Category Archives: General Elective

General Elective Only

The Contemporary Literature Lab (ENGL-UA 9995)

This course bridges scholarly and professional training by providing students with an intensive introduction to the world of contemporary literature: its writers, its communities, and its organizations and institutions. Built around the English Department’s Contemporary Literature Series (CLS), which brings noted authors who are on course syllabi that semester to the NYU campus, the focus of the CLS Lab varies each semester depending on the featured authors. Some of the topics to be explored include: literary publishing, forums for literary discussion and criticism, literary organizations and institutions, and the possibilities and challenges of writing scholarly literary criticism about contemporary literature. By the end of the CLS Lab, students will have a firm grasp of the contemporary literary landscape and they will be better prepared to translate their interests and skills as English majors into the intellectual and professional contexts of the literary world.

English (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGL-UA 9995-000 (2758)
09/02/2024 – 12/06/2024 Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Robson, Catherine

Seeing London’s Architecture (ARTH-UA 9674)

This course is designed to work in three ways. First, it is an opportunity to learn about London’s architecture and history by physically exploring the city’s historic and modern built environment. Second, this class is an introduction to sketching and keeping a travel notebook, a fulfilling skill that any liberal arts student should experience. Third, and perhaps most important, this course teaches students how to ‘read’ a building and a town or city. The ability to visually make sense of the built environment of this major capital should help in understanding the architecture of New York City and other towns and cities throughout the world. Our course is formed of a series of site visits through London’s extraordinary and diverse environment, considering significant architectural developments from many periods, while learning to record and describe what we see. We will study the architectural vocabulary of London and learn how to accurately and elegantly depict buildings and places in both word and image. Please note that it is very important that students attend the first class, which covers the introductory information, lecture and drawing session.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Architecture as Narrative (IDSEM-UG 2003)

In this course, students explore the relationships between architecture and narrative-based cultural expressions such as film, novels and even games, analyzing current developments from a critical perspective. As part of their study, students will focus on space as medium for storytelling. The course is divided in two parts in order to progress from homo spectator to homo faber. In the first half students develop their theoretical framework through lectures, group discussions and workshops on different sources that may include films such as Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner and Japanese Studio Ghilbi’s Spirited Away, architectural work from Rem Koolhaas and Toyo Ito, and cyberpunk texts from William Gibson, Lebbeus Woods, and others. Students’ newly-acquired conceptual background is summarized in a midterm essay. In the second part of the course, students apply their skills on a series of short projects for Manhattan, located at the intersection between architecture and narrative. For the production of their projects, students are expected to bring to the class their own set of interests and abilities —ranging, for example, from music to computer gaming, or from academic research to Internet literacy.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Intro to Urban Agriculture (FOOD-UE 1030)

This course provides a practical introduction to urban agriculture. Students will learn horticultural skills while performing tasks at the NYU Urban Farm Lab. They will also learn about the biological processes that these tasks manage & how they fit together in a system. Through visits to other sites around the city, students will be exposed to a wide variety of strategies for practicing horticulture in the urban environment.

Food Studies (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FOOD-UE 1030-000 (10584)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Metrick, Melissa


FOOD-UE 1030-000 (10585)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Metrick, Melissa

Ecology of New York Theater (THEA-UT 679)

New York City is celebrated in the English speaking world as a center of theatrical production, making a consequential contribution to the culture. The sheer volume, range and scope of activity can make the theater scene challenging to navigate, especially as an emerging professional. The course “Ecology of New York Theater” unpacks the power structures, operating systems and business models currently underpinning the live theater industry. From the commercial theater to not-for-profit companies to presenting organizations and festivals, how does each part of the sector function and where do they interact? Who are the power brokers within the current ecosystem and, perhaps more importantly, who are the influencers that are driving innovation – the makers and disrupters moving the field forward? With which producing companies, unions and institutions is it essential to become familiar as amatter of professional literacy? And who are the creatives and power brokers that are most significant in the field right now? How is new work developed in both the commercial and the not for profit theater? Who really decides what gets produced – how and why? Upon what should one rely for cultural information? Do critics still matter? What about new trends such as immersive theater, illusion, hybrid concerts, autobiographical and testimony theater, circus and burlesque? And what of the audience? What does the live experience offer – and has the responsibility of the artist toward the audience changed? Who is coming to the theater and who is not? While it will not be possible to cover every linchpin organization, company or creator, students will know how to find out what they need to know when they need to know it.

Drama (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

The Business of Nonprofit Management (UPADM-GP 242)

This course is a general introduction to nonprofit management, with heavy emphasis on practical application. How do not-for-profit organizations actually function? How do they attract “customers?” How do these companies grow when there are no owners with financial incentives to grow the business? What are the core elements of a “good” not-for-profit company? What are the metrics for determining the health of a company without profit? And, what, exactly does not-for-profit even mean?

UG Public and Nonprofit Management and Policy (Graduate)
4 credits – 5 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


UPADM-GP 242-000 (3459)
07/08/2024 – 08/12/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by Nawabi, Aniqa


UPADM-GP 242-000 (3460)
07/08/2024 – 08/12/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by Niemann, Alyson


UPADM-GP 242-000 (3458)
07/08/2024 – 08/12/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by Nawabi, Aniqa


UPADM-GP 242-000 (3461)
07/08/2024 – 08/12/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by Niemann, Alyson

Experiments in Collective Joy (OART-UT 18)

How do ants or bees organize on a mass scale when their individual brains are incapable of understanding the bigger systems they’re creating together? How did a Twitch hive-mind of 1.2 million people beat Pokémon one collective move at a time? How do we make art that makes us and our audience feel more connected, more alive, more powerful? This hands-on project studio course is about making art where participants are the medium, and the masterpiece created exists inside and between them. Let’s explore community and its connection to transformational, radical joy — not complacent happiness, but a joy that is the feeling of power, agency, and capacity growing within us and within the people around us as we cooperate to overcome shared challenges. Which systems and forms of art, play, and expression foster that kind of joy? This course is heavy on imagination, vulnerability, reading, discussion, experimentation, playtesting, and interactive group activities. Each week explores the relationship of the individual to the group under various lenses and spheres of life (i.e. politics, religion, activism, evolutionary biology, sociology, pleasure, the universe, sports, games, childhood, etc.). Then together, we break down the relationships, dynamics, and effects those systems have, and create multi-media prototypes and performance experiments inspired by these themes and ideas. The early assignments are solo, and then almost all assignments are in groups. The core process of the class uses iterative game design as a structure for ideating, creating, playtesting, and refining, though students are welcome to work in any medium they choose, so long as the goal is to explore themes of collective joy.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


OART-UT 18-000 (7263)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Luhrs, August

Reality and Creation (OART-UT 106)

Reality & Creation is an interdisciplinary, collaborative workshop that requires students to develop and present original works using real-life material. While primarily focused on filmmaking – students may also explore writing and performance to investigate the artful manipulation of reality in order to evoke meaning and emotion. Students will explore the meanings of both documentary and narrative filmmaking – and the inherent conflicts between creative construction and telling true stories. They will analyze cinematic representations of reality and devise hybrid works that use inventive and surprising forms while playing with the notion of the real. Over the course of the semester, students will complete a series of classroom/studio projects as well as independent works from non-fiction sources: such as unscripted interviews, archival material, found footage and newsreel. These projects are designed to foster experimentation across the arts disciplines and to cultivate creative collaboration.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Content and Meaning (ASPP-GT 2045)

The class is to consider the depth of grief and loss within artistic responses and to inspire love and hope with our creative transformation. How does the artist process or respond to the emotions and events of loss? What are cultural heritage examples? What are ways we were taught in our families? What traditions do we wish to reimagine? Who needs to be commemorated? Is creative transformation possible? Is there a space for hope, love and joy within the complexity of these emotions? The course will have creative exercises and conceptual prompts that can be developed in the medium of your choice. We will consider creative texts such as visual, film, music, media, performance, installation, and poetic examples to broaden and inspire our understanding of ways to respond. There are other forms of expression to contemplate such as fashion, outsider art, architecture, archives, memorials, gardening, and cultural movements. We will have discussion, guests, field trips, and presentations. Is there a way to create an archive? How do we document or forget? Together we will be a collective of considering, contemplating and creating. Some of the strategies we will be considering are: metaphor, expression within nature, fairy tales, abstraction, fragments, love, celebration and the space of silence for restoration. Some of the artists /writers will be Maya Angelou, Dunbar, David Wognarowicz, Krishnamurti, Pamela Sneed, Barthes, Rilke and bell hooks. We will look at films such as the 1926 silent film, Page of Madness by Kunsuga, Let me Come in by Bill Morrison, or News From Home by Chantal Ackerman. I look forward to being your guide for the seminar, Grief, Loss , Love, Hope and Creative Transformation. Feel free to contact me with any questions karen.finley@nyu.edu

Ctr for Art, Society & Pub Pol (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Hyper Object (COART-UT 700)

The object, in reality, is anything but inert – it is hyperactive, changing in function and meaning as it moves in time and space. This studio-based course will give students the tools to use objects and materials specifically and deliberately in their work. The course will link intuitive making with research, allowing students to investigate their genuine and unique interests and develop their conceptual goals. During the course of the semester, students will be exposed to a wide range of non-traditional objects and materials that have been employed by artists throughout history. Readings and viewings will supplement the work done in the studio, with four themed sections serving as guided warm ups for a final project of the students’ own direction. These sections are titled: The Other, The Icon, The Minuscule, The Massive. Each student will make a work based on each theme, and group critiques will function as a laboratory in which students can test theories on display, context, form and legibility. This course is best suited to those with an interest in nontraditional art materials, collage, and found objects. Prior experience in sculpture or painting will be particularly helpful, however, it is not required.

Collaborative Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Lighting: (PHTI-UT 1013)

Prerequisite: Photography II or permission from the Department. This class teaches lighting as a series of the most common lighting problems encountered in professional photography and cinematography. The course philosophy is that the most complex and difficult lighting problems are really just combinations of small, easily resolved, problems. Starting with basic three-point lighting for portraiture using simple continuous source lighting, the course will progress quickly to extremely complex set ups using electronic flash as well as lighting for the new generation of hybrid Dslr’s (video/still camera) as it moves through multiple environments. Subjects covered include: Lighting for portraits, still life, fashion, interiors, documentary, and exterior location lighting using battery powered flash. Location scouting and planning according to location limitations. Color temperature and color control. Light shaping and control. Students will learn how to use: Digital SLR’s, medium format cameras, Leaf Aptus electronic capture, direct tethered capture using Adobe Lightroom, continuous lighting, electronic flash, color temperature meters and custom white balance profiles as well as the basics of video/sound capture. Lighting equipment is provided. A lab fee is charged for this course.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

History of Documentary Film (OART-UT 1701)

The course traces the documentary film from its origins to the present day. Pioneer documentarians like Dziga Vertov and Robert Flaherty saw in documentary film the ability to portray life with a kind of truthfulness never before possible. Early Polish filmmaker Boleslaw Matuszewski wrote that while “the cinematograph does not give the whole truth at least what it gives is unquestionable and of an absolute truth.” Since those heady days, it has become all too clear that documentaries have no special access to the truth. Nevertheless, as this still-young art evolved, documentarians of different schools constantly sought new means to tell the human story. Documentary filmmaking has always been a blend of artistry and technical means and we will also explore this critical relationship. The course explores the development of the documentary and the shifting intentions of documentary filmmakers through the evolution of narrative approach and structure paying special attention to the documentary tradition’s relationship to journalism. Students examine how different filmmakers have gone about trying to convey “reality” on screen both through the use and avoidance of narration, through interviews, editing and dramatizations. Throughout the semester, students investigate how image-driven medium attempts to report stories and the ways an emotion-driven art can be problematic for journalistic objectivity. Finally, the ethical and journalistic responsibilities the documentary filmmaker are discussed. Special attention is given to dramatic re-creations, the filmmaker’s relationship to his/her subjects and the construction of narrative through editing.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


OART-UT 1701-000 (7218)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dorman, Joseph

Devising & Documentary (OART-UT 144)

Note this class is called “Devised Theater: History and Practice.” This intensive focuses on both historic evolution of ritual-based/early theater models through contemporary theater philosophies (accentuating history of Futurist/Dada theater innovations to present), and on anatomizing the nature of performer, performance, story and storytelling via the non-traditional philosophies and methods of contemporary experimental theater. The class will be rigorously participatory in terms of discussing/physicalizing these experimental methods and will culminate in the creation and performance of simple class collaboration-generated stage narratives. Students will investigate the meaning and application of physical/environmental ’neutrality’ on stage as they simultaneously investigate and define for themselves the most essential markers needed for the viewer to perceive ‘story’ in performance. As the staged pieces are constructed from these anatomized building blocks of performance and story, more complex qualities of character, identity, archetype, mannerism, linguistic disfluencies (verbal and non-verbal) and psychological subtext will be introduced as tools for each performer’s role in the story. In the final phases of piece creation, simple analog elements of music, sound, light, mask, craft materials, dance, virtuosic/specialized skill, props will be introduced as tools. The final performance will aspire to clear and effective applications of the performance/story elements discussed (or discovered) in class. Techniques and exercises derived from the worlds of Futurism/Dada, Richard Maxwell, Blue Man Group, Elevator Repair Service, Ann Bogart, Joshua Fried, and others will be discussed and employed.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
1 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


OART-UT 144-000 (15799)

Experiential Learning Seminar: Fashion Industry: Creativity & Business (MULT-UB 104)

Fashion companies, as business entities, have always been faced with balancing technological and operational necessities with creative and imaginative artistry. Today, this challenge is even more difficult to manage, as the industry’s traditional modes of operation (e.g. a multitude of physical retail locations, seasonally driven creation & distribution of products, near total dependency on foreign production, and the producer’s sense of fashion trend entitlement) has given way to omnichannel retailing, merchandise “drops” and smaller collections, reimagining production systems (aka “Supply Chains”)and the ascendency of the consumer as the controlling factor in confirming fashion trends and determining market outcomes, to name just a few of the disruptive changes. This has been underscored by the industry struggling to contain its role as a major source of global pollution, and global warming. The ESG/CSR Sustainability challenge has intensified Fashion’s need to manage these disruptive changes and incorporate new operational modes while, in the same space and time, embracing the new digital ways of thinking about business and fashion, including the impact of the Metaverse, NFT’s, Blockchain and virtual try-on processes and platforms. This course and this class is charged with finding new, untried but business-driven, solutions to these challenges placed within the Sustainability context.

Multidisciplinary (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


MULT-UB 104-000 (10943)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carr, Jeffrey

Arts Marketing (MKTG-UB 24)

This course is designed to be a self contained introduction to marketing in the arts. It will focus primarily on live performing arts, but also include museums and gallerias. The arts category is rife with change. This presents enormous challenges for artists, producers, venue managers and marketers. In addition, the practice of marketing is changing just as quickly if not more so. Strategy and tactics are at more of a premium than ever. Marketers in arts related businesses must find a way to flourish in this new world, by working smarter, faster, and with great ingenuity. COURSE OBJECTIVE : ● To garner an understanding of the concepts that drive arts marketing ● To explore the competitive landscape and uncover what leads to a successful arts business ● To practically apply coursework towards a project of students interest and focus ●

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Business of Film (MKTG-UB 20)

This course is designed to provide both business and films students with a systematic overview of the modern day filmed entertainment business. The course covers the traditional “Hollywood System” operating out of Los Angeles and also examine the independent film model.. The course takes a critical look at the financing, production, marketing and distribution of filmed entertainment. Particular attention is focused on the various revenue streams inherent in the exploitation of such product both in the domestic marketplace and in the international arena. The primary objective of the course is to provide students with real life experiences, the practical realities, and a keen understanding of how things actually work in the film business. The course will hopefully provide students with a requisite background and orientation that can lead to an entry level position with a film production or distribution company, an international sales organization, or related support organizations.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Craft & Commerce of Cinema: Tribeca Film Fest (MKTG-UB 51)

This is a specialized EMT course, designed in coordination with the Tribeca Film Festival Board, that provides students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of the global film industry including the complete film production process from crafting the idea for a script, hiring or becoming a producer, financing the project, selling it to a studio or independent production company, building a team, production elements, post-production including music acquisition, and the selling or distribution to a global marketplace. The course includes learning about distribution and exhibition, marketing and building audience awareness, research applications, international licensing, and preparation for careers in the industry. Students attend and fully participate in the panels offered during the two week period of the Tribeca Film Festival.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MKTG-UB 51-000 (10655)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Social Media Strategy (MKTG-UB 45)

The course covers marketing, advertising, and communications strategies in the new media landscape where traditional media (e.g., television, print) and the online social media (i.e., Web 2.0; e.g., online social networks, user-generated content, blogs, forums) co-exist. Students are expected to have knowledge about the fundamentals of traditional advertising methods and strategies. With this background knowledge, the primary focus of the course is on understanding social media, developing social media marketing strategies, and tracking their effectiveness. This course does not look at more tactical aspects of advertising/communications such as creative, message management, and publicity.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MKTG-UB 45-000 (10761)
02/03/2021 – 03/17/2021 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Entrepreneurship in Sustainable Protein (BSPA-UB 50)

Today, the food industry is the biggest emitter of greenhouse gases, accounting for up to 30% of emissions. A poor diet is now the leading cause of mortality in the U.S. As part of these huge global problems, animal production is arguably the biggest culprit. In recognition of this, consumers are dramatically altering diet patterns, and food entrepreneurs are rushing to solve the problem with desirable solutions. Vegetarianism and veganism are exploding and new alternative meat and dairy offerings are being launched at a frenetic pace. This undergraduate course—the first of its kind—is designed to put the idea of teaching entrepreneurship to its ultimate test—with the objective of incubating a series of ventures through the course of the semester that have the potential to be viable businesses and reverse negative externalities that arise from animal production. The course will start by exploring the chemistry of protein, the nutritional role of protein, the history of animal production and its environmental consequences. It will then take students through a series of frameworks to identify and implement solutions using entrepreneurship as the vehicle. These frameworks will include: (1) design thinking to identify opportunities, (2) sector / industry analysis models to identify need-gaps and validate the opportunity, (3) design thinking to prototype solutions and (4) business modeling in order to commercialize solutions. At the beginning of the semester, “start-up” teams of five to six students each will be formed and tasked with building a “blue-print” for a startup in the sustainable protein sector.

Business and Society (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


BSPA-UB 50-000 (19353)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Taparia, Hans

Introduction to Editing (FMTV-UT 1016)

This is a hands-on course designed to introduce the student to narrative and documentary editing techniques, and to the role of the editor in shaping the final form of film and video productions. Good editing is crucial to the success of every film and video. This class is recommended to students pursuing directing or producing who want a better understanding of how the post-production workflow functions, as well as to any student, from sophomore to senior, who would like to gain a clearer understanding of the role of the editor as an artist, a technician and a collaborator. To achieve this, the class will delve into the methods, objectives, and technical aspects of post-production. It will thoroughly explore two major editing programs (Avid Media Composer and Adobe Premiere Pro) used in today’s professional post-production environment, and acquaint the student with every stage of the editing workflow from capture to final output. Students will learn to approach these and other non-linear programs as variations on common themes rather than as completely new and foreign tools. In addition, the class will present examples of edited sequences from both narrative and documentary films for discussion, and have invited guests who will share their experiences in bringing films to completion. There will also be a course pack of assigned readings. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Storyboarding (FMTV-UT 1033)

Students will create a storyboard from an assigned literary property (i.e., fairy tales, folk tales, famous short stories, etc.) and research the chosen material visually in picture libraries, print and photo archives, museum/gallery libraries and online. From this basic research, the student will create and develop all the visual elements that lead to a final production storyboard; these elements include character model drawings; styling sketches for costumes and sets; experimental “inspirational” sketches exploring mood, color, and character relationships and experiments in animation and color test footage. Each week, students will “pitch,” (i.e. present material) as it is being developed. Through weekly critiques from the instructor and students, elements and shape of the production storyboard is refined to its final form. The approved storyboard at the end of the semester should be ready to go into production, and must reflect character ,attitude, design, entertainment, mood, expressions, feeling and type of action. It must use dialogue, music/sound effects, and tell the story in the best possible way. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19436)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moore, William


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19437)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baker, Zoya


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19438)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baker, Zoya


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19439)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Organizational Behavior (MG-UY 2104)

This course focuses on the study of human behavior in innovative organizations. Emphasis is on teams, leadership, communication theory and organizational culture and structure. The course includes analyses of organizational behavior problems through case studies and participation in experiential learning.

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 2104-000 (14068)


MG-UY 2104-000 (14069)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at ePoly
Instructed by Bowens, Carla

Journalistic Inquiry: The Written Word (JOUR-UA 101)

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


JOUR-UA 101-000 (8832)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


JOUR-UA 101-000 (23456)


JOUR-UA 101-000 (10147)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by De La Hoz Arias, Felipe


JOUR-UA 101-000 (9303)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Borak, Donna


JOUR-UA 101-000 (8735)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reed, Anika


JOUR-UA 101-000 (8677)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


JOUR-UA 101-000 (9796)


JOUR-UA 101-000 (20665)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Surico, John

Introduction to Creative Writing (LITCW-UH 1003)

This workshop introduces the basic elements of poetry, fiction, and personal narrative with in-class writing, take-home reading and writing assignments, and substantive discussions of craft. The course is structured as a workshop, which means that students receive feedback from their instructor and their fellow writers in a roundtable setting, and that they should be prepared to offer their classmates responses to their work.

Literature & Creative Writing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


LITCW-UH 1003-000 (3504)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Handal, Nathalie

Elementary Arabic 1 (ARABL-UH 1110)

This course is designed for learners with no prior knowledge of Arabic. Students who have studied Arabic before or who have prior knowledge of Arabic are required to take a placement test. This is a full semester (or equivalent session) course during which students first learn the Arabic alphabet, then move on to work on the sentence and paragraph levels. It is an interactive course designed to build the student’s abilities in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. At the end of the semester students should be able to carry on a short conversation; ask and answer questions; introduce themselves and others; provide simple biographical information; interact in simple daily life situations; ask for assistance; express likes and dislikes; read short texts; and gain a basic understanding of Arab culture. Types of tasks and assignments required for this course include daily homework assignments, periodic quizzes, brief presentations, short essay writing, and a final exam.

Arabic Language (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARABL-UH 1110-000 (3501)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Kittaneh, Khulood


ARABL-UH 1110-000 (3502)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by El Araby, Omima


ARABL-UH 1110-000 (3518)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by El Araby, Omima


ARABL-UH 1110-000 (3623)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Kittaneh, Khulood

Intro to Marketing (MKTG-UB 9001)

This course evaluates marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and a catalyst of business activity. It presents a comprehensive framework that includes a) researching and analyzing customers, company, competition, and the marketing environment, b) identifying and targeting attractive segments with strategic positioning, and c) making product, pricing, communication, and distribution decisions. Cases and examples are utilized to develop problem-solving abilities.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4953)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Thu
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Donvito, Raffaele


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4981)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (21443)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4834)
08/29/2024 – 12/04/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Magarino, Victor


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (3462)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Anton, Muriel


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (21026)
at NYU Tel Aviv (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (3380)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by West, Andrew

Economics of Media and Entertainment (ECON-UB 120)

The media and entertainment industries (including professional sports) share a series of peculiar features: essentially, they (a) produce an intangible output (e.g., a music recording), which can be distributed in a variety of forms and (b) do so based on an input which is extremely idiosyncratic: the creative output of a person or group of persons (e.g., a singer or a band). Finally, (c) recent technological innovation has changed the balance of power between the various players and led various industry segments to re-invent their business model. This course provides an introduction to the businesses of media and entertainment: value chain, key players, significant trends, etc. It takes a distinctive economics perspective to understanding how the forces of supply and demand have changed the business model of various industry segments.

Economics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Entertainment Law (MULT-UB 48)

This two-credit course is about key legal aspects of the entertainment industry. Entertainment law is not a separate legal discipline. There is really no such thing as entertainment law. Instead, it lies at the intersection of several areas of law and applies those disciplines to the diverse entertainment industry of products and services. The course will involve a foundational coverage of the following areas: contract, advertising, protection of ideas by contract, copyright and trademark (including the concepts of parody and fair use), rights of publicity and privacy, defamation, and artist representation. This course should prepare you to analyze a wide variety of entertainment law issues at a general level. Entertainment law does not tend towards an orderly system because it lacks overriding organizational principles that would tie together its myriad facets. As such, this course will appear to lack a logical outline in its progression and instead, will examine this corner of law in separate pieces, which will cover doctrine, analytical problem-solving, practical skills related to law (e.g., analytical writing, reasoning skills, argument structure, etc.), and the particular contexts in which issues arise in the entertainment industry. Dealing with more narrow topics, such as constitutional concerns or union representation, or obtaining a much deeper knowledge of specific topics discussed in class, will require additional, specialized study. This class also helps students further develop their reasoning, communication, and listening skills.

Multidisciplinary (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MULT-UB 48-000 (10639)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MULT-UB 48-000 (10725)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

TV Nation: Inside and Out of The Box (FMTV-UT 1086)

TV Nation: Inside and Out of the Box gives students the opportunity to experience, first hand, how the world of network television works from two points of view: business and creative. Students will gain an understanding of the business aspect through the vantage point of the network executives and programmers. They will also learn the creative process from development to pitching, from the vantage point of writers and producers in the industry. In TV Nation, students will role play the entire process as the key players who put together a season for broadcast and cable networks. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1086-000 (19478)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldman, Andrew

The City and the Writer: New York City and Abu Dhabi (LITCW-UH 1509)

New York City and Abu Dhabi is a laboratory for studying NYC and AD, works written about them, as well as creating new works inspired by them. New works – poems, short stories, short plays, visual essays, or films – that will serve as a map for possible journeys as they reinvent and talk back to debates on immigration and space, culture and literature. A cross-disciplinary and cross-border conversation that examines how urban life and the cityscape create imaginative spaces, and the way words create cities. NYC & AD as global spaces will be explored in the works of writers with backgrounds from Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Latin America, and the Caribbean. How does the city shape the form of writing and language? How has literature challenged certain theories on space, and narratives constructed around urban identities? Students get the unique opportunity to meet numerous residents, from theater makers, designers, architects, artists, filmmakers, feminists, actors, comedians, chefs and bodega owners as well as be part of a podcast series and/or publish in one of the most important international literary magazines, Words Without Borders.

Literature & Creative Writing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


LITCW-UH 1509-000 (4206)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Handal, Nathalie

Storytelling: from Aristotle to Beyonce and Beyond (FMTV-UT 1203)

Aristotle to Beyoncé and Beyond introduces students to an eclectic group of storytellers and storytelling. Students study the mechanics of telling a story, gaining a deeper appreciation and understanding of how storytellers and storytelling impact the world.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


FMTV-UT 1203-000 (3347)
07/03/2024 – 08/15/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Riazi, Saba


FMTV-UT 1203-000 (3348)
07/03/2024 – 08/15/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Riazi, Saba

Music for Film and TV (FMTV-UT 1008)

This course examines the artistic, aesthetic, and technical aspects in composing and creating music for film and television. It provides an inside look into the relationship between composer, director, and music editor, exploring music as a creative tool. Through lectures, analysis, demonstrations, and presentations by guest speakers, students learn and deal with the specifics of the film composer’s job, duties, and responsibilities, including the basics of film scoring. As a result, students develop the listening and production skills necessary for creative use of music in films, television, and media. In addition to creative and technical considerations, the business and personal relationship between composer and director/producer will be discussed. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1008-000 (19412)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Research for Customer Insights (MKTG-UB 9)

This course provides students with both research and managerial perspectives in the development and application of marketing research tools and procedures. It describes the development of research designs from problem formulation to analysis and submission of the research report. It also covers the analysis of techniques in marketing research, such as focus groups, experimental design, surveys, sampling, statistical analysis, and reporting. Cases are utilized in the development of methods and in specific areas of application.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 9-000 (18453)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pluzinski, Carol

Film: A Transformative Process, a Vision Beyond Technology (OART-UT 140)

This course emphasizes the content, the aesthetics, and the purpose of cinema as a truly distinctive and dynamic art form uncovering the inner vision of the filmmaker, and the organic and transformative process where filmmakers projects their original truth, not compromising or borrowing ideas and themes from other films. Students explore the use of technology as a valuable tool that enhances the vision of the filmmaker without diminishing the organic texture of the work by its overwhelming presence. The course brings to light the stagnant and repetitious formulae of commercial cinema, resulting in diluted mainstream films. The works of iconic filmmakers who embrace and use film as an original, vibrant and reflective art form are reviewed throughout the course. Extracts and readings from relevant filmmakers are given throughout the course.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Art and Technology (OART-UT 1059)

Thesis: All art uses technology. Technology is not art. Whether a work of art is created to bridge the supernatural, convey experience, thought, or a world view, or something more, art is a three letter verb representing the result of an individual’s desire to create difference. This course is an exploration in technological literacy for all NYU students. Students will create a website, capture, edit, and publish digital media to their sites, use software to create objects through subtractive (laser cutting) and additive (3D printing) machining processes, build circuits, learn to program a microcomputer, and build a functioning computer-controlled object.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Printmaking in an Expanded Field (ART-SHU 255)

This Praxis course is an exploration of contemporary and traditional artistic printmaking practices, with an emphasis on expanding notions of conventional printmaking techniques and forms. Students will be introduced to various printmaking techniques, and experiment with traditional and non-traditional forms, in conjunction with their histories and consider what constitutes a hand-made print in an artistic framework. Students will gain an understanding of printmaking – its history based in China, development across the globe and inventive contemporary practices which include sculptural forms. They will learn techniques, modes, forms, and applications of printmaking – with an emphasis on relief prints (stamps and wood cuts) – in a conceptual framework of contemporary printmaking practices and global visual culture. Note: attendance in the first class meeting is mandatory, otherwise you will be dropped from the course. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: This course satisfies IMA/IMB elective.

Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ART-SHU 255-000 (19570)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Lin, Monika

Design with Climate Change (ARTS-UG 1636)

The course explores how design can respond to environmental problems and climate change. In analyzing past attempts, the course starts with decolonizing turn of the century admirations for primitivism and ends with the cyber punks planning new environments online. Following the work of architects, artists, urban planners, graphic designers and fashionista, the course will review histories of adaptation and ways to design with climate. The class will decolonize modernist design schemes, and focus on better ways to design with climate. We will also devote time to discuss topics such as building closed ecological systems, counterculture designs, cyber environments, sick building syndrome, biomimetics, eco-fashion, earth art, and other methods to design within the realm of nature. The overall objective is twofold; to survey the larger historical context of ecological design and define specific contributions to the climate change debate. Ultimately, the students will be asked to design, develop, and participate in an ecologically driven conceptual final design project of their choice.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ARTS-UG 1636-000 (12489)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Anker, Peder · Joachim, Mitchell

Contemporary Music Performance I (ARTS-UG 1305)

This course is designed to help students develop a better understanding of music by presenting the opportunity to experience music as a musician. Students review basic music theory and develop rudimentary musicianship skills; learn how to utilize the basic functionality of common digital audio workstations; and use that experience to create music. The goal is for each student to be able to compose, rehearse, and then perform, original contemporary pieces of music, individually and in a group setting, in a wide range of musical idioms. The course culminates in a public recital of works written and performed by students.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ARTS-UG 1305-000 (12193)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Castellano, John

Spanish for Beginners- Level I (SPAN-UA 1)

Open to students with no previous training in Spanish and to others on assignment by placement test. 4 points. Beginning course designed to teach the elements of Spanish grammar and language structure through a primarily oral approach. Emphasis is on building vocabulary and language patterns to encourage spontaneous language use in and out of the classroom.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


SPAN-UA 1-000 (9237)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10108)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10109)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10110)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (9252)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10111)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10112)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10113)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10114)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Munoz, Sophy


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10115)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


SPAN-UA 1-000 (9268)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Munoz, Sophy


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10116)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Burgos Trujillo, Felix


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10117)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Munoz, Sophy


SPAN-UA 1-000 (9277)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Burgos Trujillo, Felix


SPAN-UA 1-000 (10118)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Del Risco, Eida

Legal Aspects of The Entertainment Industry (FMTV-UT 1195)

A course that tracks the filmmaking process from its inception, at the idea phase and follows the creative process through development, pre-production, principal photography and post-production. The class will focus on the business and legal issues that arise during every phase of filmmaking. Key topics covered will include: copyright law; option agreements for underlying rights such as books, plays, magazine and newspaper articles; sources of financing; distribution agreements; licensing of music; agreements for actors, directors, producers and writers. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. Students must have Junior or Senior standing. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1195-000 (19505)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lichter, Rosalind

Photography of Architecture, City and Territory (IPHTI-UT 1210)

City, territory and architecture have been, from the beginning of photography, privileged objects for its practice. Photography has become a tool to strengthen the understanding of architecture, to highlight aesthetic and design ideas and to critically interpret the space. This class focuses on architectural photography and the photography of urban space, both in relation to their historical roots and contemporary practice. Florence offers a perfect environment to develop one’s artistic talent while learning the art of photography and discovering the secrets of one of the most fascinating cities in the world. Assignments are designed to help explore options for technical control as well as visual experimentation and individual style. Keeping in mind the inseparability of photographic technique and expression, students are expected to articulate their particular choices in relation to the overall conceptual approach of the projects. Critiques of assignments are important to the progress of each individual in the class, to help verbalize visual concepts, and to learn to see actively. The final exam consists of the presentation of a portfolio of photographs and an artist’s statement. Students are expected to work on their projects to develop an aesthetic and coherent photographic language and a personal approach to the photographic medium in a different environment. An emphasis is also placed on refining craft in relation to ideas, and to research on an individual basis, since it is crucial in developing an artistic practice. The course includes lectures, shooting sessions and field trips, discussions and critiques of the photographs. Each student must have a camera with manually adjustable aperture and shutter speed.

Int`l Pgms, Photography (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


IPHTI-UT 1210-000 (13446)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by

Distributed Ledger Technology: Ethereum, DeFi, and Beyond (BUSF-SHU 274)

One of the most exciting socio-technological developments in the past decade has been the emergence of blockchain technology, and with it the Blockchain Economy. This subset of the digital economy has mostly been driven by the Internet-of-Value (web3.0) where decentralized platforms compete over user’s investments in various blockchain verticals. These include Decentralized Finance (DeFi) – a vibrant decentralized money management ecosystem, NFT’s that promise to overhaul how we consume and invest in art, DAO’s that decentralize business governance, various novel financial instruments such as perpetuals, ERC20’s to disintermediate resource sharing, and many more. Fulfillment: BUSF Non-finance Elective; BUSM Non-marketing Elective; IMB Business Elective. Prerequisite: CSCI-SHU 11 Introduction to Computer Programming. Antirequisite: Students who have taken ECON-SHU 232 Blockchain, Cryptocurrency & Money or BUSF-SHU 366 Applications in Entrepreneurial Finance: Fintech are not eligible to enroll.

Business and Finance (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Information Technology in Business & Society (BUSF-SHU 142)

In Information Technology in Business and Society, students learn the fundamental concepts underlying current and future developments in computer-based information technology – including hardware, software, network and database-related technologies. They will also acquire proficiency in the essential tools used by today’s knowledge workers and learn how these can be used to help solve problems of economic, social or personal nature. Throughout the course, they will be exposed to a range of more advanced topics which may include big data, information privacy, information security, digital piracy and digital music. Pre-requisites: not open to freshman. Fulfillment: This course satisfies BUSF/ BUSM Business Elective, Business Analytics Track; IMB Business Flexible Core.

Business and Finance (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


BUSF-SHU 142-000 (17570)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Junque De Fortuny, Enric

History of Theatre Architecture (THEA-UT 722)

This course examines the development of theatre architecture and design from the early formalized drama spaces (the theatre of Dionysus and the theatre of Epidaurus) to the English playhouse (the Globe to Convent Garden). We discuss the significance of the Italians to design, from the first temporary scenic elements to Serlio and Torelli to the Bibiena family. The course continues with the Paris Opera House, Wagner’s Bayreuth theatre; and the American playhouses of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth centuries, and it includes the technological changes during that period. The final aspect of the course focuses on contemporary multiple use and adaptable theatre spaces. Emphasis is placed on how trends in the theatre affect the designs of productions, individuals, and aesthetic and technical innovations. (Theatre Studies C)

Drama (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Art and Architecture: Reinventing the City (VISAR-UH 2121)

This course takes a sculptural approach to exploring and reimagining the city by looking at the existing landscape of Abu Dhabi. Students will visit public parks, streetscapes, the markets, super-blocks, the port, shopping malls, and industrial districts. We will document our observations through field notes, drawings, photography, video and sound recordings. This research will serve as a foundation for creating objects, sculptures, and installations. Students will learn to develop forms of artistic and architectural presentation and representation that reflect the urban design and development of the city. This research and artistic production will be accompanied by selected readings that address theoretical, historical and contemporary perspectives from authors and artists such as: Atelier, Bow Wow, Denise Scott Brown, Homi Baba, Dan Graham, Kevin Mitchell, Robert Venturi, Andrea Zittel.

Visual Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Foundations of Photography (VISAR-UH 1010)

This course introduces students to the history, theory, and practice of photography. Students will learn foundational image-making techniques with a focus on Black and White analog photography. A range of studio and darkroom tools and approaches will be explored. Students will be introduced to key artists, themes, and developments in photography and will consider the impact of photographic media on the development of art and society.

Visual Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


VISAR-UH 1010-000 (16675)

Asian Art and Architecture (ART-SHU 180)

This course surveys Asian art and architecture from the earliest civilizations to the present day through several themes. It focuses more on the arts and monuments from China, Japan, and India but also introduces those from Korea and Southeast Asia. We will study how artistic traditions transmit and develop in distinctive yet interconnected societies in Asia, as well as how those traditions interact with specific political, religious, social, and cultural contexts in which they grow. Issues investigated include (but are not limited to): the spread and metamorphosis of Buddhist art, the artistic exchanges between the “East” and the “West” (and the formations of the ideas of the “East” and the “West”), the production and consumption of art as related to various forms of power such as political authority, social hierarchy, and gender, and the “Asian-ness” in the contemporary world. Prerequisite: None.

Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


ART-SHU 180-000 (23806)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Kong, Hyoungee

Applications in Entrepreneurial Finance: Fintech (FINC-UB 62)

This course examines the lifecycle of high-growth new ventures (i.e. startups), with a focus on how they are funded. We will follow a successful startup’s path from founding through the stages of new venture finance. These include developing a business plan and its financials, the core skills of valuation, the venture capital industry, and how entrepreneurs and investors realize returns. Through examples of specific companies and technologies, we will also learn about the emerging landscape of financial technology (fintech) startups. We will consider the following subsectors, where startups are either seeking to displace incumbents or sell them their services: personal finance, blockchain, equity crowdfunding, lending (peer-to-peer and AI-augmented), payments, insurance, institutional investment, and money transfer.

Finance (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


FINC-UB 62-000 (19097)
02/06/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


FINC-UB 62-000 (19364)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Financial Analysis in Telecom, Media & Technology (FINC-UB 68)

This course is designed for students who intend to pursue careers across the investment banking industry as well as those exploring careers in corporate strategy and management. Areas covered include equity and debt analysis, mergers and acquisitions, and corporate strategy. While the core of the course is corporate finance, the issues encompass strategy, marketing, and economics aspects. Students will learn the unique characteristics of telecom, media and technology companies/industries while building on fundamental analytical skills by examining a series of landmark and potential corporate transactions in telecom, media & technology industries to understand how TMT companies respond to secular changes and transform their business models in the midst of evolving ecosystems. Cases discussed/analyzed include: Instagram, ActivisionBlizzard, Twitch, Apple, Alphabet, Disney, FOX, AT&T, DirecTV and Time Warner.

Finance (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


FINC-UB 68-000 (19093)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Sports Marketing (MKTG-UB 47)

Provides an overview of sports marketing as a component of a fully integrated marketing communication strategy. Studies the history and contemporary application of sports marketing as a method to achieve goals. Considers corporate as well as sporting property use of sports marketing strategies to achieve business objectives. Examines strategies that address critical business constituencies, including consumers, trade factors, employees, and the financial community. Covers sports marketing within the context of special sporting event sponsorships and professional sports teams as well as governing organizations, sports media (broadcast, print, and the Internet), licensing, hospitality, etc.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MKTG-UB 47-000 (10724)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Master, Stephen

Sports Management (MKTG-UB 39)

This course provides an overview of the key components of the global sports management ecosystem. Managing the myriad moving parts that make up the sports industry requires an understanding of general management principles and their special applications to the sports industry. From technology and marketing innovations to improved delivery systems, sports and sports-related content are one of the key drivers of the changing media landscape. The course will explore the critical elements of delivering sports content to viewers in the U.S. and abroad, taking into account constituencies which include the rights holders (e.g. leagues, conferences, teams, national governing bodies) the performers or talent (e.g. players, coaches, general managers) the media the sponsors and the consumer. For each component the course will examine the strategies, history and management perspectives that have informed this massive and evolving sector of media industries.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 39-000 (18484)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Business of Publishing (MKTG-UB 19)

This course provides students with working knowledge of the publishing industry comprising newspapers, magazines, and books. It explores traditional business models and how disruptive forces including digitalization, consumer generated content, low barriers to entry, and changing media consumption patterns are reshaping the industry. By the end of the course, students understand the operations of media companies, and can speak to the opportunities and challenges facing the industry, engage in discussions on the economics, terms, and metrics, and explain emerging business models.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 19-000 (18454)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Leisure Marketing (MKTG-UB 80)

This is a specialty marketing course designed to provide students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of marketing several leading sectors within the leisure industry. The focus is on understanding the development and application of marketing strategies and tactics for leisure companies competing for a share of the consumers discretionary spending. Key marketing concepts such as segmentation, branding, life-time value, and CRM are examined in the context of leisure industries. The course will also cover recent activities including mergers, acquisitions in those key sectors of the leisure industry: casinos, cruise ships, theme parks, eco-tourism, themed restaurants, resorts, leisure hotels, time shares. The course will explore marketing techniques that apply across the leisure companies, including licensing, sponsorships, line extensions and promotion. Discussion of evolution, and current status in these sectors through lectures, case studies, text and article readings and project work will be included.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 80-000 (18462)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Deal Making in the Entertainment Industry (MKTG-UB 43)

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the deal-making and business affairs process in the entertainment space, using film and television content as the primary example for what goes into cutting a deal. The course will explore the deal process from the perspective of the different players in entertainment and media, focusing on how each player looks to maximize value. Students will learn the process of striking a deal, from its inception, to the term sheet phase, to the negotiation process and contractual agreements, through to deal implementation. The process will be evaluated in the context of the factors that play into reaching an agreement, such as exclusivity, windowing, multi-platform rights and timing. Students will learn about negotiations strategies for maximizing value in content deals, identifying common issues in the deal process and effective paths to reaching resolution and striking a deal. The course is designed to help students: –Understand the basics of the process for making a deal in the entertainment industry –Appreciate the factors that play into maximizing value through the deal process, including understanding the relative position of the players in the entertainment industry –Learn and understand negotiating strategies and how to navigate the business affairs and deal-making process

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 43-000 (18481)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Business of Producing (MKTG-UB 49)

A specialized EMT course within the Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies designed to provide students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of producing (as a business profession) a finished creative product in the entertainment and media industries, developing a business model, and generating an income stream to repay and provide investors with a profit. Educates the student in the process of feature film and long-form television production from the initial concept of the story, through script development, to completion of the project. Covers the most important steps in the production of an independent film, a studio project, a network TV or cable show, a radio program, a Broadway production, and an advertising television commercial. Explores all the elements a producer must know, understand, and eventually become skilled with through mastery of development, including script selection, finance, budgeting, timetable development, team building, talent selection, sales, contract and union negotiation, regulations, technology, and other relevant core competencies.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 49-000 (18459)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 49-000 (18458)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

The Business of Broadway (MKTG-UB 25)

This is a specialty marketing course designed to provide students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of Broadway and live theater, as an important business enterprise within the entertainment industry. The focus is on understanding the development and application of the economics, finance, structure, implementation and staging of performances, as well as the marketing strategies and tactics for gaining audience awareness and decision to purchase. The course will examine funding, marketing, branding, product positioning and the global distribution of live theatrical entertainment. The course will cover the history, venues, vocabulary, players, business and creative structures, budget development, supplementary revenue streams, successes and failures, relationship with the movie and music industries, the important figures and support systems that make the system work, global reach, and other topics. Lecture, discussions, site visits, and project work will be included.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MKTG-UB 25-000 (10616)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Television Management: Network, Cable/Satellite (MKTG-UB 44)

This course covers the television industry, focusing on network television, cable, and satellite. It primarily surveys the American market and investigates new technology including digitization and HDTV, while providing some comparison with the international broadcast market. Students explore the organization, programming, and revenue strategies, as well as marketing innovations and competition in the newly configured broadcast landscape. Important legislation including the Telecommunications Act of 1996 are also examined. The recent volume of mergers and acquisitions in the broadcast industry are studied for their impact on the domestic entertainment landscape.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 44-000 (18447)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Movie Marketing (MKTG-UB 22)

This course gives students a basic understanding of key business issues relating to producing, distributing, marketing, and exploiting feature films. The course examines key aspects of the movie business, including managing a creative enterprise, deal making, acquiring rights, building a library, branding, and all aspects of effective marketing. The concepts developed in the course are applied in a group project presentation.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 22-000 (18448)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 22-000 (18473)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 22-000 (18479)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Intro to Marketing (MKTG-UB 1)

This course evaluates marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and a catalyst of business activity. It presents a comprehensive framework that includes (1) researching and analyzing customers, company, competition, and the marketing environment; (2) identifying and targeting attractive segments with a strategic positioning; and (3) making product, pricing, communication, and distribution decisions. Cases and examples are utilized to develop problem-solving abilities.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 2 Weeks

Sections (January 2021)


MKTG-UB 1-000 (1219)
01/05/2021 – 01/21/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 4:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Sports Economics (ECON-UB 211)

This course applies microeconomic theory and econometric analysis to sports and explores some public policy issues that have arisen in the design of sports competitions. The course is divided into four main parts: the structure of sports leagues, labor market issues, college sports, and the market for sports betting.

Economics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ECON-UB 211-000 (22435)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bowmaker, Simon

Delicious Movement: Time Is Not Even, Space Is Not Empty (ARTS-UG 1275)

Distance is Malleable is a multi-faceted course that contemplates the notions of human fragility, existential solitude, and metaphorical “nakedness.” Led by NYC-based interdisciplinary performing artist Eiko Otake, students will engage in movement study, art making, and exploration of different places and people, living or dead. How does being or becoming a mover reflect and alter each person’s relationship with the environment, history, language, and other beings? How are we defined by or/and how do we define our relationships to the particulars of place? How do we maximize the potentials of selected encounters with other human beings, places, and things? Reading assignments will focus on our collective experience of massive violence and human failure. In addition to the Gallatin studio, we will also work at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine and the Brooklyn Botanic Garden where Eiko is an artist-in-residence. Weekly reading and journal entries are required. Students will share their projects in class.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1275-000 (16980)
09/03/2024 – 10/22/2024 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Otake, Eiko

Rites of Passage into Contemporary Art Practice (ARTS-UG 1420)

Modern art has been a balancing act between control and letting go. This course focuses on the psychological interface between the two, the “liminal” zone. We will survey modern artists’ techniques for tapping sources of creativity, including Dada collagists’ free-associations; Surrealists’ automatic writing, doodles, and “cadavres exquises”; and Abstract Expressionists’ embrace of chaos. We will engage in simple exercises: doodling, speed drawing, painting an abstract mural as a group, keeping a liminal journal, collaging, and exploring ritualistic techniques. We will follow up with discussions, take a trip to the Met to dialogue with an African oracle sculpture,and conclude the course reexamining modern art in light of the inner journey threshold drama each of us has taken during the course. Readings include van Gennep’s Rites of Passage, Chipp’s Theories of Modern Art, R.D. Laing, Federico Garcia Lorca on duende, Victor Turner on liminal, Mircea Eliade on Shamanism Techniques of Ecstasy, James Elkins on alchemy and art, and Frida Kahlo’s journal.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1420-000 (16715)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ruhe, Barnaby

Photography I: (PHTI-UT 1001)

There is no prerequisite for this course. Many photographers who have been utilizing digital cameras are turning (and returning) to traditional, silver-based film and papers. This intensive course is designed to introduce and explore the practical and creative applications of analog photography. Students will learn camera operation, composition principles, and metering techniques. Supported by a comprehensive lab facility, students will learn film processing and archival projection print enlarging methods as well as the basics of print finishing and presentation. Classes will incorporate critiques of student work, slide lectures of important historical and contemporary imagery, hands-on studio and laboratory demonstrations, and field trips. Students will be assigned reading for class discussion and relevant photography exhibits to view. Students are required to complete a minimum of 4 hours of lab work per week (hours arranged by the student) in addition to regular class attendance. This course is designed to engage the student in a photographic dialogue within a productive semester. A lab fee is charged for this course.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Photography 2 (PHTI-UT 1002)

Prerequisite: Photography I or permission from the Department. This course is recommended for transfer students and non-majors. During the Fall and Spring, non-majors must fill out the following form to request access to the course: http://photo.tisch.nyu.edu/object/pinonmajorrequestform.html Photo II is a course that expands upon the principles and tools of Photography I. Students will start out continuing to refine analog skills through a series of short technical assignments. Students will work on exercises with on-camera flash, medium format camera, and tungsten lighting to further their technical skills. At the heart of the class is the development of two long-term projects in which students can hone their creative vision. Weekly critiques of students’ projects will include discussions on content, aesthetics, editing, and technique. Class time will also be spent on slide presentations of historical and contemporary photography, technical lectures, and lab demonstrations. While students will predominantly be working in analog, digital photography will be introduced. Topics to be covered include the use of a digital SLR, the basics of Adobe Photoshop, and film scanning. Students are required to have a film camera with a light meter and manual functions in addition to film and photographic paper to execute their assignments. A lab fee is charged for this course.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Conversations in the Global Music Business Surviving the Future (REMU-UT 9810)

With sales of more than 1.3 billion, the German recorded music market is the third largest in the world: it is larger than the UK music market and behind only the USA and Japan. Beyond just numbers, the Berlin music business is unique: it’s home to hundreds of powerful independent and D.I.Y. record labels; it’s historically been ground zero for innovative electronic and dance music; and it’s a burgeoning tech hub for innovative software/hardware companies like Native Instruments, Ableton and Soundcloud. In this colloquium series, students will meet and hear each week from key creative entrepreneurial figures and innovators in the German and European music business. This course has several purposes. First, students will consider how ongoing economic and technological changes might be impacting the worldwide music business, as speakers discuss controversial trends like the rise of cryptocurrency, block chain and cashless systems, customization technologies like 3D printing and developments in robotics, and radical, disruptive approaches to copyright. Second, students will develop a greater understanding of the chief similarities and differences between the traditional European and US music business operations, particularly with regard to label operations, publishing and copyright, touring and festivals, and nightlife promotion. Third, students will become more informed about the D.I.Y. music business in Berlin itself, as they hear from speakers about the promises and challenges one faces in launching innovative music start ups in Germany. And finally, students will get to meet and network with key movers and shakers in the Berlin scene, past and present. In anticipation for a guest class visit, students may be required to investigate websites, read biographical or contextual material, or attend events outside of class time. Students will be expected to ask informed questions of the guests and to develop responses throughout the course of the class. Students should leave the class with a greater understanding of how the European and German music businesses work and how they themselves might make a business or sales impact on a global scale.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


REMU-UT 9810-000 (13438)
08/31/2023 – 12/07/2023 Mon
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by

History of Animation (FMTV-UT 1144)

Offered in the fall semester only. A chronological survey of the art and commerce of the animated film internationally over the last 100 years. Designed to expand students’ awareness of the origins of a significant 20th-century art form and to acquaint them with a wide variety of practical techniques and styles, from pre-film influences to computer-generated images; from “Golden Age” studio cartoon factories to today’s independent avant-garde animator-filmmakers. Designed to expand student aesthetic sensibilities and sharpen critical perceptions about this unique genre. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES. Non-majors must process a “Permission Notice for Non-Majors” form to register for the course (subject to availability).

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1144-000 (19501)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kosarin, Ray

Projects in Photography (ART-UE 1380)

Students work directly with internationally recognized figures in photography. Topics for workshops range from the techniques of established photographers to discussions of issues in photographic theory, history, & criticism.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 1380-000 (9681)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harouni, Shadi

Visual Arts Praxis (ART-UE 900)

A studio course that combines theory & artistic practice to examine the development of the arts from a critical perspective. The course will address a range of models from structuralism & semiotics to modern & postmodern paradigms. The class is designed for practicing artists, allowing students to gain the skills & confidence to express their artistic objectives in critical writing, art making, & verbal analysis. Each student is responsible for oral presentations, works of art generated through research, & written statements about their artistic objectives.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Photography I for Non-Majors (ART-UE 301)

Introduction to the use of photography as a medium of documentation and expression. Assignments and critiques enhance the development of individual work while developing photographic skills and techniques. Students provide their own cameras. Enlargers and photographic chemicals are provided in class.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ART-UE 301-000 (11411)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ART-UE 301-000 (11412)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ART-UE 301-000 (12495)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Applied Studio Production (MPATE-UE 1006)

Hands-on studio course with an emphasis on ear training to increase understanding of different technical & artistic practices in the recording studio. Students will explore use of microphone placement techniques, balancing natural & artificial acoustics as well as dynamic audio effects & filters.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MPATE-UE 1006-000 (18222)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by O’Reilly, Michael

Aesthetics of Recording (MPATE-UE 1227)

A critical listening study of acoustic music recordings that develops the student’s ability to define and evaluate aesthetic elements of recorded music. Students explore recorded music attributes including dynamic range, stereo imaging, perceived room acoustics, the use of reverb and equalization, naturalness, and the listening perspectives.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1227-000 (12988)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wojcik, Leszek

Concert Recording (MPATE-UE 1011)

Introduction to the concepts of live concert recording. Microphone selection, characteristics & placement as well as acoustic problems encountered in concert halls will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to apply the lecture material by recording undergraduate rehearsals & recitals.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1011-000 (12977)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MPATE-UE 1011-000 (12978)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Studio Production Techniques (MPATE-UE 1005)

Principles covered in MPATE-UE1001 & MPATE-UE-1003 are put into practice with additional theory & techniques. Students perform various duties just as they would in a professional recording session. Studio Lab assignments are performed outside of class reinforcing weekly topics.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1005-000 (12127)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by O’Reilly, Michael

Analog Recording Technology (MPATE-UE 1001)

The physical aspects of sound, analog recording technology & studio production techniques are explained & demonstrated. Lecture topics include microphones, stereo recording, analog consoles, multi-track tape recording, equalization, compression, reverberation & mixing. Studio lab assignments are performed outside of class reinforcing weekly lecture topics

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1001-000 (10647)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Filadelfo, Gary


MPATE-UE 1001-000 (10650)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Filadelfo, Gary

Computer Systems Organization (CS-UH 2010)

The course focuses on understanding lower-level issues in computer design and programming. The course starts with the C programming language, moves down to assembly and machine-level code, and concludes with basic operating systems and architectural concepts. Students learn to read assembly code and reverse-engineer programs in binary. Topics in this course include the C programming language, data representation, machine-level code, memory organization and management, performance evaluation and optimization, and concurrency.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CS-UH 2010-000 (3374)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ali, Karim · Mengal, Khalid

Indesign (PHTI-UT 1021)

This course is devoted to a different level of understanding the design and production of making a book. On the first day of class, students bring in digital versions of their art and decide to translate it into a printed piece. The class we’ll focus on book design. Students will begin to explore InDesign and learn how to use the program to create a publication, deciding on the size nand order of image and where text will go. On the second day of class students learn how to work with type. The class explores how to make type work for you and what typefaces work best depending on your design and art. The class will talk about image pacing and the flow of text throughout a publication. On the third day of class, homework is reviewed and InDesign files are revised if needed. The class then turns to production. We will go over each file and make it as final as possible and ready for print. The class will also discuss the different ways to get your document published and how to do each one. In the beginning of this course the students will walk into the classroom with a loose body of work and leave, after the third day, with their work organized into a book format. This course is charged a lab fee. Graduate course numbers are available on Albert.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Elementary Yoruba I (SCA-UA 182)

Yoruba is a language spoken in West Africa by approximately 20 million people. This course is an introduction to Yoruba language, people and culture and is designed for students without prior knowledge. The main goal is to develop elementary communicative competence in the language. It is designed to enable students read, write, listen to and talk about simple concepts, ensuring that they can minimally understand and be understood in the language, while developing a fundamental knowledge of the Yoruba culture. Emphases are on Yoruba as used by contemporary native speakers in the present day West Africa. Skills are developed through intensive interactive conversations, grammar exercises, and classroom activities designed for a learner to use the language in various daily activities.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


SCA-UA 182-000 (9690)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mabayoje, Moses

Elementary Cantonese I (SCA-UA 331)

An introduction to Cantonese with an emphasis on the spoken and written language and conversational proficiency as a primary goal. Emphasizes grammar, listening comprehension, and oral expressions. Designed to give beginning students a practical command of the language. Upon completion of the course, students can expect to converse in simple sentences and recognize An introduction to Cantonese with an emphasis on the spoken and written language and conversational proficiency as a primary goal. Emphasizes grammar, listening comprehension, and oral expressions. Designed to give beginning students a practical command of the language. Upon completion of the course, students can expect to converse in simple sentences and recognize and write about 350 Chinese characters. Students with passable conversational ability or native speakers from Cantonese-speaking communities should not enroll in this course.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Elementary Filipino I (SCA-UA 321)

An introduction to Filipino with an emphasis on mastering basic grammar skills and working vocabulary. Lessons incorporate discussions on history, current events, literature, pop culture, and native values. Open to beginning language students, and lessons are modified according to the needs of individual students. Because language is key to connecting with community concerns, the course includes field trips to Filipino neighborhoods in Queens and Jersey City.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


SCA-UA 321-000 (7439)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Magtoto, Agnes

Elementary Swahili I (SCA-UA 121)

Provides students with an elementary understanding of Swahili, a Bantu language with a rich oral and written tradition that is spoken by about 100 million people from Somalia to Mozambique and Zanzibar. After a short presentation of Swahili?s history, codification, and relation to other languages, students are drilled in phonetics and grammar. They are also introduced to poems, songs, and oral narratives.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


SCA-UA 121-000 (9390)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nanji, Abdul

Elementary Russian I (RUSSN-UA 9001)

The course combines the traditional grammatical approach with a communicational, interactive method. Since the size of the classes is usually small we can put a great emphasis on oral drills and getting the pronunciation right from the beginning. This course is tailored for students who have never taken Russian but some linguistic awareness about Slavic languages is welcome. Students will be introduced to the grammatical complexity of the Russian language and will have the opportunity to master enough Russian to cope with everyday situations in Russian. The students will do considerable amount of grammar and vocabulary exercises in the Workbook as part of the home assignments.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RUSSN-UA 9001-000 (18086)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by

Intermediate Hindi I (MEIS-UA 407)

Designed to further develop fluency in oral and written communication. In addition to the class, small-group activities, and language and computer lab sessions, students are given an individual assignment to work with native speakers from the community and report on their findings. The reading assignments are designed to broaden understanding of content used for oral presentations.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 407-000 (8168)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhargava, Rajni


MEIS-UA 407-000 (10148)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ilieva, Gabriela Nik

Elementary Persian I (MEIS-UA 401)

Grammar, phonetics, and pronunciation of modern standard Persian, reading simple texts, and writing short compositions. Builds basic skills in modern standard Persian in preparation for reading classical Persian literature.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 401-000 (8166)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Alizadeh, Yass

Elementary Arabic I (MEIS-UA 101)

Builds basic skills in modern standard Arabic, the language read and understood by educated Arabs from Baghdad to Casablanca. Five hours per week of instruction and drills, stressing the proficiency approach, plus work in the language laboratory.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MEIS-UA 101-000 (8158)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badawi, Ghada


MEIS-UA 101-000 (8159)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Badawi, Ghada


MEIS-UA 101-000 (8160)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Amani


MEIS-UA 101-000 (25871)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Suliman, Anas

Strategies for Independent Producing (FMTV-UT 1092)

Today’s content creators must be entrepreneurs, navigating dynamically changing industry. How does emerging talent gain traction in a ’tsunami wave’ of independent films, episodics, webisodes and podcasts? This class explores development, funding, and legal strategies to make, market and distribute DIY low and ultra-low budget projects. Ones you can make now. Students will develop core competencies, culminating in a pitch deck for a viable indie feature film.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1092-000 (19479)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pichirallo, Joe

Elementary Haitian Kreyol I (LATC-UA 121)

This course introduces students to the language of Haitian Kreyòl, also called Creole, and is intended for students with little or no prior knowledge of the language. Haitian Kreyòl is spoken by Haiti’s population of nine million and by about one million Haitians in the U.S. Including over 190,000 in the New York City area. In fact, New York City has the second largest population of Kreyòl Speakers after Port–‐au–‐Prince, Haiti’s capital. Through this course, you will develop introductory speaking, reading, and writing skills. We use a communicative approach, balanced with grammatical and phonetic techniques. Classroom and textbook materials are complemented by work with film, radio, and especially music (konpa, rasin, twoubadou, rap, raga, levanjil, vodou tradisyonèl, etc.), as well as with visits to city museums and institutions related to Haiti.

Latin Amer-Caribbean Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LATC-UA 121-000 (9043)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lamour, Wynnie


LATC-UA 121-000 (10248)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lamour, Wynnie

Elementary Italian I (ITAL-UA 1)

Open to students with no previous training in Italian and to others on assignment by placement test.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ITAL-UA 1-000 (8344)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gold, Eva


ITAL-UA 1-000 (9090)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Battaglia, Marco


ITAL-UA 1-000 (8345)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stemwedel, Nina Fiona


ITAL-UA 1-000 (8346)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scarcella Perino, Roberto


ITAL-UA 1-000 (25928)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Curtoni, Chiara


ITAL-UA 1-000 (9536)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sebastiani, Concetta

Financial Accounting (MG-UY 2204)

This course provides a solid foundation in constructing and interpreting financial statements. Topics include: accounting terminology, financial-statement preparation and analysis, liquidity and credit-risk ratios, depreciation calculations, revenue recognition, accrued liabilities and asset valuation. Also covered are the effects of equity transactions, cash flows and various accounting methods on financial statements.

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 2204-000 (14066)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by TALISSE, EDWARD


MG-UY 2204-000 (14067)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kohli, Ashish

Elementary Moder Greek I (HEL-UA 103)

Open to students with no previous training in Greek and to others by permission of the instructor. Elementary I offered in the fall; Elementary II offered in the spring. 4 points per term. An introduction to modern Greek. Provides students with the fundamentals of grammar, syntax, oral expression, listening comprehension, reading, and composition. Students develop the skills and vocabulary necessary to read simple texts and hold basic conversations. Students are introduced to modern Greek culture, history, and society, since the ultimate goal of the course is to enrich our understanding of multiple, living Greek realities through the language. Teaching materials include current newspaper articles, graded literary passages, songs, and various linguistic games.

Hellenic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


HEL-UA 103-000 (8032)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Venetsanos, Anna

Elementary Hebrew I (HBRJD-UA 1)

Active introduction to modern Hebrew as it is spoken and written in Israel today. Presents the essentials of Hebrew grammar, combining the oral-aural approach with formal grammatical concepts. Reinforces learning by reading of graded texts. Emphasizes the acquisition of idiomatic conversational vocabulary and language patterns.

Hebrew & Judaic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


HBRJD-UA 1-000 (9233)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mayer, Ganit


HBRJD-UA 1-000 (9036)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kamelhar, Rosalie

Elementary German I (GERM-UA 1)

Open only to students with no previous training in German; others require permission of the department. Offered every semester. 4 points.

German (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


GERM-UA 1-000 (8238)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Samartzi, Foteini


GERM-UA 1-000 (8239)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu,Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kaczmar, Maiken

Managing Creative Content Development (MKTG-UB 4)

This course provides students with an opportunity to learn about the individual and collaborative services provided by professional managers both inside and outside EMT companies. It develops a system by which to evaluate the quality of the service provided, the nature of the service and how these services are being implemented through collaboration with industry creative and business executives. Through discussions with and lectures by entertainment and media lawyers, accountants, talent and literary agents, studio executives, producers, publicity and advertising specialists, the student will understand the diversity of talents required to complete a project or product successfully. Course Objectives: To provide students with an understanding of the role of the executive in the entertainment and media industries who can assemble a team of creative professionals and manage their activities so that successful content can be the outcome. To share an overview of the various disciplines and content genres/typology needed for the industry sectors that include movies, television, music, publishing, electronic games, theater, and related businesses. To gain insights into legal and financial issues pertaining to the various entertainment and media industry sectors, including basic copyright, intellectual property and privacy issues. To examine the roles and responsibilities of each of the members of the team assembled by the manager (producer, head of production, student head, manager/agent, manager/lawyer, business coach, management consultant). To review and be capable of implementing business plans for funding entertainment projects offered through venture capital, limited partnerships, angels or other specialists in financial deal making. To learn from the experts using lectures, cases, film, texts and guest lectures.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Social Media Strategy (MKTG-UB 9045)

This course will introduce students to social media marketing. Through case studies, interactive sessions, and class exercises, students will learn best practices and develop the skills to connect business objectives with social media strategy, platforms and tactics. We will study how to develop a strategy for a product or service in social media, how to execute that strategy and how to assess the results. Topics will include choosing appropriate platforms, creating effective and engaging social media content, content management, social listening and creating a social media plan. The course also has a practical component, for which students work in small groups and individually.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MKTG-UB 9045-000 (4955)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Grazzini, Laura

Business of Video Games (MKTG-UB 58)

Video games are now a mainstream form of entertainment. In economic terms, this industry has experienced tremendous growth, despite a grueling recession, growing to an estimated $60 billion worldwide. A key development that has changed the playing field for both the producers and consumers of interactive entertainment is a shift away from physical retail to digital and online game distribution. The audience for games has also shifted—no longer the exclusive practice of hardcore gamers, video games have gained mass appeal in the form of social and casual gaming, on the internet, on consoles, and smartphones. At the same time, the development and publishing of games has become far more accessible. The game behind the game, in a manner of speaking, has changed. In this class, we explore the basic components of the current video game industry. Every week, we review major current events, will hear from people currently working in the industry, examine case studies, and discuss the overall business landscape. Central to each class is the notion that practical business considerations and the design-driven creative process do not have to be in opposition.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MKTG-UB 58-000 (10780)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Digital Business Strategy (MKTG-UB 56)

This course covers the digital technology industry (e.g. consumer electronics, software) from a strategic and marketing perspective. The objectives are to understand how these industries function, the unique challenges they face, and how digital technology companies can leverage their strengths to achieve success in the marketplace. The focus is on understanding the interactions between competition, technology evolution, and firm capabilities.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Entertainment & Media Industries (MKTG-UB 40)

This course provides students with a framework for understanding the economics and key strategic issues facing organizations in the entertainment industry. It establishes a basis for the formulation of marketing tactics and strategies for firms competing for consumers’ discretionary spending. Recent developments in major sectors of the entertainment industry are covered, including movies, television and cable, theatre, and sports. Issues that cut across all types of entertainment industries are examined, including licensing, promotion, and new technologies.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10507)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Tuschman, Robert


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10508)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)at Washington SquareInstructed by Krushel, Kenneth J


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10509)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Hardart, Paul


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10510)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Lieberman, Alvin


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10547)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Lieberman, Alvin


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10601)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Narayanan, Sunder


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10640)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Narayanan, Sunder


MKTG-UB 40-000 (22981)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)at Washington SquareInstructed by

Advertising (MKTG-UB 3)

This course provides students with a comprehensive framework and tools to understand the advertising process and to appreciate managerial and theoretical perspectives in advertising. It tackles the stages in developing an advertising plan- from analyzing the situation and defining clear advertising objectives to execution. Students learn tools related to various skill areas in advertising, including account planning, media planning and buying, and copywriting/art direction, while developing a broader appreciation of how each skill area fits into the overall structure of the advertising process. Coursework involves a comprehensive group project that utilizes learning in all functional areas of advertising, while simulating the development of an advertising campaign.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MKTG-UB 3-000 (10504)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cohen, Daniel

Photography I (OART-UT 11)

A basic black-and-white photography course designed for those with little or no experience in photography. Emphasis is placed on the application of technique in terms of personal expression through the selection and composition of subject matter. Class size is limited, providing for a greater degree of individual critique and classroom participation. The course comprises technical lectures, readings and discussions about critical issues in photography, slide lectures on historical and contemporary work as well as class critiques. Each student must have a camera with manually adjustable aperture and shutter speeds.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 11-000 (14186)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Frocheur, Nichole

Elementary Korean I (EAST-UA 254)

First-year Korean designed to introduce the Korean language and alphabet, Hangul. This course provides a solid foundation in all aspects of the language, including speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students study the language’s orthographic and phonetic systems, grammar, syntax, and vocabulary within social and cultural contexts.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 254-000 (9018)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Choi, Yongjun


EAST-UA 254-000 (9045)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jang, Kyungmi


EAST-UA 254-000 (9170)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Park, Jeesun


EAST-UA 254-000 (9426)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Park, Jeesun


EAST-UA 254-000 (9730)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jung, Su

Elementary Japanese I (EAST-UA 247)

Introductory course in modern spoken and written Japanese, designed to develop fundamental skills in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Gives contextualized instructions to develop both communicative and cultural competency. Systematically introduces the Japanese writing system (Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji).

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 247-000 (8045)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kurahara, Kazue


EAST-UA 247-000 (8747)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Matsumoto, Mayumi


EAST-UA 247-000 (9070)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Omori, Toshiko


EAST-UA 247-000 (9072)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Takeda, Shuichiro


EAST-UA 247-000 (9409)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Takeda, Shuichiro


EAST-UA 247-000 (9427)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kurokawa, Kazue


EAST-UA 247-000 (20184)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kurokawa, Kazue


EAST-UA 247-000 (20185)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Omori, Toshiko

Elementary Chinese I (EAST-UA 201)

Designed to develop and reinforce language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives are: to master the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones) with satisfactory pronunciation; to understand the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional) and learn to write them correctly; to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; to build up essential vocabulary; to read and write level appropriate passages; to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


EAST-UA 201-000 (8748)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Xin


EAST-UA 201-000 (9123)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Xin


EAST-UA 201-000 (9292)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Chen


EAST-UA 201-000 (9568)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Chen

Intermediate Poetry Workshop (CRWRI-UA 817)

The intermediate workshops offer budding fiction writers and poets an opportunity to continue their pursuit of writing through workshops that focus on a specific genre. The workshops also integrate in-depth craft discussions and extensive outside reading to deepen students’ understanding of the genre and broaden their knowledge of the evolution of literary forms and techniques.

Creative Writing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8090)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rohrer, Matthew


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8091)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Popa, Maya


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8692)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fitterman, Robert


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8092)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gallagher, Jean


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8628)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nutter, Geoffrey


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (20174)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Eye, David

Intermediate Fiction Workshop (CRWRI-UA 816)

The intermediate workshops offer budding fiction writers and poets an opportunity to continue their pursuit of writing through workshops that focus on a specific genre. The workshops also integrate in-depth craft discussions and extensive outside reading to deepen students’ understanding of the genre and broaden their knowledge of the evolution of literary forms and techniques.

Creative Writing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CRWRI-UA 816-000 (8084)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lieu, Jocelyn


CRWRI-UA 816-000 (8085)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mesmer, Sharon


CRWRI-UA 816-000 (8086)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kingsley-Ma, Hannah


CRWRI-UA 816-000 (8087)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hood, Ann


CRWRI-UA 816-000 (8088)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Price, Eliza


CRWRI-UA 816-000 (8627)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Price, Eliza


CRWRI-UA 816-000 (8691)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bock, Charles

The Directors Process (FMTV-UT 125)

This class is an introduction to the craft of directing. We will take a step-by-step look at the director’s process and responsibilities in this most collaborative of arts. Our focus will include script, character and scene analysis; performance, casting and rehearsal; design and visual style; assembling the final form. We’ll talk about what an actor wants from a director, how to talk to the cinematographer and production/costume designers and why we look at editing as the final rewrite. Through lectures, screenings, assignments and discussions with working professionals, the class will offer a comprehensive foundation for the director on which to build a rich creative experience at Tisch and a long and satisfying professional career thereafter.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


FMTV-UT 125-000 (14309)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zentelis, Enid


FMTV-UT 125-000 (14375)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brown, Alrick

Life Drawing: The Figure (FMTV-UT 1112)

Reccomended for students studying both animation and live action. This course is designed to train animation students to think visually, and to strengthen their overall drafting and design skills. The focus of the course is drawing humans and animals from live subjects, thereby learning to translate the three-dimensional world into two-dimensional terms. Drafting skills are important to all animators, regardless of their chosen media or focus. In particular, strong drafting skills are essential for character animators. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1112-000 (19493)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Camhy, Sherry

Storytelling Strategies (FMTV-UT 20)

The ability to understand “what makes a good story well told” is a skill that is crucial to your growth as a filmmaker whether you become a writer, director, producer, actor, editor, cinematographer, etc. Storytelling Strategies looks at how narrative stories work through an examination of the structural and mythic elements first established by the ancient Greek playwrights and recognized by Aristotle in his “Poetics” thousands of years ago. The course continues this examination up to and including such contemporary story models as Joseph Campbell’s “The Hero with a Thousand Faces” as well as the current Hollywood paradigm, “the three-act structure.” We will seek to find those principles that form the backbone of successful narrative screenplays and contribute to a film’s ability to resonate with an audience. The lecture is for analysis. The recitations are for applying what you have learned, through writing exercises and a completed short screenplay. This course allocates as Scriptwriting for Film & TV majors. Course may not be repeated.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

ENTREPRENEURSHIP (MG-UY 4404)

This course focuses on key aspects of entrepreneurship as a critical engine for innovation. It also treats entrepreneurship as a state of mind that is not limited to small firms. Students discuss current theories and practices related to starting and managing entrepreneurial enterprises, emphasizing firms in technology- , information- and knowledge-intensive environments. Particular attention is paid to the critical issues of (1) identifying opportunities that provide competitive advantage; (2) the development of a solid business plan; (3) the marketing of new ventures; (4) entrepreneurial business operations, including human-resource and process management; (5) ethical and social issues in entrepreneurial firms; and (6) financial management and fund raising for entrepreneurial firms. | Prerequisites: Junior or senior student status.

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 4404-000 (14073)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Husain, Badrul


MG-UY 4404-000 (14074)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Jimenez Leon, Bertha

The Art and Craft of Poetry (WRTNG-UG 1560)

In this workshop (practicum), poets will focus on the foundations and intricate dynamics of poetry as a writer’s process. A weekly reading of a new poem by each poet in the circle will serve as point of departure for discussion of the relationships of craft and expression. A final portfolio of polished poems is required at the end of the course.

Advanced Writing Courses (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


WRTNG-UG 1560-000 (12069)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hightower, Scott

Introduction to Mindful Product Management (IMBX-SHU 254)

Technology products and services are increasingly a huge part of how businesses reach their end-customer and Product Managers (PMs) are the ones to lead teams to build software that solve real problems. This course is designed as an introduction course of how PMs do this across a variety of contexts to evaluate customer needs, translate needs into functional requirements, prioritize different aspects of development, work with cross-functional teams, launch a product and create a holistic vision of how customers experience the product. This course will focus on lectures, discussions, case-studies and hands-on exercises that replicate a typical product process at a startup, tech or non-tech company. This course equips students with the mindset, tools, frameworks to mindfully discover, design and build things that make an impact and meet the needs of real humans. We will cover both core product thinking, and also how to translate that into practical ways to make decisions and build great products. Prerequisite: None Fulfillment: Interactive Media Business Elective ; Interactive Media Arts Elective

Interactive Media and Business (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


IMBX-SHU 254-000 (20028)
01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Wang, Nicole

Cultural Capital: Media and Arts in New York City (MCC-UE 1152)

This course explores the multi-faceted nature of New York City as a cultural and economic hub for media and the arts, arguably the cultural capital of the world. Classroom instruction is supplemented by site visits, guest lectures, and field research to develop an appreciation of the ways that media and the arts have shaped the work and leisure of life in New York City for the past one hundred years. How did New York City become such a focal point for the creative industries? What goes on behind-the-scenes? Topics include: Time Square and live spectacle, the Broadway theatre, Madison Ave and modern advertising, the museum of New York, galleries, artists, and the art market, the Harlem Renaissance, alternative media and Bohemian arts.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


MCC-UE 1152-000 (2908)
07/03/2024 – 08/15/2024 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Procter, Alice


MCC-UE 1152-000 (2967)
07/03/2024 – 08/15/2024 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Procter, Alice

Digital Photography (OART-UT 13)

This is a standard digital photography course designed for those with little or no experience in photography. This course will emphasize personal expression through the application of technique to the presentation of subject matter. Open Arts will have enough Sony A7r cameras for students to share. If students plan to borrow the DSLR cameras, they are first required to purchase College Student Insurance, (CSI). While it is not required that you own your own digital camera to enroll in this course, it is recommended that you borrow or acquire your own camera for the duration of this course, or if you would like to avoid having to share one of the department’s cameras with another student. If you would like to purchase your own camera, a digital single lens reflex (SLR) or mirrorless digital camera is highly recommended for this course. The camera needs to have manual aperture and shutter speed controls. The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the technical and aesthetic aspects of making photographic images. We will apply fundamental photographic techniques such as composition, framing, lighting and manual camera controls to the images we create. We will discuss the way we see, compared to how cameras and lenses see, evaluate the similarities and differences and how that impacts the creation of images and how we analyze them. Students will make photographs that are effective as individual images and photographs that work together in a series. Students will learn how to create a narrative with a series of photographs and express a feeling or mood with a series of photographs. Class discussions will introduce students to a variety of concepts related to visual literacy. Students will also be introduced to the work of historically significant photographers from a broad range of backgrounds. Students will learn how to use Adobe Creative Cloud software to adjust images for print and digital publishing. By the end of the course, students will understand how to use a digital SLR or mirrorless camera to create compelling photographs using manual controls, process their images using Adobe Creative Cloud software and best practices for publishing their images digitally as well as best practices for printing their images. Finally, students will enhance their critical thinking skills while developing a deeper understanding of visual/photographic language. Students are expected to shoot a minimum of 108 exposures (photographs) each week.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 13-000 (14496)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ross-Smith, Bayete

Choreography (OART-UT 805)

The purpose of this course is to enable the student to gain a heightened awareness, appreciation, and knowledge of dance through movement and performance. We focus on the foundations of dance such as control, aesthetics, alignment, dynamics, athleticism, musicality, use of space, development of learning strategies within a group context, and personal, artistic expression. The students exploration of their creativity, expression and concepts, as well as their work on other dancer’s bodies is part of the work of this course. Through individual and collective kinesthetic participation in unfamiliar patterns, the student is physically and conceptually challenged and informed. Students will be asked to problem solve as homework assignment and in-class composition exercises. Dance experience is recommended, but formal dance training is not required.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 805-000 (14213)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Digital Photography (OART-GT 2013)

This is a standard digital photography course designed for those with little or no experience in photography. This course will emphasize personal expression through the application of technique to the presentation of subject matter. Open Arts will have enough Sony A7r cameras for students to share. If students plan to borrow the DSLR cameras, they are first required to purchase College Student Insurance, (CSI). While it is not required that you own your own digital camera to enroll in this course, it is recommended that you borrow or acquire your own camera for the duration of this course, or if you would like to avoid having to share one of the department’s cameras with another student. If you would like to purchase your own camera, a digital single lens reflex (SLR) or mirrorless digital camera is highly recommended for this course. The camera needs to have manual aperture and shutter speed controls. The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the technical and aesthetic aspects of making photographic images. We will apply fundamental photographic techniques such as composition, framing, lighting and manual camera controls to the images we create. We will discuss the way we see, compared to how cameras and lenses see, evaluate the similarities and differences and how that impacts the creation of images and how we analyze them. Students will make photographs that are effective as individual images and photographs that work together in a series. Students will learn how to create a narrative with a series of photographs and express a feeling or mood with a series of photographs. Class discussions will introduce students to a variety of concepts related to visual literacy. Students will also be introduced to the work of historically significant photographers from a broad range of backgrounds. Students will learn how to use Adobe Creative Cloud software to adjust images for print and digital publishing. By the end of the course, students will understand how to use a digital SLR or mirrorless camera to create compelling photographs using manual controls, process their images using Adobe Creative Cloud software and best practices for publishing their images digitally as well as best practices for printing their images. Finally, students will enhance their critical thinking skills while developing a deeper understanding of visual/photographic language. Students are expected to shoot a minimum of 108 exposures (photographs) each week.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


OART-GT 2013-000 (7438)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ross-Smith, Bayete

Choreography (OART-GT 2805)

The purpose of this course is to enable the student to gain a heightened awareness, appreciation, and knowledge of dance through movement and performance. We focus on the foundations of dance such as control, aesthetics, alignment, development of strength and flexibility, dynamics, athleticism, musicality, use of space, development of learning strategies within a group context, and personal, artistic expression. The student’s mastery of their body, expression with their body and creativity through their body is the center of the work. Through individual and collective kinesthetic participation in unfamiliar patterns, related, but not limited to China, West Africa, United States, and Japan, the student is physically and conceptually challenged and informed. Using these learned dances as inspiration, students go on to re interpret, improvise and choreograph their own variations on dance forms in their class assignments. Dance experience is not necessary.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


OART-GT 2805-000 (7359)09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Hoffbauer, Patricia

Games 101 (GAMES-UT 101)

Games 101 is the foundational course for the NYU Game Center. The focus of Games 101 is game literacy – a shared understanding of games as complex cultural and aesthetic objects. The class will incorporate lectures, discussion, readings, and writing assignments, but the primary activity of the class is critical play – playing games in order to better understand and appreciate them. The class will cover games on and off the computer, including classic and contemporary board and card games, sports, and games on the PC, internet, and consoles.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14339)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Clark, Naomi


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14340)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Jones-Brewster, Jordan


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14342)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Porter, Caroline


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14341)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Boyer, Chapin


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14343)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Jones-Brewster, Jordan


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14344)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sorensen, Samuel


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14723)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Croasdill, D

Digital Sculpting for Facial Animation (INTM-SHU 284)

This course emphasizes on the 3D animation through digital modeling / sculpting techniques, keyframe and blend-shape animation . The course breaks down into 4 stages : 1. basic topology of head model, 2. high-poly sculpting and projection texturing, 3. Keyframe and blend-shapes animation, 4. 3D animation final project. In the final project, students get to choose either lip-sync animation or conceptual piece utilizing the created head models. An overview of digital editing / compositing and sound design will also be introduced to assist with students’ final project at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: IMA/IMB elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


INTM-SHU 284-000 (20474)
01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Chen, Wu Wei

Digital Photography I for Non Majors (ART-UE 300)

A hands-on introduction to the technical & creative uses of digital photography. The class will explore the use of digital technologies to compose, shoot, scan, alter, & print images, as well as considering the ways in which photographic meaning has been changed by the use of the computer. Student provides their own camera & paper.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ART-UE 300-000 (12836)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carballar, Karla


ART-UE 300-000 (12038)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sunairi, Hiroshi


ART-UE 300-000 (12858)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Guo

Drawing & Design for Animation (FMTV-UT 1313)

This course offers students an opportunity to increase their technical proficiency and, more importantly, develop stylistic and creative channels for dealing with common drawing problems. In animation, drawing is not simply seeing. It is thinking and, when successful, doing so on a deep level. The class includes one, two and three point perspective, figure drawing, character rotations, drawing exercises related to fine artists (Picasso, Matisse, Giacometti, etc.), use of tones, continuity sketches, layouts, animatics.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1313-000 (19514)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lennert, Dean

Interactive Narrative (MD-UY 2314)

This course introduces students to the complex relationship between interactivity and storytelling. Students analyze how an interactive structure creates narrative. Works explored in this course range from nonlinear novels, experimental literature, audio narratives, theater/performance to film as narrative databases and games. The study of the structural properties of narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time, space, and storyline is complemented by theoretical texts about authorship/readership, plot/story, and characteristics of interactive media. | Prerequisite: Completion of first year writing requirements. Note: Satisfies HuSS elective.

Media Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MD-UY 2314-000 (8923)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dahnke, Sarah


MD-UY 2314-000 (8924)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dahnke, Sarah


MD-UY 2314G-000 (4279)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by Farmer, Mia

Games 101 (OART-UT 1600)

Games 101 is the foundational course for the NYU Game Center. The focus of Games 101 is game literacy – a shared understanding of games as complex cultural and aesthetic objects. The class will incorporate lectures, discussion, readings, and writing assignments, but the primary activity of the class is critical play – playing games in order to better understand and appreciate them. The class will cover games on and off the computer, including classic and contemporary board and card games, sports, and games on the PC, internet, and consoles.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 1600-000 (14221)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by Clark, Naomi


OART-UT 1600-000 (14345)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by Jones-Brewster, Jordan


OART-UT 1600-000 (14346)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by


OART-UT 1600-000 (14347)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by


OART-UT 1600-000 (14348)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by


OART-UT 1600-000 (14349)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by


OART-UT 1600-000 (14722)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by

Public Speaking (MCC-UE 1805)

Analysis of the problems of speaking to groups and practice in preparing and presenting speeches for various purposes and occasions. Hours are arranged for student evaluation and practice.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1805-000 (14025)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Makar, Ivan


MCC-UE 1805-000 (14026)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ross, Alan

Interviewing Strategies (MCC-UE 1740)

This course focuses on the principles and practices of successful interviewing techniques. Students are provided with background on the structure of an interview and learn how to analyze success and/or potential problems. Review of case studies and practice in holding interviews enables students to gain experience and to improve their own abilities.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1740-000 (14015)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Werner, Dawn


MCC-UE 1740-000 (14016)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Werner, Dawn


MCC-UE 1740-000 (14017)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Online
Instructed by White, Karen


MCC-UE 1740-000 (14018)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Online
Instructed by White, Karen


MCC-UE 1740-000 (14019)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lynch, Ashley


MCC-UE 1740-000 (14020)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Online
Instructed by Battinelli, Olivia

Photography and Words (DM-UY 3183)

This course explores various image editing techniques and outputs, utilizing various styles of text, including fiction and non-fiction. The assignments foreground how text influences viewers’ perception of images, and how images can enrich a body of writing. Students will use a range of production skills to create work — using After Effects for animation, HTML/CSS for website creation, book and print design, and archival printing methods. All projects are accompanied by readings that provide historical and theoretical grounding to support the concepts explored through practice. An emphasis on refining technical and aesthetic photography skills are central throughout the semester. Prerequisites: DM-UY 2183 or DM-UY 2263

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


DM-UY 3183-000 (9246)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Toolin, Jack Craig