12572)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Alessandro, Nina


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12573)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Alessandro, Nina


WRCI-UF 102-000 (20634)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cordon Hornillos, Sara


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12780)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Polchin, James


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12574)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Jason


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12575)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Buck, Marie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (20635)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cordon Hornillos, Sara


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12576)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heiser, Erin


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12725)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by del Rosso, Lisa


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12577)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heiser, Erin


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12578)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rzonca, Christopher


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12579)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lin, Cammie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12601)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Eve, Sean


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12820)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Datcher, Michael


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12729)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Datcher, Michael


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12841)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bishop, Jacqueline


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12730)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12580)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Banks, Danis


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12581)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ray, Montana


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12582)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Colonna, Joseph


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12583)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moore, Carley


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12584)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Jason


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12585)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ray, Montana


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12854)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williams, Deborah


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12596)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bishop, Jacqueline


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12586)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rzonca, Christopher


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12731)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Eve, Sean


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12587)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shivers, Kaia


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12732)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tomlinson, Timothy


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12588)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moore, Carley


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12589)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ray, Montana


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12590)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12591)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hendrickson, Janet


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12592)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hendrickson, Janet


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12602)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Datcher, Michael


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12593)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wilkinson, Amy


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12594)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tobin, Elayne


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12710)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Roma, Mary


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12595)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Buck, Marie


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12597)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Colonna, Joseph


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12598)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12699)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Banks, Danis


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12599)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tomlinson, Timothy


WRCI-UF 102-000 (12600)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Jason


WRCI-UF 102-000 (20636)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Corcoran, Jonathan

Film, Literature and Mental Health (UNDSW-US 89)

Artists often explore powerful issues of mental health through literature and film. “No form of art goes beyond ordinary consciousness as film does, straight to our emotions, deep into the twilight room of the soul.” (Ingmar Bergmann 1918-2007) In this course, we will draw on classic examples from literature and film to highlight and understand aspects of mental health in ways that are more vivid and visceral than any text book can illustrate. Materials will be chosen from novels, poems, and films to illustrate various mental health issues, such as anxiety, depression, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), dissociative identity disorder (DID), and schizophrenia. We will look at how some of the disorders fare in psychological treatments that either succeed or fail. Guest speakers may be invited to highlight some topics.

Undergrad Social Work (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


UNDSW-US 89-000 (13644)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Michaels, Vera

Ethnicity & The Media (SCA-UA 232)

Examines media images in relation to the making of ethnic and racial identities in the United States. Surveys some of the theoretical approaches to the study of images, paying particular attention to the intersection of history and ideologies or representation. Looks into the nature and politics of stereotypes; inquires into their reproduction through discourses, representations, and practices; and then moves to a comparative examination of media images in relation to the making of African American, Latino, Asian, and Native American images in the media, looking specifically at changes and continuities in the representation of these four minority groups in the media.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


SCA-UA 232-000 (20866)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Davila, Arlene

Counting and Chance (MTHED-UE 1051)

This course is designed to be accessible and approachable for people who will be future teachers of elementary school mathematics. It is also intended for people who want to broaden their knowledge in mathematics and experience it as a relevant, challenging, and enjoyable field. It is not intended for math majors. It will be taught as a problem-based course, that allows for students to explore and develop new ideas, and apply them to real life situations. The course builds on intuitive understandings of fundamental ideas of counting and chance and moves gradually to more formal knowledge of combinatorics and probability concepts and techniques. The learning experiences offered throughout the course are designed to facilitate student interactions and active role in the learning process. Liberal Arts Core/MAP Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Quantitative Reasoning

Mathematics Education (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MTHED-UE 1051-000 (9403)

Principles of Macroeconomics (ECI-UF 101)

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental topics in macroeconomics, the analysis of the economy as a whole. After an overview of introductory economic concepts, such as comparative advantage, opportunity costs, and supply and demand, the course focuses on the determinants of aggregate income, employment, and prices. Other topics include the study of long-run economic growth, the business cycle, the financial system, as well as monetary and fiscal policy. *ECI-UF 101 and ECII-UF 102 may meet some of the equivalent course requirements for the College of Arts and Science. Students may take ECI-UF 101 and ECII-UF 102 in any order; neither course is a pre-requisite for the other.

Economics I (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECI-UF 101-000 (19798)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mejorado, Ascension


ECI-UF 101-000 (13426)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mejorado, Ascension


ECI-UF 101-000 (13352)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mejorado, Ascension


ECI-UF 101-000 (19799)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ECI-UF 101-000 (19800)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Urban Ethnography (SCA-UA 9868)

Through a focus on contemporary Paris, this course aims to explore the insights offered by anthropological approaches to cities and urban life. We will consider the relationships between urban spatial organization and an array of social, economic and political phenomena; the relevance of consumption and display to the shaping of urban identities; and the shifting dynamics of social groups and boundaries within the urban context. This will be accomplished through course readings and also through training in urban ethnographic research methods, supporting each student’s own systematic observation over the semester of one locus of everyday Parisian life. The final project for the course will be a piece of ethnographic analysis based on this field research.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


SCA-UA 9868-000 (18401)
09/01/2023 – 12/06/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by Epstein, Beth

Living a Good Life: Greek and Jewish Perspectives (RELST-UA 422)

Key questions: Does living well require acquiring knowledge and wisdom? What is the place of moral responsibility in the good life? Is the good life a happy life, or does it require sacrificing happiness? Does religion lead to living well or does it hinder it? What is friendship and how does it contribute to the good life? Study of primary texts by Plato, Aristotle, Seneca, Avot, Maimonides, Spinoza, and Hermann Cohen.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RELST-UA 422-000 (20451)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gottlieb, Michah

Engaging Early Christian Theology (RELST-UA 840)

What does it mean to say that Jesus Christ was both human and divine? How can the Christian divinity be one yet three? How are the sacraments such as baptism effective? Do we have freewill? These were some of the pressing questions the Church Fathers addressed in the early centuries of Christian history and their answers contributed to the Christian theological tradition for centuries to come. In this course we will examine some of the classic works of early Christian theology. Despite the often highly rhetorical and polemical character of their writings the Church Fathers nevertheless developed an intellectually rigorous field of knowledge, one that has had a significant intellectual historical as well as socio-political impact in the history of the Church. This is not a theological course but rather an introduction to some of the key texts in a historically significant mode of theological inquiry.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RELST-UA 840-000 (19704)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Becker, Adam

Kafka and His Contexts (COLIT-UA 9136)

The course is focused on exploring Franz Kafka’s work – stories, novels, diaries and letters – in the context of fin de siècle Prague and the birth of modernism. We will take a closer look at the cultural and social context of Central Europe (literature and the arts, but also the Modernist architecture of Adolf Loos, Simmel’s sociology of the metropolitan life, Freud’s analysis of the unconscious, Brentano’s psychology, the resonance of Nietzsche’s philosophy, or the emergence of new media like phonograph and silent film) in the first two decades of the 20th century. In addition, we will discuss the adaptations of Kafka’s work and its impact on later art, fiction and film (Borges, Welles, Kundera, Roth, Švankmajer). The topics discussed through Kafka’s writings and other related works include: man and metropolis, family, estrangement, authorship, time, writing and media, travelling, territories and identities, languages, animals, art and pain. We will be especially interested in how these phenomena transform when represented in and through the medium of literary fiction.

Comparative Literature (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


COLIT-UA 9136-000 (2530)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by

Quantified Self (CCOL-UH 1059Q)

Self-tracking. Biohacking. Personal informatics. Quantified self. The contemporary “quantified self” movement makes claims of “self-knowledge through numbers” and improving health and human welfare. There are clearly other elements to self-tracking culture that deserve critical investigation. What does the self become through the lens of data? What is the dark side of data that can be used against us, and without regard for social justice and equality? This multidisciplinary course takes both a theoretical and a practical look at the pressing issue of data aggregation about human beings. It looks to the past for historical forms of self-quantification and to the future of a rapidly expanding globalized landscape of app tracking and wearable technologies. With the question of human data in mind, the course examines the unsure futures of humanity in a variety of domains: medicine and aging, education, the arts, marketing, and the Internet of Things. Students will situate themselves critically within this increasingly dense data landscape by creating data about themselves that can be analyzed and interpreted using a variety of data visualization and storytelling frameworks.

Core: Colloquium (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


CCOL-UH 1059Q-000 (22917)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Wrisley, David

Monsters and Their Humans (RELST-UA 649)

Humanity has long imagined monstrous transformations of ourselves. What do these creatures mean to us, historically and today? What do we think we are becoming? Investigates the supernatural in popular culture through vampires and zombies. Places them in the context of our imagination of the divine through history and ethnography, and also alongside our intimate problems of managing sex, gender, race, and class. The archives of religions, psychologies, philosophy, film, TA, and novels provide rich source material, Requires a short midterm essay and a longer final project, while posting to a forum most weeks.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


RELST-UA 649-000 (20380)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zito, Angela · Rubino, Rena

Dancing in the Here and Now: Making Dances, Knowing Bodies (ARTS-UG 1221)

Both dancing and everyday movement offer continual opportunities for embodied experience. Those who regularly dance or engage in movement practices such as yoga, jogging, cycling, and walking typically develop an appetite, even a need, for moving and the breadth of experience it brings. Whether you already feel this appetite or want to explore embodied experience for the first time, this Arts Workshop offers the opportunity for deep investigation of movement, focusing on active and contemplative exploration of bodies in space and time. We will be guided by several research strands linked to the existence and power of embodiment, noting experimental choreographer Susan Rethorst’s term, “the body’s mind”: ways of knowing (individually, culturally) through our bodies. Through many movement options, including dancing and somatic practices, walking and other everyday actions, and personal/cultural/political movement histories, we will encounter or create relationships between what we do and who we are. In the studio and elsewhere, we will consider how our lives as movers, and our sense of ourselves as embodied, bring us into contact with others—walkers, dancers, friends and family—and with our spaces, places, and sociocultural worlds. In this course (open to anyone with/without previous training), our research-in-action will be supported by interdisciplinary scholarship engaged with dance, embodiment, space, everyday culture, phenomenology, environmental studies, and life writing. Readings may include works by Thomas DeFrantz, Anna Halprin, Victoria Hunter, Einav Katan, Marcel Mauss, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Andrea Olsen, Steve Paxton, Georges Perec, Yvonne Rainer, Susan Rethorst, Kathleen Stewart, and Yi-Fu Tuan.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ARTS-UG 1221-000 (12594)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Satin, Leslie

Conserving Our Global Heritage through Science (CCOL-UH 1006)

What is “global heritage”? Is it simply our collective legacy as human societies – how we want to be remembered by future generations – or must we confront more difficult questions about identity, the ownership of culture, and conflicts between local and global stewardship of the cultural treasures and historical evidence? With time, negligence, and even military conflict working to erase the past, we must ask: Can a better understanding of our shared heritage assist us in addressing cultural differences in the present day? And how can science both help us understand the historic record and work to preserve it? This class examines ways in which scientific methods can help define “global heritage” and protect it for future generations. Students explore the history and the science behind the creation of paintings, frescoes, parchments, sculptures, ancient mummies, historical buildings, musical instruments, and other artifacts. They will also examine the methods used to differentiate between an authentic object and a fake and ask how some objects come to be valued more than others: distinctions that can lead, and have led, to cultural conflict in recent years.

Core: Colloquium (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


CCOL-UH 1006-000 (17210)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Arneodo, Francesco · Parthesius, Robert

Cultural Appropriation (CCEA-UH 1069)

Virtually unknown outside of academic discourse until very recently, the term cultural appropriation has become a commonplace in social and popular media, as activists and public intellectuals have highlighted what they see as problematic uses (or abuses) of cultural symbols, artifacts, or expressive modes connected to marginalized groups. But what exactly is cultural appropriation, and under what circumstances can it be said to constitute a form of exploitation or violence? This course approaches these questions both philosophically and empirically, asking, on the one hand: What is culture, and how can it be “owned” or “stolen”? and on the other: How have practices of adopting or using culture been implicated in processes of social subjugation or marginalization? Course readings are drawn from a range of disciplines across the humanities and social sciences, including cultural anthropology, art theory, music studies, and philosophy. By engaging with a rich corpus of ideas through in-class discussions, oral presentations, and written reflections, students will develop critical perspectives on cultural appropriation as well as the broader concepts of culture, race, and ethnicity.

Core: Cultural Exploration & Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


CCEA-UH 1069-000 (16833)
08/29/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Eisenberg, Andrew Jarad

Introduction to Psychology and Its Principles (APSY-UE 2)

Introduction to the fundamental principles of psychology, emphasizing both the unity & the diversity of a field that spans major theoretical & research areas, including biological bases of human behavior, learning, development, motivation, & social and abnormal behavior. Links between theory & classic as well as contemporary research are a recurrent theme. Liberal Arts Core/MAP Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Society & the Social Sciences

Applied Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


APSY-UE 2-000 (11013)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brito, Natalie


APSY-UE 2-000 (12169)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
7:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Collado, Amarfi


APSY-UE 2-000 (12170)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
8:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Collado, Amarfi


APSY-UE 2-000 (12171)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


APSY-UE 2-000 (12172)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


APSY-UE 2-000 (12337)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sanchez, Nathalia


APSY-UE 2-000 (12338)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sanchez, Nathalia


APSY-UE 2-000 (21776)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Disability Justice and Radical Inclusion (OT-UE 1403)

Explores the implications and meaning of having a disability in global contexts by introducing students to experts’ voices, especially disabled activists, as they seek to advance disability justice and inclusion and demand systemic change in spheres of influence including education, politics, healthcare, the arts, culture, social welfare, and everyday life. Examines how public (government) and private (outside of the government) policies and practices in these sectors affect the inclusion of persons with disabilities. Students explore and identify how international trends in disability and inclusion, local cultural beliefs, and biases influence inclusion.

Occupational Therapy (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OT-UE 1403-000 (11793)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patten, Kristie

Concepts of Film and New Media (FILMM-UH 1011)

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of film and new media studies. The course provides an overview of the historical development of film as an art, technology, and industry and the role of new media as an extension to and reinvention of models for production, distribution, exhibition, and reception. Students are introduced to documentary, experimental, narrative, and new media within different historical and cultural contexts, comparative aesthetics, and the lines of critical enquiry that have been developed for film and new media in dialogue with other fields in the arts and humanities.

Film and New Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FILMM-UH 1011-000 (4002)

In With The Old, Out With The New: Debates on “Tradition” in Western Music (IDSEM-UG 1823)

Contests between stalwart custodians of “tradition” and rebels searching for new, untested modes of expression pervade Western music history. This course surveys some of the most contentious debates on music’s past, present, and future waged between music theorists, critics, artists, and audiences, spanning the last five hundred years. Our focus is on the seemingly inevitable tension between what music is, what it should be, and what it can be. Starting with the Greek philosophers of antiquity, we explore debates on the music of Claudio Monteverdi, Ludwig van Beethoven, Richard Wagner, Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, Carmen Miranda, John Cage, Bob Dylan, and The Slits. We also examine the backlash against and subsequent defense of styles like jazz, rock and roll, punk rock, rap, and 2000s pop. Our goal is to better understand how culture is “made” precisely during these moments of charged debate, where a particular music’s perceived merits or transgressions serve as the pretext for larger often controversial ideological issues. Art in this sense–and music in particular–becomes a platform by which to observe how competing aesthetic value systems reveal deep social and cultural rifts. Each unit within this course has two parts. First, we scrutinize and discuss primary sources related to the debate: letters, scores, newspaper and magazine articles, journal entries, singles, albums, and films. Secondly, we read and discuss secondary sources by scholars, critics, and investigative journalists for context, using this new information as a way to think critically about the primary sources and our own aesthetic judgments. What we will see is that debating music in terms of what’s “good” and “bad,” classical and avant-garde, edifying and dangerous, traditional and innovative, is, in the Western world, a long-standing tradition in its own right.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IDSEM-UG 1823-000 (12292)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Coleman, Kwami

Abrupt Climate Change (OART-UT 1058)

Combining science and the art of storytelling, this course will tackle one of the most pressing issues facing the future of humanity: Abrupt Climate Change. In a unique collaboration with NYU physical climate scientist Professor David Holland, students will research and create work that bridges the divide between science and the public through accurate, creative science-based storytelling. This highly multidisciplinary, hands-on course welcomes students from all backgrounds and fields of study to imagine and invent creative ways of telling stories about this global phenomenon and to investigate solutions. Weekly assignments will lead to a final collaborative project and an exhibition open to the public.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OART-UT 1058-000 (13226)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Terezakis, Peter

Sailors, Convicts, and Pilgrims: The Indian Ocean Since 1500 (IDSEM-UG 2067)

Can oceans be the subject of historical inquiry? Maritime spaces help in thinking beyond nations and national borders that dominate modern global histories, leading us into a world of connected pasts. This course investigates the Indian Ocean’s long expanse from the early modern to the modern period from 1500 to the early 20th century. What changed about movement and exchange across land and sea in the longer transition from empires to nation-states? In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, despite growing European presence in the Indian Ocean littoral, pre-existing networks between East Africa, the Persian Gulf, the Indian sub-continent, and Southeast Asia remained resilient. Yet, by the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, new shipping technologies, the monitoring of movement across borders, and the introduction of travel documents like the passport became crucial in the formation of nation-states that emerged from colonial empires. From sailors, moneylenders, and pilgrims to convicts and indentured laborers, cultures of mobility connected vast geographies, often defying the logic of nation-states and colonialism. In examining this history, we will cover themes ranging from encounters in port-cities, commodities, smuggling, piracy, and pilgrimage to documents of identity and travel. Readings may include: Broeze’s Brides of the Seas, Ewald’s Motley Crews: Indian and African Seafarers, Tagliacozzo’s Secret trades, porous borders, and Torpey’s The Invention of the Passport, and translations from Samarqandi’s Account of Calicut and Vijayanagar, Afonso De Albuquerque’s Letter from Aden, Linschoten’s Itinerario, Munshi Rahman Khan’s Autobiography of an Indian Indentured Laborer, and Nawab Sikandar Begam’s A Pilgrimage to Mecca.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IDSEM-UG 2067-000 (12492)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dayal, Subah

History of Editing (FMTV-UT 1003)

The theory and practice of editing, from Griffith to Kubrick. The emphasis will be on experiments in narrative clarity and dramatic emphasis in storytelling. For many, editing is the unique source of the art of filmmaking. This course addresses this point of view. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


FMTV-UT 1003-000 (6959)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rea, Peter

The Art of Sound (FMTV-UT 1007)

This is a critical studies course exploring the aesthetics and psycho-acoustics of sound: how sound works in art and life; how it affects emotions and stimulates the imagination; and how it is used in film, radio, television and other creative or artistic contexts, particularly its application as a key element in storytelling. This course examines the meaning and character of the soundscape (the acoustic environment) and the ways it has technically and aesthetically evolved throughout film history from the Kinetophone to the iPhone. The course includes reading in the theory of sound, and listening to examples of sound work by composers and sound designers. In previous semesters we have looked at the soundtrack in such films as: Playtime; Apocalypse Now, The Conversation, Aliens, The Evil Dead II, Saving Private Ryan, and Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Class meetings will be devoted to: 1) lecture and discussion based on assigned readings and listening and viewing assignments; and 2) screening of selected audio and video works. Students are graded on class participation, journals, a paper, and exams. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1007-000 (19411)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McKeever, Marsha

American Cinema: 1960 to Present (FMTV-UT 324)

Offered in the spring semester only. Course level: Intermediate. 4 points. No prerequisite. Over the last 50 years the American Cinema has produced a remarkably rich abundance of entertaining, exciting, and challenging films. This course is designed to provide a survey of the wealth of styles, forms, purposes, and approaches to filmmaking that developed and emerged in this era. While Hollywood has obviously served as the dominant mode of filmmaking in this country, a significant of other filmmaking practices have continued to operate and sometimes thrive outside of it. Beyond the attention paid to Hollywood narrative cinema as it has changed and evolved over this half-century, we will also consider documentaries, avant-garde and experimental works, independent narraive cinema, and “cult” films. Consequently, we will be screening a variety of films, including works by such notable American filmmakers as Steven Spielberg, Francis Ford Coppola, Quentin Tarantino, George Romero, John Singleton, and Michael Moore.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


FMTV-UT 324-000 (23683)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
6:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brasiskis, Lukas


FMTV-UT 324-000 (23684)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Banfi, Ryan


FMTV-UT 324-000 (23685)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Banfi, Ryan


FMTV-UT 324-000 (23686)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Banfi, Ryan

The Black Image in Cinema (FMTV-UT 1216)

This is a critical analysis of the Black image in cinema through film screenings, discussions, and selected readings. Film is an art form whose influence dictates how we see others and ourselves. It shapes our worldview and, yet, it is one of the youngest and most misunderstood art forms. On the surface, film viewing might seem like a passive form of learning, but effective films engage us on emotional, intellectual, spiritual, cultural, and political levels. Film is one of the most powerful mediums ever invented and since it’s invention, the Black image and experience has been distorted, demonized, romanticized, erased, appropriated as well as exalted and reified. So, it is our duty and responsibility to know its history, understand its present effects, so we can dictate its future and participate in how the Black image evolves and is treated over time. This course will survey and critically explore an historical range of the Black image on screen and Black films in relation to inspiration, narrative, a scene, set, and site of production. Screening will include a sampling of important Black independently made, and/or Black cast and narrative feature films. We will discuss and analyze specific technical elements (direction, editing, framing and composition, mise-en-scene, music, etc.) that reinforce and demonstrate these larger themes. Accordingly, our discussions and readings will cover the full range of current issues and debates in Black cinema studies, from independence vs. mainstream filmmaking; gender and sexuality; class and color caste; the ghettoization and upwardly mobile integration of urban zones; cooptation and the rise of the bourgeois story as genre, and so on.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1216-000 (19573)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pollard, Jason

Feminist Filmmakers (FMTV-UT 1156)

Feminist Filmmakers examines gender constructs in narrative film and episodic work. We will explore how gender constructs in film and television influence societal views of gender roles, as well as contextualize gender in the era and cultures specific films were made. The vehicle through which this course will examine gender will be the history and work of female directors around the world. Screenings, critical reading in film and gender studies, articles and interviews on current debates regarding gender and diversity inclusion in the film industry, make this class valuable for everyone.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1156-000 (20466)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zentelis, Enid

Traditions in Narrative: Comedy in America (FMTV-UT 1231)

The history of comedy in 20th century America is the history of America itself. Comedians from all walks of life have provided a funhouse mirror as well as a perceptive lens for American society and culture. This course will examine significant periods and players of the 20th century comedic genre and analyze them against their historic context and legacy. Humor will be used as a platform to discuss how comedy was governed by and ultimately responded to the influence of American society. This course will observe how comedians in turn shaped American life, running the gamut from silent movies to Vaudeville; screwball comedies of the 1930s and ‘40s to the Golden Age of Television; from the sitcom to the political comedies of present day. Equally important, this course will analyze the genesis and evolution of the comedic persona in performance: what worked, what did not work, and why. Comprehensive analysis of performances will help this course determine how performers did what they did and why they made the choices they made. This course will assess how the work of the comedian has evolved and grown over the course of a career, what methods have withstood the test of time, and why.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


FMTV-UT 1231-000 (3295)
07/03/2024 – 08/15/2024 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Friedfeld, Eddy


FMTV-UT 1231-000 (3296)
07/03/2024 – 08/15/2024 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Friedfeld, Eddy

Traditions in Narrative (FMTV-UT 1031)

This course surveys narrative forms and representative works from literature that employ them, contributing to a familiarity with the literary tradition inherited by film, television, and radio. It examines the various strategies of narrative structure and its principal components (e.g., plot, theme, character, imagery, symbolism, point of view) with an attempt to connect these with contemporary forms of media expression. The course includes extensive readings, which are examined in discussions, and selected from English, American, and world literature. This course may be allocated to either History & Criticism or Gen Ed Humanities for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


FMTV-UT 1031-000 (6982)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Monda, Antonio

Hollywood Auteurs (FMTV-UT 1154)

This course will analyze the possibility of pursuing the ideals of an “author cinema” – a personal way of expressing ideas that can deal with Hollywood mainstream and also with the independents, but will never be considered an integral part of either one. The “author cinema” would be a cinema of personal expression that refuses the mainstream’s prison of “three acts, happy ending, stars, etc.”; and at the same time, refuses the trends and the limited scope of most of the independents: a cinema that shows not only how to make a film, but why. Films from all over the world will be analyzed, focusing in particular on the authors that are able to keep alive their personal vision while dealing with the studios (i.e. Stone, Lee, Scorsese, Kubrick), the ones that dared to fight Hollywood (i.e. Welles, Peckinpah, Cimino, von Stroheim) and the loose cannons independent at heart (Altman, P.T. Anderson, Coen brothers). A series of guests to the class will be comprised of critics, curators and cultural organizers, filmmakers and producers. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES. Non-majors must process a “Permission Notice for Non-Majors” form to register for the course (subject to availability).

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1154-000 (19539)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Monda, Antonio

Film Analysis (FMTV-UT 1204)

A rival reportedly asked Walt Disney why Disney’s films were so much better. Disney replied, “I analyze.” His rival said, “So do I.” Disney answered, “I analyze better.” Film Analysis is an advanced course in film criticism taught by practitioners. We build upon the analytical skills developed in Language of Film, Storytelling Strategies and the various production courses in order to strengthen the students’ ability to critically assess the weave of narrative content, mise-en-scene, cinematic technique and structures. Through this in-depth examination of a wide range of films, students deepen their understanding of how filmmakers over the years and in various cultures have created meaningful experiences for their audiences.This course counts as History & Criticism for Film Majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1204-000 (19541)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Santha, Laszlo

Consumer Behavior (MKTG-UB 2)

This course presents a comprehensive, systematic, and practical conceptual framework for understanding people as consumers—the basic subject matter of all marketing. It draws on the social sciences to evaluate the influence of both individual and ecological factors on market actions. Students discuss relevant psychological and sociological theories and study how they can be used to predict consumers’ reactions to strategic marketing decisions. Basic methodologies for research in consumer behavior are developed and applied. Course emphasis is on developing applications of behavioral concepts and methods for marketing actions.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 2-000 (18452)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Watson, Jared


MKTG-UB 2-000 (18466)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Watson, Jared


MKTG-UB 2-000 (18486)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pham, Ngoc

Arts & War Seminar: (ASPP-UT 1046)

Art and War: Battle Lines of the Graphic Novel This course explores storytelling about war through the use of the graphic novel. Students will be introduced to both recent and historically significant comics about war. Our goal is to gain a deeper understanding of the interplay between image and text in sequential art, and the ability to critically analyze graphic novels that deal with challenging subject matter. What are the methodological and ethical issues that arise when constructing sequential narratives of war? What are the varying strengths between war narratives that are autobiographical, documentary or fictional? Is there something unique about the format of graphic novels that enables artists to tell a different kind of war story than filmmakers, musicians or performers? How do comic books circulate culturally, and how might this expand or limit their ability to inform our understandings of war? We will explore these questions through close readings, robust discussions and careful written analysis of well-known works by Art Spiegelman, Marjane Satrapi and Joe Sacco, as well as graphic novels by Keiji Nakazawa, Jason Lutes, Gipi, Emmanuel Guibert and others.

Ctr for Art, Society & Pub Pol (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ASPP-UT 1046-000 (22204)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hebert, Patrick

Film: A Transformative Process, a Vision Beyond Technology (OART-UT 140)

This course emphasizes the content, the aesthetics, and the purpose of cinema as a truly distinctive and dynamic art form uncovering the inner vision of the filmmaker, and the organic and transformative process where filmmakers projects their original truth, not compromising or borrowing ideas and themes from other films. Students explore the use of technology as a valuable tool that enhances the vision of the filmmaker without diminishing the organic texture of the work by its overwhelming presence. The course brings to light the stagnant and repetitious formulae of commercial cinema, resulting in diluted mainstream films. The works of iconic filmmakers who embrace and use film as an original, vibrant and reflective art form are reviewed throughout the course. Extracts and readings from relevant filmmakers are given throughout the course.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

International Cinema: 1960 to Present (CINE-UT 56)

Cinema Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CINE-UT 56-000 (13919)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
6:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dominguez, Anthony


CINE-UT 56-000 (13920)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CINE-UT 56-000 (13921)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CINE-UT 56-000 (13922)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Transgender Youth (CAMS-UA 154)

Transgender and gender non-conforming (TGNC) youth are quickly becoming more visible in society. Parents of gender non-conforming children are coming to mental health providers in increasing numbers and are often met with stigma and bias and a lack of education on TGNC health. TGNC youth are turned out of their homes at disproportionate rates and harassed and bullied in school at higher rates than their gender conforming peers. They have higher rates of suicide, depression and substance abuse and face unique medical, legal and social barriers. They also have produced their own cultures and communities to face these challenges. This course will examine the scientific research on TGNC youth in the context of the practical challenges faced by these individuals and their families. Students will hear from experts in the field, receive personal accounts from TGNC teens and transgender adults, and take field trips to social services agencies and events produced by TGNC teens themselves.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CAMS-UA 154-000 (8893)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Glaeser, Elizabeth

Reading in French Lit: The Modern Era (In French) (FREN-UA 9121)

In this course students read masterpieces of French literature from the French Revolution to the end of the twentieth century. Works are considered from various historical, aesthetic and theoretical perspectives. Texts include: Le Père Goriot (Balzac); Madame Bovary (Flaubert); Les Faux-Monnayeurs (Gide); La Nausée (Sartre); Le Ravissement de Lol V. Stein (Duras), and Du côté de chez Swan I (Proust), which will be the subject of a final essay. Conducted in French.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


FREN-UA 9121-000 (10584)
02/04/2019 – 05/16/2019 Tue,Thu
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Studies in Prose Genres: Postcolonial Readings of Classic Texts (FREN-UA 9833)

In this course we focus on four contemporary novels in which the world of the character, the narrator, or the author, is read through the lens of a literary classic. In each case, the reading and rewriting of the primary text involves temporal and spatial displacements (from the 18th to the 20th century, from Europe to the Caribbean and to the South Pacific) that generate shifting perspectives and a constant reshuffling of center and periphery. Between a reverential affiliation to the past and a creative misreading and rewriting of it, these intertextual encounters with « great » Western literary works insistently raise the questions of identity, originality, and “writing back”. Exploring these questions will therefore also involve drawing on comparative, translation, and postcolonial studies.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FREN-UA 9833-000 (21162)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Poverty and Inequality Around the Globe (SOCS-SHU 326)

This seminar examines the causes and consequences of poverty and rising inequality around the globe. Students will study the ways in which poverty and inequality are shaped by multifaceted contexts; understand the theories underlying strategies and programs which address key poverty and inequality issues faced by many developed, developing and least developed countries; and learn about different countries’ experiences addressing their own poverty and inequality issues. We consider philosophies of global justice and the ethics of global citizenship, and students are expected to critically reflect upon their own engagements with poverty relief activities and aspirations for social changes. Students should be prepared to tackle advanced social science readings, analysis, and writing. Open to seniors, and to other students with instructor’s permission. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. Fulfillment: Social Science Focus Political Economy/Sociology 300 level.

Social Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


SOCS-SHU 326-000 (20242)
01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Wed
8:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Zelleke, Almaz

Contemporary Art and Theory in North America and Europe (HUMN-SHU 231)

Contemporary art can seem perplexing, yet when viewed as a progression of ideas and aesthetic strategies that respond to societal shifts, a certain logic emerges. This course traces movements in North American and European art from 1945 to the present through a study of primary and secondary texts, artwork examples, and historic context. In lectures, discussion and activities, we will investigate how artists went beyond primarily object-based works to explore expanded notions of what art can be and the interaction between the artwork and the viewer. The ways institutional frameworks, media and technology, politics, and social relations, informed contemporary art practice will also be examined. At the end of this course, students should be able to identify contemporary art movements, key artists, and relevant artworks and create compelling arguments around these works. They will also be able to articulate the conceptual and visual strategies employed in these pieces, recognize connections and differences across movements and have a basic knowledge of the milieu in which they were produced. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: Humanities Introductory course (18-19: survey).

Humanities (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


HUMN-SHU 231-000 (20180)
01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Fri
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Kramer, Maya

Gender and Sexuality in Modern Visual Culture (HUMN-SHU 181)

This course examines how ideas of gender and sexuality have shaped the production and consumption of visual culture from the late nineteenth century. We will examine a variety of visual and material texts that shape, criticize, and/or negotiate with contemporaneous gender and sexual norms. Focusing on these expressions’ cultural and historical specificities, the students will assess gender and sexuality—and as an extension, the notions of normality, healthfulness, and self—as ideas that continuously evolve in response to social discourses. The course proceeds roughly chronologically. It starts with the nineteenth-century Euro-American context, in which modern ideas of gender and sexuality began to circulate authoritatively in medical and legal terms. It then moves onto more globalized contemporary perspectives that critique and/or expand the pronouncedly “Western” conceptions of identity and identity categories. Prerequisite: None.

Humanities (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


HUMN-SHU 181-000 (23103)
01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Kong, Hyoungee

Human Genetics: Genes in Human Health & Disease (CCEX-SHU 136)

The goal of the first half of the course is to build a basic understanding of how information about traits is encoded in our genes, how this “blueprint” is interpreted by cellular machinery to build a complex human being, and how our heredity has resulted in our evolution. In the senond half of the course, we will continue the exploration of how environment, experience and random errors affect the process of building our traits, what happens when these processes fail, and the promise and possible peril of genetic technologies for human life. Fulfillment: CORE ED (with CCEX-SHU 137)

Exper Discovery in Nat World (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CCEX-SHU 136-000 (21479)
01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yu, Danyang


CCEX-SHU 136-000 (21480)
01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yu, Danyang

Youth and Consumer Culture in China (GCHN-SHU 246)

How can a hamburger symbolize progress, an animated character provide comfort, and rock music define one’s identity? In this course we will study the role of consumer culture in the lives of Chinese youth, both today and in the past. By examining popular commodities including sneakers, coffee, backpacking, and celebrity idols, we will think about how young people use these things to find friendship and love, to seek success and happiness, and to define who they are. As we consider why people like particular commodities, we will learn about class, gender, ethnicity, and modernity in China. Reading about the history of commodities in China, we will consider what is new about consumer culture, and why people’s tastes change over time. Alongside studies of specific commodities, we will read key theoretical texts about shopping, advertising, media, identity, and fantasy: these texts will help us understand how commodities can be imbued with tremendous power to shape our desires and create our identities. During the semester, each student will conduct qualitative research about a commodity, including online research and offline interviews with people who buy and sell this commodity. At the end of the semester, we will gather your research together to produce a handbook of Chinese youth and consumer culture. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Fulfillment: CORE SSPC/IPC; GCS Elective: The Politics, Economy, and Environment of China; Social Science focus Anthropology 200 level.

Global China Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Printmaking in an Expanded Field (ART-SHU 255)

This Praxis course is an exploration of contemporary and traditional artistic printmaking practices, with an emphasis on expanding notions of conventional printmaking techniques and forms. Students will be introduced to various printmaking techniques, and experiment with traditional and non-traditional forms, in conjunction with their histories and consider what constitutes a hand-made print in an artistic framework. Students will gain an understanding of printmaking – its history based in China, development across the globe and inventive contemporary practices which include sculptural forms. They will learn techniques, modes, forms, and applications of printmaking – with an emphasis on relief prints (stamps and wood cuts) – in a conceptual framework of contemporary printmaking practices and global visual culture. Note: attendance in the first class meeting is mandatory, otherwise you will be dropped from the course. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: This course satisfies IMA/IMB elective.

Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ART-SHU 255-000 (19570)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Lin, Monika

Philosophy of Technology: Thinking Machines (PHIL-SHU 130)

This course aims to train students to think philosophically about our rapidly changing—and ever more intimate—relationship with machines. We focus in particular on the following subjects: artificial intelligence, robots, cyborgs, automation and science fiction speculation. Prerequisite: Global Perspectives on Society (GPS) Fulfillment: CORE STS; Humanities Interdisciplinary or Advanced course; IMA/IMB elective.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


PHIL-SHU 130-000 (20189)
01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Weslake, Brad · Greenspan, Anna

Foundations of Art History (ARTH-UA 10)

Introduces students to the skills and concepts they will need in order to develop a meaningful engagement with the visual arts and art history as a global discipline. Rather than providing a chronological survey of great works, it covers examples and perspectives from a wide array of regions, periods, and societies. Topics include materials and techniques of production; formal analysis; subject matter and iconography; historical and cultural contexts; the social role and formation of artists; and the history of art history as a discipline. Pitched for students who have little or no background in the study of art and architecture, this course provides a rigorous introduction to the foundations of the discipline. It is required of all art history majors.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ARTH-UA 10-000 (9715)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flood, Finbarr


ARTH-UA 10-000 (9716)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ARTH-UA 10-000 (9717)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ARTH-UA 10-000 (9718)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ARTH-UA 10-000 (9719)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Education and Social Entrepreneurship (EDST-UE 1503)

Innovative solutions in education are emerging from the private sector every day. Business ventures from Teach for America to Khan Academy are changing the way teachers are prepared, the way students learn, and the way institutions use data. These ideas are started by “social entrepreneurs,” people who try to improve lives through solutions that have a market and customers. Students in this course learn about social entrepreneurship, how to identify critical issues in the education-related space, and how to develop their own entrepreneurial solutions accordingly.

Education Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


EDST-UE 1503-000 (18440)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gold, Thomas

Culture, Hist/Imaging Photography Studies (PHTI-UT 1003)

Offered Fall Only. Required of all freshmen majors and highly recommended for incoming transfers. Students are required to register for the lecture and the recitation sections. No prerequisites for this course. The course will consist of a series of weekly lectures, discussions, readings and field trips to museums and galleries in the city. Lectures will present historic and contemporary art and photography and it’s ideation as a basis for understanding the work the students are viewing on their weekly field trips. Students will visit selected exhibitions chosen for their quality and relevance and arranged by geographic area of the city (One week the Whitney, the next Chelsea, etc). Students will be required to monitor the daily press and periodicals for reviews of work they’ve seen and to highlight exhibitions the class should see. Additional readings of historic material will be assigned and short papers will be required.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


PHTI-UT 1003-000 (13385)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kobielski, Lili


PHTI-UT 1003-000 (13386)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Aesthetic History of Photography (PHTI-UT 1102)

Open only to Photography & Imaging majors. Sophomore Standing. This class will chronicle the history of photography?s complex and symbiotic relationship to the other visual arts: painting, sculpture, architecture, installation and performance, among others. Beginning with the medium?s invention and the early fights of its practitioners to establish themselves as fine artists, the course will describe photographers? unique attempts to negotiate their relationships with both artistic movements and the media culture of which they are a part. Robinson, Cameron, Emerson, F. Holland Day, Stieglitz, Moholy-Nagy, Rodchenko, Weston, Alvarez Bravo, Lartigue, De Carava, Cahun, Robert Frank, Diane Arbus and Cindy Sherman (among others) will be seen within the context of their respective art worlds, so the impact of art movements, cultural attitudes and new technologies on photographers during different historical periods can be assessed.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PHTI-UT 1102-000 (7498)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rice, Shelley

Hist of Nationalism in Cent & Eastern Europe (HIST-UA 9176)

The goal of this course is to introduce the students into nationalism studies and into a plethora of historical and present roots of national identities and manifestations of nationalism in Central and Eastern Europe. The course will examine how selected aspects of national histories have been used (and misused) in 19., 20. and 21. century to support/justify national political programs and leaders; specifically, how a romantic picture of national history influenced the development of national identity and what role its interpretation has had in political struggles and programs of Central and East European nations. The course focuses on forces that triggered many eruptions of ethnic hatred and atrocities in Central and Eastern Europe including Holocaust, post World War II expulsion of Germans, civil war in former Yugoslavia, and most recently the nationalist aspects of conflict between Ukraine and Russia. The course will focus on Ukraine and Russia, Poland, Hungary, former Czechoslovakia, present-day Czech Republic and Slovakia, on former Yugoslavia and on independent states on its territory, and it will motivate the students to formulate a positive and cooperative prospect for the region’s future.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


HIST-UA 9176-000 (2828)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Polisenska, Milada

Comp Modern Societies: Pol & Soc in 20C Germany (HIST-UA 9133)

The history of Germany in the twentieth century offers rich material to explore various approaches to organizing modern society. Beginning with Imperial Germany in 1900 and moving forward to today’s reunited Germany, we will look at different ways in which the relationship between the state and the individual, and relationship between politics, economy, and society developed over five different political systems. We will interrogate how these institutional arrangements were envisioned and structured and how they were experienced in everyday negotiations. In this course, principle narratives and events will be situated in a European and global context, allowing us to place the concept of German modernity in a comparative framework. Lectures will provide an overview of Germany in the twentieth century; readings and in-class discussions will explore different approaches to analyzing German history and society. During museum visits and walking tours, we will analyze contestations over the various attempts to integrate – both in concerted efforts to memorialize as well as to forget and erase – Germany’s oft-problematic pasts within the narrative of Germany’s present.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


HIST-UA 9133-000 (2797)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by

Statistics for Business and Economics (BUSF-SHU 101)

This course introduces students to the use of statistical methods. Topics include: descriptive statistics; introduction to probability; sampling; statistical inference concerning means, standard deviations, and proportions; correlation; analysis of variance; linear regression, including multiple regression analysis. Applications to empirical situations are an integral part of the course. Pre-requisites: None Fulfillment: This course satisfies the following: Major req: BUSF, BUSM, ECON, CS, DS Foundational course; Social Science: methods course; IMB Business elective.

Business and Finance (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


BUSF-SHU 101-000 (17187)
09/13/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Zheng, Dan


BUSF-SHU 101-000 (17188)
09/13/2022 – 12/16/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Zheng, Dan


BUSF-SHU 101-000 (17189)
09/13/2022 – 12/16/2022 Fri
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Zheng, Dan

Virgins Martyrs Monks & Saints: Early Christianity (RELST-UA 846)

What was it about Christianity that it made it so popular in the ancient world? Was it the martyrs volunteering for public execution? Monks’ sexual renunciation? The isolation of hermits living on the tops of columns in the wilderness? Or perhaps orthodoxy and its politically divisive anxieties about heretics and Jews? In fact, all these things (and more) explain how a small Jewish messianic sect from Palestine became the dominant religion of the Roman Empire. This course will provide an introduction to the big questions in the history of early Christianity. The focus will be on early Christian literature, such as martyr texts, saints’ lives, and works of monastic spirituality and mysticism. Issues addressed will include the Christian reception of Greco-Roman antiquity, the origins of anti-Semitism, gender and sexuality in the early Church, and the emergence of Christian theology.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

History in the Headlines (HIST-UA 70)

The key events you read about in your morning twitter feed or on your favorite news sites are usually not unique in world affairs. They have a background, a context, that makes them more understandable and often more interesting. History is about everything that happened before you started reading this course description. And thinking historically means trying to make sense of the new in the context of what human beings have done before. In this lecture series, NYU’s historians take you on a behind the scenes tour of current events you thought you knew, with the goal of making you a better observer and analyst of news about the world around you.

History (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Philosophical Approaches to Race and Racism (PHIL-UA 8)

This introductory-level course is needed to provide students with a firm understanding of distinctively philosophical approaches to issues concerning race and racism. This course has two themes. The first is an exploration of the concept of race. This is a question in social ontology, which is the philosophical study of the nature of social entities. The second is an examination of some of the normative and conceptual issues surrounding the most morally significant of the ways in which “race” has mattered for social life, namely as the concept that defines the object of the attitudes, practices, institutions and beliefs we call “racist.” We shall ask what racism is, what sorts of things can be racist, and what makes racism wrong.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHIL-UA 8-000 (10079)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Appiah, Kwame Anthony


PHIL-UA 8-000 (10080)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ulerie, Jodell


PHIL-UA 8-000 (10081)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ulerie, Jodell


PHIL-UA 8-000 (10082)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grabelsky, Dana


PHIL-UA 8-000 (10083)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grabelsky, Dana

British Art in London (ARTH-UA 9011)

The principal aim of this course is to familiarize students with the history of British art from the Stuarts to the early Victorian era. Teaching will be conducted entirely on sites in London or its immediate vicinity. The course will begin with the elite patronage of the Stuart court and end with the development of public institutions of art from the mid-eighteenth century. The social significance of portraiture, the cult of antiquity, the art market and the rise of landscape will all be studied as themes. There will be a strong emphasis on the European sources of British visual culture and the emergence of a distinctive national tradition of painting from Hogarth through to Turner.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTH-UA 9011-000 (2722)
09/02/2024 – 12/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Schuster, Jana


ARTH-UA 9011-000 (2723)
09/02/2024 – 12/06/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Weiner, Julia

Introduction to The New Testament (RELST-UA 302)

Introduces students to issues and themes in the history of the Jesus movement and early Christianity through a survey of the main texts of the canonical New Testament as well as other important early Christian documents. Students are given the opportunity to read most of the New Testament text in a lecture hall setting where the professor provides historical context and focus on significant issues, describes modern scholarly methodologies, and places the empirical material within the larger framework of ancient history and the theoretical study of religion.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


RELST-UA 302-000 (26095)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cady, Alyssa

Advanced Seminar in Personality Disorders (CAMS-UA 202)

Can we truly classify one’s personality, the very essence of an individual, as “disordered”? We explore the history, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of personality disorders. We begin with an overview of personality and theories of personality development and then complete an in-depth review of each disorder. We consider the genetic, neurobiological, and developmental research supporting and refuting these diagnoses. We review various classification systems, observe how the media often portrays personality disorders, and challenge the notion that undesirable personality traits are always maladaptive. Finally, we utilize both research and clinical material and aims at a nuanced understanding of these disorders and their sustained impact upon affected individuals.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CAMS-UA 202-000 (9695)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Ross · Davis, Jordan

TrendingMentalHealth (CAMS-UA 504)

Addresses current problems facing our society and threatening our mental health, such as the opioid epidemic, gun violence, video game addiction, legal use of marijuana, and prolonged separation of children from their parents. Students contrast what is scientifically understood with what is commonly believed and learn critical reading and thinking skills as they parse fact from fiction, reality from supposition. Given the topical nature of this course, themes may vary by semester and instructor expertise (including a focus on social and cultural issues, novel neuroscience, digital health technology, etc.).

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CAMS-UA 504-000 (9479)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Waugh, Whitney


CAMS-UA 504-000 (9700)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Castellanos, Francisco · Baroni, Argelinda


CAMS-UA 504-000 (19793)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gerson, Ruth · Marsh, Akeem · Chhabra, Divya

Introduction to Computer Programming (Limited Prior Experience) (CSCI-UA 3)

This course introduces object-oriented programming, recursion, and other important programming concepts to students who already have had some exposure to programming in the context of building applications using Python. Students will design and implement Python programs in a variety of applied areas.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CSCI-UA 3-000 (9289)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Arias Hernandez, Mauricio

Cultural History of Spain (SPAN-UA 9260)

This course provides an introduction to the making of modern Spain through the study of key cultural practices in literature, visual art, film, and performance from the 19th century to the present. The course is organized around key concepts, which may vary by semester and by instructor.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


SPAN-UA 9260-000 (18385)
08/31/2023 – 12/12/2023 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by

Islam and Spain (SPAN-UA 9466)

From the 8th century until the 17th century, Islam played a crucial role in the history of the Iberian Peninsula. Today this period is often portrayed as one of inter-religious harmony, while al-Andalus is simultaneously mourned in contemporary Islamist discourse as a lost paradise. While we look at the history of Al-Andalus and assess the importance of the contributions of Al-Andalus to Europe and America, we evaluate the significance of its legacy in modern Spain. Furthermore, we will study the protagonist role that Spain has played in relations between Europe and the Mediterranean Islamic countries during the Modern Age. Students will gain further understanding and contextualization of current Arab-Muslim geopolitics. As a case study, we will address the Spanish Protectorate in Morocco, as well as its ensuing process of decolonization and the consequences that shape the current international relations between the two neighboring countries, Spain and Morocco.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


SPAN-UA 9466-000 (18390)
08/31/2023 – 12/12/2023 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Armada, Almudena Ariza

Queer Cultures and Democracy (SPAN-UA 9481)

In the last decade, many Latin American nations have witnessed decisive progress in the legal recognition of non-normative sexualities and gender identities. The conventional map of “advanced democracies” crafting models of democratization to be exported to “less developed” nations seems definitely challenged: a new understanding of the multiple temporalities of queer cultures in North and South America is even more necessary than ever. In order to explore this multi-layered landscape, this course is aimed at reconstructing the historical detours of queer cultures in Buenos Aires and New York, considered enclaves of queer cultures in Argentina and the US respectively. The course revisits the last three decades in order to question the dominant and frequently reductive narratives of lineal progress. Taught simultaneously in Buenos Aires and New York, the class includes critical readings of queer cultural production as well as work on local archives and interviews with activists and GLTTBI organizations.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


SPAN-UA 9481-000 (8803)
01/25/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Buenos Aires (Global)
Instructed by Lopez Seoane, Mariano

Intensive Interm Spanish (SPAN-UA 9020)

SPAN-UA 9020.002 (Intensive Intermediate Spanish) is a six-credit course that continues and reviews the introductory level Spanish learned in SPAN-UA.1 and SPAN-UA.2, or in SPANUA. 10, while introducing literary readings, short films, and more complex composition exercises. The course involves an integration of the four basic skills: listening, speaking,reading and writing with the aim to improve communication in Spanish. Through this integrated approach, you will participate in a practical application of vocabulary, grammar,and culture. The course emphasizes mastery of language skills through specific contexts and dialogical situations.At the end of the course students will read a novel which will also be used to review many of the grammatical points covered in the textbook and class work, to improve analytical thinking and literary criticism skills, as well as to verbally express opinions about the situations presented in the novel. The goals of this course are to provide you with the opportunity to improve your oral and written communication skills in the language, by applying all the grammar rules you have learned and will be reviewing. You will be expected to substantially increase your working vocabulary and make solid progress in reading and writing skills.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
6 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


SPAN-UA 9020-000 (2585)
at NYU Buenos Aires (Global)
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 9020-000 (2608)
05/21/2024 – 07/01/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
10:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Castillo, Maria

Advanced Spanish for Spanish-Speaking Students (SPAN-UA 9051)

For native and quasi-native speakers of Spanish whose formal training in the language has been incomplete or otherwise irregular.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


SPAN-UA 9051-000 (3938)
at NYU Buenos Aires (Global)
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 9051-000 (3957)
05/21/2024 – 07/01/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Figueroa-Rojas, Armando

Cultural History of Latin America (SPAN-UA 205)

This course provides an introduction to the making of modern Latin America through the study of key cultural practices in literature, visual art, film, and performance from the 19th century to the present. The course is organized around key concepts, which may vary by semester and by instructor

Spanish (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


SPAN-UA 205-000 (9397)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Intermediate Spanish II (SPAN-UA 4)

Readings and discussions of contemporary Hispanic texts and review of the main grammatical concepts of Spanish. Completion of this course fulfills the MAP foreign language requirement.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


SPAN-UA 4-000 (8360)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 4-000 (8361)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 4-000 (8362)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 4-000 (8363)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 4-000 (8364)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 4-000 (8365)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 4-000 (8366)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 4-000 (8367)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 4-000 (8368)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 4-000 (8369)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 4-000 (8370)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 4-000 (8371)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 4-000 (8372)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Intens Elemen Spanish (SPAN-UA 10)

Open to students with some previous training in Spanish or another Romance language (one year of high school Spanish or the equivalent, or two years of high school French, Italian, or Latin) and to others on assignment by placement exam or in consultation with the director of the Spanish language program. This is a one-semester intensive course that covers the equivalent of one year of elementary Spanish (SPAN-UA 1 and SPAN-UA 2). 6 points. After completing this course, students may go into SPAN-UA 3, which is preparation for SPAN-UA 4. Students with high scores in the semester (B and up) or with permission from the Director of the Language Program may enroll in SPAN-UA 20. Completion of either SPAN-UA 20 or SPAN-UA 4 fulfills the Core requirement.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
6 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


SPAN-UA 10-000 (8373)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 10-000 (9212)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Spanish for Beginners – Level II (SPAN-UA 2)

After completing SPAN-UA 2 or SPAN-UA 10 (see below), students who wish to continue studying Spanish at an intermediate level must take a qualifying exam. Students who pass the exam may enroll in SPAN-UA 3, which is preparation for SPAN-UA 4. Students who complete SPAN-UA 2 or SPAN-UA 10 and pass the qualifying exam with high scores may enroll in SPAN-UA 20, a 6-credit intensive intermediate course that is the equivalent of Intermediate Spanish I and II. Completion of either SPAN-UA 20 or SPAN-UA 4 satisfies the MAP foreign language requirement.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


SPAN-UA 2-000 (8341)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 2-000 (8342)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 2-000 (8343)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 2-000 (8344)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 2-000 (8345)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 2-000 (8346)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 2-000 (8347)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 2-000 (8348)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 2-000 (8349)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 2-000 (8350)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 2-000 (8351)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 2-000 (8412)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 2-000 (8799)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 2-000 (8800)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Intermediate Spanish I (SPAN-UA 3)

Review of grammar, language structure, and culture, concentrating on fluency and accuracy through listening, speaking, reading, and writing activities. After completion of this course, students take SPAN-UA 4 in fulfillment of the MAP foreign language requirement.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


SPAN-UA 3-000 (8352)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 3-000 (8353)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 3-000 (8354)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 3-000 (8355)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 3-000 (8356)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 3-000 (8357)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 3-000 (8358)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 3-000 (8359)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 3-000 (8463)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 3-000 (8464)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Spanish for Beginners- Level I (SPAN-UA 1)

Open to students with no previous training in Spanish and to others on assignment by placement test. 4 points. Beginning course designed to teach the elements of Spanish grammar and language structure through a primarily oral approach. Emphasis is on building vocabulary and language patterns to encourage spontaneous language use in and out of the classroom.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


SPAN-UA 1-000 (8333)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (8334)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (8335)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (8336)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (8337)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (8338)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (8339)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (8340)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (8461)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (8462)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (8798)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Terrorism and Political Violence in the Modern World (SOC-UA 474)

Following the 9/11 attacks, there has been much discussion of “terrorism” and political violence more generally by politicians, journalists, and scholars. But what exactly is “terrorism,” and how does it differ from other types of violence? This course addresses the following questions: How and for what purposes has the idea of “terrorism” been conceptualized and used by politicians, journalists, and scholars? How have scholars attempted to explain terrorism and political violence? Why and under what conditions does collective violence and terrorism in particular seem to arise? Are terrorism or other forms of political violence ever justified? And does terrorism or violence actually work? If so, how and under what circumstances? To answer these questions, we will examine a wide range of historical cases of terrorism and political violence in the modern world.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Politics, Power, and Society (SOC-UA 471)

The nature and dimensions of power in society. Theoretical and empirical material dealing with national power structures of the contemporary United States and with power in local communities. Topics: the iron law of oligarchy, theoretical and empirical considerations of democracy, totalitarianism, mass society theories, voting and political participation, the political and social dynamics of advanced and developing societies, and the political role of intellectuals. Considers selected models for political analysis.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2021)


SOC-UA 471-000 (2730)
07/06/2021 – 08/15/2021 Mon,Wed,Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meyer, Neal


SOC-UA 471-000 (2742)
07/06/2021 – 08/15/2021 Mon,Wed,Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meyer, Neal

The Family (SOC-UA 451)

Introduction to the sociology of family life. Addresses a range of questions: What is the relationship between family life and social arrangements outside the family (e.g., in the workplace, the economy, the government)? How is the division of labor in the family related to gender, age, class, and ethnic inequality? Why and how have families changed historically? What are the contours of contemporary American families, and why are they changing?

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sex and Gender (SOC-UA 21)

What forms does gender inequality take, and how can it best be explained? How and why are the relations between women and men changing? What are the most important social, political, and economic consequences of this ?gender revolution?? The course provides answers to these questions by examining a range of theories about gender in light of empirical findings about women?s and men?s behavior.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2022)


SOC-UA 21-000 (2406)
05/23/2022 – 07/06/2022 Mon,Tue,Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leigh, Jenny


SOC-UA 21-000 (4294)
07/07/2022 – 08/17/2022 Mon,Tue,Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kaplan, Golda


SOC-UA 21-000 (4373)
07/07/2022 – 08/17/2022 Mon,Tue,Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kaplan, Golda

Social Networks (SOC-UA 131)

Social life in its different forms, from the delicate equilibrium of a triadic relation to the chaotic dynamic of a crowd, emerges from the interdependent behavior of multiple actors. By studying social networks – i.e., the web of relationships in which individuals and groups are embedded –, we will understand important collective dynamics, such as interpersonal influence, social diffusion, the origin of social norms, group cohesion and intergroup conflict, political participation, and market exchange. This course will offer an overview of basic social networks concepts, combining the theoretical tradition of structural and relational sociology with the analytical tools of graph theory.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


SOC-UA 131-000 (9277)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SOC-UA 131-000 (9278)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SOC-UA 131-000 (9279)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Immigration (SOC-UA 9452)

To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


SOC-UA 9452-000 (4016)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Busch, Nicky


SOC-UA 9452-000 (4017)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Busch, Nicky

Immigration (SOC-UA 452)

This course provides an introduction to contemporary immigration to the United States, against the backdrop of immigration since the start of the Republic and rooted in socio-behavioral science. The first half of the course is devoted to understanding U.S. law and policy governing immigration, and the second to understanding the characteristics and behavior of foreign-born – especially immigrants – in the United States.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


SOC-UA 452-000 (8813)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Criminology (SOC-UA 503)

Examines the making of criminal laws and their enforcement by police, courts, prisons, probation and parole, and other agencies. Criminal behavior systems, theories of crime and delinquency causation, victimization, corporate and governmental crime, and crime in the mass media. Policy questions.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


SOC-UA 503-000 (9851)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SOC-UA 503-000 (9852)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SOC-UA 503-000 (9853)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Race and Ethnicity (SOC-UA 135)

What is ’race’ exactly? Defining the concept presents a real challenge. This class explores what race and ethnicity mean, beginning with historical ideas about human difference. Comparing American beliefs and practices to those found in other societies, we will pay special attention to the particular notions and hierarchies of race that emerge in different times and places. The course also investigates the roles that institutions like the media, the arts, the state, and the sciences play in shaping our understandings of race and ethnicity. We will conclude by considering the predictions that scholars have made about the future of racial stratification in the United States.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


SOC-UA 135-000 (9848)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SOC-UA 135-000 (9849)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SOC-UA 135-000 (9850)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Statistics for Social Research (SOC-UA 302)

Gives students in the social sciences (sociology, anthropology, political science, and metropolitan studies) an introduction to the logic and methods of descriptive and inferential statistics with social science applications. Deals with univariate and bivariate statistics and introduces multivariate methods. Problems of causal inference. Computer computation.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


SOC-UA 302-000 (8328)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SOC-UA 302-000 (8329)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SOC-UA 302-000 (8330)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Sociological Theory (SOC-UA 111)

Prerequisite: one previous course in sociology, junior standing, or permission of the instructor. Brenner, Corradi, Ertman, Goodwin, Lukes. Offered every semester. 4 points. Examines the nature of sociological theory and the value of and problems in theorizing. Provides a detailed analysis of the writings of major social theorists since the 19th century in both Europe and America: Tocqueville, Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Simmel, Freud, Mead, Parsons, Merton, Goffman, Habermas, Giddens, Alexander, and Bourdieu.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


SOC-UA 111-000 (8327)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SOC-UA 111-000 (8978)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SOC-UA 111-000 (8979)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

The Performing Arts in Global Cultures (MPATC-UE 1505)

The study of the intersection of key philosophical and ethical systems with the analysis of performing art works and the music industry. Students learn an “Eclectic Method” of analysis to holistically explore and study works of art from cultures from around the world while studying ethical complexities and analytical systems in relation to the performing arts industries.

Music Theory and Composition (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MPATC-UE 1505-000 (16548)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by White, Leonard · Bush, Christopher

Future of Medicine (CCOL-UH 1010)

One of the biggest challenges in medicine is to prevent disease and ensure personalized treatment. This is now becoming possible thanks to high-resolution DNA sequencing technology that can decipher our individual information. These developments are already impacting global health, but they raise global challenges such as equality. How will these new technologies blend into healthcare systems? What regulations are needed to ensure that personalized medicine reaches all layers of society? How do we prevent discrimination based on our genes? Through an inquiry-based approach we will examine the science, economics, and politics behind medicine and evaluate the ethical issues that arise in this fast-developing field.

Core: Colloquium (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CCOL-UH 1010-000 (3677)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Percipalle, Piergiorgio

Photography of Architecture, City and Territory (IPHTI-UT 1210)

City, territory and architecture have been, from the beginning of photography, privileged objects for its practice. Photography has become a tool to strengthen the understanding of architecture, to highlight aesthetic and design ideas and to critically interpret the space. This class focuses on architectural photography and the photography of urban space, both in relation to their historical roots and contemporary practice. Florence offers a perfect environment to develop one’s artistic talent while learning the art of photography and discovering the secrets of one of the most fascinating cities in the world. Assignments are designed to help explore options for technical control as well as visual experimentation and individual style. Keeping in mind the inseparability of photographic technique and expression, students are expected to articulate their particular choices in relation to the overall conceptual approach of the projects. Critiques of assignments are important to the progress of each individual in the class, to help verbalize visual concepts, and to learn to see actively. The final exam consists of the presentation of a portfolio of photographs and an artist’s statement. Students are expected to work on their projects to develop an aesthetic and coherent photographic language and a personal approach to the photographic medium in a different environment. An emphasis is also placed on refining craft in relation to ideas, and to research on an individual basis, since it is crucial in developing an artistic practice. The course includes lectures, shooting sessions and field trips, discussions and critiques of the photographs. Each student must have a camera with manually adjustable aperture and shutter speed.

Int`l Pgms, Photography (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


IPHTI-UT 1210-000 (13446)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by

Music, the Mind and Artificial Intelligence (MPATE-UE 1113)

Music is universal to all human cultures. This course will explore fundamental concepts of the psychological, emotional, and cognitive effects of music and what factors in the human body and brain are involved in producing them, with particular emphasis on cross-cultural study. Students will learn beginning methods of computational feature extraction and machine learning to explore simple artificial intelligence models that build on and articulate the conceptual frameworks of music and cognition introduced in the initial phase of the class.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

The Business of Broadway (MKTG-UB 25)

This is a specialty marketing course designed to provide students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of Broadway and live theater, as an important business enterprise within the entertainment industry. The focus is on understanding the development and application of the economics, finance, structure, implementation and staging of performances, as well as the marketing strategies and tactics for gaining audience awareness and decision to purchase. The course will examine funding, marketing, branding, product positioning and the global distribution of live theatrical entertainment. The course will cover the history, venues, vocabulary, players, business and creative structures, budget development, supplementary revenue streams, successes and failures, relationship with the movie and music industries, the important figures and support systems that make the system work, global reach, and other topics. Lecture, discussions, site visits, and project work will be included.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MKTG-UB 25-000 (10616)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Globalization of The Entertainment Industry (MKTG-UB 46)

Provides a framework for understanding the global expansion of media and entertainment companies. Examines the impact that the significant export growth of American leisure products and services has on the U.S economy. Analyzes the strategies of several leading entertainment and media multinational companies and the development of their entertainment businesses within the major world economic zones. International speakers, cases and readings are used in this course.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


MKTG-UB 46-000 (22222)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Brown, Colin


MKTG-UB 46-000 (22228)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)at Washington SquareInstructed by Brown, Colin


MKTG-UB 46-000 (23357)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Maheswaran, Durairaj

Intro to Marketing (MKTG-UB 1)

This course evaluates marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and a catalyst of business activity. It presents a comprehensive framework that includes (1) researching and analyzing customers, company, competition, and the marketing environment; (2) identifying and targeting attractive segments with a strategic positioning; and (3) making product, pricing, communication, and distribution decisions. Cases and examples are utilized to develop problem-solving abilities.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 2 Weeks

Sections (January 2021)


MKTG-UB 1-000 (1219)
01/05/2021 – 01/21/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 4:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Sports Economics (ECON-UB 211)

This course applies microeconomic theory and econometric analysis to sports and explores some public policy issues that have arisen in the design of sports competitions. The course is divided into four main parts: the structure of sports leagues, labor market issues, college sports, and the market for sports betting.

Economics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ECON-UB 211-000 (22435)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bowmaker, Simon

History of Animation (FMTV-UT 1144)

Offered in the fall semester only. A chronological survey of the art and commerce of the animated film internationally over the last 100 years. Designed to expand students’ awareness of the origins of a significant 20th-century art form and to acquaint them with a wide variety of practical techniques and styles, from pre-film influences to computer-generated images; from “Golden Age” studio cartoon factories to today’s independent avant-garde animator-filmmakers. Designed to expand student aesthetic sensibilities and sharpen critical perceptions about this unique genre. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES. Non-majors must process a “Permission Notice for Non-Majors” form to register for the course (subject to availability).

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1144-000 (19501)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kosarin, Ray

Thermodynamics (ENGR-UH 3710)

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of thermodynamics and their applications to engineering problems. The following topics are covered in this course: properties of pure substances; concepts of work and heat; closed and open systems; the fundamental laws of thermodynamics; Carnot and Clausius statements of the 2nd law; entropy and entropy production; heat engines, refrigerators, heat pumps; efficiencies, coefficients of performance.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3710-000 (3597)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ryu, Je Ir


ENGR-UH 3710-000 (3598)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Al-Chalabi, Mohammed · Ryu, Je Ir

Re-Design (CADT-UH 1025)

Giorgio Vasari defined Mannerism in terms still used today in Art History: in the wake of the Renaissance masters, copying became the standard way to learn. But what do we really learn by copying? Would a contemporary mannerism fit in today’s world, dominated by visual information? How then does creativity work? How does change happen? Why did we wait half a century before having personal computers in colors other than beige? Why do we seem oblivious to the manufactured filters mediating our observation of nature itself? What are the trade-offs when we delegate creative choices to Google’s algorithms? What separates the artists of the past and the brand consultants of today? This course addresses the role and limits of copying as students explore many facets of graphic design, visual communication, and artistic value. The vibrant visual culture-in-the-making of Abu Dhabi and the UAE provide an ideal background for such explorations. Students will elaborate on the tension (real or perceived) among today’s artists, designers, and scientists, while discussing why a multidisciplinary mind is fundamental for contemporary attempts to re-design the world around us.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


CADT-UH 1025-000 (17329)

Introduction to Computer Programming (CSCI-SHU 11)

An introduction to the fundamentals of computer programming. Students design, write, and debug computer programs. No prior knowledge of programming is assumed. Students will learn programming using Python, a general purpose, cross-platform programming language with a clear, readable syntax. Most class periods will be part lecture, part lab as you explore ideas and put them into practice. This course is suitable for students not intending in majoring in computer science as well as for students intending to major in computer science but having no programming experience. Students with previous programming experience should instead take Introduction to Computer Science. Prerequisite: Either placed into Calculus or at least a C in Pre-Calculus Fulfillment: Core Curriculum Requirement Algorithmic Thinking; EE Required Major Courses. Note: Students who have taken ICS in NY, Abu Dhabi, and Shanghai cannot take ICP.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (17503)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (17504)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23632)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23633)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Liu, Yijian


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23634)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23767)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Liu, Yijian


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (26252)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
9:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Spathis, Promethee


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (26253)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
9:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Spathis, Promethee

Discrete Mathematics (CS-UH 1002)

Discrete mathematics concerns the study of mathematical structures that are discrete rather than continuous, and provides a powerful language for investigating many areas of computer science. Discrete structures are characterized by distinct elements, which are often represented by integers. Continuous mathematics on the other hand deals with real numbers. Topics in this course include: sets, counting techniques, logic, proof techniques, solving recurrence relations, number theory, probability, statistics, graph theory, and discrete geometry. These mathematical tools are illustrated with applications in computer science.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 1002-000 (3526)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fernandes, Joao Paulo · Ahmad, Liza


CS-UH 1002-000 (3624)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Mumtaz, Sara


CS-UH 1002-000 (3917)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Ahmed, Dena


CS-UH 1002-000 (19983)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 1002-000 (19984)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 1002-000 (19985)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Artificial Intelligence (CSCI-UA 9472)

There are many cognitive tasks that people can do easily and almost unconsciously but that have proven extremely difficult to program on a computer. Artificial intelligence is the problem of developing computer systems that can carry out these tasks. We will focus on three central areas in AI: representation and reasoning, machine learning, and natural language processing.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CSCI-UA 9472-000 (2636)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


CSCI-UA 9472-000 (2637)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
7:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Race, Football and American Culture (SCA-UA 153)

This interdisciplinary course explores the evolution of American football into a mirror of black life and politics and a reflection of race relations in American culture. Students will examine the growth of black players since the NFL was integrated in the late Sixties. Student writing and research will explore the growth of football as a vehicle and model for black protest and support for movements such as Black Lives Matter. Students will go to two football games this semester. The focus will also include a study of the segregated American Football League and its integration of the NFL.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Queer NYC (SCA-UA 421)

How queer is New York City? How do queerness and the city shape each other? This course crosses time and space, examining the history, politics and culture of the Big Apple. Ranging from Harlem to Times Square to Greenwich Village to Park Avenue, and beyond Manhattan to Queens, Brooklyn and Fire Island outposts, we follow people and money, high and underground culture, protests and politics. Materials include fiction and poetry, music, theater and performance, photography and film, and works of urban studies, history and ethnography. Assignments may include archival research and digital cartographic work.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Approaches to Latinx Studies (SCA-UA 501)

Explores a set of principles that have guided Latino/a presence in the United States. These principles can be found in many but not necessarily all of the readings. They include urban/rural life, freedom/ confinement, memoir as source of voice/other sources of voice, generational separation and identity, and loss and healing. The course traces a movement through time from masculinist nationalism to the recognition of variations in gender, sexuality, race, class, region, and national origin. Other principles may be added to this list as the course proceeds.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Approaches to Metropolitan Studies (SCA-UA 601)

A broad and interdisciplinary introduction to the field of urban studies, surveying the major approaches deployed to investigate the urban experience in the social space of the modern city. Explores the historical geography of capitalist urbanization with attention to North American and European cities, to colonial and postcolonial cities, and to the global contexts of urban development. Major topics include urban politics and governance; suburban and regional development; urban social movements; urban planning; the gendering of urban space and racial segregation in urban space.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Filming Asian America: Documenting Community (SCA-UA 361)

Focuses specifically on the Asian American communities of New York and their histories. Presents filmmaking as a mode of community documentation and filmmakers as historians. Students meet as theorists and field researchers. The first phase is largely historical and theoretical, while the latter mainly deals with hands-on filmmaking. Students document various aspects of Asian/Pacific American communities in New York?sociocultural and political issues surrounding them, histories, personal stories, geodynamics of ethnic localities, domestic lives, professions, ethnic festivals and performances, etc. At the end of the course, students have made at least two collective documentaries (10 to 12 minutes each), which may be interrelated or on entirely different subjects.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Race & Reproduction (SCA-UA 158)

Examines the connections between gender, racial ideology and history of medicine to consider the range of ways that reproduction—medically, culturally, and experientially—produces and troubles racial ideology. In this course we will explore issues in the history of race and reproduction, focusing primarily (though not exclusively) on North American contexts. Cross-cultural breadth will help us to consider the relationship between biological experiences (which are often portrayed as universal) and socio-cultural context. While questions about biology will be central to this history, we will also locate biology within a wider set of issues around social reproduction and the practices of motherhood. Through our readings we will consider how different disciplinary orientations (social history, medical anthropology, feminist theory, art history, etc.) help us to illuminate and problematize the connections between technologies and politics of biology and difference.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Elementary Yoruba I (SCA-UA 182)

Yoruba is a language spoken in West Africa by approximately 20 million people. This course is an introduction to Yoruba language, people and culture and is designed for students without prior knowledge. The main goal is to develop elementary communicative competence in the language. It is designed to enable students read, write, listen to and talk about simple concepts, ensuring that they can minimally understand and be understood in the language, while developing a fundamental knowledge of the Yoruba culture. Emphases are on Yoruba as used by contemporary native speakers in the present day West Africa. Skills are developed through intensive interactive conversations, grammar exercises, and classroom activities designed for a learner to use the language in various daily activities.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


SCA-UA 182-000 (9690)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mabayoje, Moses

Landcapes of Consumption (SCA-UA 625)

Consumption of objects, images, and places is central to the culture and economy of metropolitan life. The class will explore how the relationship between consumption and cities has developed by examining three key moments—the late nineteenth century and the invention of urban commodity spectacles, post-war America and the rise of suburban consumer spaces, and contemporary America and the selling of the commodity city. The class addresses three questions: Why do we want things? How does landscape organize our consumer desires? How does place become an object of consumption? We will begin with an examination of classic theoretical works that probe the relationships between people, things, and cities. We will then embed these in discussions of changing forms and practices of consumption and urbanism. The empirical cases we will examine range from the development of the department store, to the fashioning of commodity home, to the work of shopping, and to the emergence of a thriving urban debt industry.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies: The Politics of Indigeneity (SCA-UA 747)

This course is a general introduction to the field of Native American and Indigenous Studies (NAIS). The course will introduce students to the central questions and debates of NAIS, including but not limited to: Native American hidden histories and oral histories; comparative indigeneities; questions of “discovery” and colonialism; the politics and representations of lands, massacres, and museums; and questions of law, gender and sexuality. It begins by asking students to consider the history of the field and weaves throughout questions about the complicated and contested terrain of the term Indigeneity. It ends with discussions about decolonizing research and indigenous futures, thus preparing students to consider theories and methodologies they will encounter in more advanced courses for the NAIS minor. By the end of the semester, students will have gained both historical and ethnographic perspectives on how museums and other forms of representation help us to know and reproduce ourselves and “others,” and how institutions craft, control, and circulate cultural heritage in various social lives.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

French/African Relations (SCA-UA 9914)

A historical and political inquiry into the French system of relations with Francophone Africa from the ‘race to Empire’ in the 19th century to the current day. The main goals of the course are: to describe the historical development of French-African relations from the colonial to the post-independence era; to investigate the political, economic and cultural mechanisms of French influence in contemporary Francophone Africa; to understand the consequences for France of complex developments subsequent to colonialism, such as African immigration in France. Conducted in French.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


SCA-UA 9914-000 (18471)
09/01/2023 – 12/06/2023 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by Taraud, Christelle

Community Empowerment (SCA-UA 613)

Empowerment is defined as those processes, mechanisms, strategies, and tactics through which people, as well as organizations and communities, gain mastery over their lives. It is personal as well as institutional and organizational. Addresses these issues in a wide variety of community settings. Designed to be challenging and rewarding to those students interested in helping people work together to improve their lives.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Intermediate Cantonese I (SCA-UA 333)

An advanced-level language and culture course following Elementary Cantonese. At this level, when the basic skills and working vocabulary have been mastered, emphasis is placed on the linguistic rules to enable students to communicate with more competence. The lessons focus not only on language, but also use a holistic approach and incorporate discussions on history, current events, literature, pop culture, and native values. Because language is key to connecting with community concerns, the course also includes field trips to Chinatown and to other Cantonese-speaking neighborhoods.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


SCA-UA 333-000 (8389)

Constitution and People of Color (SCA-UA 366)

Examines how the American legal system decided constitutional challenges affecting the empowerment of African, Latino, and Asian American communities from the 19th century to the present. Topics include the denial of citizenship and naturalization to slaves and immigrants, government-sanctioned segregation, the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, the prison industry, police brutality, post-9/11 detention issues, and voting rights. Course requirements include attendance at a community function involving constitutional issues, a midterm, and an interactive oral and written final project comparing a present-day issue affecting racial minorities in New York City and proposing measures to collectively address the issue.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Intermediate Filipino I (SCA-UA 323)

At this level, when the basic skills and working vocabulary have been mastered, emphasis can be placed on the linguistic rules to enable the student to communicate with more competence. There is also a focus on translation. Lessons use a holistic approach and incorporate discussions on history, current events, literature, pop culture, and native values. To observe and experience the language at work, the course includes field trips to Filipino centers in the New York/ New Jersey area, as well as invited guests who converse with students in Filipino about their life and work.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


SCA-UA 323-000 (8905)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Francia, Luis

History & Literatures of The So Asian Diaspora (SCA-UA 313)

America is not always the answer. This class offers an introduction to the many and varied fictions that have been produced by diasporic South Asians across the globe over the last 150 years: in Australia, Africa, Europe, Caribbean. Our exploration of the poetics and politics of immigration will attend to different types of traveller (inc. soldiers, students, athletes, medics, cosmonauts) and draw on a wide range of media (inc. literature, cinema and music). Particular attention will be paid to the diverse geographies of Asian migration – be they plantations, dance Floors, restaurants, call centres. Themes to be addressed include coolietude, globalization, the impact of 9/11 and techno-servitude.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


SCA-UA 313-000 (9910)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sandhu, SS

Elementary Swahili I (SCA-UA 121)

Provides students with an elementary understanding of Swahili, a Bantu language with a rich oral and written tradition that is spoken by about 100 million people from Somalia to Mozambique and Zanzibar. After a short presentation of Swahili?s history, codification, and relation to other languages, students are drilled in phonetics and grammar. They are also introduced to poems, songs, and oral narratives.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


SCA-UA 121-000 (9390)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nanji, Abdul

Urban Cultural Life (SCA-UA 608)

Few cities boast as rich a cultural life as New York City, with its plethora of neighborhoods, museums, galleries, theatres, concert halls, and alternative spaces. Through walking tours, attendance at cultural events, and visits to local cultural institutions, students explore the definition of urban culture. Sites include the familiar and the unfamiliar, the Village and the outer boroughs. Students examine the attributes that constitute culture and community from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
0-4 credits – 6 Weeks

Approaches to Gender & Sexuality Studies (SCA-UA 401)

Designed to interest and challenge both the student new to the study of gender and sexuality and the student who has taken departmental courses focusing on women, gender, and/or sexuality. Through a focus on particular issues and topics, explores the construction of sex, gender, and sexuality; gender asymmetry in society; sexual normativity and violations of norms; and the interactions of sex, gender, sexuality, race, class, and nation. This interdisciplinary course engages materials and methodologies from a range of media and disciplines, such as literature, the visual arts, history, sociology, psychology, and anthropology. Examines both feminist and nonfeminist arguments from a variety of critical perspectives.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2022)


SCA-UA 401-000 (2751)
05/23/2022 – 07/06/2022 Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Cindy


SCA-UA 401-000 (2783)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Couture/Culture: Fashion and Globalization (SCA-UA 253)

This course examines fashion as both a product and expression of globalization. It explores fashion’s contested histories; its modes of production, consumption, and address; its relationship to colonial enterprises; its system of meaning-making. In this course, we will tackle such issues as the social uses of fashion; the fashion cycle (use, reuse, discard); the relationship between dress and the body; feminist critiques of fashion; the politicization of clothing (from ethnic dressing to green clothing); and the links between style consumption and garment production–and the relationship of all of these to the processes of globalization.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Latinx Art & Visual Culture (SCA-UA 533)

This course examines the history of Latinx contributions to the artistic vitality of the United States and will introduce students to some of the contemporary artists, debates and institutions that support Latinx art in NYC and beyond. We will pay especial attention to the relationship between Latinx and Latin American art and consider linkages between museums, private and governmental art stakeholders and communities. We will visit studios, speak to artists and also learn about the role of contemporary art markets in shaping Latinx art worlds.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Urban Environmentalism (SCA-UA 631)

Explores environmental issues in urban centers, their causes and impacts, and the rise of a movement that considers the “environment” not just as the term we use to describe the natural world from which most urban residents feel dissociated, but rather as the array of places where we live, work and play. Considers the relationship between society and public policy in the context of environmentalism. Introduces students to public policy analysis, with a focus on policy implementation and decision-making in New York City. Examines the powers of the NYC Council and explains the role of agencies, the private sector, and interest groups as critical parts of a bureaucracy through which environmental issues are shaped, managed and negotiated. Through a variety of case studies, increases students’ understanding of the political, legal, economic and technical and scientific constraints of the policy decision-making process and explores the path towards managing, using and protecting environmental resources in urban centers.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Amer Dilemmas: Race, Ineq, Unful Prm Pub Educ (SCA-UA 755)

Historically, education has been the most accessible and effective means for groups to achieve social mobility in American society. However, access to public education has never been equal for all segments of society, and there continues to be considerable variability in the quality of education provided to students. As a result of both explicit and subtle discrimination, racialized minority groups have at various times been denied access to education or been relegated to inferior schools or classrooms. Yet education has also been the arena where the greatest advances in social justice and racial equality have been achieved. Understanding the contradictions created by the hope and unfulfilled promise of American education is a central theme of this course.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


SCA-UA 755-000 (24950)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Andrea Martínez, Pamela


SCA-UA 755-000 (25163)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Andrea Martínez, Pamela

Social and Cultural Analysis 101 (SCA-UA 101)

Introduces theories, methods, and political trajectories central to the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis (SCA). SCA 101 addresses how individuals and populations structure their worlds and navigate the resulting social, cultural, and political terrain. It privileges scholarly work with an intersectional approach, drawing on theoretical insights from such fields as social geography, feminism and queer studies, ethnic studies, urban and metropolitan studies, critical race theory, labor studies, and cultural studies.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


SCA-UA 101-000 (9221)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patros, Tyson


SCA-UA 101-000 (9222)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grimaldi, Nicole


SCA-UA 101-000 (9223)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grimaldi, Nicole


SCA-UA 101-000 (9224)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ghabin, Tamar


SCA-UA 101-000 (9225)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ghabin, Tamar

New York City in Film (SCA-UA 623)

What are the diverse ways in which New York City has been imagined on the silver screen? How does a cinematic perspective shape our understanding of urban spaces? This course analyzes films that portray New York as a site of local encounter and global exchange in both commercial and documentary films since the 1960s. We will investigate the dramatic mapping and remapping of urban space through works that articulate questions of gentrification, immigrant labor, organized crime, and sexual subcultures. In turn, we will examine how these stories have helped shape and contest the city’s image of itself–as a space of struggle, belonging, illegality, emancipation, and transformation. The goal is to see how each particular film captures a distinct moment both in the city’s history over the past fifty years as well as in the history of filmmaking. In so doing, we will blend the perspectives of urban studies, ethnic studies, and visual culture, placing films within their aesthetic, political, and historical context.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Theories of Symbolic Exchange (RUSSN-UA 860)

Marcel Mauss developed a concept of an alternative, non-market type of economy, based on a nonmonetary exchange of such symbolic values as social recognition, sovereignty, and political participation. Today, this concept has acquired a new relevance in relation to the economy of the Internet. Examines various theories of the symbolic that expand the original Maussian model and encompass multiple aspects of culture.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


RUSSN-UA 860-000 (21730)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Groys, Boris

Intro to Soviet Cinema (RUSSN-UA 850)

Iampolski. Offered every year. 4 points. An examination of the history of Russian cinema from its beginnings. The main focus is on landmarks of cinematic art and on the cultural specificity of Russian cinema. The survey also includes questions of cinema and politics (cinema as a propaganda tool), and cinema and the market. Artists discussed include Eisenstein, Vertov, Pudovkin, Kuleshov, Barnet, Shub, Kozintsev, Trauberg, and Tarkovsky. Topics include cinema and revolution, the cinema of the Russian avant-garde and constructivism, cinema and totalitarianism, and socialist realism in film.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


RUSSN-UA 850-000 (23815)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Iampolski, Mikhail

Russian Grammar & Composition I (RUSSN-UA 5)

Designed for students who speak some Russian at home but have virtually no reading and writing skills. Does not satisfy the College Core Curriculum language requirement.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


RUSSN-UA 5-000 (8293)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Korsounskaia, Ekaterina


RUSSN-UA 5-000 (8850)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Belodedova, Irina

Elementary Czech I (RUSSN-UA 9201)

Students work on pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary enrichment. Emphasis is placed on developing and enhancing listening, comprehension and oral skills. Additional hours are offered to improve pronunciation. Written and oral examinations required.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RUSSN-UA 9201-000 (18092)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by

Intermediate Russian I (RUSSN-UA 9003)

The course combines the traditional grammatical approach with a communicational, interactive method. Since the size of the classes is usually small we can put a great emphasis on oral drills and improving speaking in Russian on various subjects. Students will be given short topics to talk about at the beginning of every lesson and most written essays will have to be presented orally in class. The class also focuses on improving your writing skills and broadening your vocabulary. That is why the students are expected to keep a diary in Russian and write several compositions during the course. The students will also read several Russian short stories which will be discussed in class. We will review familiar grammar and study some advanced grammatical structures. The students will do considerable amount of grammar and vocabulary exercises in the Workbook as part of the home assignments. Several short lectures on various aspects of Russian culture and history will be given during the course and we will watch two Russian films that would be followed by the discussions.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RUSSN-UA 9003-000 (18088)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by

Advanced Russian I (RUSSN-UA 9107)

The course combines the traditional grammatical approach with a communicational, interactive method. Since the size of the classes is usually small we can put a great emphasis on improving speaking in Russian on various subjects. Students will be given short topics to talk about at the beginning of every lesson and most written essays will have to be presented orally in class. The class also focuses on improving your writing skills. That is why the students are expected to keep a diary in Russian and write several compositions during the course. The students will also read several Russian short stories in original which will be discussed in class. We will review familiar grammar and study some advanced grammatical structures. The greater emphasis is also put on and broadening your vocabulary and the students will do considerable amount of vocabulary exercises as part of the home assignments. Several short lectures on various aspects of Russian culture and history will be given during the course and we will watch two Russian films that would be followed by the discussions.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RUSSN-UA 9107-000 (18090)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by

Elementary Russian II (RUSSN-UA 2)

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


RUSSN-UA 2-000 (8535)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Korsounskaia, Ekaterina


RUSSN-UA 2-000 (8536)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Korsounskaia, Ekaterina


RUSSN-UA 2-000 (9240)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Danilin, Michael


RUSSN-UA 2-000 (20392)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Efremova, Tatiana

American Religion (RELST-UA 480)

Explores the relationship between religion and American identity. We will analyze the role of religion in American culture, politics, and law and question if the United States has a secular government, what the separation of church and state means, and if religious freedom exists for everyone. Considers the role of religion in slavery, settler colonialism, Native American and immigrant assimilation, and also how religion has influenced the U.S. political system. Examines the role of religion within movements for racial justice, reproductive choice, and LGBTQ equality.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


RELST-UA 480-000 (20867)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Theories & Methods in The Study of Religion (RELST-UA 1)

Offered in the fall. 4 points. Focuses on fundamental theoretical and methodological issues pertaining to the academic study of religion. Exposes students to, and familiarizes them with, some of the more important theories of the origin, character, and function of religion as a human phenomenon. Students are given an opportunity to encounter and test an assortment of the main scholarly approaches to understanding and interpreting religious phenomena, including psychological, sociological, anthropological, and hermeneutical perspectives.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


RELST-UA 1-000 (9385)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McGrath, William

Lab in Human Cognition (PSYCH-UA 46)

Students experience current thinking in hypothesis formulation, experimental design, data analysis and research communication. Experiments are performed in the fields of Cognition and Perception and can include visual processing, auditory processing, learning, memory, and decision making. Students complete research projects and gain experience in writing research reports that conform to APA guidelines.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


PSYCH-UA 46-000 (9749)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Lab in Clinical Research (PSYCH-UA 43)

The course provides instruction in methods and concepts employed in research in the area of clinical psychology. Students learn about these methods and concepts in a hands-on manner by completing a set of research exercises. Methods covered include correlational and experimental designs and observational procedures. Topics include psychotherapy process research, case formulation approaches to psychopathology and therapy, and several theoretical perspectives that are employed in both research and clinical practice. Prerequisites: PSYCH-UA 1 AND PSYCH-UA 10 AND (PSYCH-UA 30 OR PSYCH-UA 51 OR PSYCH-UA 81)

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Industrial Organizat’L Psychology (PSYCH-UA 62)

Personal, social, and environmental factors related to people?s attitudes and performance in industry and other organizations. Topics include personnel selection and evaluation, training and development, attitudes and motivation, leadership, group dynamics, organizational structure and climate, and job design and working conditions.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


PSYCH-UA 62-000 (9065)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldenberg, Liz

Motivation and Volition (PSYCH-UA 74)

The course provides an overview of the major theories and findings in research on motivation and volition. More specifically, we will address the history of research on motivation and volition, classic phenomena of being motivated versus lacking motivation and willpower, the psychology of goals (goal setting, goal implementation, effortful goal pursuits, disengagement, content and structure of goals, the mental representation of goals), disorders of self-regulation, and cognitive-neuropsychological research as well as the perspective of economics on motivation and volition. We will focus on understanding the interrelations and contradictions between the different approaches, and on designing research that promotes these different lines of thinking.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Lab in Personality & Social Psychology (PSYCH-UA 39)

Methodology and procedures of personality and social psychological research and exercises in data analysis and research design. Statistical concepts such as reliability and validity, methods of constructing personality measures, merits and limitations of correlational and experimental research designs, and empirical evaluation of theories. Student teams conduct research projects.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2022)


PSYCH-UA 39-000 (2400)
05/23/2022 – 07/06/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vega, Melissa · Abrams, Ellie

Abnormal Psychology (PSYCH-UA 9051)

The kinds, dynamics, causes, and treatment of psychopathology. Topics include early concepts of abnormal behavior; affective disorders, anxiety disorders, psychosis, and personality disorders; the nature and effectiveness of traditional and modern methods of psychotherapy; and viewpoints of major psychologists past and present.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


PSYCH-UA 9051-000 (9950)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by

Lab in Developmental Psychology (PSYCH-UA 40)

In depth investigation of the methodological foundations of developmental psychology, in particular, behavioral methods with infants and children. Students will learn how to design experiments, create experimental stimuli, collect quantifiable measures from infant and child behavior, and analyze developmental data. Each week students will read ~3 primary research articles from a variety of domains in developmental psychology, but all focused on one methodological theme. Students will produce a thoroughly researched and creative proposed experiment and analysis plan for the course’s final project.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Lab in Infancy Research (PSYCH-UA 42)

Part of a yearlong research training program. Students learn general methods for studying infant development and specific methods for examining infants’ perceptual-motor development. Students design and conduct laboratory research projects, code and analyze data, and prepare results for presentation and publication (grant proposals, conference submissions, and journal submissions).

Psychology (Undergraduate)
1-4 credits – 15 Weeks

Advanced Psychological Statistics (PSYCH-UA 11)

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9029)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hilford, Andrew


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9030)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sun, Siqi


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9031)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sun, Siqi


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9134)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Judy


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9135)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Judy


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9363)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Qingqing


PSYCH-UA 11-000 (9364)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Qingqing

Social Psychology (PSYCH-UA 32)

Gollwitzer, Trope, Uleman. Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduction to theories and research about the social behavior of individuals, such as perception of others and the self, attraction, affiliation, altruism and helping, aggression, moral thought and action, attitudes, influence, conformity, social exchange and bargaining, group decision making, leadership and power, and environmental psychology.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8510)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gollwitzer, Peter


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8511)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Adjei Boateng, Fiona


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8512)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwak, Jasmine


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8513)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tao, Bradley


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8514)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tao, Bradley


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8515)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwak, Jasmine


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8516)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liaquat, Usman


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (25991)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Adjei Boateng, Fiona


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (25995)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liaquat, Usman

Personality (PSYCH-UA 30)

AndersenAndersen. Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduction to research in personality, including such topics as the self-concept; unconscious processes; how we relate to others; and stress, anxiety, and depression.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9269)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Andersen, Susan


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9270)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ganapathy, Rheanna


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9271)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qin, Joyce


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9272)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Qin, Joyce


PSYCH-UA 30-000 (9273)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ganapathy, Rheanna

Cognitive Neuroscience (PSYCH-UA 25)

Curtis, Davachi. Offered every semester. 4 points. Provides students with a broad understanding of the foundations of cognitive neuroscience, including dominant theories of the neural underpinnings of a variety of cognitive processes and the research that has led to those theories. In doing so, students also learn about the goals of cognitive neuroscience research and the methods that are being employed to reach these goals.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8500)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Curtis, Clayton


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8501)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Babu, Deepika


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8502)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Babu, Deepika


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8503)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yan, Dongni


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8504)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yan, Dongni

Cognition (PSYCH-UA 29)

McElree, Murphy, Rehder. Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduction to theories and research in some major areas of cognitive psychology, including human memory, attention, language production and comprehension, thinking, and reasoning.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8505)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ausch, Robert


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8506)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Muhareb, Samer


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8507)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Muhareb, Samer


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8508)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vaghani, Jhanvi Bharatbhai


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (8509)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Muhareb, Samer


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (26096)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vaghani, Jhanvi Bharatbhai


PSYCH-UA 29-000 (26111)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vaghani, Jhanvi Bharatbhai

On Eating Others (PORT-UA 403)

The notion of cannibalism is a recurring concern in the history of ideas regarding the primitive, the animalistic, the monstrous, or any of the other classifications frequently invoked to mark others, regardless of their actual culinary preferences. Reflection upon cannibalism as an intellectual phenomenon suggests how people eating people, or at least the possibility of it, says a great deal about those that do not. In some regions of the Caribbean and Brazil, ideas regarding cannibalism have made an important turn, such that the cannibal has become a provocative affirmation of self. The aim of this course is to think about cannibalism, not, as it often is, as a theme for anthropologists and ethnographers, but rather as an intellectual problem that has enjoyed a very long life in the history of ideas about self. In this course, we shall revisit a selection of texts regarding cannibalism from Columbus’ diaries to the present, and including works by, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Oswald de Andrade, Nelson Pereira dos Santos, and Suely Rolnik, in the company of some key notions involving postcolonial theory. Readings will be made available in Portuguese, Spanish, and English, and course papers may be carried out in any of the three languages according to student interest and ability.

Portuguese (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PORT-UA 403-000 (22046)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Robbins, Dylon

Intermed Portuguese II (PORT-UA 4)

Portuguese language courses PORT-UA 10, PORT-UA 3, and PORT-UA 4 are oriented toward achieving oral proficiency and are taught in the native language. The elementary-level course stresses the structures and patterns that permit meaningful communication and encourages spontaneous and practical proficiency outside the classroom. The intermediate-level courses aim to promote fluency in speaking, as well as proficiency in reading and writing. They include readings and discussions on contemporary Portuguese and Brazilian texts.

Portuguese (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PORT-UA 4-000 (9058)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kettner, Michele

Socialist Theory (POL-UA 140)

Concentrates on those socialist schools?Christian socialism, utopian socialism, Marxism, Fabianism, and anarchism?that have proved to be the most successful. Presents their major theories and examines the usefulness of such theories in helping us to understand and, in some cases, alter the world in which we live.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


POL-UA 140-000 (10065)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ollman, Bertell

Contemporary African Politics (POL-UA 584)

This course offers an introduction to contemporary African politics. Our goal is to introduce students to the most pressing problems African countries have faced since independence. Questions motivating the course include: (1) Why state institutions weaker in African than in other developing regions? (2) What explains Africa’s slow economic growth? (3) What can be done to improve political accountability on the continent? (4) Why have some African countries been plagued by high levels of political violence while others have not? (5) Can or should the West attempt to “save” Africa?

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

The Politics of Administrative Law (POL-UA 354)

Offered every other year. 4 points. Examines legal, political, and economic issues in government regulation. Covers such classic debates and issues as the historical origins of regulation, the legal philosophy of administrative regulation, the relationship between courts and agencies, the political and social conflicts surrounding regulatory politics, and the role of law in state formation.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


POL-UA 354-000 (20278)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harrington, Christine · Madson, Nathan

The Election Process (POL-UA 344)

Provides an understanding of election processes in the United States through different theoretical approaches to the study of campaigns and elections and the testing of empirical hypotheses. Analyzes campaign strategies of political candidates, the use of polls and media in campaigns, and the effects of issues and personalities on election outcomes. Evaluates the role of presidential primaries and elections in the functioning of a democracy.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


POL-UA 344-000 (20604)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nagler, Jonathan

Civil Liberties (POL-UA 332)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Interpretation of the Bill of Rights, the Civil War amendments, and other rights in the U.S. Constitution through the reading of Supreme Court opinions. Topics include freedom of speech and press; free exercise of religion and separation of church and state; the right of privacy; rights of the criminally accused; equal protection of the law against race, gender, and other discrimination; and the rights of franchise and citizenship. Cases are read and discussed closely for their legal and philosophical content.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


POL-UA 332-000 (10012)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harrington, Christine · Holfeuer, Kristen

Controversies in Public Policy: Logic and Evidence (POL-UA 315)

This course is about using logic to think about issues of public policy and evidence to do the same thing. One way to think about this course is it is sabermetrics (logic and evidence applied to baseball, and in Moneyball) applied to vastly more important topics than baseball: making schools better, designing health policy and dealing with climate change (with tons of other policy applications possible, but we will focus on these three).

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

The Biology of Politics (POL-UA 311)

Why do we participate in politics? Who tends to participate? When are we most likely to participate? Political scientists have traditionally focused on factors such as demography, socioeconomic status, mobilization, electoral institutions, and social norms to answer these questions. However, scholars have recently begun to explore the possibility that genetic differences may, at least in part, help to explain individual differences in political participation.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Games, Strategy, and Politics (POL-UA 844)

Offered every year. 4 points. Theories of political strategy with emphasis on the theory of games. Uses of strategy in defense and deterrence policies of nations, guerrilla warfare of revolutionaries and terrorists, bargaining and negotiation processes, coalitions and the enforcement of collective action, and voting in committees and elections. Secrecy and deception as political strategies and uses of power, with some applications outside political science.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


POL-UA 844-000 (9366)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brams, Steven


POL-UA 844-000 (9369)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


POL-UA 844-000 (9370)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Terrorism (POL-UA 742)

Comparative study of terrorism as a domestic political phenomenon. Examines foundational issues, economic, psychological, strategic, and social theories of terrorism as well as theories of the cessation of terrorist violence, government negotiation with terrorists, the relationship between terrorists and nonviolent political actors, and the internal political economy of terrorist organizations. Considers terror in the Middle East (especially emphasizing Hamas), nationalist terror (ETA and the IRA), and Maoist revolutionary terror (with emphasis on the Shining Path).

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Politics of Poverty & Welfare (POL-UA 382)

Prerequisite: V53.0300. Offered in the spring. 4 points. Poverty and welfare problems in the United States and the controversies aroused by them. Concentrates on the causes of poverty and dependency among the controversial working-age poor, the history of programs and policies meant to help them, and the enormous impact these issues have had on national politics.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


POL-UA 382-000 (9662)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williams III, Napoleon

Comparative Politics of South Asia (POL-UA 562)

Introduces the comparative politics of South Asia. Analyzes the politics of South Asian countries, including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Nepal, individually and in a comparative framework. Readings are chosen from across disciplines, including political science, anthropology, economics, and history. The course also uses novels and films on South Asia to illustrate themes highlighted in the readings.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


POL-UA 562-000 (20838)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chandra, Kanchan

Congress & Legislative Assemblies (POL-UA 320)

Origin, structure, functions, and dynamics of legislatures in the United States. Although some attention is given to state legislatures and municipal lawmaking bodies, the major emphasis is on the Congress. Readings include a textbook, official sources such as the Congressional Record and Congressional District Data Book, and the new behavioral studies and commentaries.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Gender in Law (POL-UA 336)

Examines the relationship between gender politics, legal theory, and social policy. Studies the role that the legal arena and certain historical conditions have played in creating, revising, and protecting particular gender identities and not others and examines the political effects of those legal constructions. Analyzes the major debates in feminist legal theory, including theories of equality, the problem of essentialism, and the relevance of standpoint epistomology. In addition to examining how the law understands sex discrimination in the workplace and the feminization of the legal profession, also addresses to what extent understandings of the gender affect how law regulates the physical body by looking at the regulation of reproduction and of consensual sexual activity. In light of all of the above, considers to what extent law is or is not an effective political resource in reforming notions of gender in law and society.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


POL-UA 336-000 (20835)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harrington, Christine

Amer Political Thought (POL-UA 170)

Study of American political ideas and debate from colonial times to the present. Topics include Puritanism, revolution and independence, the Constitution framing, Hamiltonian nationalism, Jeffersonian republicanism, Jacksonian democracy, pro- and antislavery thought, Civil War and Reconstruction, social Darwinism and laissez-faire, the reformist thought of populism, progressivism and socialism, legal realism, the New Deal and 20th-century liberalism, modern conservatism, civil rights, and war protest. Readings and discussion are based on original and interpretative sources.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


POL-UA 170-000 (20834)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Int’L Pol of Middle East (POL-UA 760)

Systematic study of the international politics of the Middle East, emphasizing the period since World War II. Emphasis on the relationship among patterns of inter-Arab, Arab-Israeli, and great-power politics, and on the relationship between domestic and external politics. Attempts to relate the Arab-Israeli conflict to interregional politics, the place and role of Turkey and Iran, and the problems in the Persian Gulf.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2022)


POL-UA 760-000 (2364)
05/23/2022 – 07/06/2022 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Erbal, Ayda

National Security (POL-UA 712)

Prerequisite: V53.0700. Offered every year. 4 points. Starting with the traditional arena of national security and U.S. military policy, students analyze how national security decisions are made in this country, as well as the past and current military strategies used to carry out those decisions. From there, students examine the particular national security concerns and policies of Russia, China, Germany, and Japan. This course also looks at new thinking on national security, asking to what extent international trade and competition, immigration, illegal drugs, and the environment should be considered national security issues.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2022)


POL-UA 712-000 (4407)
07/07/2022 – 08/17/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lutmar, Carmela


POL-UA 712-000 (5147)
07/07/2022 – 08/17/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lutmar, Carmela

Diplomacy & Negotiation (POL-UA 720)

Analyzes the theory and practice of diplomacy, with special emphasis on bargaining strategies that nations use to try to settle their differences and avoid wars, including the use of mediators, arbitrators, and institutions like the United Nations. Applies game theory to analyze the use of exaggeration, threats, and deception in bilateral and multilateral diplomacy. Supplements case studies of international negotiation, especially in crises, with studies of domestic bargaining used in the formulation of foreign policy.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

War, Peace, and World Order (POL-UA 741)

Characteristics and conditions of war and peace and the transition from one to the other from the perspective of political and social science. Examines the role and use of coercion in global affairs, with emphasis on attempts to substitute negotiation, bargaining, market forces, politics, and law for the resort to massive violence in moderating disputes.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Democracy & Dictatorship (POL-UA 160)

Democracy and dictatorships have traditionally been analyzed in terms of their apparently different institutional characteristics and legal foundations. Examines these traditional interpretations but leans heavily toward ideological and contextual factors. Challenges traditional distinctions between democracy and dictatorship.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2022)


POL-UA 160-000 (2363)
05/23/2022 – 07/06/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Erbal, Ayda

Ethics, Politics and Public Policy (POL-UA 130)

Provides students with the ability systematically to evaluate ethically controversial public policy issues using concepts from normative political theory. In the first half of the course, we consider the means by which policy is implemented: Under what conditions, if any, might we permit political actors to do bad in order to do good? In the second half, we consider the ends of public policy: What is it we want the state to accomplish, and at what cost? Substantive policy topics vary from semester to semester.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Introduction to Research Methods for Politics (POL-UA 850)

New research is the most exciting and important aspect of political science: we are able to pose novel questions, construct fresh theories, and provide new evidence about the way the world works. But before we start doing research, we have to learn how it is done. With this in mind, this class will introduce students to quantitative techniques used for research in the study of politics. Part of this task is conceptual: helping students to think sensibly and systematically about research design. To this end, students will learn how data and theory fit together, and how to measure the quantities we care about. But part of the task is practical too: students will learn a `toolbox’ of methods–including statistical software–that enable them to execute their plans.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 850-000 (9156)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harvey, Anna


POL-UA 850-000 (9238)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by López Peceño, Alejandro


POL-UA 850-000 (9157)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by López Peceño, Alejandro


POL-UA 850-000 (9158)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pulejo, Massimo


POL-UA 850-000 (9159)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pulejo, Massimo


POL-UA 850-000 (9734)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Demin, Sasha


POL-UA 850-000 (25687)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Melnick, Justin

Private Influence in Public Policy (POL-UA 9341)

Topics: analysis of mechanisms of influence (selection of sympathetic incumbents, the provision of incentives for public officials, and the provision of information); objects of influence (voter choices, legislative behavior, bureaucratic decisions); collective action; and organizational maintenance.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


POL-UA 9341-000 (4273)
at NYU Washington DC (Global)
Instructed by

Western European Politics (POL-UA 9510)

Study of the politics of Britain, Ireland, France, and Germany. Compares the historical origins of these systems and analyzes their institutions as manifestations of their social and political culture and traditions. Treats each country’s current politics and political trends. Attempts to introduce the basic concepts of comparative political analysis in developing cross-cultural theory.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


POL-UA 9510-000 (3989)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Harmon, Josephine

Politics of Near & Middle East (POL-UA 9540)

The course description for this Topics in Politics course varies depending on the topic taught. Please view the course descriptions in the course notes section below.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


POL-UA 9540-000 (3992)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Tue,Thu
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Segal, Hagai


POL-UA 9540-000 (20920)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Segal, Hagai

Doing Political Economy: Apprs to Public Policy (POL-UA 842)

Political economy is a field of inquiry that has made great strides in recent years in explaining political and economic behavior by characterizing the incentives of actors and the context in which these actors make decisions and influence outcomes. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to these theoretical approaches and show how they can be used to address contemporary policy questions.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 842-000 (8877)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lee, Sukwon

Social Choice & Politics (POL-UA 845)

Introduces students to social choice theory applied to political science. It focuses on (1) individual choice, (2) group choice, (3) collective action, and (4) institutions. It looks at models of individuals’ voting behavior, the incentive structures of interest groups, and the role of institutions. The emphasis is analytical, though students are not expected to have a background in formal mathematics.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 845-000 (20351)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lee, Sukwon

International Relations of Asia (POL-UA 770)

Identical to V33.0770. Prerequisite: V53.0700. Offered every other year. 4 points. The relations of and between the principal Asian national actors (e.g., China, Japan, India) and the relationship of the Asian “subsystem” to the international system. Covers the traditional Asian concepts of transnational order, the impact of external interventions, the modern ideological conflict and technological revolution, the emergent multilateral balance beyond Vietnam, the changing patterns of relations in the Asian subsystem traced to the international evolution from bipolarity to multicentrism, and the U.S. role in Asia.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 770-000 (10196)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hsiung, James

Int’L Political Economy (POL-UA 775)

This course serves as an introduction to the workings of the contemporary international political-economic system and introduces students to some of the main analytical frameworks that political economists use to understand this system. Finally, the course familiarizes students with analytical tools that serve to gain a better understanding of the current problems and opportunities facing actors in today?s international political economy.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

International Politics (POL-UA 700)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Analysis of state behavior and international political relations; how things happen in the international state system and why. Emphasizes the issue of war and how and in what circumstances states engage in violence. Topics include different historical and possible future systems of international relations, imperialism, the Cold War, game theory and deterrents, national interests, and world organization.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 700-000 (8260)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bueno De Mesquita, Bruce


POL-UA 700-000 (8261)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Becker, Michael


POL-UA 700-000 (8262)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Becker, Michael


POL-UA 700-000 (8263)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yildirim, Mikdat


POL-UA 700-000 (8264)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yildirim, Mikdat


POL-UA 700-000 (8265)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schwarz, Christopher


POL-UA 700-000 (8266)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schwarz, Christopher


POL-UA 700-000 (8267)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ge, Zoe


POL-UA 700-000 (9112)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ge, Zoe


POL-UA 700-000 (10194)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by MEDA, Francis William


POL-UA 700-000 (10195)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by MEDA, Francis William

American Constitution (POL-UA 330)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Interpretation of the U.S. Constitution through the reading of Supreme Court opinions. Distribution of constitutional power among Congress, the president, and the federal courts; between the national government and the states; and among the states. Constitutional law and American political and economic development. Cases are read and discussed closely for their legal and philosophical content.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Urban Gov’T & Politics (POL-UA 360)

This course will introduce you to the study of local and urban politics in the U.S. Municipal governments profoundly impact the day-to-day of citizens. Cities have substantial power over policy areas from education and public safety to transportation, and they also address basic needs: making sure the trash gets taken out, the water runs, and that people are safe from crime. And yet, cities are often quite constrained in their policy choices. For example, one of the central challenges facing municipal government is how to attract and maintain a middle class tax base while providing essential services for low-income residents. This course will explore patterns of city politics against the background of American social and cultural history, including the impulse toward reform and the effects of reform efforts on the distribution of power in the community. Additional topics will include issues related to voting, race and ethnicity, gentrification, and the relationship between cities and the federal government.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Comparative Politics (POL-UA 500)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Major concepts, approaches, problems, and literature in the field of comparative politics. Methodology of comparative politics, the classical theories, and the more recent behavioral revolution. Reviews personality, social structure, socialization, political culture, and political parties. Major approaches such as group theory, structural-functionalism, systems analysis, and communications theory and evaluation of the relevance of political ideology; national character; elite and class analysis; and problems of conflict, violence, and internal war.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 500-000 (8257)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Slough, Tara


POL-UA 500-000 (8258)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Mark


POL-UA 500-000 (8259)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Mark


POL-UA 500-000 (10534)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Niu, He


POL-UA 500-000 (9210)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Niu, He


POL-UA 500-000 (9360)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by He, Ning


POL-UA 500-000 (9361)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by He, Ning


POL-UA 500-000 (25686)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cheng, Mengfan

Power & Politics in America (POL-UA 300)

A survey of national political institutions and behavior in the United States, which introduces students to a variety of analytical concepts and approaches useful for the study of domestic politics. Concepts typically covered include public goods and collective action; preference aggregation and the median voter theorem; delegation, representation, and accountability; agenda control; inter-branch bargaining; and the mechanisms of private influence on public policy.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 300-000 (8252)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dawes, Christopher Todd


POL-UA 300-000 (8253)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wirsching, Elisa


POL-UA 300-000 (8254)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, Lexi


POL-UA 300-000 (8255)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, Lexi


POL-UA 300-000 (8256)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wirsching, Elisa


POL-UA 300-000 (8796)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heo, Kun


POL-UA 300-000 (8797)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heo, Kun


POL-UA 300-000 (10192)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McGrath, David

Political Theory (POL-UA 100)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduces students to some outstanding theories of politics. The theories treated offer alternative conceptions of political life, and they are examined from both theoretical and historical perspectives. Among the theorists included are Plato, Aristotle, Locke, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Rousseau, Mill, and Marx.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 100-000 (9202)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pevnick, Ryan


POL-UA 100-000 (9203)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bose, Amartya


POL-UA 100-000 (9204)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bose, Amartya


POL-UA 100-000 (9205)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yi, Sophie


POL-UA 100-000 (9206)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yi, Sophie

Astrophysics (PHYS-UA 150)

Introduction to modern astrophysical problems with an emphasis on the physical concepts involved?radio, optical, and X-ray astronomy; stellar structure and evolution; white dwarfs, pulsars, and black holes; and galaxies, quasars, and cosmology.

Physics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


PHYS-UA 150-000 (10148)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scoccimarro, Roman


PHYS-UA 150-000 (10149)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Electricity & Magnet I (PHYS-UA 131)

Introduction to Maxwell’s equations with applications to physical problems. Topics include electrostatics, magnetostatics, the solution of the Laplace and Poisson equations, dielectrics and magnetic materials, electromagnetic waves and radiation, Fresnel equations, transmission lines, wave guides, and special relativity.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHYS-UA 131-000 (8212)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gruzinov, Andrei


PHYS-UA 131-000 (8213)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 131-000 (9331)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Computational Physics (PHYS-UA 210)

Introduction to computational physics, with an emphasis on fields of current research interest where numerical techniques provide unique physical insight. Topics are chosen from various branches of physics, including numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations, eigenvalue problems, Monte Carlo methods in statistical mechanics, field theory, dynamical systems, and chaos.

Physics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHYS-UA 210-000 (8214)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sels, Dries


PHYS-UA 210-000 (8871)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

20th Cent Concepts of Space, Time, & Matter (PHYS-UA 20)

The 20th century has been witness to two major revolutions in man’s concepts of space, time, and matter. Einstein’s special and general theories of relativity: implications of the special theory, for our understanding of the unity of space and time, and the general theory, for our understanding of the nature of gravity. Quantum mechanics: a new picture of the basic structure and interactions of atoms, molecules, and nuclei. Topics include the uncertainty principle, wave-particle duality, and the continuing search for the fundamental constituents of matter.

Physics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHYS-UA 20-000 (8204)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wray, Lewis Andrew

Quantum Mechanics I (PHYS-UA 123)

Designed to deepen the insights into quantum mechanics introduced in PHYS-UA 103, 104 and to provide an introduction to the more formal mathematical structure of quantum mechanics. The Schr?dinger and Heisenberg description of quantal systems; perturbation theory; spin and statistics; coupling of angular momenta; scattering theory; and applications to atomic, molecular, nuclear, and elementary particle physics.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHYS-UA 123-000 (8210)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grier, David


PHYS-UA 123-000 (8211)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 123-000 (9336)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Dynamics (PHYS-UA 120)

Topics include conservation laws, central force motion, Lagrange’s and Hamilton’s equations, non-inertial frames, inertia tensor, rigid body dynamics, coupled oscillators and particles, eigenvalues, eigenvectors and normal modes.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHYS-UA 120-000 (9318)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moscatelli, Frank


PHYS-UA 120-000 (9319)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Loizeau, Nicolas


PHYS-UA 120-000 (9503)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Loizeau, Nicolas

Physics II (PHYS-UA 93)

Continuation of PHYS-UA 91. Topics include electrostatics; dielectrics; currents and circuits; the magnetic field and magnetic materials; induction; AC circuits; Maxwell’s equations.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8451)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hogg, David


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8452)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lant, Caspar


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8453)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lant, Caspar


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8454)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

General Physics I (PHYS-UA 11)

With PHYS-UA 12, forms a two-semester sequence that must be taken in order. Lecture and laboratory-recitation. Not open to students who have completed PHYS-UA 91 with a grade of C- or better. Offered in the fall. 5 points. Begins a two-semester introduction to physics intended primarily for preprofessional students and for those majoring in a science other than physics, although well-prepared students may wish to take the physics majors sequence PHYS-UA 91, PHYS-UA 93, PHYS-UA 94, PHYS-UA 95, and PHYS-UA 96 instead. Topics include kinematics and dynamics of particles; momentum, work, and energy; gravitation; circular, angular, and harmonic motion; mechanical and thermal properties of solids, liquids, and gases; heat and thermodynamics.

Physics (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

General Physics II (PHYS-UA 12)

Continuation of PHYS-UA 11. Topics include electric charge, field, and potential; magnetic forces and fields; resistive, capacitive, and inductive circuits; electromagnetic induction; wave motion; electromagnetic waves; geometrical optics; interference, diffraction, and polarization of light; relativity; atomic and nuclear structure; elementary particle physics.

Physics (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10171)


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10172)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Somawanshi, Prajwal Prakshep


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10173)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (23490)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10175)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (23495)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10177)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10178)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10179)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10180)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10181)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10182)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10183)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Engstler, Justin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10184)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by La Madrid, Joan


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10185)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by La Madrid, Joan


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10186)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10187)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10188)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10642)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (25702)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Somawanshi, Prajwal Prakshep

Existentialism and Phenomenology (PHIL-UA 36)

Examines the characteristic method, positions, and themes of the existentialist and phenomenological movements and traces their development through study of such thinkers as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Sartre.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


PHIL-UA 36-000 (19900)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jauernig, Anja


PHIL-UA 36-000 (19901)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Barat, Alan


PHIL-UA 36-000 (19902)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Barat, Alan

Recent Continental Phil (PHIL-UA 39)

Examines some of the most important philosophical ideas and developments in the “Continental” tradition in Europe in the twentieth century. After a review of some nineteenth-century developments, covers major works by Heidegger and Sartre, and some selection, determined by the instructor’s particular focus, of writings by such figures as Husserl, Gadamer, Arendt, Beauvoir, Merleau-Ponty, Foucault, and Deleuze.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Philosophy of Physics (PHIL-UA 94)

We will investigate different approaches to understanding space and time, and how the account of space-time structure has evolved in physics. One of the main objectives is to have a clear and accurate understanding of the Special Theory of Relativity, detailed enough to allow the student to solve some physics problems. This will require a bit of mathematics, but not more than algebra. We will discuss the General Theory of Relativity in a more qualitative way, including an account of the structure of black holes. Philosophy students do not need any further background in physics or mathematics, and physics students will not benefit from greater mathematical sophistication. We will also study the relevant history of physics and philosophy, particularly the debate between Newton and Leibniz about the nature of space and time. There will be two lectures each week and a recitation section.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


PHIL-UA 94-000 (19175)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Maudlin, Tim


PHIL-UA 94-000 (19176)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher


PHIL-UA 94-000 (19177)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher

Set Theory (PHIL-UA 73)

An introduction to the basic concepts and results of set theory.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


PHIL-UA 73-000 (19544)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fine, Kit


PHIL-UA 73-000 (19545)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher


PHIL-UA 73-000 (19546)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher

History of Ancient Philosophy (PHIL-UA 20)

Examines some of the most important philosophical ideas and developments in Ancient Greece and Rome. Covers major writings by Plato and Aristotle, and a selection of writings by such thinkers as the Presocratics, Stoics, Epicureans, and Skeptics.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8864)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moss, Jessica


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8865)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lingle, Clara


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8866)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lingle, Clara


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8867)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beizaei, Banafsheh


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8868)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beizaei, Banafsheh

From Hegel to Nietzsche (PHIL-UA 32)

Examines some of the most important philosophical ideas and developments in Europe in the nineteenth century, preceded by a brief examination of some aspects of Kant’s philosophy. (Kant is examined in more detail in PHIL-UA 30.) Covers major writings by Hegel, and a selection of writings, determined by the special focus of the particular version of the course, from such thinkers as Fichte, Schelling, Feuerbach, Schopenhauer, Mill, Comte, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

History of Modern Philosophy (PHIL-UA 21)

Examines some of the most important philosophical ideas and developments in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe. Covers some of the major writings of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, and Hume, and concludes with a brief examination of some aspects of Kant’s philosophy. (Kant is examined in more detail in PHIL-UA 30.) May also include writings of Hobbes, Malebranche, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Conway, Berkeley, and Shepherd, among others.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


PHIL-UA 21-000 (8744)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 21-000 (8745)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 21-000 (8746)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 21-000 (8747)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 21-000 (8748)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Consciousness (PHIL-UA 7)

Examines conceptual and empirical issues about consciousness. Issues covered may include the explanatory gap, the hard and harder problems of consciousness, concepts of consciousness, phenomenal concepts, the mind-body problem and neural correlates of consciousness, higher-order thought theories of consciousness, the inverted spectrum, views of phenomenality as representation, and arguments for dualism.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


PHIL-UA 7-000 (19756)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 7-000 (19771)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 7-000 (19772)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 7-000 (19773)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 7-000 (19774)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Advanced Logic (PHIL-UA 72)

An introduction to the basic concepts, methods, and results of metalogic, i.e., the formal study of systems of reasoning.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHIL-UA 72-000 (20815)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dorr, Cian


PHIL-UA 72-000 (20816)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Roth, Richard


PHIL-UA 72-000 (20817)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Roth, Richard

Philosophy of Language (PHIL-UA 9085)

Examines various philosophical and psychological approaches to language and meaning, as well as their consequences for traditional philosophical problems in metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics. Discusses primarily 20th-century authors, including Russell, Wittgenstein, and Quine.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PHIL-UA 9085-000 (3665)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Global Ethics (PHIL-UA 6)

This course aims to accomplish two things. The first is to introduce three broad traditions of normative thinking about social issues from around the globe: a Confucian tradition, one based in Islamic legal traditions, and one derived from European liberalism. The second is to address three current areas of normative debate: about global economic inequality, about gender justice and human rights. We shall explore these first-order questions against the background of the three broad traditions. Our aim will be to understand some of differences of approach that shape the global conversation about these issues that concern people around the world.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20339)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Appiah, Kwame Anthony


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20340)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wu, Patrick


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20341)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wu, Patrick


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20342)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zacek, Justin


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20343)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zacek, Justin

Epistemology (PHIL-UA 76)

Considers questions such as the following: Can I have knowledge of anything outside my own mind?for example, physical objects or other minds? Or is the skeptic’s attack on my commonplace claims to know unanswerable? What is knowledge, and how does it differ from belief?

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHIL-UA 76-000 (20336)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Xueyin


PHIL-UA 76-000 (20337)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ballarini, Cristina


PHIL-UA 76-000 (20338)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ballarini, Cristina

Medical Ethics (PHIL-UA 50)

Examines moral issuExamines moral issues in medical practice and research. Topics include euthanasia and quality of life; deception, hope, and paternalism; malpractice and unpredictability; patient rights, virtues, and vices; animal, fetal, and clinical research; criteria for rationing medical care; ethical principles, professional codes, and case analysis (for example, Quinlan, Willowbrook, Baby Jane Doe).

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHIL-UA 50-000 (9403)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beardman, Stephanie


PHIL-UA 50-000 (23793)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wills, David Clinton

Modal Logic (PHIL-UA 74)

Modal logic is the logic of necessity and possibility and other such notions. In recent times, the framework of possible worlds has provided a valuable tool for investigating the formal properties of these notions. This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts, methods, and results of modal logic, with an emphasis on its application to such other fields as philosophy, linguistics, and computer science.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Cellular & Molecular Neurobiology (NEURL-UA 210)

Lecture and laboratory course that provides students with broad exposure to current questions and experimental approaches in cellular neuroscience. Lectures and laboratories are organized into three areas: cell structure aLecture and laboratory course that provides students with broad exposure to current questions and experimental approaches in cellular neuroscience. Lectures and laboratories are organized into three areas: cell structure and organization of the vertebrate central nervous system, mechanisms underlying neural signaling and plasticity, and control of cell form and its developmental determinants. Laboratory instruction in anatomical, physiological, and biochemical methods for investigating the biology of nerve cells.

Neural Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


NEURL-UA 210-000 (9291)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aoki, Chiye · Shapley, Robert


NEURL-UA 210-000 (9292)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NEURL-UA 210-000 (9293)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NEURL-UA 210-000 (9343)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NEURL-UA 210-000 (10246)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cellular & Molecular Neurobiology Lab (NEURL-UA 211)

Lecture and laboratory course that provides students with broad exposure to current questions and experimental approaches in cellular neuroscience. Lectures and laboratories are organized into three areas: cell structure and organization of the vertebrate central nervous system, mechanisms underlying neural signaling and plasticity, and control of cell form and its developmental determinants. Laboratory instruction in anatomical, physiological, and biochemical methods for investigating the biology of nerve cells.

Neural Science (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


NEURL-UA 211-000 (8176)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aoki, Chiye · Shapley, Robert

Music Theory III (MUSIC-UA 203)

Analysis of music of the late 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries, and the creation of imitative compositional models based on works studied as well as on principles acquired earlier in the sequence. Additional topics will include whole-tone and octatonic scale systems, atonality, serialism, and an introduction to post-modern and spectral techniques. Weekly lab sections are devoted to skills in musicianship and are required throughout the sequence.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


MUSIC-UA 203-000 (10371)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rust, Joel


MUSIC-UA 203-000 (10372)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krimitza, Vasiliki

Music of New York (MUSIC-UA 100)

This course is designed to take advantage of New York’s dynamic music community. There are in-class presentations by local musicians and scholars, and students regularly attend performances throughout the city. The focus is on the everyday practices of musical life in New York City by both performers and listeners in a number of the City’s musical constituencies: immigrant communities; amateur and professional music-makers; and popular, classical, and avant-garde scenes. Examination of these processes of music-making will be enhanced by a look at the histories of these different kinds of music-making. There will also be a historical discussion of the vibrant musical life of New York in the 19th and early 20th centuries, which will contribute to an understanding of why New York is seen, and sees itself, as a musical city.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2022)


MUSIC-UA 100-000 (2384)
07/07/2022 – 08/17/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yuditskaya, Sonya


MUSIC-UA 100-000 (2475)
07/07/2022 – 08/17/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fairley, Brian


MUSIC-UA 100-000 (2458)
07/07/2022 – 08/17/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yuditskaya, Sonya


MUSIC-UA 100-000 (2476)
07/07/2022 – 08/17/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fairley, Brian

Music Theory II (MUSIC-UA 202)

Music Major Distribution Requirement. Chromatic harmony as developed and practiced by composers of the 19th century and beyond. Introduction to score reading and principles of musical analysis applied to larger musical structures. Continuation of species counterpoint and an introduction to invertible counterpoint and fugue.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MUSIC-UA 202-000 (9126)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beeferman, Gordon


MUSIC-UA 202-000 (9127)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zamcheck, Akiva


MUSIC-UA 202-000 (9128)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zamcheck, Akiva

Elements of Music (MUSIC-UA 20)

Explores the underlying principles and inner workings of the tonal system, a system that has guided all of Western music from the years 1600 to 1900. It includes a discussion of historical background and evolution. Focuses on concepts and notation of key, scale, tonality, and rhythm. Related skills in sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard harmony are stressed in the recitation sections.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MUSIC-UA 20-000 (8415)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ha, Moon Young


MUSIC-UA 20-000 (8416)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rose, Michael


MUSIC-UA 20-000 (8417)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rose, Michael

Music Theory I (MUSIC-UA 201)

Students study principles of tonal music composition including 18th and 19th century harmonic, formal, and contrapuntal practices. Exercises in four-part voice-leading and species counterpoint are supplemented by analyses of music from around the world and from a variety of genres, including concert and popular music. Weekly lab sections are devoted to skills in musicianship and are required throughout the sequence.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MUSIC-UA 201-000 (9130)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hoffman, Elizabeth


MUSIC-UA 201-000 (9132)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vlasis, Konstantine


MUSIC-UA 201-000 (9133)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vlasis, Konstantine

The Art of Listening: (MUSIC-UA 3)

Students acquire a basic vocabulary of musical terms, concepts, and listening skills in order to describe their responses to musical experiences. Considers the structure and style of influential works in the Western art music repertoire, popular music, or other musical cultures, with attention to the wider social, political, and artistic context. Course does not count towards the Music major. Can be counted toward the minor as an elective.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Politics of The Middle East (MEIS-UA 750)

Historical-political background of the Middle East and its contemporary social and political problems, including the impact of the West; religious and liberal reactions; conflict of nationalisms (Arab, Iranian, Turkish, and Zionist); and revolutionary socialism. Specific social, political, and economic problems?using a few selected countries for comparison and analysis?including the role of the military, the intelligentsia, the religious classes, the legitimization of power, urban-rural cleavages, bureaucracy, and political parties.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9142)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Keshavarzian, Arang


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9143)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bell, Robert


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9144)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by ODell, Kelley


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9145)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bell, Robert


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9146)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by ODell, Kelley

Mediterranean Worlds (MEIS-UA 660)

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 660-000 (21873)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Balbale, Abigail


MEIS-UA 660-000 (21874)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cuyler, Zack


MEIS-UA 660-000 (21875)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cuyler, Zack

Advanced Hindi I (MEIS-UA 409)

Offers an overview of Indian culture via original texts and is designed to improve students’ advanced-level reading, as well as their written and oral discourse in Hindi. Emphasis is placed on the development of linguistic skills required for a close reading and in-depth analysis of complex texts. Introduction is learner-centered, and students have a choice in the selection of the texts and topics for their presentations. Taught seminar-style, the course combines classroom discussions, oral reports, and occasional background lectures. Students should have completed the two-year sequence of Hindi or have an equOffers an overview of Indian culture via original texts and is designed to improve students’ advanced-level reading, as well as their written and oral discourse in Hindi. Emphasis is placed on the development of linguistic skills required for a close reading and in-depth analysis of complex texts. Introduction is learner-centered, and students have a choice in the selection of the texts and topics for their presentations. Taught seminar-style, the course combines classroom discussions, oral reports, and occasional background lectures. Students should have completed the two-year sequence of Hindi or have an equivalent background.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 409-000 (10149)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ilieva, Gabriela Nik

Elementary Hindi (MEIS-UA 405)

As a part of a two-year curriculum, prepares the student for a high level of proficiency in Hindi. Through a variety of class, small-group, and paired activities, as well as language and computer lab sessions, students are expected to develop reading, speaking, listening, and writing skills. The instructor also takes into consideration individual needs.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 405-000 (10146)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhargava, Rajni


MEIS-UA 405-000 (10147)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhargava, Rajni

Intermediate Urdu I (MEIS-UA 303)

Continues where Elementary Urdu leaves off. The students are introduced to literary texts. Along with specific language tasks, criticism and analysis now form part of the curriculum. Dictation, memorizing poetry, comprehension, and engaging in longer sessions of conversation form an important part of this course. By the end of this course, students should have achieved some fluency in reading literary texts, writing short essays, and carrying on a conversation.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 303-000 (8165)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Naqvi, Tahira

Intermediate Arabic I (MEIS-UA 103)

Builds on the skills acquired in Elementary Arabic I and II, with increased emphasis on writing and reading from modern sources, in addition to aural/oral proficiency.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 103-000 (8161)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Alnaemi, Ali


MEIS-UA 103-000 (8162)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Alnaemi, Ali


MEIS-UA 103-000 (8163)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Amani

The Emergence of The Modern Middle East (MEIS-UA 690)

Surveys main political, social, economic, and intellectual currents of the 20th century. Emphasis on historical background and development of current problems in the region. Topics include imperialism, nationalism, religion, Orientalism, women, class formation, oil, the Arab-Israeli crisis, and the Iranian revolution.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2022)


MEIS-UA 690-000 (5389)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MEIS-UA 690-000 (2662)
07/07/2022 – 08/17/2022 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mousavi, Bita


MEIS-UA 690-000 (2671)
07/07/2022 – 08/17/2022 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mousavi, Bita

South Asian Literature (MEIS-UA 717)

Addresses the rich literary product of modern and contemporary South Asia. Offers more advanced undergraduates a window on a rich and culturally varied area of the world, as well as an understanding of aspects of South Asian history and society as represented in translations of modern prose writing (short stories and novels) originally written in South Asian languages.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MEIS-UA 717-000 (9065)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ilieva, Gabriela Nik

Elementary Arabic II (MEIS-UA 102)

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MEIS-UA 102-000 (8421)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badawi, Ghada


MEIS-UA 102-000 (8422)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badawi, Ghada


MEIS-UA 102-000 (8423)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Amani

Vector Analysis (MATH-UA 224)

Brief review of multivariate calculus: partial derivatives, chain rule, Riemann integral, change of variables, line integrals. Lagrange multipliers. Inverse and implicit function theorems and their applications. Introduction to calculus on manifolds: definition and examples of manifolds, tangent vectors and vector fields, differential forms, exterior derivative, line integrals and integration of forms. Gauss’ and Stokes’ theorems on manifolds.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


MATH-UA 224-000 (8661)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 224-000 (8662)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Intro to Math Modeling (MATH-UA 251)

Formulation and analysis of mathematical models. Mathematical tools include dimensional analysis, optimization, simulation, probability, and elementary differential equations. Applications to biology, economics, other areas of science. The necessary mathematical and scientific background is developed as needed. Students participate in formulating models as well as in analyzing them.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Partial Differential Equations (MATH-UA 9263)

Many laws of physics are formulated as partial differential equations. This course discusses the simplest examples of such laws as embodied in the wave equation, the diffusion equation, and Laplace?s equation. Nonlinear conservation laws and the theory of shock waves. Applications to physics, chemistry, biology, and population dynamics. Prerequisite: prerequisite for MATH-UA 263

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MATH-UA 9263-000 (10132)
01/26/2023 – 05/05/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by Lebovits, Joachim


MATH-UA 9263-000 (10310)
01/26/2023 – 05/05/2023 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by Lebovits, Joachim

Honors Linear Algebra (MATH-UA 148)

This honors section of Linear Algebra is a proof-based course intended for well-prepared students who have already developed some mathematical maturity and ease with abstraction. Its scope will include the usual Linear Algebra (MATH-UA 140) syllabus; however this class will be faster, more abstract and proof-based, covering additional topics. Topics covered are: Vector spaces, linear dependence, basis and dimension, matrices, determinants, solving linear equations, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization, inner products, applications.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 148-000 (9196)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cao, Norman


MATH-UA 148-000 (10147)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rilloraza, Paco

Honors Calculus III (MATH-UA 129)

The scope of this honors class will include the usual MATH-UA 123 syllabus; however this class will move faster, covering additional topics and going deeper. Functions of several variables. Vectors in the plane and space. Partial derivatives with applications, especially Lagrange multipliers. Double and triple integrals. Spherical and cylindrical coordinates. Surface and line integrals. Divergence, gradient, and curl. Theorem of Gauss and Stokes.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 129-000 (9309)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Serfaty, Sylvia

Honors Analysis II (MATH-UA 329)

Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in Honors Analysis I (MATH-UA 328), or a grade of A in Analysis (MATH-UA 325) and permission of instructor. Continuation of Honors Analysis I (MATH-UA 328). Topics include: metric spaces, differentiation of functions of several real variables, the implicit and inverse function theorems, Riemann integral on R^n, Lebesgue measure on R^n, the Lebesgue integral.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 329-000 (8889)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gunturk, C Sinan


MATH-UA 329-000 (8890)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mui, Stephanie

Honors Algebra II (MATH-UA 349)

Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in Honors Algebra I (MATH-UA 348), or a grade of A in Algebra (MATH-UA 343) and permission of instructor. Principal ideal domains, polynomial rings in several variables, unique factorization domains. Fields, finite extensions, constructions with ruler and compass, Galois theory, solvability by radicals.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 349-000 (8887)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goodman, Jonathan


MATH-UA 349-000 (8888)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Charyyev, Jumageldi

Introduction to Fluid Dynamics (MATH-UA 230)

Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in Calculus III (MATH-UA 123) or Math for Economics III (MATH-UA 213) (for economics majors). Recommended: Mathematical Physics (PHYS-UA 106). Fluid dynamics is the branch of physics that can describe the flow of blood in the human body, the flight of an insect, or the motions of weather systems. Key concepts include: the formalism of continuum mechanics; the conservation of mass, energy, and momentum in a fluid; the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations; and viscosity and vorticity. These concepts are applied to such classic problems in fluid dynamics as potential flow around a cylinder, the propagation of sound and gravity waves, and the onset of instability in shear flow.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 230-000 (8755)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by