Category Archives: Spring 2024

Sustainability and Health (FOOD-UE 1184)

The concept of sustainability is important in our current moment, yet we use the term in a variety of ways and via different frameworks of understanding. This course explores how we talk about and understand the concept of sustainability, including as environment and climate change, food production and consumption, and individual and community health. Students will examine the concept of sustainability through these different lenses, exploring the connections among them.

Food Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Experiments in Collective Joy (OART-UT 18)

How do ants or bees organize on a mass scale when their individual brains are incapable of understanding the bigger systems they’re creating together? How did a Twitch hive-mind of 1.2 million people beat Pokémon one collective move at a time? How do we make art that makes us and our audience feel more connected, more alive, more powerful? This hands-on project studio course is about making art where participants are the medium, and the masterpiece created exists inside and between them. Let’s explore community and its connection to transformational, radical joy — not complacent happiness, but a joy that is the feeling of power, agency, and capacity growing within us and within the people around us as we cooperate to overcome shared challenges. Which systems and forms of art, play, and expression foster that kind of joy? This course is heavy on imagination, vulnerability, reading, discussion, experimentation, playtesting, and interactive group activities. Each week explores the relationship of the individual to the group under various lenses and spheres of life (i.e. politics, religion, activism, evolutionary biology, sociology, pleasure, the universe, sports, games, childhood, etc.). Then together, we break down the relationships, dynamics, and effects those systems have, and create multi-media prototypes and performance experiments inspired by these themes and ideas. The early assignments are solo, and then almost all assignments are in groups. The core process of the class uses iterative game design as a structure for ideating, creating, playtesting, and refining, though students are welcome to work in any medium they choose, so long as the goal is to explore themes of collective joy.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


OART-UT 18-000 (7263)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Luhrs, August

Reality and Creation (OART-UT 106)

Reality & Creation is an interdisciplinary, collaborative workshop that requires students to develop and present original works using real-life material. While primarily focused on filmmaking – students may also explore writing and performance to investigate the artful manipulation of reality in order to evoke meaning and emotion. Students will explore the meanings of both documentary and narrative filmmaking – and the inherent conflicts between creative construction and telling true stories. They will analyze cinematic representations of reality and devise hybrid works that use inventive and surprising forms while playing with the notion of the real. Over the course of the semester, students will complete a series of classroom/studio projects as well as independent works from non-fiction sources: such as unscripted interviews, archival material, found footage and newsreel. These projects are designed to foster experimentation across the arts disciplines and to cultivate creative collaboration.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

The Making of Economic Policy in the White House (ECON-UB 217)

This course shows students how economic policy gets made, and should get made, at the highest levels of federal government. It draws upon almost fifty years of economic policy-making, and the challenges that have confronted the men and women who have sat in positions of power in the Treasury, the Office of Management and Budget, the Council of Economic Advisers, and the National Economic Council. These challenges include the breakdown of the Bretton Woods system and the transition to a predominantly floating exchange rate world, the era of rampant inflation, the collapse of the Soviet Union and the transition to market economies, the shock of 9/11, the financial crisis of 2008, and the Great Recession that followed. Lectures and discussions will lead to in-class exercises, in which students will role- play as advisers to US presidents from Richard Nixon to Donald Trump. What is it like to sit in the Oval Office and discuss policy with the president? To know that your input into his decisions will impact millions of people? To know that the wrong advice could be calamitous? Students will learn how to analyze policy problems and design solutions, taking into account the multi-dimensional aspects of making federal policy and the many constraints upon those decisions, including of course the influence of Congress. As part of the learning process, students will also have the opportunity to hear from guest speakers who have worked at the very top of economic policy-making in the executive branch of government, and played a role in the policy-making process through their work in the media.

Economics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Content and Meaning (ASPP-GT 2045)

The class is to consider the depth of grief and loss within artistic responses and to inspire love and hope with our creative transformation. How does the artist process or respond to the emotions and events of loss? What are cultural heritage examples? What are ways we were taught in our families? What traditions do we wish to reimagine? Who needs to be commemorated? Is creative transformation possible? Is there a space for hope, love and joy within the complexity of these emotions? The course will have creative exercises and conceptual prompts that can be developed in the medium of your choice. We will consider creative texts such as visual, film, music, media, performance, installation, and poetic examples to broaden and inspire our understanding of ways to respond. There are other forms of expression to contemplate such as fashion, outsider art, architecture, archives, memorials, gardening, and cultural movements. We will have discussion, guests, field trips, and presentations. Is there a way to create an archive? How do we document or forget? Together we will be a collective of considering, contemplating and creating. Some of the strategies we will be considering are: metaphor, expression within nature, fairy tales, abstraction, fragments, love, celebration and the space of silence for restoration. Some of the artists /writers will be Maya Angelou, Dunbar, David Wognarowicz, Krishnamurti, Pamela Sneed, Barthes, Rilke and bell hooks. We will look at films such as the 1926 silent film, Page of Madness by Kunsuga, Let me Come in by Bill Morrison, or News From Home by Chantal Ackerman. I look forward to being your guide for the seminar, Grief, Loss , Love, Hope and Creative Transformation. Feel free to contact me with any questions karen.finley@nyu.edu

Ctr for Art, Society & Pub Pol (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Fashion, Culture & the Body (IDSEM-UG 9254)

This is a course that explores the relationship between ideas, the body and the way that fashion can be understood to mediate between the two. Through a range of disciplines and media this course considers the body as an aspect of not only medical and scientific exploration, but crucially as a vital element of culture and society. Bodies affect the ways in which the social world and power relations are organized, and they even arguably condition the way that we understand reality itself. Our physical form is constantly shaped according to both philosophies and fashions. Body ideals and broader ideals often interrelate strongly through bodily practices and with what we wear. There are meanings and fashions in all bodily forms (skinny, buxom, muscular, ideas of ’whiteness’) and body practices (dieting, hair management, cleansing rituals, plastic surgery and genital cutting). Over the sessions, we will take a conceptual approach to fashion, as a strident condition of modern life, that incorporates politics, science and aesthetics and we will closely read a number of cultural texts against a number of theoretical models. Attitudes towards the body can vary widely according to historical period, and this course will explore how, in different moments, and via different media, we have been preoccupied with the aesthetics of different body zones, with displaying identity (gender, class and ethnicity), and also with power. Different cultural forms (literary, visual, material etc) will provide the focus of our discussions as they all engage with the different ways that we make meaning out of our bodies. Students will be invited to investigate in their written work set texts from class in addition to primary material of their own choice.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Global Fashion Industry: Britain (PRACT-UG 9250)

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON: The Global Fashion Industry and British Fashion aims to introduce fashion history and theory in its contemporary social and cultural context. The course will examine various aspects of the fashion industry and offer an understanding of critical concepts such as social identity, consumer culture and globalization. Students will explore aspects of the British fashion industry, including fashion media, retail environments, fashion exhibitions and the impact of sub and counter culture.

Practicum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PRACT-UG 9250-000 (4039)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Khan, Nathalie

Lighting: (PHTI-UT 1013)

Prerequisite: Photography II or permission from the Department. This class teaches lighting as a series of the most common lighting problems encountered in professional photography and cinematography. The course philosophy is that the most complex and difficult lighting problems are really just combinations of small, easily resolved, problems. Starting with basic three-point lighting for portraiture using simple continuous source lighting, the course will progress quickly to extremely complex set ups using electronic flash as well as lighting for the new generation of hybrid Dslr’s (video/still camera) as it moves through multiple environments. Subjects covered include: Lighting for portraits, still life, fashion, interiors, documentary, and exterior location lighting using battery powered flash. Location scouting and planning according to location limitations. Color temperature and color control. Light shaping and control. Students will learn how to use: Digital SLR’s, medium format cameras, Leaf Aptus electronic capture, direct tethered capture using Adobe Lightroom, continuous lighting, electronic flash, color temperature meters and custom white balance profiles as well as the basics of video/sound capture. Lighting equipment is provided. A lab fee is charged for this course.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Science in Our Lives: Facts and Lies in the Name of Science (SCIED-UE 218)

Students explore how science became a global form of knowledge making about the natural world, how European notions of science contributed to its growth as a form of systematic knowledge, how some people were excluded from this process, and how bias and discrimination were made real. By observing, measuring, analyzing and explaining data, students learn to produce and evaluate the quality of scientific knowledge and to recognize how science understanding helps to interrogate the construction of difference between facts and lies. Fulfills Life Science Core requirement.

Science Education (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

History of Documentary Film (OART-UT 1701)

The course traces the documentary film from its origins to the present day. Pioneer documentarians like Dziga Vertov and Robert Flaherty saw in documentary film the ability to portray life with a kind of truthfulness never before possible. Early Polish filmmaker Boleslaw Matuszewski wrote that while “the cinematograph does not give the whole truth at least what it gives is unquestionable and of an absolute truth.” Since those heady days, it has become all too clear that documentaries have no special access to the truth. Nevertheless, as this still-young art evolved, documentarians of different schools constantly sought new means to tell the human story. Documentary filmmaking has always been a blend of artistry and technical means and we will also explore this critical relationship. The course explores the development of the documentary and the shifting intentions of documentary filmmakers through the evolution of narrative approach and structure paying special attention to the documentary tradition’s relationship to journalism. Students examine how different filmmakers have gone about trying to convey “reality” on screen both through the use and avoidance of narration, through interviews, editing and dramatizations. Throughout the semester, students investigate how image-driven medium attempts to report stories and the ways an emotion-driven art can be problematic for journalistic objectivity. Finally, the ethical and journalistic responsibilities the documentary filmmaker are discussed. Special attention is given to dramatic re-creations, the filmmaker’s relationship to his/her subjects and the construction of narrative through editing.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


OART-UT 1701-000 (7218)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dorman, Joseph

Stats F/Bus Cntl Regress & Forecasting Models (STAT-UB 103)

This course examines modern statistical methods as a basis for decision making in the face of uncertainty. Topics include probability theory, discrete and continuous distributions, hypothesis testing, estimation, and statistical quality control. With the aid of computers, these statistical methods are used to analyze data. Also presented are an introduction to statistical models and their application to decision making. Topics include the simple linear regression model, inference in regression analysis, sensitivity analysis, and multiple regression analysis.

Statistics & Operations Research (Undergraduate)
6 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


STAT-UB 103-000 (2538)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Giloni, Avi.


STAT-UB 103-000 (2539)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Duan, Yaqi


STAT-UB 103-000 (2540)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chen, Elynn


STAT-UB 103-000 (2541)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kovtun, Vladimir


STAT-UB 103-000 (2542)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Turetsky, Jason


STAT-UB 103-000 (2995)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Turetsky, Jason

Introduction to the Study of Literature (ENGL-UA 9101)

Gateway course to the major that introduces students to the demands and pleasures of university-level investigation of English literature. Develops the tools necessary for advanced criticism: close-reading skills, knowledge of generic conventions, mastery of critical terminology, and skill at a variety of modes of analysis, from the formal to the historical. Also emphasizes frequent writing.

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ENGL-UA 9101-000 (4062)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Hopf, Courtney

Writing London (SCA-UA 9886)

This course will study a variety of texts written at particular times in the history of London. The aims of the course are to encourage the student to think historically, in terms of the way London and representations of the city have changed and developed over time; and theoretically, in terms of the way the city is mediated through different forms and genres (e.g. poetry, novels, essays, film; satire, detective and crime fiction), and the interrelationship of literary and material spaces. We will also examine the significance of gender, the definition of the modern metropolis as a labyrinthine city of Babylon, the influence of metropolitan culture on Modernism and Modernity, assimilation versus multiculturalism, immigration, and the effects of new modern spaces on individuals.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


SCA-UA 9886-000 (4067)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Landau, Leya


SCA-UA 9886-000 (4068)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Landau, Leya

Media History of NY (MCC-UE 1151)

New York has played a crucial role in the history of media, and media have placed a crucial role in the history of New York. New York has been represented by media since Henry Hudson wrote his reports to the Dutch. Media institutions have contributed centrally to its economy and social fabric, while media geographies have shaped the experiences of city living. This course explores media representations, institutions, and geographies across time and is organized around the collaborative production of an online guidebook to the media history of New York.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1151-000 (20991)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ramirez, George

Food and Nutrition Global Society (FOOD-UE 1180)

This course unites the liberal arts experience with a specialization in food and nutrition. It contains three areas of focus: food and nutrition history; ethical issues in food and nutrition; and emerging technologies as they related to food and nutrition.

Food Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


FOOD-UE 1180-000 (18285)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Arab Theatre & Film: (MEIS-UA 747)

Examines recent trends in contemporary Arab theatre and film, contextualizing these within a broader history of Arab performance. Particular attention is given to how experimental practitioners have explored issues of human rights and the control of territories under the modern state. Strategies addressed include the conflation of the past and present as a means of exploring the persistence of the colonial power structure in the modern Arab world; the use of the parable to speak truth to power; the incorporation of the populist entertainment forms that directly engage the audience; and the use of familiar tales to explore new political realities.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MEIS-UA 747-000 (13271)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Atrach, Naila

Science in Our Lives: Environmental Issues (SCIED-UE 212)

Introducing the notion of citizen science, this course provides students with opportunities to use scientific information to solve real-world problems related to environmental & public health. By exploring the practices of science from observing & measurement to analyzing & explaining data, students learn to use data & produce scientific knowledge for the public. Liberal Arts Core/MAP Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Natural Sciences

Science Education (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


SCIED-UE 212-000 (18146)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Milne, Catherine

Ruins, Fragments, and Archives (IDSEM-UG 1748)

Traces of time passing, ruins are time that has turned into space, duration ossified and broken up into fragments. Fragments are things we carry out of ruins, relics rescued from the abyss of lost time. We create archives to organize the rescued and the abandoned, compiling catalogs and designing systems that are often ruins themselves. Drawing on literature, painting, film, and installation art, this class will explore the entanglement of nature and history and of the recent and deep past in representations of architectural and social decay—in stories and images of ruined cottages, “picturesque” abbeys and castles, partially buried woodsheds. We will examine representations of objects redeemed from the ruins of history as well as the ruined sites in which such objects find refuge (arcades, museums, libraries). And we will consider what it means for something to outlive its usefulness, to survive itself and live on in its own afterlife. Students will write several analytic essays, building toward a research project in which they will explore and interpret a ruin of their choice. Texts may include essays by Uvedale Price, Walter Benjamin, Siegfried Kracauer, Sigmund Freud, Michel Foucault, Douglas Crimp, Robert Smithson, Marguerite Yourcenar, and Hal Foster; engravings, films, and installations by Giovanni Battista Piranesi, Jacques Tourneur, Chantal Akerman, Ilya Kabakov, Tacita Dean, and Pat O’Neill; poetry and prose by William Cowper, William Wordsworth, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Virginia Woolf, H.D., Louis Aragon, Susan Howe, and Theresa Hak Kyung Cha.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Global Media Seminar: Media Activism and Democracy (ITAL-UA 9513)

The course on “Media, Activism & Democracy” aims at, first, introducing students to the complex and fascinating topic of civil society activism; second, at illustrating them the linkages between activism and media; third, at showing them the impact of civil society’s advocacy on contemporary political systems. In a nutshell, the course aims at providing students with a closer understanding of the civil society activism-media-politics conundrums at the national and global levels.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITAL-UA 9513-000 (2451)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Masrani, Rahoul

Global Culture Wars (HSED-UE 1033)

This course will examine the origins, development, and meanings of so-called cultural conflict in the United States. Topics will include abortion, gay rights, bilingualism, and the teaching of evolution in public schools. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Cultures & Contexts

History of Education (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


HSED-UE 1033-000 (18428)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Fashion as Art: Contemporary Collaborations (ARTS-UG 1437)

Presently, the distinctions between fashion and art have begun to fray, revealing a dynamic cultural nexus that has propelled new concepts, processes, materials and modes of presentation. Artists, designers, curators and critics alike recognize the wide-ranging appeal of locating fashion within Fine Art and vice versa. This malleable exchange between the two mediums is illuminated in landmark exhibitions like Alexander McQueen’s Savage Beauty and in the profusion of artist to brand collaborations that continue to transform the fashion world. In this arts workshop, students will have the opportunity to explore fashion as art through a range of material investigations. Questions that the course will engage include: how has the confluence of fashion and Fine Art both challenged and enriched the cultural significance of dress, shifting the industries course and altering the way the world sees value, gender and even identity? Additionally, how can merging these mediums expand and enhance one’s own studio practice? Students can choose from a variety of mediums, including, but not limited to: illustration, painting, collage, textile design, sculpture, photography and performance. This course is open to students of all artistic backgrounds with an interest in expanding their experiences in visual culture and the visual arts.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

The Gardens and Landscapes of Tuscany (ARTH-UA 9653)

To provide the student with an awareness and appreciation of gardens and landscapes of Tuscany from early Roman precedents to the 21st century. The design of the Italian landscape and garden is studied as a means of cultural communication–an expression of a society’s values, philosophy and understanding of the environment. Emphasis is placed on historic precedent, sustainable design techniques utilized in Italian gardens and classic Renaissance design concepts. The format includes lectures, class presentations and field trips.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


ARTH-UA 9653-000 (2596)
05/21/2024 – 07/01/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Bucellii, Claudia

Images (PHIL-UH 2416)

Images depict, words describe. A picture of the cat of the mat depicts the cat as being on the mat. The sentence ’the cat is on the mat’ describes the cat as being on the mat. Both represent the world as being in a certain state, but they do so in different ways. What is the difference in these ways of representing? What does it take for an image to depict? This course covers most major theories of depiction, including resemblance, experience, recognition, pretense, and structural theories. We then expand the scope of inquiry to include topics such as systems of depiction, analog vs. digital representation, maps, film, comics, maps, mental imagery, and relations to the cognitive science of vision.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PHIL-UH 2416-000 (5805)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rabin, Gabriel

Zine Scenes (OART-UT 24)

Before the internet artists and enthusiasts found their communities through self-publishing niche small-circulation magazines, usually without profit, with a burning desire to communicate. We’ll discuss the continued relevancy of the culture as we look at zines scenes from the past. For each scene, we’ll have an “object lesson” in which we dissect historical zines with an eye on form, content, aesthetic, publisher motives, and technology required for production. Then we’ll make our own! We’ll learn about historical zine making methods by making our own small-run zines in the same fashion to circulate within class. In addition to this tactile learning, you’ll produce a small body of work and gain an instant collection from your peers.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Expressive Culture: Museum in Washington Field Study (CORE-UA 9723)

With its vast array of institutions dedicated to distinct cultural groupings and its formation inextricably linked to the halls of power, the museum culture in our nation’s capitol is uniquely Washington D.C. Taking advantage of behind-the- scenes access to some of the most prestigious museums in the world and their staff, students will explore various approaches to interpreting art and will develop tools for appreciating their aesthetic experiences. We will also look critically at the ways in which museums—through their policies, programs, exhibitions, and architecture—can define regional or national values, shape cultural attitudes, inform social and political views, and even effect one’s understanding of the meaning of a work of art. Starting our class at The Phillips Collection, America’s first museum of modern art, we will visit other pioneering private and public museums both old and new and have the opportunity to meet with staff members actively involved in different activities. We will explore the collections, learn about the inner workings of the exhibition process, and investigate the diverse educational missions these museums fulfill. Against the backdrop of the Capitol Building where legislation is made influencing museums on the National Mall and beyond, we will examine the political sides of this cultural history and the unusual array of institutions that have been legislated into existence, specifically museums dedicated to defined constituencies.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CORE-UA 9723-000 (4978)
at NYU Washington DC (Global)
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: Topics (CORE-UA 500)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CORE-UA 500-000 (10506)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Igsiz, Asli


CORE-UA 500-000 (10507)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10508)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10509)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10510)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10511)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Juette, Daniel


CORE-UA 500-000 (10512)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10513)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10514)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10515)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10516)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10517)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10518)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bottex-Ferragne, Ariane


CORE-UA 500-000 (10519)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10520)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10521)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10522)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10523)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stark, Soren


CORE-UA 500-000 (10524)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Jingyi


CORE-UA 500-000 (10525)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Jingyi


CORE-UA 500-000 (10526)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fiorio, Soraya


CORE-UA 500-000 (10527)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fiorio, Soraya


CORE-UA 500-000 (10528)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cordivari, Braden


CORE-UA 500-000 (10529)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cordivari, Braden


CORE-UA 500-000 (10530)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10531)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Expressive Culture: Topics (CORE-UA 700)

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CORE-UA 700-000 (10544)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ganti, Tejaswini


CORE-UA 700-000 (10545)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 700-000 (10546)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 700-000 (10547)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 700-000 (10548)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 700-000 (10549)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hay, Jonathan


CORE-UA 700-000 (10550)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xie, Vivi Fupeng


CORE-UA 700-000 (10551)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xie, Vivi Fupeng


CORE-UA 700-000 (10552)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Deng, Zhilong


CORE-UA 700-000 (10553)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Deng, Zhilong

Cultures & Contexts: Multiculturalism in France (CORE-UA 9547)

With an important history of immigration, France has long been a site of cultural contact and exchange. This course considers the country’s multicultural make-up and the ideologies, institutions, conflicts, and paradoxes that shape how that diversity has taken form through time. Conflicts and controversies of the past 40 years, which include the rise of the extreme right, the problem of the disadvantaged suburbs, the question of Islamic headscarves, and more, have in particular pushed these questions to the front of the country’s domestic agenda. Looking historically and across several case studies, we ask as well as what the French example can add to our understanding of culture, diversity, and race. Conducted in English.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CORE-UA 9547-000 (6345)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Writing with AI: Philosophy and Practice (INTM-SHU 142)

In this class, we will use AI as a writing and editing tool and study the history and philosophy of augmented and automated writing. Through a combination of lectures and hands-on workshops, we will explore the theoretical aspects of AI and writing with case studies and examples, as well as experiment with different AI tools and techniques. Prerequisite: None.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


INTM-SHU 142-000 (19975)
03/18/2024 – 05/10/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Konior, Bogna

Advanced Lab: Synthetic Media (INTM-SHU 306)

This advanced course investigates emerging trends in machine learning and artificial intelligence for generating media content – images, video, and sound. The course explores the idea of how artists, designers, and creators can use machine learning in their own research, production, and development processes. Students will learn and understand machine-learning techniques and use them to generate creative media content. We will cover a range of different platforms and models and also experiment with implementing the content with platforms for interaction design, such as Unity. Prerequisite: INTM-SHU 120 Communications Lab OR INTM-SHU 205 What’s New Media OR INTM-SHU 124 Emerging Technologies & Computational Arts

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


INTM-SHU 306-000 (6121)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Didakis, Stavros

Breaking the Code: Gender, Art, and Interactivity in the Digital Age (IM-UH 2517)

In this course, we will focus on gender as a central mode of identity exploration in contemporary art within the digital age, adopting a multidisciplinary and interactive approach. Over a course of six sections, we will analyze how contemporary artists, from diverse backgrounds, delve into various facets of gender identity within the context of digital art history. This exploration will encompass their interactions with new media styles, mediums, reception, and critical analysis. We will raise essential questions: How does technology in interactive art contribute to gender equality? To what extent does an artist’s gender identity influence the interpretation of their digital work? We will critically engage with gender studies, examine gender’s profound impact on digital creation, and explore the socio-cultural influences at play. Through weekly readings and group interactive activities, class discussions, and a final VR exhibition on a related topic of their choosing, students will explore gender’s relevance to digital art creation, examine materials highlighting how gender shapes digital art, analyze socio-cultural factors influencing gender and sexuality in digital contemporary art, and apply their insights to interactive media.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IM-UH 2517-000 (20958)

Mod Chines Fiction (EAST-UA 732)

This course will survey literature produced at various points in the tumult of modern Chinese history, from the late Qing through to the present day. While the time period will be broad, we will hope to engage in close, critical readings of significant works of fiction from a selection major authors primarily from Mainland China. How do certain concerns of modernity arise in different texts, at different times, and for different writers? What different relationships do we see being shaped between literature, life, and politics, and how does fiction negotiate certain tensions and anxieties about modern and contemporary life? By exploring a variety of engaging novels and short stories, we will hope to gain a more nuanced understanding of modern China and the role that fiction has played as both an agent of modernity and a reflection of modern Chinese life.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


EAST-UA 732-000 (7696)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Foley, Todd

Designing Your Voice: Synthetic Sounds From Circuits (ITPG-GT 3046)

Course Description: In this 14-week course, students will explore sound design fundamentals through modular synthesizers, leveraging the capabilities of microcontrollers. Modular synthesizers are a type of electronic musical instrument used to generate, manipulate, and shape sound through the interconnection of individual modules, or components. This course is designed to equip students with the skills and creative prowess required to craft their own unique devices that adhere to the Eurorack design format; a popular modular synthesizer standard. The curriculum blends the art of sound design with the technical aspects of hardware synthesizer architecture, building skills so that by the end of this course students will have the competence to bring their sonic visions to life in physical form through thoughtful interaction. By harnessing the modular nature of these components, students will work independently, taking into consideration the designs of their peers to ensure seamless compatibility between their devices, resulting in a distinct ‘voice’; a term used to describe a collection of components that define the signal path of a synthesizer. The first half of the course will focus on sound design coding techniques utilizing the Teensy microcontroller, with the second half dedicated to developing tangible hardware design skills. Prerequisites: Intro to Physical Computing No sound design/musical experience is required.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3046-000 (14811)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Live! (ITPG-GT 3004)

This course focuses on designing, developing and delivering multimedia live performances via a virtual platform. The class will have an emphasis on experimenting with different possibilities of virtual performances, pushing the boundaries of the performative medium, and using emerging technologies to create experiences that allow for the unfolding of engaging narratives, and/or generate compelling visuals in real time. We will look at various examples of both online and offline performances, explore how we can apply the technologies we have learned to design performative systems, and discuss methods we can use to make our performances more engaging. Students will practice quickly coming up with ideas and performing in class. A few weeks into the course, students will propose final project ideas and then develop the performances in the following weeks with support from the instructor. The class will culminate in a virtual event featuring solo and/or group performances by the students.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3004-000 (14795)
01/22/2024 – 03/11/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Wang, Carrie

Designing Curiosity Portals (ITPG-GT 3008)

By exploring and dissecting the field of STEM education, we will research how STEM education currently exists with clear biases and gatekeeping. Through that we intend to create a framework to challenge the biases and design more inclusive and accessible pathways. As a class we will engage in discussions around spaces (community/public spaces and private spaces), STEM as an inclusive element, and definitions of accessibility. The hope is to yield an experience where students can observe, inspire (or get inspired) by mundane things around their day to day lives and connect them to STEM experiences that might seem rather oblivious. Students will create assignments in dialogue with “making with everyday objects”, STEM pedagogy practice, social/emotional learning in spaces, and human-centered design. Students will be exposed to STEM literacy pedagogy, will curate a pop-up space, practice comprehensive user-testing, and reconstruct the framework around accessible and universal design. Students will engage in critical thinking, critiques, visiting artist lectures, field trips and class discussions. About Sharon De La Cruz: https://www.sharonleedelacruz.com/about-me, https://khushbukshirsagar.weebly.com/about.html

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3008-000 (14799)
01/26/2024 – 05/03/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by De La Cruz, Sharon

R&D Studio: Feature, Smart, and Super Phones (ITPG-GT 3009)

In this special format studio class, students will investigate techniques and frameworks to challenge the socioeconomics of planned obsolescence. We will research, design, and develop projects that rethink our strained relationship with smartphones and re-imagine the future of “old” devices. This is a production-heavy, four-credit course, where students will contribute to original research, and develop projects that combine HCI, design, and critical theory. Prerequisites include an open mind, the drive to make, and graduate-level Physical Computing.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3009-000 (14800)
01/23/2024 – 04/30/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Galvao Cesar de Oliveira, Pedro

Therapeutic Sensory Immersion – VR Focused (ITPG-GT 3006)

The use of digital technology in mental health treatment, recovery, support, and prevention is rapidly gaining acceptance. For instance: The FDA recently approved the VR therapeutic EaseVRx to treat pain. Researchers recently found that exposure to natural environments in VR can provide emotional well-being benefits for people who cannot access the outdoors. Strobing lights can be tuned to stimulate temporary harmonic brain wave patterns usually only found in people who have been meditating for decades. Apps which help you track your mood could facilitate gaining knowledge and awareness of one’s mood patterns and thus help maintain emotional well-being. ASMR videos are reported to be effective in inducing sleep for those susceptible to insomnia, and assuaging a range of symptoms, including those associated with depression, anxiety and panic attacks. This class will focus on the use of technology to activate any and all of our senses to aid in mindfulness and meditation, distraction therapy, body awareness and acceptance, and more, via the use of tools and techniques shown to have a direct impact on our physiology as well as supportive and accessible user experience design with broad applications in other areas. Prerequisite: Basic coding and physical computing About Brian Lobser: http://light.clinic

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3006-000 (14797)
01/26/2024 – 05/03/2024 Fri
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Lobser, David

Magazines, Art, and Public Culture (CEH-GA 3028)

This course examines magazines as collaborative sites for artists and writers internationally, leading the way to a global, networked cultural sphere. We will consider periodicals as both commercial and artist-driven enterprises and as material objects to be studied through the lens of the history of photography, journalism, and design.

Center for Experimental Humanities (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CEH-GA 3028-000 (10923)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cole, Lori

Food and the City (FOOD-UE 1050)

Food is all around us. It influences who we are and how we related to our surroundings. This course explores food in the city from multiple points of view. Students observe and analyze various aspects of food in the city, from personal experiences to large social issues such as gentrification and food insecurity, and examine the cultural, social, and political aspects of food systems. Students acquire familiarity with basic ethnographic skills and methods such as interviews, observations, visual ethnography, and virtual ethnography Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Society & Social Sciences.

Food Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FOOD-UE 1050-000 (10588)
at Online
Instructed by Figueroa, Shayne

Platforms and Society (MCC-UE 1039)

Platforms are instrumental in mediating a wide range of phenomena, including social interaction, economic transactions, resource access, information circulation, cultural experiences, and more. Their ubiquity in everyday life is documented in concepts of platformization and platform capitalism and an emerging discipline of platform studies. This course explores the metaphors, histories, logics, and materialities of platforms. Through lenses of media studies, political economy, and anthropology, students investigate the implications of platforms in contemporary life.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1039-000 (11429)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Serpe, Joaquin

Global Media Seminar: Britain and Europe (MCC-UE 9457)

With an emphasis on British and European news and journalism, this course explores globalization from a wide range of theoretical frameworks including political economy, cultural analysis, theories of representation, and critical race and postcolonial studies. It considers how technologies, diasporic and transnational communities, and international institutions impact global communications, and how these networks and organizations are challenging, re-imagining and re-shaping social, cultural and geographic boundaries via mediated discourse.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9457-000 (2753)at NYU London (Global)Instructed by

Digital Media: Theory and Practice (MCC-UE 1031)

This course offers students a foundational understanding of the technological building blocks that make up digital media & culture, & of the ways they come together to shape myriad facets of life. Students will acquire a working knowledge of the key concepts behind coding, & survey the contours of digital media architecture, familiarizing themselves with algorithms, databases, hardware, & similar key components. These technological frameworks will be examined as the basic grammar of digital media & related to theories of identity, privacy, policy, & other pertinent themes.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1031-000 (11419)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Santos, Leonard

Inquiry Seminar (MCC-UE 1200)

MCC Research Inquiry Seminars, taken early in the major, expose students to the department’s culture of scholarly inquiry. Course topics reflect faculty research interests, offering students a chance to explore emerging issues in the field of media studies.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13990)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Benson, Rodney


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13991)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fleetwood, Nicole


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13992)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gitelman, Lisa


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13993)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hegde, Radha


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13994)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Robles, Erica


MCC-UE 1200-000 (5470)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ross, Andrew · Tawil-Souri, Helga


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13995)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13996)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Huda


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13997)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Ethics and Media (MCC-UE 1028)

Students who plan on pursuing careers in the media (professional and academic) will be faced with difficulty choices that carry with them potent ethical repercussions, choices that practical training does not properly equip them to approach in a critical and informed manner. The purpose of this course is therefore twofold: 1) to equip future media professional with sensitivity to moral values under challenge as well as the necessary skills in critical thinking and decision making for navigating their roles and responsibilities in relation to them; and 2) honing those same skills and sensitivities for consumers of media and citizens in media saturated societies.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1028-000 (20074)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cormier, Robert

Ind Study (MCC-UE 1000)

It should be noted that independent study requires a minimum of 45 hours of work per point. Independent study cannot be applied to the established professional education sequence in teaching curricula. Each departmental program has established its own maximum credit allowance for independent study. This information may be obtained from a student?s department. Prior to registering for independent study, each student should obtain an Independent Study Approval Form from the adviser.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
1-6 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1000-000 (13976)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schull, Natasha


MCC-UE 1000-000 (13977)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schull, Natasha

Management & Organizations (BUSOR-UH 1003)

Why do some organizations succeed while others flounder? Whether it be as an employee within a traditional for-profit business, or within one of the wide spectrum of alternative career paths, all of us will ultimately be a part of organizations. This course will help illuminate the key processes and factors that determine why organizations function as they do, drawing upon the fields of management, strategy, sociology, and psychology in the process. Specific topics covered include: Corporate strategy and achieving competitive advantage, Organizational structure and design, Organizational and national culture, Leadership, Motivation and incentives, Groups dynamics, Power & politics within organizations, including a discussion of persuasion & influence and social networks, Judgment and decision-making.

Business & Organizational Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


BUSOR-UH 1003-000 (3759)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Tekeste, Milena · Kailas, Lakshmi


BUSOR-UH 1003-000 (4139)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Tekeste, Milena · Kailas, Lakshmi

Introduction to Creative Writing (LITCW-UH 1003)

This workshop introduces the basic elements of poetry, fiction, and personal narrative with in-class writing, take-home reading and writing assignments, and substantive discussions of craft. The course is structured as a workshop, which means that students receive feedback from their instructor and their fellow writers in a roundtable setting, and that they should be prepared to offer their classmates responses to their work.

Literature & Creative Writing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


LITCW-UH 1003-000 (3504)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Handal, Nathalie

Elementary Arabic 1 (ARABL-UH 1110)

This course is designed for learners with no prior knowledge of Arabic. Students who have studied Arabic before or who have prior knowledge of Arabic are required to take a placement test. This is a full semester (or equivalent session) course during which students first learn the Arabic alphabet, then move on to work on the sentence and paragraph levels. It is an interactive course designed to build the student’s abilities in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. At the end of the semester students should be able to carry on a short conversation; ask and answer questions; introduce themselves and others; provide simple biographical information; interact in simple daily life situations; ask for assistance; express likes and dislikes; read short texts; and gain a basic understanding of Arab culture. Types of tasks and assignments required for this course include daily homework assignments, periodic quizzes, brief presentations, short essay writing, and a final exam.

Arabic Language (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARABL-UH 1110-000 (3501)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Kittaneh, Khulood


ARABL-UH 1110-000 (3502)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by El Araby, Omima


ARABL-UH 1110-000 (3518)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by El Araby, Omima


ARABL-UH 1110-000 (3623)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Kittaneh, Khulood

Shakespeare and the Elizabethan Stage: Text and Performance (ENGL-UA 9412)

This course provides an introduction to the dramatic work of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Students read and attend representative comedies, tragedies, and histories, their selection to be determined by the plays actually in production in and around London, particularly at the Barbican, New Globe, and Stratford to which at least one excursion will be made. Special attention will be given to the playhouses and the influence they had on the art of the theatre, actors’ companies, and modes of production and performance. Lectures and discussions will focus on the aesthetic quality of the plays, their relationship with the audiences (then and now), the application of the diverse attitudes and assumptions of modern critical theory to the Elizabethan stage, the contrasting structures of Shakespearean and non-Shakespearean drama, the new emphasis on selfhood and individuality, and the major themes of hierarchy, order, and justice, the conflict of Nature and Fortune, the role of Providence, the ideals of love, and the norms of social accord. Opportunities will be given to investigate the interrelations of the plays and other arts, including film, opera, and ballet.

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGL-UA 9412-000 (4964)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


ENGL-UA 9412-000 (20189)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by

TV Nation: Inside and Out of The Box (FMTV-UT 1086)

TV Nation: Inside and Out of the Box gives students the opportunity to experience, first hand, how the world of network television works from two points of view: business and creative. Students will gain an understanding of the business aspect through the vantage point of the network executives and programmers. They will also learn the creative process from development to pitching, from the vantage point of writers and producers in the industry. In TV Nation, students will role play the entire process as the key players who put together a season for broadcast and cable networks. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1086-000 (19478)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldman, Andrew

Documenting the African City (ANTH-UA 9087)

This interdisciplinary course combines ethnographic readings, representations, and interpretations of city and urban cultures with a video production component in which students create short documentaries on the city of Accra. The interpretative classes will run concurrently with production management, sights and sound, and post-production workshops. The course will have three objectives: (1) teach students the documentary tradition from Flaherty to Rouch; (2) use critical Cinema theory to define a document with a camera; and (3) create a short documentary film.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ANTH-UA 9087-000 (2318)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Accra (Global)
Instructed by Suberu, Yahaya

The City and the Writer: New York City and Abu Dhabi (LITCW-UH 1509)

New York City and Abu Dhabi is a laboratory for studying NYC and AD, works written about them, as well as creating new works inspired by them. New works – poems, short stories, short plays, visual essays, or films – that will serve as a map for possible journeys as they reinvent and talk back to debates on immigration and space, culture and literature. A cross-disciplinary and cross-border conversation that examines how urban life and the cityscape create imaginative spaces, and the way words create cities. NYC & AD as global spaces will be explored in the works of writers with backgrounds from Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Latin America, and the Caribbean. How does the city shape the form of writing and language? How has literature challenged certain theories on space, and narratives constructed around urban identities? Students get the unique opportunity to meet numerous residents, from theater makers, designers, architects, artists, filmmakers, feminists, actors, comedians, chefs and bodega owners as well as be part of a podcast series and/or publish in one of the most important international literary magazines, Words Without Borders.

Literature & Creative Writing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


LITCW-UH 1509-000 (4206)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Handal, Nathalie

Film Story Analysis: (DWPG-UT 1105)

This text analysis course is designed to provide a platform for an in-depth study of how the story of a film is presented, what choices are made by the author, how information is offered or withheld and what effect this has on the drama. This class will be an “anthology” of different works, each selected for a different aspect of storytelling, exploring how the stylistic choices, themes, and dramatic devices reveal themselves within the body of work. The course is designed to better help students organize their own narratives by analyzing the techniques employed by various screenwriters in constructing their screenplays. A selection of films will be screened and discussed in terms of continuity of theme; delineation of plot, development of structure, protagonist’s story purpose, dialogue as action and character. After each screening, the instructor will lead a group discussion and analysis of the film, focusing further on the techniques, conventions and devices employed by the screenwriter to both tell a good story and satisfy the demands of the audience.

Dramatic Writing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DWPG-UT 1105-000 (9511)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bogle, Donald

Counting and Chance (MTHED-UE 1051)

This course is designed to be accessible and approachable for people who will be future teachers of elementary school mathematics. It is also intended for people who want to broaden their knowledge in mathematics and experience it as a relevant, challenging, and enjoyable field. It is not intended for math majors. It will be taught as a problem-based course, that allows for students to explore and develop new ideas, and apply them to real life situations. The course builds on intuitive understandings of fundamental ideas of counting and chance and moves gradually to more formal knowledge of combinatorics and probability concepts and techniques. The learning experiences offered throughout the course are designed to facilitate student interactions and active role in the learning process. Liberal Arts Core/MAP Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Quantitative Reasoning

Mathematics Education (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MTHED-UE 1051-000 (9403)

Kafka and His Contexts (COLIT-UA 9136)

The course is focused on exploring Franz Kafka’s work – stories, novels, diaries and letters – in the context of fin de siècle Prague and the birth of modernism. We will take a closer look at the cultural and social context of Central Europe (literature and the arts, but also the Modernist architecture of Adolf Loos, Simmel’s sociology of the metropolitan life, Freud’s analysis of the unconscious, Brentano’s psychology, the resonance of Nietzsche’s philosophy, or the emergence of new media like phonograph and silent film) in the first two decades of the 20th century. In addition, we will discuss the adaptations of Kafka’s work and its impact on later art, fiction and film (Borges, Welles, Kundera, Roth, Švankmajer). The topics discussed through Kafka’s writings and other related works include: man and metropolis, family, estrangement, authorship, time, writing and media, travelling, territories and identities, languages, animals, art and pain. We will be especially interested in how these phenomena transform when represented in and through the medium of literary fiction.

Comparative Literature (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


COLIT-UA 9136-000 (2530)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by

ELECTRICITY AND LIGHT (PH-UY 1223)

Second of two introductory courses in general physics for non science or engineering majors. (Not an acceptable substitute for PH-UY 2023 or PH-UY 2033) Electric forces and fields. Electric potential and capacitance. Electric current. Magnetic forces and fields. Faradays law and inductance. Maxwell’s Theory of Electromagnetism. Electromagnetic waves. Light and Color. Geometrical optics. Image Formation. Interference and diffraction. | Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 1213 or PH-UY 1013; Co-requisite: EX-UY 1.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PH-UY 1223-000 (17458)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Di Bartolo, John


PH-UY 1223-000 (17459)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


PH-UY 1223-000 (17460)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Di Bartolo, John


PH-UY 1223-000 (17461)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Di Bartolo, John

Introduction to Mechanical Engineering (ME-UY 1012)

This course introduces students to the range of mechanical engineering and emphasizes the basic principles and devices for storing and using energy, directing motion and satisfying needs. Case studies look at design issues and related ethical and professional practice issues. Emphasis is on a mindset of exploration. Engineering standards and standard parts. Teams work on and present two design challenges. | Prerequisite: Only first-year students are permitted to enroll in this course.

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 1012-000 (12688)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Wilson-Small, Nialah

Applied Audio for Video (MPATE-UE 1225)

A continuation of MPATE-UE 1010. This is an advanced & detailed study of the audio-visual production & post-production process including digital recording techniques, with special emphasis on synchronization & the interfacing of SMPTE time code. Sound design, advanced Foley topics, * creative workflow in audio post production will also be discussed.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MPATE-UE 1225-000 (12867)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shafter, Spencer

Fund of Audio Tech II: Stu Maint (MPATE-UE 1009)

Advanced work in studio repair and maintenance focusing on digital equipment. Students will develop practical skills tracing schematics, using test equipment, and replacing components as required daily in the studio environment.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MPATE-UE 1009-000 (18223)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Glanz, Jake

Sound Design and Spatialization at IRCAM (MPATE-UE 9055)

This course focuses on three important areas in music technology: spatialization, computer aided composition, analysis & synthesis techniques. In each area, concepts & implementations will be explored in a variety of artistic & technological contexts. Students will work with the latest technologies including IRCAM Tools, Spat plugin, Max Bach library, Ambisonics, & Wave Field Synthesis. The course includes a 3-hour weekly lecture, 3-hour studio lab, & workshops at IRCAM. This course is taught in collaboration with IRCAM in Paris, one of the world leading institutions in computer music and acoustics.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
6 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MPATE-UE 9055-000 (3671)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Bio-sensors and Biochips (ENGR-UH 4142)

This course covers the principles, technologies, methods and applications of biosensors and bioinstrumentation beginning with an examination of the ethical, legal, cultural, religious, and social implications of nanotechnologies. The objective of this course is to link engineering principles to understanding of biosystems in sensors and bioelectronics. The course provides students with detail of methods and procedures used in the design, fabrication, and application of biosensors and bioelectronic devices. The fundamentals of measurement science are applied to optical, electrochemical, mass, and pressure signal transduction. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to be able to explain biosensing and transducing techniques; design and construct biosensors instrumentation.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ENGR-UH 4142-000 (19903)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Song, Yong-Ak (Rafael)


ENGR-UH 4142-000 (19904)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Song, Yong-Ak (Rafael)

In With The Old, Out With The New: Debates on “Tradition” in Western Music (IDSEM-UG 1823)

Contests between stalwart custodians of “tradition” and rebels searching for new, untested modes of expression pervade Western music history. This course surveys some of the most contentious debates on music’s past, present, and future waged between music theorists, critics, artists, and audiences, spanning the last five hundred years. Our focus is on the seemingly inevitable tension between what music is, what it should be, and what it can be. Starting with the Greek philosophers of antiquity, we explore debates on the music of Claudio Monteverdi, Ludwig van Beethoven, Richard Wagner, Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, Carmen Miranda, John Cage, Bob Dylan, and The Slits. We also examine the backlash against and subsequent defense of styles like jazz, rock and roll, punk rock, rap, and 2000s pop. Our goal is to better understand how culture is “made” precisely during these moments of charged debate, where a particular music’s perceived merits or transgressions serve as the pretext for larger often controversial ideological issues. Art in this sense–and music in particular–becomes a platform by which to observe how competing aesthetic value systems reveal deep social and cultural rifts. Each unit within this course has two parts. First, we scrutinize and discuss primary sources related to the debate: letters, scores, newspaper and magazine articles, journal entries, singles, albums, and films. Secondly, we read and discuss secondary sources by scholars, critics, and investigative journalists for context, using this new information as a way to think critically about the primary sources and our own aesthetic judgments. What we will see is that debating music in terms of what’s “good” and “bad,” classical and avant-garde, edifying and dangerous, traditional and innovative, is, in the Western world, a long-standing tradition in its own right.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IDSEM-UG 1823-000 (12292)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Coleman, Kwami

Sailors, Convicts, and Pilgrims: The Indian Ocean Since 1500 (IDSEM-UG 2067)

Can oceans be the subject of historical inquiry? Maritime spaces help in thinking beyond nations and national borders that dominate modern global histories, leading us into a world of connected pasts. This course investigates the Indian Ocean’s long expanse from the early modern to the modern period from 1500 to the early 20th century. What changed about movement and exchange across land and sea in the longer transition from empires to nation-states? In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, despite growing European presence in the Indian Ocean littoral, pre-existing networks between East Africa, the Persian Gulf, the Indian sub-continent, and Southeast Asia remained resilient. Yet, by the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, new shipping technologies, the monitoring of movement across borders, and the introduction of travel documents like the passport became crucial in the formation of nation-states that emerged from colonial empires. From sailors, moneylenders, and pilgrims to convicts and indentured laborers, cultures of mobility connected vast geographies, often defying the logic of nation-states and colonialism. In examining this history, we will cover themes ranging from encounters in port-cities, commodities, smuggling, piracy, and pilgrimage to documents of identity and travel. Readings may include: Broeze’s Brides of the Seas, Ewald’s Motley Crews: Indian and African Seafarers, Tagliacozzo’s Secret trades, porous borders, and Torpey’s The Invention of the Passport, and translations from Samarqandi’s Account of Calicut and Vijayanagar, Afonso De Albuquerque’s Letter from Aden, Linschoten’s Itinerario, Munshi Rahman Khan’s Autobiography of an Indian Indentured Laborer, and Nawab Sikandar Begam’s A Pilgrimage to Mecca.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IDSEM-UG 2067-000 (12492)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dayal, Subah

The Art of Sound (FMTV-UT 1007)

This is a critical studies course exploring the aesthetics and psycho-acoustics of sound: how sound works in art and life; how it affects emotions and stimulates the imagination; and how it is used in film, radio, television and other creative or artistic contexts, particularly its application as a key element in storytelling. This course examines the meaning and character of the soundscape (the acoustic environment) and the ways it has technically and aesthetically evolved throughout film history from the Kinetophone to the iPhone. The course includes reading in the theory of sound, and listening to examples of sound work by composers and sound designers. In previous semesters we have looked at the soundtrack in such films as: Playtime; Apocalypse Now, The Conversation, Aliens, The Evil Dead II, Saving Private Ryan, and Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Class meetings will be devoted to: 1) lecture and discussion based on assigned readings and listening and viewing assignments; and 2) screening of selected audio and video works. Students are graded on class participation, journals, a paper, and exams. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1007-000 (19411)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McKeever, Marsha

History of Editing (FMTV-UT 1003)

The theory and practice of editing, from Griffith to Kubrick. The emphasis will be on experiments in narrative clarity and dramatic emphasis in storytelling. For many, editing is the unique source of the art of filmmaking. This course addresses this point of view. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


FMTV-UT 1003-000 (6959)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rea, Peter

The Black Image in Cinema (FMTV-UT 1216)

This is a critical analysis of the Black image in cinema through film screenings, discussions, and selected readings. Film is an art form whose influence dictates how we see others and ourselves. It shapes our worldview and, yet, it is one of the youngest and most misunderstood art forms. On the surface, film viewing might seem like a passive form of learning, but effective films engage us on emotional, intellectual, spiritual, cultural, and political levels. Film is one of the most powerful mediums ever invented and since it’s invention, the Black image and experience has been distorted, demonized, romanticized, erased, appropriated as well as exalted and reified. So, it is our duty and responsibility to know its history, understand its present effects, so we can dictate its future and participate in how the Black image evolves and is treated over time. This course will survey and critically explore an historical range of the Black image on screen and Black films in relation to inspiration, narrative, a scene, set, and site of production. Screening will include a sampling of important Black independently made, and/or Black cast and narrative feature films. We will discuss and analyze specific technical elements (direction, editing, framing and composition, mise-en-scene, music, etc.) that reinforce and demonstrate these larger themes. Accordingly, our discussions and readings will cover the full range of current issues and debates in Black cinema studies, from independence vs. mainstream filmmaking; gender and sexuality; class and color caste; the ghettoization and upwardly mobile integration of urban zones; cooptation and the rise of the bourgeois story as genre, and so on.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1216-000 (19573)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pollard, Jason

Feminist Filmmakers (FMTV-UT 1156)

Feminist Filmmakers examines gender constructs in narrative film and episodic work. We will explore how gender constructs in film and television influence societal views of gender roles, as well as contextualize gender in the era and cultures specific films were made. The vehicle through which this course will examine gender will be the history and work of female directors around the world. Screenings, critical reading in film and gender studies, articles and interviews on current debates regarding gender and diversity inclusion in the film industry, make this class valuable for everyone.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1156-000 (20466)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zentelis, Enid

Hollywood Auteurs (FMTV-UT 1154)

This course will analyze the possibility of pursuing the ideals of an “author cinema” – a personal way of expressing ideas that can deal with Hollywood mainstream and also with the independents, but will never be considered an integral part of either one. The “author cinema” would be a cinema of personal expression that refuses the mainstream’s prison of “three acts, happy ending, stars, etc.”; and at the same time, refuses the trends and the limited scope of most of the independents: a cinema that shows not only how to make a film, but why. Films from all over the world will be analyzed, focusing in particular on the authors that are able to keep alive their personal vision while dealing with the studios (i.e. Stone, Lee, Scorsese, Kubrick), the ones that dared to fight Hollywood (i.e. Welles, Peckinpah, Cimino, von Stroheim) and the loose cannons independent at heart (Altman, P.T. Anderson, Coen brothers). A series of guests to the class will be comprised of critics, curators and cultural organizers, filmmakers and producers. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES. Non-majors must process a “Permission Notice for Non-Majors” form to register for the course (subject to availability).

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1154-000 (19539)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Monda, Antonio

Traditions in Narrative (FMTV-UT 1031)

This course surveys narrative forms and representative works from literature that employ them, contributing to a familiarity with the literary tradition inherited by film, television, and radio. It examines the various strategies of narrative structure and its principal components (e.g., plot, theme, character, imagery, symbolism, point of view) with an attempt to connect these with contemporary forms of media expression. The course includes extensive readings, which are examined in discussions, and selected from English, American, and world literature. This course may be allocated to either History & Criticism or Gen Ed Humanities for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


FMTV-UT 1031-000 (6982)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Monda, Antonio

Film Analysis (FMTV-UT 1204)

A rival reportedly asked Walt Disney why Disney’s films were so much better. Disney replied, “I analyze.” His rival said, “So do I.” Disney answered, “I analyze better.” Film Analysis is an advanced course in film criticism taught by practitioners. We build upon the analytical skills developed in Language of Film, Storytelling Strategies and the various production courses in order to strengthen the students’ ability to critically assess the weave of narrative content, mise-en-scene, cinematic technique and structures. Through this in-depth examination of a wide range of films, students deepen their understanding of how filmmakers over the years and in various cultures have created meaningful experiences for their audiences.This course counts as History & Criticism for Film Majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1204-000 (19541)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Santha, Laszlo

Computational Approaches to Music and Audio I (MUSIC-UH 2419)

The Computational Approaches to Music and Audio I will introduce students to programming for the development of applications of generative music and audio, ranging from standalone musical compositions to fun and engaging musical games or intelligent musical instruments. These applications will be developed mostly in Max, a widely used and very popular graphical programming environment for electronic music and interactive media. By the end of this course students will have become familiar with current approaches to audio and music programming namely in the Max programming environment, plug-in creation for Ableton Live, as well as have acquired a strong foundation in the field that will prepare them for the second course in the sequence.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MUSIC-UH 2419-000 (4520)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Guedes, Carlos

Manus et Machina (CADT-UH 1001)

This course explores how technology and machines have influenced human life across the ages. It further explores how technology has influenced the fields of arts and design and investigates this inspirational source for new technological developments. Lecture and discussion will be the breeding ground for concept development of new machines: Every student will realize a prototype of a machine executing a certain task. This hands-on project will be complemented by case studies, reading assignments, workshops, excursions, and one-on-one meetings with the professor. The course builds knowledge about futuristic developments and their use and influence from past to present, including questions concerning ethics and values. Students will leave the course with a completed project to be displayed in an exhibition and a personal philosophy of Arts, Design, and Technology.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CADT-UH 1001-000 (4555)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alawadi, Khulood


CADT-UH 1001-000 (4556)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alawadi, Khulood

What is Technology (IDSEM-UG 9353)

It would be a misnomer to assume that technology is something we “use.” Rather, the human appears as embedded in a matrix of the socio-techno-material. In this sense, there is something quite non-technical about technology which has an intrinsically social nature and can take the form of bodily and socializing techniques, the canalization of creative powers, becomings of all sorts, and of course the mechanical and material manipulation of ourselves and our life-worlds. We must thus speak of a biological and technical habitus of dependency and over-coming, one constituted by everything from creating art, to language, to ideological persuasion, to human enhancement and post-humanism, and various forms of convergence. What is the relationship between these various techniques and technologies and their respective effects (ethical, cultural, aesthetic) on the category of the human? Social transformation and technology cannot be theorized in isolation. The technological, mediological, and digital have to be unearthed as constitutive of our shared “material culture” and milieu. Within such a milieu, which is both internal and external to actors and agents implicated within it, the “essence” of the human is not only potentially redefined, but indeed dissolved. In such a potential redefinition and dissolution, one finds a radically new ethical and political threshold that has yet to be adequately theorized. This course attempts to reveal this threshold through developing a critical heuristic which maps the topoi of the socio-eco-techno system. Drawing on mediology, ethics, and the French school of the anthropology of techniques, we explore such topoi in terms as both “deep” historical sediment and also futurology with a view to illuminating how our values are negotiated and transformed in our rapport with the technological.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IDSEM-UG 9353-000 (3672)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

France and Islam (FREN-UA 9806)

Islam is the second most important religion in France (after Roman Catholicism) and France has the highest Muslim population in Europe. Complex events from the mid-20th century forward have led to continuous heated debate and controversy about the place of Muslim citizens within the secular Republic. France’s interwoven history with Islam dates back, however, to the first Umayyad conquests of the Iberian peninsula in the 8th century and then to the period of the Crusades. Through the use of primary sources, literary and filmic texts, and critical readings (notably in history, sociology and cultural studies), this course traces the complexity and heterogeneity of French perceptions of Islam within a broad historical perspective beginning with these early encounters and continuing up to the present day.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FREN-UA 9806-000 (2624)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Studies in Prose Genres: Postcolonial Readings of Classic Texts (FREN-UA 9833)

In this course we focus on four contemporary novels in which the world of the character, the narrator, or the author, is read through the lens of a literary classic. In each case, the reading and rewriting of the primary text involves temporal and spatial displacements (from the 18th to the 20th century, from Europe to the Caribbean and to the South Pacific) that generate shifting perspectives and a constant reshuffling of center and periphery. Between a reverential affiliation to the past and a creative misreading and rewriting of it, these intertextual encounters with « great » Western literary works insistently raise the questions of identity, originality, and “writing back”. Exploring these questions will therefore also involve drawing on comparative, translation, and postcolonial studies.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FREN-UA 9833-000 (21162)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Intro to 3D Character Design using Zbrush (FMTV-UT 1071)

This course explores the Art of Character Creation using the powerful digital sculpting program ZBRUSH. Students will learn the ins and outs of the program to create their own 3d characters from scratch. Sculpting, detailing, Polypainting, rendering and compositing in Photoshop will all be covered. The class will encourage learning while doing as I find it’s the best way to learn a new art. Zbrush is a unique program that allows users to manipulate 3D shapes in a quick fashion without having to model polygons like other 3D programs such as Maya. In effect you are using “digital clay” in Zbrush to push and pull primitive forms into fantastic creatures and characters. Zbrush is the perfect tool for traditional artists to transition to artmaking in the digital realm. Zbrush is an extremely feature-rich piece of software, with a unique interface unlike any other computer graphics program. While the interface may seem quite intimidating at first, rest assured we will explore the interface together and learn all the most important tools to get started and having fun with organic character creation! Some benefits of using Zbrush for Character and Creature Design over other computer design software: -The ability to quickly create concepts as if you were manipulating real clay -Great for rough character concepts or more finished painted renders -Transition is much smoother from practical to digital art using Zbrush because it feels like you are using an artistic tool rather than a technical tool – Zbrush offers such a deep diverse toolset, you can create stylized cartoon-like characters, realistic animals and humans! The possibilities are endless. You can use it for everything from organic characters to hard surface robots and props! -Once you learn the interface and tools, you can simply sculpt without worrying as much about technical aspects like polygons, faces, points and edges like other traditional polygon modelling programs

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1071-000 (20242)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Benevides, Rob

Education and Social Entrepreneurship (EDST-UE 1503)

Innovative solutions in education are emerging from the private sector every day. Business ventures from Teach for America to Khan Academy are changing the way teachers are prepared, the way students learn, and the way institutions use data. These ideas are started by “social entrepreneurs,” people who try to improve lives through solutions that have a market and customers. Students in this course learn about social entrepreneurship, how to identify critical issues in the education-related space, and how to develop their own entrepreneurial solutions accordingly.

Education Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


EDST-UE 1503-000 (18440)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gold, Thomas

Interactive Multi-Screen Experiences (ITPG-GT 3002)

We experience screens daily in many forms: in our hands, on our desktops, on walls and public installations as we travel. This course will explore the creative possibilities of real-time interactive and reactive art on screens in various forms. Using the recently developed p5VideoKit we will create standalone installations. p5VideoKit is a new library of live video effects – building on p5js – presented as a dashboard for mixing video in the browser. This library allows the user to apply visual effects to live video from connected cameras and sensors or streaming from devices on the internet. p5VideoKit is open source and can be extended with the user’s p5js code for a plethora of visual effects and interactivity. One possible application of p5Videokit would be a public facing installation allowing anonymous people on the street to use their hand held devices to interact with large street facing screens, thereby collaborating on real time creation of “digital graffiti”. Building on ICM, students will learn how to adapt simple sketches into components of p5VideoKit so that algorithms can be quickly composited and orchestrated into more complex works. Students will also learn how to edit and share code beyond the p5js editor, use nodejs/javascript to automate deployment of installations, and remotely configure dedicated computers with long running installations. Several dedicated computers and screens will be available to preview installations on the floor and street facing areas of the 370 Jay Street campus. Prerequisites: ICM or equivalent coding experience. About John Henry Thompson: http://johnhenrythompson.com

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3002-000 (14793)
03/14/2024 – 05/02/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Thompson, John

Mobile App Development Lab (ITPG-GT 2372)

One of the most transformative consumer products in history, the iPhone remains the standard bearer for great design and user experience. With the latest versions of iOS and iPhone, Apple puts depth sensing and augmented reality in our pockets. How do we take advantage of this incredible platform to produce our own compelling experiences? This course will be a hands-on workshop where we explore the world beyond generic apps and push the boundaries of what’s possible on iOS hardware. Each week, you’ll be asked to complete a programming exercise meant to foster your understanding of iOS application development. We’ll leverage existing open source libraries to quickly build out your app with features such as real time communication and cloud storage. We aim to create distributed instruments for computed expression. Full-time access to an iOS device and a Mac laptop computer running the latest operating system and development tools are required. Prereq: Some programming experience (such as ICM) and willingness to learn Apple’s Swift programming language.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2372-000 (14786)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Thompson, John

Designing for Well-Being (ITPG-GT 3000)

This course would focus on the questions of 1) what makes people healthy? and 2) how can we design tools and environments that support healthy lifestyles? Key topics to be covered include public health concepts like the multiple determinants of health and the social-ecological framework, plus a little evolutionary biology; the role of behavior in health, key tenets of behavioral economics and behavior change strategies; and systems thinking concepts from Donella Meadows and others. Students will come away with a much more sophisticated understanding of the complex system of factors and forces that affect people’s health; understanding of key systems concepts and some techniques for understanding systems; and experience designing for behavior at scale. A potential final project could be to reimagine/redesign a popular commercial service so that it would have a more health-producing impact — or, alternatively, to focus on designing changes to the ITP environment that would promote better health for students, faculty and staff. About Steve Downs: www.stevedowns.net

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3000-000 (14792)
01/23/2024 – 03/05/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Downs, Stephen

No Screens Allowed (ITPG-GT 3010)

“Since the introduction of the iPhone in 2007, the touchscreen has become the dominant manner for navigating Mobile devices. UX pattern best practices are enshrined in documents such as Apple’s ‘HIG’ (Human Interface Guidelines) or Google’s more recent Material Design. ‘No Screens Allowed’ is a class that challenges this ’Touchscreen first’ interaction approach. Taught in the Kotlin language, students will prototype solutions in response to Instructor directed assignments. The various projects structured to interrogate mobile device capabilities such as: Voice Recognition, Computer Vision, Machine Learning, and built in sensors. Students will be provided with identical hardware: Pixel 3 phones running Android, the chosen development platform for the class. Successful completion of Introduction to Computational Media and Introduction to Physical Computing are required for entry into class. “

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3010-000 (14801)
01/25/2024 – 05/02/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Jones, Brian

Modern Artifacts: Interactive Public Art for the People (ITPG-GT 3005)

In an era of remote everything, how can we create artwork that brings us back together IRL? This course explores our connection to physical objects within the context of community. How can sculpture, installation, immersive, and public art nurture our neighborhoods via collaboration, play, ritual, self-expression, and awe? Students will work collaboratively to radically imagine bold, sculptural, immersive works using innovative and lo-if techniques integrated with technology. Hands-on workshops include experiments creating found sculptures, AR prototypes, projection mapping, real-time interactive multimedia content, and more. We’ll reference ancient monuments, sacred objects, NYC relics, street art and contemporary works to envision new artifacts that create awareness by reflecting the needs of our communities. Prerequisite: Comm Lab: Hypercinema About Ali Santana: http://www.alisantana.com/bio

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3005-000 (14796)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Santana, Ali

Introduction to Quantum Technologies (ITPG-GT 3003)

Quantum technologies are the next frontier of electronics and computing. Quantum Computers, Quantum Sensors, Quantum Materials are just beginning to emerge from laboratories and enter the realm of practical application. The course introduces the underlying principles of quantum physics, and reviews emerging capabilities of quantum computers and related technologies. Coursework will include programming quantum algorithms on a simulator, and running programs on actual cloud-based quantum computing hardware. The topics will be highly technical and will require the study of scientific principles and experimental apparatus. We will cover some basic mathematical operations in linear algebra, and we’ll be encountering some equations from physics and computer science.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3003-000 (14794)
01/23/2024 – 03/05/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Shakar, Gregory

Code Your Way (ITPG-GT 3007)

This course provides students an opportunity to sharpen their coding skills in several ways: by reviewing fundamental programming concepts, acquiring techniques to systematically develop code-driven projects, and then implementing those to develop an independent project with the structure and support of a classroom learning community. The first part of the semester consists of weekly exercises to practice strategies for learning new algorithms, writing pseudocode, pair programming, debugging, refactoring, version control, and more. Screen-based code examples for the activities and assignments draw inspiration from the history of creative coding. The second part of the semester shifts to a project development studio format for students to apply these strategies to a self-directed project. This could be an existing idea or one devised during the course. Ultimately this course aims to empower students to reflect on their process and teach themselves how to program with greater efficiency and independence. It is a direct follow-up to Introduction to Computational Media (ICM) or for anyone interested in advancing their coding practice. Examples and exercises will be provided in JavaScript using the p5.js library. However, students are welcome to consult the instructor about working with another programming library, framework, or language with which they have interest or prior experience. Prerequisite: ICM or equivalent experience

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 3007-000 (14798)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Nickles, Ellen

Performance in Virtual Space (ITPG-GT 2999)

Focusing on motion capture (ak. MoCap), this class introduces basic performance skills alongside 3d graphic manipulation to create real-time virtual experiences. In this class we will have the opportunity to build sets, produce interactive props, and design unique characters to tell stories or engage with audiences. Utilizing Optitrack Motion Capture system, Blender, Motionbuilder, and Unreal Gaming Engine; we will create, rig, animate, and perform as avatars.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2999-000 (14791)
03/15/2024 – 05/03/2024 Fri
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Truxillo, Marcel

Future Mapper (ITPG-GT 2362)

As you know, projection mapping and Light Art are becoming popular again because of large-scale pop-up installations worldwide: ARTECHOUSE, SuperReal, Meow Wolf, and TeamLab. Technology has advanced over the years, but how people enjoy light art have not changed so much. How do your ideas and artwork fit into these site-specific installations? This class is for anyone interested in creating a site-specific installation using mapping technologies to create new experiences for the public audience. This class guides students through conceptual and technical processes of project and artist development. It consists of three parts: Project & Artist Development, Projection Mapping, and LED Mapping. We will research and discuss the history of visual artwork, public engagement, and technical exercises using real international contests and festival sites. The student will learn the latest Projection and LED Mapping techniques using Madmapper. And we will also focus on advanced techniques like multi-projector projection, projector calculation, Interactive Mapping, and software & hardware to culminate in a final project. The class will also invite guest speakers to discuss the nuts and bolts of their art and business. About Chika Iijima: www.mappathon.com, www.imagima.com

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2362-000 (14784)
01/23/2024 – 04/30/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Iijima, Chika

Through the Lens: Modalities of AR (ITPG-GT 2368)

In this course, students will explore the fundamentals of augmented reality by dissecting the interaction between camera, computer, and user. Each week we will focus on a different AR modality: image, face, body, environment, and object, and consider their real-world applications. Through weekly explorations, we will examine the existing affordances of AR as well as their impact. This course will culminate in a final project, and our tool of choice will be Lens Studio. Course syllabus: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1wMWVnDdzgz2bbsCNp7jRAiCe1job4glq61o67sWAP00/edit?usp=sharing

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2368-000 (14785)
03/12/2024 – 04/30/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pruitt, Maya

Biophilic Experiences – activating our sensory relationship to nature (ITPG-GT 2361)

As the scale of human impact on global climate and ecosystems deepens, we see the need to alter our trajectory, to be more inclusive of other species in our imagining of the future. This class sets out to investigate the relationships we humans have with nature and non-human animals, to dive deep into the meaning and utility of being in relationship, and ultimately to translate these ideas into tangible, multimedia experiences that expose a larger audience to a multi-species worldview. This class sits at the intersection of art, science, and technology. It combines studio practice and research with example case studies and critical texts. Together, we will meet artists, designers and scientists who build multispecies futures through urban ecology, biology, and public art. This class is for students who are eager to develop XD (experience design) and storytelling skills. The course follows a research-driven process that results in a design proposal and proof-of-concept that can be pitched to a public arts org. Keywords: bioArt, interactive installations, experience design, research, eco-activism

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2361-000 (14783)
01/23/2024 – 03/05/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Ruckman, Leslie

CAD for Virtual and Reality (ITPG-GT 2086)

The goal of this class is to gain an understanding and proficiency with Computer Aided Design (CAD). We will become familiar with CAD software, mechanical design, and simulation. The class will cover common CAD modeling techniques. We will use our designs to get physical parts made as well as use them in virtual projects. We will create parts both real and impossible.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2086-000 (14782)
01/25/2024 – 05/02/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Siman

Web Art as Site (ITPG-GT 2094)

WEB ART AS SITE addresses the history and practice of art made for and inseparable from the web, while teaching basic coding for the web. We explore key examples of web art from the early days of the internet through today, asking questions about this idiosyncratic artistic medium like: How do different forms of interaction characterize the viewer and/or the artist? What happens to our reading practice when text is animated or animates? How is an internet-native work encountered, and how does the path we take to reach it affect our reading? Who is able to see a work of web art, and what does access/privilege look like in this landscape? How are differently-abled people considered in a web artwork? What feels difficult or aggressive in web art, and when is that useful? How do artists obscure or reveal the duration of a work, and how does that affect our reading? What are the many different forms of instruction or guidance online? As we ask these questions, we exploit the internet pedagogically, collaborating online, playing with anonymity, and breaking the internet spaces we know. Students learn web coding through specialized online tutorials; most of class time is reserved for discussion (of web art and supplementary readings) and critique. Throughout the semester, students will produce two major works of web art. Students need only a standard laptop, and will not be expected to purchase any software or text (cost of materials: $0).

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2094-000 (14781)
01/24/2024 – 05/01/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Ballew, Theo Ellin

Real-Time Online: Building Video & Audio Interactions for the Web (ITPG-GT 2327)

Over the past 3 years, we have seen many aspects of our lives thrust online. Increasingly, we are working, learning, socializing with family and friends, attending live performances and more through 2D grids of video feeds on platforms such as Zoom and Google Meet. These communication tools have become essential for remote communities to connect, yet fail to replicate many of the most engaging, messy and human aspects of our in-person experience. What happens when we break out of this grid and explore new forms of real-time social interactions online using webcam video and audio? Recent explorations in this realm have shown the promise of spatial metaphors in creating engaging real-time social interactions online. In this course, students will create their own series of experimental social spaces that explore these questions: how does the shape and nature of our environment affect the way we communicate? What unique forms of real-time expression and sharing might be possible online (and only online)? How might we design experiences for the unique social dynamics we want to support? Students will be exposed to principles of spatial design as well as a series of open source Javascript tools for arranging live webcam video and audio in 2D and 3D space in the browser. They will use WebGL (through the three.js library) to build 2D and 3D environments, and will be exposed to WebRTC (Web Real-Time Communications) and Node.js to add interactivity to those environments.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2327-000 (14780)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Nelson, Aidan

Haptics (ITPG-GT 2457)

From the crass rattle of early pager motors to the sophisticated clicks and purrs of the iPhone Taptic engine, the ability to buzz has increasingly worked its way into our devices. This course focuses on physical prototyping and interaction design for non-visual feedback. Specifically, it will explore how haptic feedback can be utilized and integrated into handhelds, wearables, objects, and environments – anything that we touch or that touches us. Traditional tools such as eccentric rotating mass (ERM) motors, linear resonance actuators (LRAs), and haptic motor drivers will be introduced as well as less conventional methods such as gentle poking, prodding, warming, cooling, squeezing, and tickling. Through hands-on experimentation and a review of research to date, students will emerge from this course well-positioned to incorporate haptic feedback into their future projects. Note: This course is designed for students who have previous experience with physical computing and Arduino.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
1 credits – 1 Day

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2457-000 (14763)

Design with Climate Change (ARTS-UG 1636)

The course explores how design can respond to environmental problems and climate change. In analyzing past attempts, the course starts with decolonizing turn of the century admirations for primitivism and ends with the cyber punks planning new environments online. Following the work of architects, artists, urban planners, graphic designers and fashionista, the course will review histories of adaptation and ways to design with climate. The class will decolonize modernist design schemes, and focus on better ways to design with climate. We will also devote time to discuss topics such as building closed ecological systems, counterculture designs, cyber environments, sick building syndrome, biomimetics, eco-fashion, earth art, and other methods to design within the realm of nature. The overall objective is twofold; to survey the larger historical context of ecological design and define specific contributions to the climate change debate. Ultimately, the students will be asked to design, develop, and participate in an ecologically driven conceptual final design project of their choice.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ARTS-UG 1636-000 (12489)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Anker, Peder · Joachim, Mitchell

FOUNDATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT (MG-UY 1002)

This course introduces the principles and practices of management. Management is viewed as a system of tasks and activities, including environmental scanning, planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Within each major task, is a series of processes, which show how to do what has to be done. Management is a science and an art; both aspects of management are covered in this course. Areas covered are management history, philosophy and the theory and practice of management planning, decision making, organizing, motivating and leading. Special emphasis is on providing the technical and managerial challenges presented by emerging and transformative technologies. Particular consideration is given to the managerial options available to both legacy and entrepreneurial organizations.

Management (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 1002-000 (14075)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by COHEN, MATHIAS


MG-UY 1002-000 (14076)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Driscoll, Michael

Global Media Seminar: Sydney, Australia (MCC-UE 9456)

In this seminar- based subject, students will discuss the latest global media developments in the context of key theoretical frameworks. Central topics include: the increasing disruption of established information flows; challenges facing the fourth estate and democracy itself; the role of soft power and popular culture; trust in journalism and traditional media; the rise of social platforms as near-sovereign technocracies; gender and diversity biases in media and emerging media tech; ethics and regulation; the proliferation of fake news and deep fakes; the potential erosion of privacy; the emergence of citizen journalism; the phenomenon of cancel culture; the influence of hacktivism and digital activism; inequality after #metoo and #blacklivesmatter; the emerging architectures of the metaverse and VR/AR; advancements in Web 3.0 and blockchain; as well as the suite of emerging implications resulting from generative AI, including the intensifying and sometimes intimate relationships between humans and machines. The focus will be international, with an emphasis on Australia. Ultimately, the course will examine the ways in which global communication is undergoing a ceaseless paradigm shift.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9456-000 (2843)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by Varga, David

Social Media Practicum (MCC-UE 9032)

In this workshop-based course, students will become well versed in contemporary debates on social media and its impact on self and society, share their own experiences and observations in this area, design an original research project (using methods such as discourse analysis, virtual ethnography, and interviewing), and write a long-form analysis paper.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9032-000 (2831)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Druker, Jeremy

Advertising and Consumer Society (MCC-UE 9015)

This course will examine the emergence of advertising as a form of communication, its influence upon other forms of mediated communication and its impact upon culture and society.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9015-000 (2561)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Murad, Salim

Video Game Economies (MCC-UE 9008)

The course approaches video games through the lens of political economy. This means examining games foremost as commodities, transactional goods through which various modes of economic life occur. This course introduces students to the structure and economics of the game industry since its emergence in the 1970s, particularly across the United States, China, and Japan. Special attention is brought to the dramatic industry changes catalyzed by digital distribution, mobile gaming, live streaming, and other contemporary developments. Examines the emergence of video games as sites of contemporary cultural production & practice. Special attention is given to the symbolic & aesthetic dimensions of video games, including their various narratives forms and sub-genres, & concentrates on their interactive dimensions. The course provides insight into the emerging trends in the interface between humans & media technologies. The course also situates video games within the business practices of the entertainment industries.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9008-000 (2834)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Krobova, Tereza

Rethinking Public Relations (MCC-UE 1750)

Public relations means different things to different things to different people but it has one undeniable element: communication. This course is concerned with arranging, handling, and evaluating public relations programs. Students work with actual case histories and deal with contemporary topics such as the use of the computer in public relations.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1750-000 (14007)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Devitt, James


MCC-UE 1750-000 (14008)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gabrielski, Jo Temah

Paper Engineering and Interactive Play (ITPG-GT 2187)

The class will focus on the many overlooked aspects of paper, and how it can be used as a three-dimensional material. We will learn the disciplines of making Pop-Ups, Origami, Paper Crafting, and Visual Design. Using these methods as a starting point, students will build prototypes to explore new ways to tell stories, inform, interact, play with, engage, and challenge a younger audience. Most classes are hands – on. The rest, dedicated to criticism (including from children), analysis, and refinement, technical and conceptual. We will discuss how they could be mass produced and distributed. Students will build three prototypes, during the semester. From these, each student will select a favorite to fully develop as the final.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2187-000 (14760)
01/25/2024 – 03/07/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Ita, Sam

Going Live: Real-Time Streaming and Interactive Media (IMBX-SHU 9501)

This course explores the disruptions and creative possibilities that realtime emerging media provides through the lens of learning how to design, create, produce and perform in realtime. Students will be learning how to design and produce for realtime interactive audiences, understand the modern streaming media pipeline, the fundamentals of virtual production, digital content creation and the basics of game engines and other software – all in the service of delivering a more engaging and intimate connection between audience and performer. Students will design and perform 2 distinct realtime performances as well as work together with peers to conceptualize, design and produce a short realtime ‘pilot’ using the tools and techniques you’ve learned in the first two projects. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: Interactive Media Business Elective ; Interactive Media Arts Elective

Interactive Media and Business (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IMBX-SHU 9501-000 (4975)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by Prasanna Kumar, Archana


IMBX-SHU 9501-000 (20268)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
5:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by Prasanna Kumar, Archana

The Western History of Madness from the Bible to DSM-5 (IDSEM-UG 1961)

Viewed as a natural kind or socially constructed, “madness” was defined and treated, examined and controlled, diagnosed and cured according to the spirit of the time. This course follows the varied social imageries of “madness” throughout Western history, from the Hebrew Bible to the contemporary and controversial Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM), also known as “the bible of psychiatry”, in its most recent 5th edition. Students read primary and secondary texts by philosophers, physicians, theologians, jurists, tragedians, novelists, psychologists, social reformers, policy makers, journalists, historians and individuals who suffered madness, known as “experts by experience.” They also observe art and watch films that portray different aspects of madness. Reading includes: the Bible, Plato, Hippocrates, Ibn Sina, Maimonides, Margery Kempe, Erasmus, Robert Burton, Freud, George Canguilhem, Foucault, Ian Hacking, Elaine Showalter among others. The course explores the interaction between the social, cultural, scientific, political as well as economic factors that have shaped the views of “madness” and its treatment while paying ample attention to the history of ideas that informed and, often, framed them.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IDSEM-UG 1961-000 (17014)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ophir, Orna

Introduction to 3D (FMTV-UT 1110)

This is an introductory course to the fundamentals of 3D computer animation. Through in-depth discussions and hands-on assignments, students will gain a thorough beginner’s understanding of the 3D production process. Using industry-leading Autodesk Maya running on high-end Mac Pro workstations, students will learn the basics of modeling and proceed through UV layout, texturing, rigging, animation, lighting and final render. At the end of the class students will have completed a series of exercises that will culminate in a final scene that showcases all they learned.This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1110-000 (19491)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McNagny, Phil


FMTV-UT 1110-000 (19492)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Guevara, Cesar

Fundamentals of Machine Learning (CSCI-UA 9473)

Machine learning is an exciting and fast-moving field of computer science with many recent consumer applications (e.g., Microsoft Kinect, Google Translate, Iphone’s Siri, digital camera face detection, Netflix recommendations, Google news) and applications within the sciences and medicine (e.g., predicting protein-protein interactions, species modeling, detecting tumors, personalized medicine). This course introduces undergraduate computer science students to the field of machine learning. Students learn about the theoretical foundations of machine learning and how to apply machine learning to solve new problems. Assuming no prior knowledge in machine learning, the course focuses on two major paradigms in machine learning which are supervised and unsupervised learning. In supervised learning, we learn various methods for classification and regression. Dimensionality reduction and clustering are discussed in the case of unsupervised learning

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CSCI-UA 9473-000 (2626)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


CSCI-UA 9473-000 (2627)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

World Dance and Global Perspectives (ARTS-UG 1212)

Dance reflects cultural heritage and is a key to understanding diverse societies. In this arts workshop, students explore dance as it appears on several continents. Dance can be seen as encoded forms of a society’s religious, artistic, political, economic, and familial values. Readings cover issues of globalization, fusion and authenticity. Migration, missionaries, trade routes and the diaspora have led to the creation of new dance forms like “Bollywood” and “Tribal” that are a synthesis of earlier forms. Students are introduced to different dance forms through selected readings, rich collection of video footage and studio practice often lead by various guest artists. After a brief warm-up, the class learns simple steps, floor plans and rhythms from the music and dance cultures being studied. Students choose a dance form as their project and themselves become researchers, performers and creators of new forms.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ARTS-UG 1212-000 (12074)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Posin, Kathryn

Introduction to Engineering and Design (EG-UY 1004)

This course introduces selected aspects of the history, philosophy, methodology, tools, and contemporary topics in engineering. Also included are basic engineering experimentation, data analysis, and a team-design project. This course will provide an understanding of what professional engineers do. In this context, an emphasis will be placed on developing oral and written communication skills. EG1004 is a survey course that introduces students to NYU Tandon academic opportunities, professional and career development, and teamwork skills. Design and project management skills are developed throughout a semester-long design project. Disciplines within engineering will be introduced during lecture, and explored through practice in laboratory assignments.

General Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


EG-UY 1004-000 (12431)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12432)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12433)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12434)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12435)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12436)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12437)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12438)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12439)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12440)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12441)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12442)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12443)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12444)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12445)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12446)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12447)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12448)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12449)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12450)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12451)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12452)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12453)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12454)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rom, Cindy


EG-UY 1004-000 (12455)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12456)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12598)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12457)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12458)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12459)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12460)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12461)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12462)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12463)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12464)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12465)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Clenance, Pamela


EG-UY 1004-000 (12466)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12467)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12468)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter · Röhr, Jason


EG-UY 1004-000 (12469)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12470)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12471)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12472)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12473)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12474)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12475)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12476)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12477)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12478)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12479)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12480)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rom, Cindy


EG-UY 1004-000 (12481)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12482)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12483)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12484)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12485)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12486)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12487)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12488)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12489)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12490)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12491)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12492)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid

DIGITAL LOGIC AND STATE MACHINE DESIGN (ECE-UY 2204)

This course covers combinational and sequential digital circuits. Topics: Introduction to digital systems. Number systems and binary arithmetic. Switching algebra and logic design. Error detection and correction. Combinational integrated circuits, including adders. Timing hazards. Sequential circuits, flipflops, state diagrams and synchronous machine synthesis. Programmable Logic Devices, PLA, PAL and FPGA. Finite-state machine design. Memory elements. A grade of C or better is required of undergraduate computer-engineering majors. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 1114 (C- or better) or CS-UY 1133 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UH 1001 (C- or better) or ENGR-UH 1000 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 101 (C- or better)

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11545)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11546)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11547)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11548)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11549)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Reagen, Brandon

Human-Centered Data Science (CDAD-UH 1044Q)

Data science is changing our lives. While the importance of data science is widely acknowledged, there are also great concerns around it. How are data generated? How can they be used to make predictions and inform insights? What can be the potential dangers of applying data science techniques? What are the social and human implications of their uses? This multidisciplinary course explores these questions through hands-on experience on key technical components in data science and critical reviews of human and social implications in various real-world examples, ranging from social science to arts and humanities to engineering. In the course, students will 1) learn basic concepts and skills in data science (e.g., crawling and visualization); 2) apply these skills in a creative project; 3) discuss social and human implications of data science, including data privacy; algorithmic bias, transparency, fairness, and accountability; research ethics; data curation and reproducibility; and societal impacts. This course encourages students to reconsider our common-place assumptions about how data science works and be critical about the responsible use of data.

Core: Data and Discovery (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CDAD-UH 1044Q-000 (4632)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Park, Minsu

Wayfinding: Graphic Design in the Built Environment (CADT-UH 1020)

In November 2014, Volvo Race’s boat Vestas did not find her way to Abu Dhabi port and got stranded on a reef in the Indian Ocean instead. What went wrong? Is it still possible to get lost today, in the age of ubiquitous and democratized GPS? What does it mean to find one’s way? How do different environments create unique problems, as well as provide solutions? How do we find those solutions ourselves, and how can we intervene in the design of our working and living environments, in the design of our navigational practices, in order to avoid getting lost? What tools do we have? How do they work? What can we learn from navigation before GPS? Informed by new technologies, the demand for sustainability, and the inputs from cognitive studies, “wayfinding” has grown to become a field of research in its own right, related to both architecture and design. It studies the ways in which people orient themselves via the organization of sensory cues from the external environment. The course explores visual design components and theoretical ramifications and will include workshops on campus signage systems, with a focus on accessible design.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CADT-UH 1020-000 (4566)


CADT-UH 1020-000 (5231)

Aesthetic History of Photography (PHTI-UT 1102)

Open only to Photography & Imaging majors. Sophomore Standing. This class will chronicle the history of photography?s complex and symbiotic relationship to the other visual arts: painting, sculpture, architecture, installation and performance, among others. Beginning with the medium?s invention and the early fights of its practitioners to establish themselves as fine artists, the course will describe photographers? unique attempts to negotiate their relationships with both artistic movements and the media culture of which they are a part. Robinson, Cameron, Emerson, F. Holland Day, Stieglitz, Moholy-Nagy, Rodchenko, Weston, Alvarez Bravo, Lartigue, De Carava, Cahun, Robert Frank, Diane Arbus and Cindy Sherman (among others) will be seen within the context of their respective art worlds, so the impact of art movements, cultural attitudes and new technologies on photographers during different historical periods can be assessed.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PHTI-UT 1102-000 (7498)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rice, Shelley

Germany and East Central Europe (HIST-UA 9514)

This course will focus on the history of the culturally rich region of “Mitteleuropa” through analysis of the parallel evolution of Germany and the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia and Hungary. Mitteleuropa as a region produced such important figures as Franz Kafka, Gustav Mahler, Sigmund Freud, Theodor Herzl and Milan Kundera; historical personalities whose influence internationally is indisputable. We’ll delve into the history of the region and on the central role played by German politics and culture from the end of the 19th century, through the turbulent 20th century to the present day. Emphasis will be on the evolution of the concept of nationalism as well as on Germany’s foreign policy in the “concert of nations”, especially towards its Eastern neighbors. The aim is to achieve an understanding of the complex evolution of national entities and their interaction between the birth of the modern German state and the integration of the Visegrád countries in NATO and the European Union.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


HIST-UA 9514-000 (3470)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Vassogne, Gaelle

Hist of Nationalism in Cent & Eastern Europe (HIST-UA 9176)

The goal of this course is to introduce the students into nationalism studies and into a plethora of historical and present roots of national identities and manifestations of nationalism in Central and Eastern Europe. The course will examine how selected aspects of national histories have been used (and misused) in 19., 20. and 21. century to support/justify national political programs and leaders; specifically, how a romantic picture of national history influenced the development of national identity and what role its interpretation has had in political struggles and programs of Central and East European nations. The course focuses on forces that triggered many eruptions of ethnic hatred and atrocities in Central and Eastern Europe including Holocaust, post World War II expulsion of Germans, civil war in former Yugoslavia, and most recently the nationalist aspects of conflict between Ukraine and Russia. The course will focus on Ukraine and Russia, Poland, Hungary, former Czechoslovakia, present-day Czech Republic and Slovakia, on former Yugoslavia and on independent states on its territory, and it will motivate the students to formulate a positive and cooperative prospect for the region’s future.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


HIST-UA 9176-000 (2828)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Polisenska, Milada

Comp Modern Societies: Pol & Soc in 20C Germany (HIST-UA 9133)

The history of Germany in the twentieth century offers rich material to explore various approaches to organizing modern society. Beginning with Imperial Germany in 1900 and moving forward to today’s reunited Germany, we will look at different ways in which the relationship between the state and the individual, and relationship between politics, economy, and society developed over five different political systems. We will interrogate how these institutional arrangements were envisioned and structured and how they were experienced in everyday negotiations. In this course, principle narratives and events will be situated in a European and global context, allowing us to place the concept of German modernity in a comparative framework. Lectures will provide an overview of Germany in the twentieth century; readings and in-class discussions will explore different approaches to analyzing German history and society. During museum visits and walking tours, we will analyze contestations over the various attempts to integrate – both in concerted efforts to memorialize as well as to forget and erase – Germany’s oft-problematic pasts within the narrative of Germany’s present.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


HIST-UA 9133-000 (2797)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by

British Art in London (ARTH-UA 9011)

The principal aim of this course is to familiarize students with the history of British art from the Stuarts to the early Victorian era. Teaching will be conducted entirely on sites in London or its immediate vicinity. The course will begin with the elite patronage of the Stuart court and end with the development of public institutions of art from the mid-eighteenth century. The social significance of portraiture, the cult of antiquity, the art market and the rise of landscape will all be studied as themes. There will be a strong emphasis on the European sources of British visual culture and the emergence of a distinctive national tradition of painting from Hogarth through to Turner.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTH-UA 9011-000 (2722)
09/02/2024 – 12/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Schuster, Jana


ARTH-UA 9011-000 (2723)
09/02/2024 – 12/06/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Weiner, Julia

Advanced Seminar: (SOC-UA 9942)

This interdisciplinary course examines the works of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud, three German speaking writers who pioneered radically different and influential interpretations of modern life, which continue to shape our contemporary understanding of society and individuality. The seminar not only delves into the origins of these prominent traditions of modern Western thought, but also underscores their relevance in modern social theories and poetics. Hence, the course will also include references to the writings of their contemporaries, as well as explications of the direct and indirect influences of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud on other writers.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


SOC-UA 9942-000 (3750)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Wed
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by Michaelis-König, Andree

Immigration (SOC-UA 9452)

To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


SOC-UA 9452-000 (4016)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Busch, Nicky


SOC-UA 9452-000 (4017)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Busch, Nicky

Europe Since 1945 (HIST-UA 9156)

The course will begin with an examination of the background to and condition of Europe in 1945. The outbreak of the Cold War and the division of Europe will be discussed as will the promotion of European unity, the establishment of NATO and the emergence of COMECON and the Warsaw Pact. The pressures leading to the creation of the European Economic Community (EEC) will be considered together with the firm establishment of the democratic principle in Western Europe. The Suez Crisis and Decolonisation in Britain and France will be explored together with the corollary, the first application by Britain for membership of the EEC. The effect of President de Gaulle’s presidency on France, NATO and the EEC will be considered. The end of Stalinism in the USSR will be examined as will the first cracks in the Soviet Empire in Eastern Europe in Hungary and Poland. This will be followed by a discussion of the merits and demerits of Khrushchev’s period in power, the U2 crisis and the construction of the Berlin Wall. The Prague Spring off 1968 will be discussed. The continued integration of Europe will be analyzed together with the impact of Ostpolitik in Germany. Brezhnev’s domination of the USSR and Détente in the 1970s will be examined. Following this, the forces that led to the triumph of Neo-Liberalism in Britain will be considered, as will the return of conservatism in Germany and the cohabitation of Mitterrand’s France. The re-launch of the European Community in the 1980s will be analysed. In Eastern Europe the Gorbachev era and the rise of Solidarność will be explored and the course will conclude with an examination of the disintegration of the Soviet Empire in Eastern Europe, the reunification of Germany, the collapse of the Soviet state and the conclusion of the Maastricht Treaty.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


HIST-UA 9156-000 (4971)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by

The Performing Arts in Global Cultures (MPATC-UE 1505)

The study of the intersection of key philosophical and ethical systems with the analysis of performing art works and the music industry. Students learn an “Eclectic Method” of analysis to holistically explore and study works of art from cultures from around the world while studying ethical complexities and analytical systems in relation to the performing arts industries.

Music Theory and Composition (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MPATC-UE 1505-000 (16548)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by White, Leonard · Bush, Christopher

Legal Aspects of The Entertainment Industry (FMTV-UT 1195)

A course that tracks the filmmaking process from its inception, at the idea phase and follows the creative process through development, pre-production, principal photography and post-production. The class will focus on the business and legal issues that arise during every phase of filmmaking. Key topics covered will include: copyright law; option agreements for underlying rights such as books, plays, magazine and newspaper articles; sources of financing; distribution agreements; licensing of music; agreements for actors, directors, producers and writers. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. Students must have Junior or Senior standing. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1195-000 (19505)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lichter, Rosalind

Advanced Circuits (ENGR-UH 2311)

This course builds on the foundations of the Circuits Fundamentals Course. The topics covered include sinusoidal steady-state response, complex voltage, current and the phasor concept; impedance, admittance; average, apparent and reactive power; polyphase circuits; node and mesh analysis for AC circuits; frequency response; parallel and series resonance; and, operational amplifier circuits.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ENGR-UH 2311-000 (4721)
01/22/2024 – 03/08/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rasras, Mahmoud


ENGR-UH 2311-000 (4722)
01/22/2024 – 03/08/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rasras, Mahmoud · Mulugeta, Tadesse


ENGR-UH 2311-000 (4723)
03/20/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ha, Sohmyung


ENGR-UH 2311-000 (4724)
03/20/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ha, Sohmyung · Mulugeta, Tadesse

Introduction to Very Large Scale Integrated Circuits (ECE-UY 3193)

The course offers an overview of integrated circuit-design process: planning, design, fabrication and testing; device physics: PN junction, MOSFET and Spice models; inverter static and dynamic behavior and power dissipation; interconnects: cross talk, variation and transistor sizing; logic gates and combinational logic networks; sequential machines and sequential system design; subsystem design: adders, multipliers, static memory (SRAM), dynamic memory (DRAM). Topics include floor planning, clock distribution, power distribution and signal integrity; Input/Output buffers, packaging and testing; IC design methodology and CAD tools; implementations: full custom, application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), field programmable gate arrays (FPGA). The course provides foundations of VLSI design and custom VLSI design methodology and state-of-the-art CAD tools. | Prerequisites: CS-UY 2204 (C- or better) and EE-UY 3114. ABET competencies: a,c,e,k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ECE-UY 3193-000 (17965)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Selesnick, Ivan


ECE-UY 3193-000 (17966)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Bhavnagarwala, Azeez

Machine Design (ME-UY 3233)

This course introduces students to fundamentals of machine elements, enabling them to employ this knowledge to design machines for various practical applications. The course begins with a brief review of stress, deformation and failure, followed by friction and wear. Subsequently, loaded columns, pressurized cylinders and shafts are presented. Bearings, gears, screws, springs, brakes, clutches and belts are discussed. The course ends with an introduction to MEMS, Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: ME-UY 3213 | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-UH 3210

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 3233-000 (12694)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Park, Kee

Music, the Mind and Artificial Intelligence (MPATE-UE 1113)

Music is universal to all human cultures. This course will explore fundamental concepts of the psychological, emotional, and cognitive effects of music and what factors in the human body and brain are involved in producing them, with particular emphasis on cross-cultural study. Students will learn beginning methods of computational feature extraction and machine learning to explore simple artificial intelligence models that build on and articulate the conceptual frameworks of music and cognition introduced in the initial phase of the class.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

The Garden of Forking Paths: Exploring the Interactive Story (ARTS-UG 1642)

In Jorge Luis Borges’s 1941 short story, The Garden of Forking Paths, a character named Ts’ Ui Pen seeks to build a labyrinth in which all men will lose their way. Borges reveals that labyrinth to be a sprawling book in which all moments in time are followed by every possible subsequent moment. Multiple futures and timelines exist as one in this garden of forking paths. Fast forward to today, where we find that Ts’ Ui Pen’s seemingly incomprehensible vision has come to fruition via video games and interactive fiction. Both often eschew linearity and instead offer users the opportunity to drive the story and shape their own narrative experience. In this course, we will first explore the trajectory of interactive fiction, from its early overtures in works by Borges and Italo Calvino, forward through Agusto Boal’s Forum Theatre, early computer text adventures, Choose Your Own Adventure books, non-linear film, and into the various digital interactive fictions of today, such as hypertext literature, adventure games, and visual novels. From there, students will embark on their own adventure through interactive creative writing. The journey will begin with students taking apart and diagraming existing interactive works, and using digital tools to craft and share their own short interactive scenes and dialogs. We will confront the challenges and limitations of writing interactive story and establish some key critical theories governing non-linearity. The course will culminate in students designing and writing a complete short work of interactive fiction in a medium of their choice.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ARTS-UG 1642-000 (12470)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bishop, Barton

Future Reality: Trends and Impact of New Media (ARTS-UG 1643)

Augmented reality (AR), Virtual Reality (VR), AI (Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning) art, projection mapped art, NFT art, as well as other types of digital artworks, have come to be an integral part of new media culture. The genesis of and their relevance to new media are cultural imperatives to study and analyze — from a creative, historical, psychological, philosophical, marketing, and technological perspective. Many artists (painters, photographers, sculptors, filmmakers, animators, and writers), scientists, and technologists at NYU, as well as nearby VR World, Artechouse, and Hall Des Lumières , and other NYC organizations are central to producing realistic and immersive three-dimensional environments – AR, VR and projection mapped (360 digital imagery) worlds. Through lectures, group discussions, GoogleDoc reports, field trips to museums and new media organizations, and workshops specific to new media innovations and applications, students will gain a framework to understand the importance of these evolving technologies and their impact on the arts, ecology (sustainability initiatives), social justice, and behavioral science. Students from varying creative and technical backgrounds will participate in the development of new media art projects, intended to be showcased at the Gallatin Arts Festival. They will be introduced to and encouraged to take advantage of NYU’s LaGuardia Studio, LaGuardia Co-op, and LinkedIn Learning instructional tutorials, as well as using their own resources to aid in developing their new media projects.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ARTS-UG 1643-000 (12456)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Allen, Cynthia

COMPUTING IN CIVIL ENGINEERING (CE-UY 3013)

This course aims to introduce the modern computing methods, tools, and best practices for students in civil and urban engineering. The course uses Python as the programming language for solving a series of fundamental computational problems in civil and urban engineering, such as solving linear equations, data interpolation, curve fitting, root finding, numerical differentiation and integration, probability and statistics, linear programming and optimization. The course also introduces a series of generic computation tools and best practices for the students’ future study and research in computing applications in civil and urban engineering, including how to debug a program, visualize data, manage source codes, collaborative programming project management, etc. It aims at laying a solid foundation for civil and urban engineering students to better understand the modern programming workflow and utilize the computing tools. Students are first introduced with the fundamental concepts through the lecture, and then guided step-by-step via the in-class lab session in each weak. There will be multiple homework assignments and in-class quizzes for the evaluating the students’ performances. | Prerequisite: (CS-UY 1113 or CS-UY 1114 or CS-UY 1133) and MA-UY 2034 and MA-UY 2224 or Adviser’s approval.

Civil & Urban Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CE-UY 3013-000 (11388)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Ozturk, Baturalp

Internet Design (FMTV-UT 1123)

This course focuses on the fundamentals of Web design and production. It will provide students with a basic understanding of HTML and CSS page construction, designing and optimizing graphics for the Web and the basic technical skills necessary for getting the student and his/her site online. This course teaches the students how to create a Website along with utilizing Social Media tools and channels as an effective part of a promotional strategy. YouTube, Vimeo, FaceBook, Twitter, KickStarter and Mobile all offer opportunities. In this age of multiple media sources competing for our attention it is important to maintain a consistent and integrated Communications and Brand Strategy across all media distribution channels. The class examines various creative and technical approaches to image manipulation, design, and montage as well as discussing the production techniques necessary to implement creative concepts. This course deals with many of the unique technical and creative challenges – graphic optimization, video compression, and file format conversion – for putting one’s reel, trailer or film online. The students are taught typographical design principles, including the aesthetics of text style and font faces. The class will explore the creative possibilities of designing layouts and integrating animation and video into their sites. Students are introduced to a variety of Internet, DHTML and multimedia tools and experiment with their creative applications. We focus on the Internet as a promotion and distribution medium for the independent artist and filmmaker. Branding, audience awareness and usability are also emphasized.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1123-000 (19497)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beaver, Howard

Projects in Photography (ART-UE 1380)

Students work directly with internationally recognized figures in photography. Topics for workshops range from the techniques of established photographers to discussions of issues in photographic theory, history, & criticism.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 1380-000 (9681)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harouni, Shadi

Advanced Topics in Music Technology: Multichannel Media Installation and Performance (MPATE-UE 1633)

Multichannel Media Installation & Performance is a course designed for composers & artists who want to work in a performance or installation context with immersive sound & image technology. The course focuses on software & hardware workflows for the creative applications of multi-channel sound & immersive video for the creation of fixed, generative, reactive, performance-based, & interactive systems that can be experienced in a gallery context or a live performance. Students will develop a semester-length project to use scale & immersion to creative effect. The course will feature regular creative critique as well as an overview of relevant interaction design strategies for creating interactive spaces using sensors & cameras.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MPATE-UE 1633-000 (12919)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ostrowski, Matthew

Applied Studio Production (MPATE-UE 1006)

Hands-on studio course with an emphasis on ear training to increase understanding of different technical & artistic practices in the recording studio. Students will explore use of microphone placement techniques, balancing natural & artificial acoustics as well as dynamic audio effects & filters.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MPATE-UE 1006-000 (18222)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by O’Reilly, Michael

Mixing in the Digital Audio Workstation (MPATE-UE 1135)

This course explores the art and craft of mixing records, with special attention to “mixing in the box” (via a digital audio workstation). Focus on methodology and technique, with particular emphasis on establishing balances, using such tools as compression and automation to enhance dynamics and develop unique coloration. Examines intersection of technology, budgets, and the marketplace. Students execute their own mixes, with guidance and critique from the instructor. Basic level of DAW proficiency required.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1135-000 (13050)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Killen, Kevin


MPATE-UE 1135-000 (13051)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Killen, Kevin

Midi for Non-Majors (MPATE-UE 1810)

An introduction to MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) with an emphasis on sequencing, production and arranging techniques. Open to students without previous experience in music technology.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1810-000 (10676)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Phillips, Andrew

Aesthetics of Recording (MPATE-UE 1227)

A critical listening study of acoustic music recordings that develops the student’s ability to define and evaluate aesthetic elements of recorded music. Students explore recorded music attributes including dynamic range, stereo imaging, perceived room acoustics, the use of reverb and equalization, naturalness, and the listening perspectives.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1227-000 (12988)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wojcik, Leszek

Fundamentals of Music Technology (MPATE-UE 1801)

A general introduction to the fundamental concepts of music technology, including: MIDI and sequencing, the basics of digital audio, sound recording, mixing and sound synthesis,. The course will also briefly overview advanced topics and applications in the field.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (12129)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Geluso, Paul


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (10670)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Las Heras, Diego


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (10673)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mueller, Charles


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (12130)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mann, Mason

Midi Technology II (MPATE-UE 1014)

Programming for MIDI, C, and other appropriate techniques. Design and implementation of software sequencers, interface drivers, and hardware applications will be the focus.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1014-000 (12979)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krauss, Briggan

Rcdg Tech for Non Majors (MPATE-UE 1022)

Introduction to the physical aspects of sound, psychoacoustics, basic electricity, principles and practice of magnetic recording and an overview of the recording studio, including an introduction to multi-track recording techniques. Students perform various duties just as they would in a professional recording session with live musicians in the recording studio. Open to students without previous experience in recording technology.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10658)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Filadelfo, Gary


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10660)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Griffin, J Chris


MPATE-UE 1022-000 (10662)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Losada, Juan

Concert Recording (MPATE-UE 1011)

Introduction to the concepts of live concert recording. Microphone selection, characteristics & placement as well as acoustic problems encountered in concert halls will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to apply the lecture material by recording undergraduate rehearsals & recitals.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1011-000 (12977)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MPATE-UE 1011-000 (12978)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Analog Recording Technology (MPATE-UE 1001)

The physical aspects of sound, analog recording technology & studio production techniques are explained & demonstrated. Lecture topics include microphones, stereo recording, analog consoles, multi-track tape recording, equalization, compression, reverberation & mixing. Studio lab assignments are performed outside of class reinforcing weekly lecture topics

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1001-000 (10647)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Filadelfo, Gary


MPATE-UE 1001-000 (10650)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Filadelfo, Gary

Engineering Statics (ENGR-UH 2011)

This course introduces students to the field of mechanics through study of rigid bodies in static equilibrium. Knowledge and understanding of static equilibrium is essential for future study of topics as diverse as dynamics, solid mechanics, structures, robotics, and fluid mechanics. The methods, techniques, theory, and application of equilibrium in the solution of engineering problems are presented for two-dimensional systems. Topics covered include collinear forces, coincident forces, general equilibrium, moments and torques, analysis of trusses, frames and machines, Coulomb friction, centroid, center of mass, and moments of inertia.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3556)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sousa, Rita Leal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3557)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sousa, Rita Leal · Mengiste, Eyob


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3792)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Celik, Kemal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (4361)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sousa, Rita Leal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (3793)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ayed, Lana Odeh · Celik, Kemal


ENGR-UH 2011-000 (4362)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mengiste, Eyob

Senior Design Capstone Project I (ENGR-UH 4011)

Students learn about the process of design with measurable metrics, and how to incorporate appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints in the design process. Students learn how to clearly frame the design problem and follow the design process to result in an optimized solution. Students perform a review of the relevant literature, develop a preliminary design, generate solution concepts and selection criteria, and review and evaluate the chosen design. Students must consider social, economic, lifecycle, environmental, ethical, and other constraints, and must document the design process and the evolution of their design. This project culminates with a final report and presentation that proposes the actual design selected for further development and/or prototyping and testing in the subsequent semester.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 4011-000 (3947)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by George, Pradeep


ENGR-UH 4011-000 (4045)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by George, Pradeep

Computer Programming for Engineers (ENGR-UH 1000)

The objective of the course is for students to acquire the fundamental knowledge of computer programming, develop transferable programming skills, and learn to solve engineering problems via programming. The course is primarily based on the C programming language and an introduction to another programming language such as MATLAB (to demonstrate transferring programming knowledge from one language to another). The course explores the application of engineering computation in various engineering domains including mechanical, civil, computer, and electrical engineering. The following topics are covered: introduction to computer systems, standard input/output, file input/output, decision structures, loop structures, functions, arrays, addressing, dynamically allocated memory, structures, introduction to object oriented programming, problem solving via programming algorithm design, and applications in another programming language such as MATLAB.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3554)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3555)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Jamil, Muhammad Hassan · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3567)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Negoiu, Elena · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3588)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Negoiu, Elena · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3991)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Jamil, Muhammad Hassan · Eid, Mohamad

Applied Machine Learning (ENGR-UH 3332)

Machine Learning is the basis for the most exciting careers in data analysis today. This course introduces students to the concepts of machine learning and deep learning. This course covers a broad introduction to machine learning techniques, which include both supervised learning and unsupervised learning techniques such as classification, support vector machines, decision trees, ensemble learning and random forests, dimensionality reduction, and neural networks and deep learning. In addition to learning about the most effective machine learning techniques, you will gain the practical implementation of applying these techniques to real engineering problems.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3332-000 (4110)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi · Annor, Prince


ENGR-UH 3332-000 (20903)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi · Fang, Yi

Bioimaging (ENGR-UH 2812)

This introductory course to Bioimaging is designed to provide an understanding on how images of organs, tissues, cells and molecules can be obtained using different forms of penetrating radiation and waves. Students will learn the imaging techniques used for soft and hard tissue visualization such as X-ray, Computed Tomography (CT), Ultrasound (US), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Spectroscopy and Optical Imaging. The course will give students an insight into the theoretical physics of imaging, real-life clinical applications of these modalities and demonstration of post-processing of the images using high-level programming.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2812-000 (4287)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zam, Azhar


ENGR-UH 2812-000 (4288)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zam, Azhar · Sabah, Shafiya

Circuits Fundamentals (ENGR-UH 2019)

This module provides an introduction to electrical circuits. The topics covered include DC circuits, passive DC circuit elements, Kirchoff’s laws, electric power calculations, analysis of DC circuits, nodal and loop analysis techniques, voltage and current division, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems, and source free and forced responses of RL, RC and RLC circuits.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (3560)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Gyorgy, Andras


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (3561)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mulugeta, Tadesse · Gyorgy, Andras


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (3812)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rasras, Mahmoud


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (4062)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (3813)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mulugeta, Tadesse


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (4063)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Avdeev, Alexander

Computer-Aided Design (ENGR-UH 3720)

This course provides an introduction to computer-aided design (CAD) using solid modeling. Students learn to create solid object models using extrusions, revolutions, and swept paths, and learn to modify parts using cutting, patterns, fillets, chamfers, and other techniques. Assemblies of multiple parts are used to demonstrate the need for geometric tolerances, and students spend a large portion of class in hands-on use of software tools. The labs emphasize experiential learning of CAD concepts and applications using software tools.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3720-000 (4030)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Montalvo Navarette, Jorge


ENGR-UH 3720-000 (4031)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Montalvo Navarette, Jorge

Probability and Statistics for Engineers (ENGR-UH 2010Q)

Introductory course in probability and statistics with an emphasis on how these topics are relevant in engineering disciplines. Topics in probability theory include sample spaces, and counting, random variables (discrete and continuous), probability distributions, cumulative density functions, rules and theorems of probability, expectation, and variance. Topics in statistics include sampling, central limit theorem, and linear regression. The course emphasizes correct application of probability and statistics and highlights the limitations of each method presented. NOTE: This course may be replaced with MATH-UH 1003Q or MATH-UH 2011Q

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2010Q-000 (3562)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain


ENGR-UH 2010Q-000 (4098)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Diabat, Ali


ENGR-UH 2010Q-000 (3628)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain · Ayed, Lana Odeh


ENGR-UH 2010Q-000 (4099)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ayed, Lana Odeh · Diabat, Ali

Numerical Methods (ENGR-UH 2017)

This course provides an introduction to the methods, techniques, theory, and application of numerical methods in the solution of engineering problems. Topics to be covered include the following: finding roots of equations, numerical differentiation and integration, time marching methods in solving ordinary differential equations, and optimization. MATLAB software is the primary computing environment.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2017-000 (3651)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Karathanasopoulos, Nikolaos


ENGR-UH 2017-000 (4055)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Karathanasopoulos, Nikolaos


ENGR-UH 2017-000 (3652)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Khalifa, Duoaa Magdi


ENGR-UH 2017-000 (4056)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Khalifa, Duoaa Magdi

Object-Oriented Programming (ENGR-UH 2510)

This intermediate-level programming course focuses on object oriented programming using C . Classes and objects including constructors, destructors, member functions and data members. Topics in this course include data representation, pointers, dynamic memory allocation and recursion, inheritance and templates, polymorphism, the process of compiling and linking using makefiles, memory management, exceptional control flow, introduction to performance evaluation, and optimization.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2510-000 (3818)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alhanai, Tuka


ENGR-UH 2510-000 (3819)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Alhanai, Tuka

Digital Logic (ENGR-UH 2013)

This module provides a rigorous introduction to topics in digital logic design mostly focusing on combinational circuits but also touching upon basic concepts in sequential circuits. Introductory topics include: classification of digital systems, number systems and binary arithmetic, error detection and correction, and switching algebra. Combinational design analysis and synthesis topics include: logic function optimization, arithmetic units such as adders and subtractors, and control units such as decoders and multiplexers. A brief overview of sequential circuits by introducing basic memory elements such as flip-flops, and state diagrams concludes the module.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (3810)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (3811)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (3660)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (4060)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (3661)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur


ENGR-UH 2013-000 (4061)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sinanoglu, Ozgur

Conservation Laws in Engineering (ENGR-UH 2012)

Conservation laws play a fundamental role in the analysis of engineering problems by providing a framework to derive the relationships between various physical properties of isolated systems. This course aims to introduce the students to these laws, namely, the conservation of mass, conservation of linear momentum, conservation of angular momentum, conservation of energy, and conservation of charge. These laws of conservation will be derived in integral forms and applied to selected case studies involving electrical, chemical, thermal, and fluid mechanical systems. In addition to the development of a unified framework for analysis of engineering problems, this course will also help the students develop a deeper understanding of the concepts of control volume and mass, work and heat, fluid pressure and hydrostatics, properties of pure substances, and the fundamental laws of thermodynamics.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (3794)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Hashaikeh, Raed


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (20078)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Julias, Margaret


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (3795)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Hashaikeh, Raed · Salim, Wahib


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (4364)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Julias, Margaret


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (3558)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Hashaikeh, Raed


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (3559)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Al-Chalabi, Mohammed

Memoir and Anti-Memoir: Experiments in Text and Image (CADT-UH 1027)

How does one attempt to write or portray the self? If we associate that practice with traditional memoir and self-portraiture forms, what happens when subjectivity is fundamentally unstable or under attack? Is the genre also simultaneously deconstructed? How is subjectivity literally made and remade through the exploration of new forms? In this course we will look at text and image projects across cultures, eras, locations, and across art forms that raise questions about the self and the collective, representation and memory, and about the remarkable as well as the everyday. Sometimes the doubt about attempts at portrayals is philosophical, but it may also be cultural-historical and context-dependent. To explore this question, and to develop skills in art, to experiment with the studio habits of artists, and to generate our own poetics of memoir/anti-memoir we will generate text and image experiments that both create and investigate an anti-memoir body of work.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CADT-UH 1027-000 (5220)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Magi, Jill

Machines in Islamic Civilization (CADT-UH 1037X)

Is automation a science or a tool? Muslim contributions in automation, overlooked in the history of science, were long regarded as means for caliphs and the rich to impress the masses. But Muslim engineers excelled in creating complex automated systems, using them as gifts to foreign leaders, as public attractions, or to augment religious ceremony such as daily calls to prayer. Mainly powered by kinetic energy, these automata drew on scholars’ deep knowledge of hydraulics and complex levers and included musical instruments, horologia, automated drinking fountains, and clocks that told time using complex audiovisual tools. This course draws on historical sources and foundational science to explore Muslim advancements in automation. What roles did translation play as Muslim scientists encountered and documented the work of previous scholars? What were the basic automatic systems they developed and how do they compare to current technologies? How did they draw on environmental resources to develop automated systems without the need for non-renewable energy? Students will address such questions as they explore implications for their own projects in design and engineering.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CADT-UH 1037X-000 (3919)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Qasaimeh, Mohammad

Bioinspiration (CADT-UH 1033)

In the 3.8 billion years since life began on Earth, nature has evolved. Inspired by this process, humans have replicated key design features to develop novel materials, devices, and structures in fields such as the arts, design, engineering, and the social sciences by replicating key design principles and features. This course asks how biology has inspired human design and thinking across different cultures and fields. Students will examine various examples in engineering, art, architecture, music, and social science to discuss how the human capacity for analogical reasoning has enabled the transfer of properties, mechanisms, and ideas from biology to design principles such as shape, surface, structure, making, information-processing, and social behavior. Using bio-inspired products such as gecko tape, Velcro, self-cleaning surfaces, and neuromorphic chips for inspiration, students will develop their own designs to address some of the 21st century’s most pressing issues, such as energy, water, environment, food, and health.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CADT-UH 1033-000 (3918)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Song, Yong-Ak (Rafael)

Creativity and Innovation (CADT-UH 1005)

Is creativity a gift or a skill? Can creativity be learned? Because creativity is deeply personal, this course will address these questions through individual and collective experiences. The heart of this course is the Personal Creativity Project – an opportunity for students to practice creativity by designing and executing a project of their choice. The project may be on any topic, from art and music to computer programs and business model development. The project will be complemented by reading assignments (completed prior to class), class discussions, and one-on-one meetings with the instructor. Students will leave the course with a completed project and a personal philosophy of creativity, based on the fusion of readings, study, discussion, and experience. The course provides a great deal of freedom for learning and does not provide step-by-step instructions. As a result, the successful completion of this course will require a significant amount of self-motivation.

Core: Arts, Design and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CADT-UH 1005-000 (3626)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Julias, Margaret

Natural Language Processing (CS-UH 2216)

The field of natural language processing (NLP), also known as computational linguistics, is interested in the modeling and processing of human (i.e., natural) languages. This course covers foundational NLP concepts and ideas, such as finite state methods, n-gram modeling, hidden Markov models, part-of-speech tagging, context free grammars, syntactic parsing and semantic representations. The course surveys a range of NLP applications such as information retrieval, summarization and machine translation. Concepts taught in class are reinforced in practice by hands-on assignments.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 2216-000 (9051)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Habash, Nizar

Computational Social Science (CS-UH 2219E)

This course introduces students to various techniques and concepts that are essential for data scientists. It also provides an in-depth survey of the latest research methodology and topics that prepare the students to produce high quality research in Data Science. This seminar-based course will cover applications from different fields, such as sociology, psychology, network analysis, and artificial intelligence. In this context, the course will cover the use of computational techniques to model and predict various phenomena using real data. Students will be required to complete a course project, and to write up the results in a short article.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 2219E-000 (4282)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rahwan, Talal

Computer Systems Organization (CS-UH 2010)

The course focuses on understanding lower-level issues in computer design and programming. The course starts with the C programming language, moves down to assembly and machine-level code, and concludes with basic operating systems and architectural concepts. Students learn to read assembly code and reverse-engineer programs in binary. Topics in this course include the C programming language, data representation, machine-level code, memory organization and management, performance evaluation and optimization, and concurrency.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 2010-000 (3495)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ali, Karim · Mengal, Khalid


CS-UH 2010-000 (3933)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mengal, Khalid

Computer Networks (CS-UH 3012)

Have you ever wondered how the internet or Facebook is able to support a billion simultaneous users? This course teaches students the design and implementation of such Internet-scale networks and networked systems. Students learn about the principles and techniques used to construct large-scale networks and systems. Topics in this course include routing protocols, network congestion control, wireless networking, network security, and peer-to-peer systems. Upon completing this course, students are able to initiate and critique research ideas, implement their own working systems, and evaluate such systems. To make the issues more concrete, the class includes several multi-week projects requiring significant design and implementation. The goal is for students to learn not only what computer networks are and how they work today, but also why they are designed the way they are and how they are likely to evolve in the future. Examples are drawn primarily from the internet.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 3012-000 (3752)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zaki, Yasir


CS-UH 3012-000 (3791)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zaki, Yasir · Ahmed, Dena

Discrete Mathematics (CS-UH 1002)

Discrete mathematics concerns the study of mathematical structures that are discrete rather than continuous, and provides a powerful language for investigating many areas of computer science. Discrete structures are characterized by distinct elements, which are often represented by integers. Continuous mathematics on the other hand deals with real numbers. Topics in this course include: sets, counting techniques, logic, proof techniques, solving recurrence relations, number theory, probability, statistics, graph theory, and discrete geometry. These mathematical tools are illustrated with applications in computer science.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 1002-000 (3526)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fernandes, Joao Paulo · Ahmad, Liza


CS-UH 1002-000 (3624)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Mumtaz, Sara


CS-UH 1002-000 (3917)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Ahmed, Dena


CS-UH 1002-000 (19983)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 1002-000 (19984)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 1002-000 (19985)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Capstone Project in Computer Science 1 (CS-UH 4001)

The capstone experience in Computer Science requires students to engage in a long-term, mentored learning experience that culminates in a piece of original work. The specific project is developed during the Research Seminar in Computer Science. During the Capstone Project, the proposed work comes to fruition in the form of a research paper along the lines of those in a scholarly computer science journal. Students also participate in a capstone research symposium during which they present their work orally.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 4001-000 (3841)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 4001-000 (3842)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Park, Minsu


CS-UH 4001-000 (3850)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Abouzied, Azza


CS-UH 4001-000 (3851)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Eid, Mohamad


CS-UH 4001-000 (3852)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Kaufman, Aaron


CS-UH 4001-000 (4033)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi


CS-UH 4001-000 (3853)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zaki, Yasir


CS-UH 4001-000 (3854)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Habash, Nizar


CS-UH 4001-000 (3855)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Baghdadi, Mohamed Riyadh


CS-UH 4001-000 (4034)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rokers, Bas


CS-UH 4001-000 (3843)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Shafique, Muhammad


CS-UH 4001-000 (4102)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Salam, Hanan


CS-UH 4001-000 (4103)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Pöpper, Christina


CS-UH 4001-000 (3844)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mourad, Azzam


CS-UH 4001-000 (3845)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Difallah, Djellel


CS-UH 4001-000 (3846)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rahwan, Talal


CS-UH 4001-000 (3847)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Puccetti, Goffredo


CS-UH 4001-000 (3848)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Oudah, Mai


CS-UH 4001-000 (3849)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 4001-000 (4125)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Capstone Project in Computer Science 2 (CS-UH 4002)

Continuation of CS-UH 4001

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 4002-000 (3856)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 4002-000 (4027)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Park, Minsu


CS-UH 4002-000 (3860)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Abouzied, Azza


CS-UH 4002-000 (3861)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Eid, Mohamad


CS-UH 4002-000 (4104)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Kaufman, Aaron


CS-UH 4002-000 (4105)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi


CS-UH 4002-000 (4348)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Difallah, Djellel


CS-UH 4002-000 (4349)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rahwan, Talal


CS-UH 4002-000 (3862)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Zaki, Yasir


CS-UH 4002-000 (4350)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Puccetti, Goffredo


CS-UH 4002-000 (4470)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Pöpper, Christina


CS-UH 4002-000 (3857)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Habash, Nizar


CS-UH 4002-000 (3858)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Baghdadi, Mohamed Riyadh


CS-UH 4002-000 (4101)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rokers, Bas


CS-UH 4002-000 (4344)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Shafique, Muhammad


CS-UH 4002-000 (4345)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Salam, Hanan


CS-UH 4002-000 (4346)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Pöpper, Christina


CS-UH 4002-000 (4347)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mourad, Azzam

Introduction to Computer Science (CS-UH 1001)

Computer Science is an innovative and exciting field that focuses on producing efficient solutions for solving problems in any field. This course introduces students to the foundations of computer science. Students learn how to design algorithms to solve problems and how to translate these algorithms into working computer programs using a high-level programming language. The course covers core programming concepts including basic computation, data structures, decision structures, iterative structures, file input/output, and recursion. Students also learn the elements of Object Oriented Programming (OOP), such as objects, classes, inheritance, abstraction, and polymorphism. A final project allows students to combine these concepts to produce a large program of their design.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 1001-000 (3489)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Pötsch, Thomas · Zeeshan, Faisal


CS-UH 1001-000 (3512)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Pötsch, Thomas · Mumtaz, Sara


CS-UH 1001-000 (3587)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Mumtaz, Sara

Artificial Intelligence (CSCI-UA 9472)

There are many cognitive tasks that people can do easily and almost unconsciously but that have proven extremely difficult to program on a computer. Artificial intelligence is the problem of developing computer systems that can carry out these tasks. We will focus on three central areas in AI: representation and reasoning, machine learning, and natural language processing.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CSCI-UA 9472-000 (2636)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


CSCI-UA 9472-000 (2637)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
7:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Design Project (CS-UY 4523)

Students or several students work with a faculty member and/or graduate students on a current topic in computer science. Each term, a project course with a particular theme is offered by the Department of Computer and Information Science. A faculty member assigns individual or group projects. The project course is highly structured and supervised closely by faculty. Students are expected to use the design and project-management skills they learned in CS-UY 4513 Software Engineering. Alternatively, students may work with a faculty member on an individual project of mutual interest. A written report and oral presentation are required. | Prerequisite: CS-UY 4513 or CS-UY 3513.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4523-000 (12266)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred


CS-UY 4523-000 (12267)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred

Penetration Testing and Vulnerability Analysis (CS-UY 4773)

The course will start off with an in-depth review of the exploitation mitigations introduced in modern operating systems. The instructors will demonstrate their limitations through simple examples and gradually develop the basic exploitation techniques into more complicated methods applicable to real-world exploitation. Unlike most other exploitation courses, we will focus on approaching exploitation as a creative problem-solving process rather than an exercise of applying cookbook techniques to common types of vulnerabilities. Most of the course will focus on the hands-on application of the material through exercises and leading the students through the development of reliable exploits for recently patched vulnerabilities in widely used software. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: CS-UY 3933 and (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better). | Prerequisites for CAS Students: CS-UY 3933 and CSCI-UA 201. | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UY 3933 and CS-AD 103

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4773-000 (16116)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at ePoly
Instructed by Rajpal, Mantej

PROBLEM SOLVING AND PROGRAMMING I (CS-UY 1113)

This course introduces problem solving and computer programming and is for undergraduate engineering students who do not have prior experience in programming in any language. The course covers fundamentals of computer programming and its underlying principles using the Python programming language. Concepts and methods introduced in the course are illustrated by examples from engineering and other disciplines. | Co-requisite: EX-UY 1; Anti-requisite: CS-UY 1114

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 1113-000 (12329)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Romero Cruz, Sebastian


CS-UY 1113-000 (12330)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Romero Cruz, Sebastian


CS-UY 1113-000 (12331)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12332)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12333)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12334)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12335)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12336)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter


CS-UY 1113-000 (12337)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DePasquale, Peter

Private Influence in Public Policy (POL-UA 9341)

Topics: analysis of mechanisms of influence (selection of sympathetic incumbents, the provision of incentives for public officials, and the provision of information); objects of influence (voter choices, legislative behavior, bureaucratic decisions); collective action; and organizational maintenance.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


POL-UA 9341-000 (4273)
at NYU Washington DC (Global)
Instructed by

Western European Politics (POL-UA 9510)

Study of the politics of Britain, Ireland, France, and Germany. Compares the historical origins of these systems and analyzes their institutions as manifestations of their social and political culture and traditions. Treats each country’s current politics and political trends. Attempts to introduce the basic concepts of comparative political analysis in developing cross-cultural theory.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


POL-UA 9510-000 (3989)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Harmon, Josephine

Politics of Near & Middle East (POL-UA 9540)

The course description for this Topics in Politics course varies depending on the topic taught. Please view the course descriptions in the course notes section below.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


POL-UA 9540-000 (3992)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Tue,Thu
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Segal, Hagai


POL-UA 9540-000 (20920)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Segal, Hagai

Philosophy of Language (PHIL-UA 9085)

Examines various philosophical and psychological approaches to language and meaning, as well as their consequences for traditional philosophical problems in metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics. Discusses primarily 20th-century authors, including Russell, Wittgenstein, and Quine.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PHIL-UA 9085-000 (3665)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Strategies for Independent Producing (FMTV-UT 1092)

Today’s content creators must be entrepreneurs, navigating dynamically changing industry. How does emerging talent gain traction in a ’tsunami wave’ of independent films, episodics, webisodes and podcasts? This class explores development, funding, and legal strategies to make, market and distribute DIY low and ultra-low budget projects. Ones you can make now. Students will develop core competencies, culminating in a pitch deck for a viable indie feature film.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1092-000 (19479)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pichirallo, Joe

Issues & Ideas: (JOUR-UA 9505)

This course aims to bring together diverse issues and perspectives in the rapidly evolving and changing area of international/global communication. Through a historical perspective, a framework will be established for the appreciation of the development of the immense scope, disparity, and complexity of this rapidly evolving field. Students will be encouraged to critically assess shifts in national, regional, and international media patterns of production, distribution, and consumption over time, leading to a critical analysis of the tumultuous contemporary global communication environment. Essential concepts of international communication will be examined, including trends in national and global media consolidation, cultural implications of globalization, international broadcasting, information flows, international communication law and regulation, and trends in communication and information technologies. The focus of the course will be international, with attention being paid both to Western-based multimedia conglomerates, as well as to the increasing global prominence of media corporations based in other regions, contributing to the reversal of international media flows and challenging the global hegemony of the Western media producers. Particular emphasis will be on the Czech Republic, as an empirical example of a national media system affected by global media flows.

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


JOUR-UA 9505-000 (3457)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Klvana, Tomas

Production & Publication (JOUR-UA 9302)

The course focuses on combining the creative techniques of fiction with the rigor of journalistic travel writing to produce stories about Prague (not only) that move beyond the constraints of the news and feature story: stories that engage, resonate with readers, provide insight – stories which “produce the emotion”. The course proceeds by the reading and analysis of important contemporary journalism and classic travel pieces: examination of the narrative; fictional and literary devices used in travel writing; examination of and practice with various information gathering strategies; humor; point of view; unique voice. Distinguished Czech travel writers/journalists/photographers will be invited as guest lecturers.

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


JOUR-UA 9302-000 (4159)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Bednarova, Veronika

Creative Writing in Italian (ITAL-UA 9103)

Students entering the course should have mastered the fundamental structure of Italian. The course is designed to help students gain confidence and increase their effectiveness in writing present-day Italian. Conducted in Italian.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITAL-UA 9103-000 (3883)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by

Conversations in Italian (ITAL-UA 9101)

Students entering the course should have mastered the fundamental structure of Italian. The course is designed to help students gain confidence and increase their effectiveness in speaking present-day Italian. Through discussions, oral reports, and readings, students develop vocabulary in a variety of topics, improve pronunciation, and learn an extensive range of idiomatic expressions. Conducted in Italian.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


ITAL-UA 9101-000 (2594)
05/21/2024 – 07/01/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by

Modern Italy (ITAL-UA 9868)

This course introduces contemporary Italy in all its complexity and fascination. Reviewing politics, economics, society, and culture over the past two centuries, the course has a primary goal — to consider how developments since the 1800s have influenced the lives and formed the outlook of today’s Italians. In other words, we are engaged in the historical search for something quite elusive: Italian “identity”. Topics will include the unification of the country, national identity in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the First World War, and Italian fascism, World War Two and the resistance, the post-war Italian Republic, the economic “miracle”, the South, the Mafia, terrorism, popular culture, and the most recent political and social developments, including Italy and the European Union. Lectures combine with readings and films (taking advantage of Italy’s magnificent post-war cinema).

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITAL-UA 9868-000 (2402)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Lombardo, Davide

Financial Accounting (MG-UY 2204)

This course provides a solid foundation in constructing and interpreting financial statements. Topics include: accounting terminology, financial-statement preparation and analysis, liquidity and credit-risk ratios, depreciation calculations, revenue recognition, accrued liabilities and asset valuation. Also covered are the effects of equity transactions, cash flows and various accounting methods on financial statements.

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 2204-000 (14066)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by TALISSE, EDWARD


MG-UY 2204-000 (14067)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kohli, Ashish

HUMAN-CENTERED PRODUCT DESIGN STUDIO (MG-UY 3724)

This course is an industrial design overview for non-designers. It explores the industrial design process from researching and establishing user and client needs to developing product specifications, prototyping and iterating. It also covers conceptual and visual design, detail design, design for manufacturing, and design for environmental sustainability. It includes skills such as sketching, model making, 3 D printing techniques. The course is formulated as two short exercises and one semester-long project in which teams choose from several product design categories and develop their ideas from concept to prototype. Probable Tandon MakerSpace related material fees. | Prerequisite: MakerSpace Safety Course

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 3724-000 (14096)

Environmental Social Movements (ENVST-UA 9481)

How do social movements form in response to environmental concerns? What makes them effective or ineffective? This course analyses the various social movements that organized in response to environmental concerns. Both historical and sociological dimensions of environmental movements are covered, with particular attention given to how issues of environmental protection and social justice intersect. At NYU Berlin, the course includes American (I), European, and in particular German (II), as well as global movements (III).

Environmental Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENVST-UA 9481-000 (2369)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by

THERMODYNAMICS (ME-UY 3333)

The course centers on properties of pure substances; concepts of work and heat; closed and open systems. Topics: Fundamental laws of thermodynamics. Carnot and Clasius statements of the 2nd law; entropy and entropy production; heat engines, refrigerators, heat pumps; efficiencies, coefficients of performance.| Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: MA-UY 1124 | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: MATH-UH 1020

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 3333-000 (12720)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Haverkamp, Sven


ME-UY 3333-000 (12721)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at ePoly
Instructed by Thorsen, Richard

Introduction to Materials Science (ME-UY 2813)

Students in this course become familiar with atomic structure and bonding, atomic arrangement in crystals, crystal imperfections, mechanical behavior and failure of materials and binary phase diagrams. | Brooklyn Students: Co-requisite PH-UY 1013 | Abu Dhabi Students: Prerequisite ENGR-UH 2012

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 2813-000 (12715)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Behera, Rakesh

Statics (ME-UY 2213)

The course covers three-dimensional vector treatment of the static equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies. Topics: Equivalent force and couple systems. Distributed force systems. Static analysis of trusses, frames and machines. Friction, impending motion. Methods of virtual work. | Prerequisite: PH-UY 1013 and MA-UY 1024

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 2213-000 (12689)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Benbelkacem, Ghania


ME-UY 2213-000 (12690)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hajesfandiari, Arezoo

Composition/Conversation (GERM-UA 9111)

Composition & Conversation is designed for post-intermediate students of German who have a solid grasp of German grammar and vocabulary and wish to extend their knowledge of the German language, history, and culture through reading, watching films, discussions, and writing. Conversation & Composition is a reading- and writing-intensive course. Emphasis will be placed on refining written expression and developing the ability to express, discuss, and argue opinions.This course will give you an overview of recent German political, social and cultural history after 1945 and onwards. Focus will be placed on moments of social criticism and changes – from the youth cultures in the 50s and 80s to the women’s movement and ecological protests, from love happenings and terrorism to mass demonstrations and the fall of the wall. During the course, we will explore narratives that are related to our topics from a variety of genres: newspaper/magazine articles, TV/radio documentaries, music, film, photography, and other visual material. The class is taught entirely in German and emphasizes the language skills necessary to communicate effectively in a foreign language speaking, reading, viewing, writing, and listening.

German (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


GERM-UA 9111-000 (2334)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by

A History of London (HIST-UA 9127)

This course examines the growth and importance of London from the Roman invasion of 43 AD to the present day. Students will learn about London’s changing economic and political role, and will understand how London grew to dominate the commerce, industry and culture of England. They will find out how London became the biggest city the world had ever known, and how it coped (or failed to cope) with the social and environmental problems created by its enormous size. The classroom sessions will be divided between a lecture and a class discussion. From week two onwards the class will begin with a discussion of the topic or period covered in the previous week‚s lecture, in which students will be expected to use knowledge and ideas gathered from lectures and from their weekly reading. There will also be four walking tours of parts of London which relate to the period we are studying at a particular time.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


HIST-UA 9127-000 (2426)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by

Spoken Contemporary French (FREN-UA 9101)

This course is designed to help students to develop vocabulary, learn new idiomatic expressions, and improve fluency and pronunciation. The emphasis is on the understanding and production of contemporary spoken French through a study of authentic documents such as radio and television interviews, advertisements, and spontaneous oral productions.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FREN-UA 9101-000 (2808)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


FREN-UA 9101-000 (2538)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

English Novel in The 19th Century (ENGL-UA 9530)

The nineteenth century was the great age of the English novel. This course charts the evolution of the form during this period, exploring texts by major authors including Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, George Eliot and Thomas Hardy. Close attention to narrative, questions of mimesis and publishing practices will combine with the exploration of a range of significant contemporary discourses relating to shifting conceptions of gender, sexuality, religion, science, class, and race. These varied contexts will help us to consider formal, stylistic and thematic continuities as well as discontinuities and innovations. Taking advantage of our local surroundings, we will also explore changing representations of London and trace the enduring legacy of this period in the twenty-first-century city.

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGL-UA 9530-000 (2721)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by

Studies in Prose Genres (COLIT-UA 9125)

In this course we focus on four contemporary novels in which the world of the character, the narrator, or the author, is read through the lens of a literary classic. In each case, the reading and rewriting of the primary text involves temporal and spatial displacements (from the 18th to the 20th century, from Europe to the Caribbean and to the South Pacific) that generate shifting perspectives and a constant reshuffling of center and periphery. Between a reverential affiliation to the past and a creative misreading and rewriting of it, these intertextual encounters with « great » Western literary works insistently raise the questions of identity, originality, and “writing back”. Exploring these questions will therefore also involve drawing on comparative, translation, and postcolonial studies.

Comparative Literature (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


COLIT-UA 9125-000 (21164)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Life Drawing: The Figure (FMTV-UT 1112)

Reccomended for students studying both animation and live action. This course is designed to train animation students to think visually, and to strengthen their overall drafting and design skills. The focus of the course is drawing humans and animals from live subjects, thereby learning to translate the three-dimensional world into two-dimensional terms. Drafting skills are important to all animators, regardless of their chosen media or focus. In particular, strong drafting skills are essential for character animators. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1112-000 (19493)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Camhy, Sherry

Storytelling Strategies (FMTV-UT 20)

The ability to understand “what makes a good story well told” is a skill that is crucial to your growth as a filmmaker whether you become a writer, director, producer, actor, editor, cinematographer, etc. Storytelling Strategies looks at how narrative stories work through an examination of the structural and mythic elements first established by the ancient Greek playwrights and recognized by Aristotle in his “Poetics” thousands of years ago. The course continues this examination up to and including such contemporary story models as Joseph Campbell’s “The Hero with a Thousand Faces” as well as the current Hollywood paradigm, “the three-act structure.” We will seek to find those principles that form the backbone of successful narrative screenplays and contribute to a film’s ability to resonate with an audience. The lecture is for analysis. The recitations are for applying what you have learned, through writing exercises and a completed short screenplay. This course allocates as Scriptwriting for Film & TV majors. Course may not be repeated.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Age of Leonardo,Raphael and Michelangelo (ARTH-UA 9307)

This course is conceived as a focused study of the works of Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael Sanzio and Michelangelo Buonarroti, the men whose careers largely defined the concept of Western artistic genius. Particular consideration will also be given to their Italian and European contemporaries and followers in order to take advantage of the opportunity to the study these original works on site. High Renaissance art cannot be divorced from its times; thus, much attention will be given to contemporary history, especially Florentine politics and politics in Papal Rome. Special attention will also be given to the evolution of drawing practice in sixteenth-century Italy, an essential development for the changes that took place in the conception of works of art over the course of the century. Themes such as patronage, humanism, interpretations of antiquity, and Italian civic ideals will form a framework for understanding the works of art beyond style, iconography, technique and preservation. As the high Renaissance works are often still in their original physical settings, during field-studies to museums and churches in Florence students will have a unique opportunity to experience the works as their original viewers did and as their creators intended.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ARTH-UA 9307-000 (3854)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Edelstein, Bruce

Impressionism to Post-Impressionism (ARTH-UA 9412)

Beginning by considering how impressionism refined and redirected the artistic aims of 19th-century realism, follows the development of progressive art to the brink of cubism and pure abstraction in the first years of the 20th century. Following impressionism and post-impressionism, close attention is paid to symbolism, aestheticism, art nouveau, the Arts and Crafts movement, fauvism, and expressionism. The aesthetic aims of these movements are analyzed in tandem with the social and cultural conditions that generated them.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTH-UA 9412-000 (2799)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Anthropology of Indigenous Australia (ANTH-UA 9037)

This course offers an introduction to some of the classical and current issues in the anthropology of Indigenous Australia. The role of anthropology in the representation and governance of Indigenous life is itself an important subject for anthropological inquiry, considering that Indigenous people of Australia have long been the objects of interest and imagination by outsiders for their cultural formulations of kinship, ritual, art, gender, and politics. These representations—in feature films about them (such as Rabbit-Proof Fence and Australia), New Age Literature (such as Mutant Message Down Under), or museum exhibitions (such as in the Museum of Sydney or the Australian Museum)—are now also in dialogue with Indigenous forms of cultural production, in genres as diverse as film, television, drama, dance, art and writing. The course will explore how Aboriginal people have struggled to reproduce themselves and their traditions on their own terms, asserting their right to forms of cultural autonomy and self-determination. Through the examination of ethnographic and historical texts, films, archives and Indigenous life-writing accounts, we will consider the ways in which Aboriginalities are being challenged and constructed in contemporary Australia. The course will consist of lectures interspersed with discussions, student presentations, and films/other media; we may also have guest presenters.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ANTH-UA 9037-000 (2844)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by

ENTREPRENEURSHIP (MG-UY 4404)

This course focuses on key aspects of entrepreneurship as a critical engine for innovation. It also treats entrepreneurship as a state of mind that is not limited to small firms. Students discuss current theories and practices related to starting and managing entrepreneurial enterprises, emphasizing firms in technology- , information- and knowledge-intensive environments. Particular attention is paid to the critical issues of (1) identifying opportunities that provide competitive advantage; (2) the development of a solid business plan; (3) the marketing of new ventures; (4) entrepreneurial business operations, including human-resource and process management; (5) ethical and social issues in entrepreneurial firms; and (6) financial management and fund raising for entrepreneurial firms. | Prerequisites: Junior or senior student status.

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 4404-000 (14073)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Husain, Badrul


MG-UY 4404-000 (14074)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Jimenez Leon, Bertha

Disability Studies (CAM-UY 2204)

This course dynamically engages students in the world of disability. As a member of a team including a guest consultant with a disability, students will discover that person’s interests, abilities, and desires and portray them with digital storytelling. This active learning approach, carefully guided by the instructor, is enhanced with readings, guest lectures, videos and field trips. Students will learn about disability history, assistive technology and universal design. The end-of-semester is celebrated with a formal presentation of the person-centered projects. The aim is to show the individual, making the “invisible visible.” Satisfies a HuSS Elective.

Culture, Arts, and Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CAM-UY 2204-000 (16608)


CAM-UY 2204-000 (16609)


CAM-UY 2204-000 (16610)


CAM-UY 2204-000 (16611)

Dance as an Art Form (MPADE-UE 1278)

Dance is an integral & defining component of cultures throughout the world & throughout history. This course introduces students to dance as a live & performing art through a variety of experiences including attendance at live performances, examination of videos & theoretical texts, & physical participation in the practice & performance of dance. Through discussions, written assignments, & the creation of original dance compositions, students will explore the history & cultural relevance of a variety of forms of dance within their own lives, larger society, & the global community beyond. Liberal Arts Core/CORE-MAP Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Expressive Cultures

Dance Education (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPADE-UE 1278-000 (14664)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gallace, Carmela


MPADE-UE 1278-000 (14665)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gallace, Carmela

Screening History: (MCC-UE 1140)

This course explores the ways in which popular Hollywood films construct the historical past, the ensuing battles among historians and the public over Hollywood’s version of American history, and the ways such films can be utilized as historical documents themselves. We will consider films as products of the culture industry; as visions of popularly understood history and national mythology; as evidence for how social conflicts have been depicted; and as evidence of how popular understanding and interpretations of the past have been revised from earlier eras to the present.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1140-000 (14041)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Miller, Mark


MCC-UE 1140-000 (14042)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Loven, Hillevi

From Polenta to Marinara: History of Italian Food (FOOD-UE 1052)

In this course we will cover the varieties of Italian food in their past and present forms. First, we will explore the history of food from past civilizations, leading up to World War I, just after the great immigration to the New World. Time periods examined will be ancient Rome, Medieval, Renaissance, Risorgimento, leading to the modern era. This course includes topics ranging from Pellegrino Artusi’s famous cookbook in the contest of Italian unification to the relationship between Italian Futurism and food. The second part of the course will introduce students to the regional diversity of Italian food using mediums such as TV, art, and film. We will examine the ways in which food shapes contemporary Italian society, from the more intimate family kitchen to the most elegant Italian restaurant in New York City.

Food Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FOOD-UE 1052-000 (10587)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scarcella Perino, Roberto

Fashion in Context (ARCS-UE 1088)

Why do fashion designers and brands exert such influence in contemporary society? What explains the trajectory from The House of Worth to Chanel to this season’s hottest label? This course investigates the interlocking forces shaping fashion: the designer system, celebrities, technology, politics, the arts and media. Through lectures and film viewings, readings, discussions, and individual research, students explore fashion as a crucial aspect of culture and how the fashion system evolved from roots in Parisian couture to become a global phenomenon. Liberal Arts Core/MAP Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Expressive Cultures

Art and Costume Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARCS-UE 1088-000 (9717)
at Online
Instructed by Cole, Daniel


ARCS-UE 1088-000 (9718)
at Online
Instructed by Cole, Daniel

Writing the Portrait: Depicting Artists in Fiction (WRTNG-UG 1529)

How do fiction writers imagine the creative process, life and world of an artist? How do we write about the artistic process? What, if any, parallels may exist between writing and the creative process of a painter, composer, musician, dancer or actor? This course will explore these questions as students read and write fiction focused on artists working in different artistic mediums. We will read fictional portraits of artists both real and imagined, paying attention to the particulars of language associated with each art form and how the writers have incorporated elements of the art form into their work. Writing workshop will include a critique of the writing and story development as well as a critique of how well the world of the artist has been built within the bounds of the fictional realm. We will also delve into research—artist interviews, online performances and exhibitions—using the art and performance worlds of New York City as a resource, culminating in a final research portfolio and presentation to be submitted alongside the final work of fiction. Readings may include works by Baldwin, Bernhard, Bolaño, Hustvedt, Maugham, McCann, Ondaatje, Rushdie and Woolf. Readings will also include essays by artists, artist interviews and profiles, and art and performance criticism.

Advanced Writing Courses (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


WRTNG-UG 1529-000 (12485)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Manko, Vanessa

The Art and Craft of Poetry (WRTNG-UG 1560)

In this workshop (practicum), poets will focus on the foundations and intricate dynamics of poetry as a writer’s process. A weekly reading of a new poem by each poet in the circle will serve as point of departure for discussion of the relationships of craft and expression. A final portfolio of polished poems is required at the end of the course.

Advanced Writing Courses (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


WRTNG-UG 1560-000 (12069)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hightower, Scott

Policy, Community, and Self (PRACT-UG 1475)

Intended to introduce policy, this course includes an internship at a policy and/or advocacy organization. Community building, family well-being, early childhood education, health, juvenile justice reform, service integration and child welfare are featured in readings, discussion, and internships. Through examples such as ethnic-matching placements in foster care, zero-tolerance approaches to drug abuse, or public financing of political campaigns, students come to understand how government, schools, gangs, religious institutions and families can, with varying degrees of explicitness and formality, all make policy. Students at the course conclusion are able to: identify policies within their lives; argue all sides of a policy question; appreciate the importance of qualitative and quantitative evidence; and distinguish implementation from formulation. Readings include Bowling Alone, by Robert Putnam, The Lost Children of Wilder, by Nina Bernstein; The Oath and the Office; by Corey Brettschneider (Donated Copies) and Not a Crime to Be Poor by Peter Edelman . Students will be helped to connect meetings they attend and the policy concepts taught and discussed in class. The goal is to leave no student unaware of the importance of policy in their own and their community’s life. Policies that are empowering are emphasized, techniques doe for oral and written advocacy, persuasion and attitude change are embedded in a final project that requires using existing skills and talents and learning new ones. Assignments include an internship journal.Films include Ethics in America and Waiting for Superman.

Practicum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PRACT-UG 1475-000 (12441)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brettschneider, Eric

Conservation Biology in Practice: Solutions for People and Nature (PRACT-UG 1550)

The past century of exponential population growth, infrastructure development, and inequitable resource uses has stressed nature’s systems to dangerous levels. We are losing cultural and biological diversity at unprecedented rates, and these threats are compounded by the associated challenges from severely disrupted climate systems. This Gallatin practicum will provide students with a forum to develop a cross-disciplinary 21st Century nature conservation toolkit – one that can create cutting-edge strategies to reduce the risks to species and ecosystem, adapt to a changing climate, and produce a healthier relationship to nature. Students will work in teams to select a site-based project from a menu of real-world options, and then design practical and achievable solutions to these risks and challenges.We will use tools from biology, earth sciences, anthropology, social psychology, economics, and business to determine the cause, magnitude, and urgency of risks. Each student team will then combine the results from these scientific and financial assessments with the skills, power, and insights from the arts and communication media to plan and implement practical conservation solutions, tell the story of conservation needs, and build commitment to get the work done.

Practicum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PRACT-UG 1550-000 (12436)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tolisano, James

Environmental Racism and Environmental Injustice: Rights, Citizenship, and Activism (IDSEM-UG 2114)

How are environmental racism and environmental injustice related to belonging in—and exclusion from—local, national, and international communities? How do questions about citizenship, rights, and rightlessness relate to environmental racism and environmental injustice? This course addresses questions about how numerous forms of environmental racism and environmental injustice impact people’s access to their human rights—universally guaranteed in principle but so frequently inaccessible in reality. These questions have newfound urgency amid the COVID-19 pandemic, as marginalized communities already subjected to environmental repression have been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic. Drawing on works from the realms of political theory, international law, literature, activism, and others, we will address relationships between race, class, gender, and environmental injustice. We will discuss fence-line communities. There are powerful connections between so-called “local” environmental injustice and the climate crisis—how are these connections overlooked by international law? We will focus on how communities of color, Indigenous communities, and stateless people are affected by and resist pollution inequity and differential access to healthcare. Historical and contemporary cases include denial of water access (e.g. Flint and Detroit, Michigan; the Palestinian West Bank and Gaza; and Cape Town, South Africa); forced exposure to toxins in armed conflict zones (ranging from the WWII bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, to the Vietnam War, and the Iraq War); poisoning from industrial pollution (such as in Minamata, Japan in the 20th century); and international examples of lead poisoning. Scholars, novelists, poets, theorists, and practitioners whose work will be read and discussed may include: Robert D. Bullard, Rachel Carson, Steve Lerner, Harriet A. Washington, Walter Benjamin, Hannah Arendt, Seyla Benhabib, Benedict Anderson, Antony Anghie, Tōge Sankichi, Ghassan Kanafani, and Yoko Tawada.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IDSEM-UG 2114-000 (12502)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krakow, Carly

Novels of Youth In and After Colonialism (IDSEM-UG 2040)

This seminar takes as its central topic the relationship between youth and empire. What does it mean to come of age in a world-system when the key decisions that shape your life might be made in far-off countries that you have never seen? And conversely, why have writers in societies that have recently achieved political independence been drawn to narrate that political transformation through the lens of stories about growing up? We will read a range of different texts and genres, including realist novels, modernist fiction and autobiographical narratives by formerly enslaved people. We will think together about the strengths and limits of these various forms, considering the ways that authors have attempted to reckon with the existential uncertainty of living in a global society. Likely readings will include Chinua Achebe, No Longer at Ease; Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre; Charles Dickens, Great Expectations; Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano; Mary Prince, The History of Mary Prince; Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea; Olive Schreiner, The Story of an African Farm; and Indra Sinha, Animal’s People.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IDSEM-UG 2040-000 (21100)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vargo, Gregory

Sexualities of the Middle East: A Cultural History (IDSEM-UG 9550)

The course will tackle questions of sexuality in the Middle East from a historical perspective. Applying methodologies of queer theory, it will discuss the complex history of sexuality in the Middle East, and sketch the genealogy of Western attitudes towards both Arab and Jewish sexuality. Relying on theorists and historians like Michel Foucault, Robert Aldrich, Khaled El-Rouayheb, Samar Habib, and Joseph Massad, we will explore the essential role that the queer issue plays in the contemporary politics of the region.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IDSEM-UG 9550-000 (4247)
01/23/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Tel Aviv (Global)
Instructed by Ilani, Ofri

History of British Fashion (IDSEM-UG 9252)

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON. This course offers a survey of key aspects of British fashion from 1500 to the present day, including womenswear, menswear, accessories, and more. We will examine selected features of producing, consuming, and representing dress, relating important shifts in fashion to historical developments in areas such as trade, economics, politics, and visual culture. Students will study examples of historical clothing as well as depictions of it, and become familiar with a variety of methodological approaches to its study. The majority of classes will take place in Bedford Square, London, and be formed of illustrative lectures, class activities, discussion of set readings, and student presentations. Each lecture is described in the syllabus and includes discussion questions, required as well as recommended readings, and recommended films. Several classes will take place on location, at museums and archives, and will explore important collections of British dress and of British everyday life and fashionable consumption.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IDSEM-UG 9252-000 (2740)
09/02/2024 – 12/06/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Li, Leren

History of Italian Fashion (IDSEM-UG 9200)

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-FLORENCE. The aim of this course is to explore the history of Italian fashion with an interdisciplinary approach focused on social, cultural, economic and political aspects. By focusing on select topics of key interest students will acquire a basic knowledge of the history of Italian fashion from the Renaissance to the present, understand the complex and multivalent clothing codes that help to order social interaction and learn to decode it. These abilities will provide students with a useful basis for understanding the capital role of the fashion of the past both as the origin of a ‘language’ of clothes still in use and as a boundless source of inspiration for contemporary designers. Conducted in English.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IDSEM-UG 9200-000 (2458)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Lurati, Patricia


IDSEM-UG 9200-000 (19675)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Thu
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Lurati, Patricia

The Novel and Society: Victorian Secrets (IDSEM-UG 1726)

In the twenty-first century, the Internet arguably makes secrecy impossible, but the exposure of secrets is already an important theme in many 19th-century British novels. In part, this reflects a society in which identity seems increasingly malleable through greater social class mobility, the questioning of traditional gender roles, and imperialist opportunities. In these novels, fake identities conceal a murderer and a madwoman, among others. And the societal constraints inspiring the fictional secrets also led the authors to keep secrets of their own. Beloved author Charles Dickens, the father of 10, had a 13-year love affair with a woman who was 18 when they met. But does the novel genre, particularly the “realist” Victorian novel, with its emphasis on an omniscient narrator and intersecting plots, have a special relationship to secrets? We attempt to uncover the answer by studying Jane Eyre (1847) by Charlotte Bronte (1847), Great Expectations (1861), by Charles Dickens, George Eliot’s Middlemarch (1871-2), and Arthur Conan Doyle’s first Sherlock Holmes novel, A Study in Scarlet (1887). Theory and criticism include selections from Michel Foucault’s History of Sexuality, Edward Said’s Culture and Imperialism, Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar’s The Madwoman in the Attic, and Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak’s “Three Women’s Texts and a Critique of Imperialism.”

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IDSEM-UG 1726-000 (12277)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Foley, June

Creative Music Entrepreneurs in Historical Context (REMU-UT 1201)

This 14-week class introduces students to the history of innovative entrepreneurs and institutions in American recorded music. We recount the stories and make arguments about famous executives, managers, producers, performers, DJs, and journalists/publishers from the dawn of the music business until the present day. We study how and why the fields, fiefdoms, and empires built by these impressive and sometimes controversial icons have transformed the course of popular music. Along the way, students become well versed in the history of 20th and 21st century recorded music, and in various music genres and styles; and we place the art and business of creating and selling recorded music in historical, political, cultural and social context. Throughout, we look at approaches to crafting successful oral and written arguments about popular music with clear, compelling writing about sound.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


REMU-UT 1201-000 (17715)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnas, Daniel


REMU-UT 1201-000 (17716)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnas, Daniel

Queer and Trans Game Studies (MCC-UE 1043)

This course examines the political movement of queer and transgender artists and programmers who are creating games and computational media. Throughout the semester, we will read work by queer, trans, and feminist scholars and designers and play the games they created in order to situate today’s queer and trans games movement within the histories, contributions, and politics of queer and trans people & people of color. How might we re-imagine the radical potentiality of video games and software by centering game studies on queer and trans life, history, & politics?

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1043-000 (11428)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pow, Whitney

Revolution and Media (MCC-UE 1352)

This course examines the role of media in the history of empires and revolutions and the history of media empires. It focuses on the investment in media forces by both empires and revolutions, and the tendency of media to form empires that are subject to periodic ’revolution’ in the marketplace with the contexts of colonization, decolonization and globalization. Media discussed include prints, paintings, photography, journalism, fiction, cinema, the Internet and digital media.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1352-000 (11392)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Raza, Sara

Human Computer Interaction (CS-UY 4543)

Designing a successful interactive experience or software system takes more than technical savvy and vision–it also requires a deep understanding of how to serve people’s needs and desires through the experience of the system, and knowledge about how to weave this understanding into the development process. This course introduces key topics and methods for creating and evaluating human-computer interfaces/digital user experiences. Students apply these practices to a system of their choosing (I encourage application to prototype systems that students are currently working on in other contexts, at any stage of development). The course builds toward a final write-up and presentation in which students detail how they tackled HCI/user experience design and evaluation of their system, and results from their investigations. Some experience creating/participating in the production of interactive experiences/software is recommended.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4543-000 (16119)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Goyal, Nitesh


CS-UY 4543-000 (16120)
at ePoly
Instructed by Lutzky, Raymond

Place-Building-Time:The Architecture of Berlin (ARTH-UA 9651)

Berlin is a unique modern Metropolis. Its alternating history with often drastic changes offers a comprehensive background to explore and investigate the nature of architecture in correlation to the various developmental processes of urban life and culture. Architecture is embedded in the urban fabric in which place and time serve as the main threads, constantly changing their multifaceted and layered relationships. This urban fabric provides the fertile soil for urban life and culture, which literally takes place in various scales between the public and the private realm, two further threads intertwined in the urban fabric. Experiencing the city through walking is essential for learning how to observe, see and read “Place, Building and Time” in Berlin. Tours will alternate with classroom discussions and workshops.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTH-UA 9651-000 (2322)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by Sigel, Paul

The Cultural Poltics of Bad Taste (IDSEM-UG 1738)

This seminar investigates the ideological, political and historical parameters of ‘taste’ in popular culture. Through examination of media artifacts that exemplify ‘trash,’ the course examines how ‘taste’ is constituted as a cultural category that reflects, produces and maintains the social structures of American society. What is meant by designations such as ‘good’ and ‘bad’ media, ‘high and ‘low’ art, ‘offensive’ or ‘artistic’ and who is empowered to make these distinctions? How do ‘bad objects’ reveal the ideological basis of ‘taste,’ and what is their relationship to ‘legitimate’ art forms? Does ‘trash’ pose a challenge to cultural standards of taste and ‘the mainstream?’ What is the relationship between ‘bad’ art and spectatorship and why might audiences find ‘trash’ so enthralling? Readings are drawn from Bourdieu’s Distinction, Glynn’s Tabloid Culture, Ross’ No Respect, and the anthology Trash Culture, while screenings include cult films such as Freaks, Pink Flamingos, Plan 9 From Outer Space,South Park, and The Room, and a selection of reality TV programs, music and viral videos.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IDSEM-UG 1738-000 (12282)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cornell, Julian

Microeconomics (MG-UY 2524)

The course is an introduction to microeconomics. It assumes no prior knowledge of the subject. The course examines the fundamentals of microeconomics needed by technologists, relying to a considerable extent upon mathematical expression and representation. The principle topics covered are price theory, production and cost theory, the theory of the firm and market theory, including the practical relevance of these to the management of technology-intensive enterprises. The role of the state and of government regulation will be considered as a special topic. Students who take this course cannot receive credit for ECON-UA 2 or FIN-UY 2003. | Prerequisite: MA-UY 1024 or MA-UY 1054 or MA-UY 1324 or an approved equivalent.

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MG-UY 2524-000 (18845)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by D’Emic, Michael

Theory of the Digital (MCC-UE 1339)

This course introduces students to the intertwined histories of philosophy and the digital, from cybernetics and German Idealism to postmodernism, Machine Learning, and the platform economy. We will read Claude Shannon, George Boole, and Immanuel Kant; John von Neumann, Karl Marx, and Ada Lovelace. While the seminar aspect of the course builds this theoretical-historical understanding of the digital, the lab component will serve as ompetenceoriented illustrations and live engagements with the theoretical materials. To live in the digital world is to engage both practically and theoretically with the processes and effects of ubiquitous computing. This course thematizes both and cultivates digital citizenry.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1339-000 (20992)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Advertising Campaigns in Context (MCC-UE 1780)

This course teaches students who have a basic understanding of advertising techniques how to develop a complete advertising campaign across a range of media for a product, service or nonprofit organization.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1780-000 (14012)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Railla, Jean

Digital Audio Workstations: Logic (REMU-UT 1021)

During this course, students will acquire an in-depth, theoretical and practical knowledge of Digital Audio Workstations using the industry standard Logic Pro software through a weekly, lab-based workshop. Each class will be a combination of lecture and immediate application. An emphasis will be placed on getting to know Logic Pro, getting inside Logic Pro, creating sessions, working with media in sessions, audio recording, audio editing, file management techniques, MIDI recording, editing techniques, mixing techniques, backups and stereo mix-down.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 2 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


REMU-UT 1021-000 (3256)
07/08/2024 – 07/23/2024 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Painson, Phil

Emerging Media Studio: (PHTI-UT 1018)

The Emerging Media Studio courses explore methods to creatively think through and hybridize artistic photographic practice with emerging media technologies from medicine, the military, archaeology, urban planning, environmental science and other industries. Projects may take open-ended forms such as video, virtual reality environments, site-based performance, spatial imaging, 3D fabrication and photographic documentation. Critical readings and ideas drawn from artists as well as professionals in other fields are discussed. Our practice is learning how to adapt to and position ourselves as artists making unique contributions to the social dynamics of culture and a constantly shifting universe of media.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PHTI-UT 1018-000 (18655)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fu, Snow Yunxue


PHTI-UT 1018-000 (18656)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fu, Snow Yunxue

Visual Effects and Compositing (FMTV-UT 1143)

Visual Effects and Compositing is a lecture and workshop course that covers the application and practical creation of 2D (greenscreen, color correction, morphing etc.)and integration of existing 3D (CGI, animation, virtual sets etc.) visual effects. The assignments will require students to explore how to create, manipulate and combine 2D and 3D images seamlessly.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


FMTV-UT 1143-000 (7092)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rathsmann, Birgit

Introduction to Visual Effects for Animated and Live Action Films (FMTV-UT 1153)

Introduction to Visual Effects for Animated and Live Action Films provides an in-depth overview of VFX production from the director-producer perspective. This course will offer a basic understanding of how VFX are utilized and will prepare students for the visual effects industry, and its constantly evolving digital and in-camera solutions. It will also provide an historical overview of the evolution of VFX. Students will also learn how powerful visual effects have been, and will continue to be, in helping to tell stories, especially projects with limited budgets. They will gain a detailed understanding of the type of camera coverage necessary on-set to facilitate the VFX process and what communications, with their primary crew, are necessary during early stages of preproduction to optimize footage for VFX. Areas of study include rig removal, green/blue screen compositing, motion capture, shooting backdrops, matte paintings, background plates, miniatures – models – forced perspectives, match lighting, sky replacement, crowd replication, integration of 2D and 3D CGI elements, motion control and practical effects shot in-camera.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


FMTV-UT 1153-000 (7111)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Weinstein, Jonathan

Podcasting Workshop (FMTV-UT 1006)

The narrative non-fiction podcast is one of the most popular and creative formats in the audio space, due to the critical success of shows like Serial, 99% Invisible, Ear Hustle, and many more. Although they are challenging to produce, these shows bring a unique blend of intimacy and urgency to the media landscape. This workshop is for those who want to learn the basics of long-form, narrative audio storytelling. Students will go through the editorial steps of pitching, recording, writing and producing a completed episode in a documentary-style format. We’ll work on interview and writing techniques, developing your voice and creative ways of editing sound. Students will also create a podcast pitch deck to support their episode and explore ways to market, distribute, and monetize a narrative podcast.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1006-000 (19410)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gonzales, Jocelyn

Live Coding (IM-UH 2322)

Live coding is a performing arts form and creativity technique where music and visuals are improvised through live edits of source code. Live coding is most visible in performance, however the ’live’ in live coding refers not to a live audience but to live updates of running code. Working across genres, live coding has been seen in algoraves (events where people dance to music generated from algorithms), jazz clubs, and concert halls. Code is projected during performances, exposing the underlying algorithms at work, and thus the patterns of creative thought the performer is developing in real time. Programs are instruments that can change and algorithms are thoughts that can be seen as well as heard. This course explores this new art form and the related themes of algorithmic thought, pattern transformation, artificial language, information theory, improvisation, listening, perception, and structural composition. Students will learn how to create music with code, as well as how to create advanced computer graphics. Students will develop algorithmic audio/visual pieces individually as well as in groups. The course culminates in an algorave.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IM-UH 2322-000 (19553)

A.rt I.ntel (IM-UH 3312)

Artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms affect many aspects of our lives whether we realize it or not: banking transactions, healthcare treatments and diagnoses, entertainment recommendations, smart car functionality, customer service agents, financial trading… the list goes on and on. The power of these algorithms lies in their ability to leverage computers to “study” and “learn”. Instead of programming a computer to do a specific task, we program the computer to train and teach itself how to do any number of tasks. As artists, how can we harness the power of these algorithms and apply them towards creative endeavors? This class will explore that basic question. Through a combination of high level applied machine learning techniques, speculative design of artificial intelligence, and some basic understanding of how these algorithms work at a low level, students will explore this rich new field. With their machine counterparts, they will create images, sounds, text, intuitive interactions, chatbots, and more.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IM-UH 3312-000 (4491)

Data and Society (MCC-UE 1349)

Data is often considered the domain of scientists and statisticians, but its increasing dominance across nearly all aspects of life – from political and advertising campaigns to social media, dating, education, and public health — has social, political, and ethical consequences, presenting both new possibilities and new hazards. In this course we think critically about how collecting, aggregating, and analyzing data affects individual and social life, with a focus on the ways in which it reproduces and creates new structural inequalities and power asymmetries.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1349-000 (14055)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kang, Edward (Byungkwon)

Design Studio for Non-Majors (ART-UE 1421)

A continuing exploration of graphic design to help students refine their skills & develop more personally expressive ways to solving problems through visual communication. Assignments, readings, & research projects will allow students to consider the complex nature of graphic design. Both traditional & digital approaches to typography & layout will be incorporated with a wide range of assignment. A priority is placed on the use of concepts to dictate design techniques & on the pursuit of a genuinely creative vision.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 1421-000 (9687)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Darts, David


ART-UE 1421-000 (9689)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rader, Michael

3D Printing & the Music Industry (REMU-UT 1234)

This course will introduce students to the basic concepts of 3D design and capture through the use of apps and other tools. Through examination and discussion of the current state of 3D printing technology we will explore current and future implications for music and the music business, including but not limited to, live and recorded music, music publishing, innovative tools, part and instrument fabrication, licensing, management, touring, copyright, distribution and marketing. Extra focus will be given to existing and potential merchandise platforms, as well as how 3D can lead to the growth of new industries and new opportunities for cross-pollination with a variety of sectors. Students will be encouraged to pursue both practical and abstract concepts in the furtherance of dynamic and newly inventive ideas – and will be required to develop and submit a concept and plan for their final project.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


REMU-UT 1234-000 (17780)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kolosine, Errol

Cell Phone Cinema (OART-GT 2566)

Hollywood in your palm. That is what this combination of lectures, screenings, demonstrations and practical production workshop will offer to the students in this course. There will be several professional guests making presentations and Q&A sessions from the mobile phone filmmaking industry. In addition to the historical and critical overview of the emergence and exponential growth of global cell phone cinema, students will shoot all footage on cell phones and download them for computerized editing. The final project will be under three minute shorts. Projects will include all genres of film and television: news, mini-documentaries, animation, music videos and narrative shorts. Completed student projects will be suitable to be posted on the Internet and entered into domestic and international mobile phone film festivals. For example, two minute long improvisations of Bollywood Style Music Videos shot on Cell Phones by the students have been projected at the Tribeca Cinemas as part of the New York Indian Film Festival. It is suggested but not compulsory that students bring to the class a cell phone capable of recording video.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


OART-GT 2566-000 (17833)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bardosh, Karoly

New Interfaces for Musical Expression (ITPG-GT 2227)

The course focus is on the design and creation of digital musical instruments. Music in performance is the primary subject of this class. We approach questions such as “What is performance?” “What makes a musical interface intuitive and emotionally immediate?” and “How do we create meaningful correlations between performance gestures and their musical consequences?” Over the semester, we look at many examples of current work by creators of musical interfaces, and discuss a wide range of issues facing technology-enabled performance – such as novice versus virtuoso performers, discrete versus continuous data control, the importance of haptic responsiveness as well as the relationship between musical performance and visual display. Extensive readings and case studies provide background for class discussions on the theory and practice of designing gestural controllers for musical performance. Students design and prototype a musical instrument – a complete system encompassing musical controller, algorithm for mapping input to sound, and the sound output itself. A technical framework for prototyping performance controllers is made available. Students focus on musical composition and improvisation techniques as they prepare their prototypes for live performance. The class culminates in a musical performance where students (or invited musicians) will demonstrate their instruments. Prerequisites: H79.2233 (Introduction to Computational Media) and H79.2301 (Physical Computing). Prerequisite: ICM / ICM: Media (ITPG-GT 2233 / ITPG-GT 2048) & Intro to Phys. Comp. (ITPG-GT 2301)

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2227-000 (15675)
09/09/2024 – 12/09/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rios, David

Visual Cultures of the Modern and Global City (MCC-UE 1038)

Examines visual culture of the city, from the dynamics of visuality in the 19th-century modern cityscape to the mega cities of globalization. It addresses the visual dynamics, infrastructure, architecture, public art and design imaginaries of urban spaces, taking New York City and Paris as primary case studies and including other cities from the 19th century to the present. The course will examine the politics of urban design, the city as a site of division, disaster, memory, and political activism. Meets Liberal Arts Core requirement for Societies and Soc Sciences.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1038-000 (11427)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sturken, Marita

Digital Electronics Lab (MPATE-UE 1828)

Hands-on lab accompanying Digital Electronics. Lab sessions will contain hands-on experience with logic circuits & microcontrollers. The course culminates with a student developed final project.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
1 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1828-000 (12132)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven


MPATE-UE 1828-000 (10687)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven


MPATE-UE 1828-000 (12133)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven


MPATE-UE 1828-000 (10689)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kleback, Mark


MPATE-UE 1828-000 (12134)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Analog Electronics (MPATE-UE 1817)

An introduction to Analog Electronic theory including solid-state devices. Ohm’s Law & related measurement techniques will be explored. Students must enroll in a Lab section to apply hands-on experience in basic circuit design & measurement.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1817-000 (10679)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven

Analog Electronics Lab (MPATE-UE 1827)

Hands-on lab accompanying Analog Electronics. Lab sessions will contain hands-on experience with analog audio circuitry. The course culminates with a student developed final project.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
1 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1827-000 (10684)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kleback, Mark

Digital Electronics (MPATE-UE 1818)

An introduction to Digital Electronics, including binary systems & logic. Students must enroll in a Lab section to apply hands-on experience in simple computer programming techniques, digital processing applied to music with specific relevance to computer music synthesis & MIDI.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1818-000 (10681)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven

Software Music Production (MPATE-UE 1070)

Analytical and theoretical concepts required grasping the aesthetic development of electronic and computer music compositions. The course emphasizes analysis and historical understanding of techniques of production and compositional ideas.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1070-000 (10667)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Losada, Juan

Elect Music Synthesis: Fundamental Techn (MPATE-UE 1037)

This course focuses on electronic music synthesizer techniques. Concepts in the synthesis of music, including generation of sound, voltage control, and treatment of sound and tape techniques. Included is a short synopsis of the history and literature of analog electronic music. Students complete laboratory tasks and compositions on vintage synthesizer modules and create one or more final projects that demonstrate(s) the application of these concepts.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1037-000 (12985)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martin, Donald


MPATE-UE 1037-000 (12986)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martin, Donald

Comp Music Synthesis: Fundamental Techniques (MPATE-UE 1047)

Introduction for teachers, composers, and performers to explore potentials of computer music synthesis. Basic concepts of music synthesis presented through the use of a microcomputer, keyboard, and appropriate software. System may be used as a real-time performance instrument or as a studio composition instrument. Educators may explore potentials for classroom application.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1047-000 (10664)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by O’Keefe, Timothy


MPATE-UE 1047-000 (12128)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
8:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by O’Keefe, Timothy

Digital Recording Technology (MPATE-UE 1003)

Digital recording technology & production techniques are explained & demonstrated. Lecture topics engage analog to digital conversion, digital to analog conversion, digital signal theory & filter design, digital audio effects & mixing. Studio lab assignments are performed outside of class reinforcing weekly lecture topics.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1003-000 (10652)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Valenzuela, Ernesto


MPATE-UE 1003-000 (12126)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Valenzuela, Ernesto

Electronic Music Performance (MPATE-UE 1019)

Through discussions with guest performers, students study the conceptualization and production of live electronics performance pieces. Individual proposals for several pieces are created, followed by a final live performance project, in which live electronics are an integral part of the concept.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1019-000 (12980)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rolnick, Neil


MPATE-UE 1019-000 (12981)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Naphtali, Dafna


MPATE-UE 1019-000 (12982)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Naphtali, Dafna


MPATE-UE 1019-000 (12983)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wiggins, Kacy


MPATE-UE 1019-000 (12984)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by O’Keefe, Timothy

Fame (MCC-UE 1346)

Fame, notoriety, renown – the desire to be recognized & immortalized is the most enduring & perhaps the most desirable form of power. Culture, commerce, politics, & religion all proffer promises of fame – whether for fifteen minutes or fifteen centuries. This course will investigate this subject by asking, what is fame? Why do people want it? How do they get it? What can they do with it? In other words, what kind of good is fame? Drawing on texts from history, ethnography, theory, literature, philosophy, & contemporary media, this course will reflect on the ethics, erotics, pragmatics & pathologies of fame.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1346-000 (11421)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fallica, Salvatore

Application Security (CS-GY 9163)

This course addresses the design and implementation of secure applications. Concentration is on writing software programs that make it difficult for intruders to exploit security holes. The course emphasizes writing secure distributed programs in Java. The security ramifications of class, field and method visibility are emphasized. | Knowledge of Information, Security and Privacy equivalent to CS-GY 6813. Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 9163-000 (15952)
at ePoly
Instructed by


CS-GY 9163-000 (15953)
at ePoly
Instructed by


CS-GY 9163-000 (15954)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Satt, Mo

Applied Cryptography (CS-GY 6903)

This course examines Modern Cryptography from a both theoretical and applied perspective, with emphasis on “provable security” and “application case studies”. The course looks particularly at cryptographic primitives that are building blocks of various cryptographic applications. The course studies notions of security for a given cryptographic primitive, its various constructions and respective security analysis based on the security notion. The cryptographic primitives covered include pseudorandom functions, symmetric encryption (block ciphers), hash functions and random oracles, message authentication codes, asymmetric encryption, digital signatures and authenticated key exchange. The course covers how to build provably secure cryptographic protocols (e.g., secure message transmission, identification schemes, secure function evaluation, etc.), and various number-theoretic assumptions upon which cryptography is based. Also covered: implementation issues (e.g., key lengths, key management, standards, etc.) and, as application case studies, a number of real-life scenarios currently using solutions from modern cryptography. | Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6903-000 (15957)
at ePoly
Instructed by Chen, Zhixiong


CS-GY 6903-000 (15958)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Di Crescenzo, Giovanni


CS-GY 6903-000 (15959)
at ePoly
Instructed by Di Crescenzo, Giovanni

Big Data (CS-GY 6513)

Big Data requires the storage, organization, and processing of data at a scale and efficiency that go well beyond the capabilities of conventional information technologies. In this course, we will study the state of art in big data management: we will learn about algorithms, techniques and tools needed to support big data processing. In addition, we will examine real applications that require massive data analysis and how they can be implemented on Big Data platforms. The course will consist of lectures based both on textbook material and scientific papers. It will include programming assignments that will provide students with hands-on experience on building data-intensive applications using existing Big Data platforms, including Amazon AWS. Besides lectures given by the instructor, we will also have guest lectures by experts in some of the topics we will cover. Students should have experience in programming: Java, C, C , Python, or similar languages, equivalent to two introductory courses in programming, such as “Introduction to Programming” and “Data Structures and Algorithms. | Knowledge of Python. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6513-000 (16126)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rodriguez, Juan


CS-GY 6513-000 (16128)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rodriguez, Juan


CS-GY 6513-000 (16127)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Sat
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Patel, Amit


CS-GY 6513-000 (16129)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Machine Learning (CS-GY 6923)

This course is an introduction to the field of machine learning, covering fundamental techniques for classification, regression, dimensionality reduction, clustering, and model selection. A broad range of algorithms will be covered, such as linear and logistic regression, neural networks, deep learning, support vector machines, tree-based methods, expectation maximization, and principal components analysis. The course will include hands-on exercises with real data from different application areas (e.g. text, audio, images). Students will learn to train and validate machine learning models and analyze their performance. | Knowledge of undergraduate level probability and statistics, linear algebra, and multi-variable calculus. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6923-000 (16014)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


CS-GY 6923-000 (16015)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Musco, Christopher


CS-GY 6923-000 (16016)
at ePoly
Instructed by Radhakrishnan, Regunathan


CS-GY 6923-000 (16017)
at ePoly
Instructed by

COMPUTER VISION (CS-GY 6643)

An important goal of artificial intelligence (AI) is to equip computers with the capability of interpreting visual inputs. Computer vision is an area in AI that deals with the construction of explicit, meaningful descriptions of physical objects from images. It includes as parts many techniques from image processing, pattern recognition, geometric modeling, and cognitive processing. This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and techniques in computer vision. | Knowledge of Data Structures and Algorithms, proficiency in programming, and familiarity with matrix arithmetic. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6643-000 (15999)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Computer Networking (CS-GY 6843)

This course takes a top-down approach to computer networking. After an overview of computer networks and the Internet, the course covers the application layer, transport layer, network layer and link layers. Topics at the application layer include client-server architectures, P2P architectures, DNS and HTTP and Web applications. Topics at the transport layer include multiplexing, connectionless transport and UDP, principles or reliable data transfer, connection-oriented transport and TCP and TCP congestion control. Topics at the network layer include forwarding, router architecture, the IP protocol and routing protocols including OSPF and BGP. Topics at the link layer include multiple-access protocols, ALOHA, CSMA/CD, Ethernet, CSMA/CA, wireless 802.11 networks and linklayer switches. The course includes simple quantitative delay and throughput modeling, socket programming and network application development and Ethereal labs. | Knowledge of Python and/or C. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6843-000 (16008)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Reddington, Thomas


CS-GY 6843-000 (16009)
at ePoly
Instructed by Portnoy, Rafail


CS-GY 6843-000 (16010)
at ePoly
Instructed by Portnoy, Rafail


CS-GY 6843-000 (16011)
at ePoly
Instructed by Zhao, John

Artificial Intelligence I (CS-GY 6613)

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is an important topic in computer science and offers many diversified applications. It addresses one of the ultimate puzzles humans are trying to solve: How is it possible for a slow, tiny brain, whether biological or electronic, to perceive, understand, predict and manipulate a world far larger and more complicated than itself? And how do people create a machine (or computer) with those properties? To that end, AI researchers try to understand how seeing, learning, remembering and reasoning can, or should, be done. This course introduces students to the many AI concepts and techniques. | Knowledge of Data Structures and Algorithms. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6613-000 (15997)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Monogioudis, Pantelis


CS-GY 6613-000 (15998)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Wong, Edward

Live Video Performance Art (OART-GT 2567)

This course will combine a history of video art and experimental film with practical training in the use of live video performance art technology. Students will explore new ways to create and edit films and videos using VJ software, projections, and multi-channel video surfaces. Workshops will demonstrate concepts and software that can be integrated into the creative process of video performance art and video art installations. COURSE OBJECTIVES At the completion of this course, the student will be able to: Draw inspiration from the recent history of incredible video and multi-media artists. Develop an understanding of audio and visual hardware used by VJ’s. Use live VJ software to manipulate digital media in real time to create Video Performance Art. Use Projection Mapping techniques to project video art onto 3D surfaces. Create original video performance art, video installations, and other performance pieces. Utilize skills to make video art in the professional market.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


OART-GT 2567-000 (7246)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nova, Max

Making Webisodes (OART-GT 2569)

Making Webisodes is an intensive production workshop in which students create unique and compelling content for the web. Students will explore the basics of online video production, working with – concept creation – writing – directing – acting – production design – camerawork – sound – editing – online distribution – social media – web monetization – and advertising. Web series are an exploding new art form. Embedded ads, 5 second hooks, instagram stories, tik-tok, and viral videos all present a variety of new media approaches within the entertainment industry, business, lifestyle, and politics. Webisodes are short visual presentations that either entertain us, directly sell us product, indirectly sell us product, share a powerful message, investigate social issues, expose problems, celebrate joy, engage our perspective, shock us, or challenge us. Students will work with Sony FS5 cameras, microphones, and LED lights and they will also be trained to use their own dslrs and cellphones, in order to practice creating a wide variety of webisodes. Workshop assignments employ practical exercises to help the students conceive and create their own unique webisode, which can be fiction or non-fiction, experimental or satire, personal or political. Combining the powerful tools of traditional filmmaking with innovative new digital media tools, this class guides students to create dynamic web based projects. As the students produce their digital media, they learn by doing and they gain practical knowledge of the art, craft, and commerce of webisodes.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


OART-GT 2569-000 (7249)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tunnicliffe, William

Urban Arts Workshop: New York (OART-GT 2925)

Urban Arts Workshop–New York is composed of lectures, presentations, screenings, readings, discussions, and visits from painters, photographers, filmmakers, writers, designers, architects, planners, restaurateurs, curators and critics designed to expose students to the key concepts and fundamental theories of urban studies, public art and the urban-inspired works of many great artists and writers based in New York City and around the world. Outside of class time, students will do readings, conduct research, watch movies, post reactions and do various assignments that engage the core course subject matter and themes. Each class will explore another form of urban art, including discussions about and encounters with graffiti, street photography, sculpture, installation art, architecture, music, dance, performance, theater, fashion, urban sound projects, large-scale projections, poetry, essays and short stories with an aim to understand how such art forms came into being and how they express a distinctly urban message to the inhabitants and visitors of New York City and cities across the planet. The instructor seeks to combine the critical and theoretical with the experiential and personal in order to lead students to a deeper and more fruitful relationship with cities, the arts and themselves. Further exploration will be conducted into the phenomenon of connectivity in the 21st century city providing a deeper perspective on globalism, the networked environment, and emerging technology’s role in the future of art, culture and urban living. Field trips may include: The Whitney, The High Line and Hudson Yards, Tiny Island, MoMA, Guggenheim, PS1, Museum of the City of New York, The New Museum, Transit Museum, Noguchi Museum, Governors Island and others based upon availability. Students will need a MetroCard for traveling around the city as well as approximately $50.00 to cover meals and museum tickets (this price varies depending on course itinerary).

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Hand Held: Creative Tools for Phones (ITPG-GT 2068)

“The smartphone is not only the primary site for digital communication and consumption, it also hosts emerging forms of media production. Let’s investigate the potential of the mobile touchscreen as a creative instrument! This is a project based course, and we will explore by creating and testing a series of functioning web-based toys – including drawing apps, character creators, and writing tools. You can expect to sharpen your skills in javascript and design. “

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2068-000 (14779)
01/23/2024 – 04/30/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Bittker, Max

Out of Order: Storytelling Technology (ITPG-GT 2076)

This course is about how to tell stories with your projects. Like a classic linear story, we’ll start at the beginning with the question of how good stories are told. We’ll learn about classical storytelling techniques and conventions from a variety of cultures, genres, and media. Next, we’ll explore what various tech and media can and can’t do in the context of story. We’ll end the semester throwing linearity out the window to create narrative work that engages with the tropes and conventions of non-linear storytelling. Chaos may ensue, as the defining feature of non-linear storytelling is that the author cedes some control of the narrative to the audience. There is no creative writing involved. Students will not be asked to invent new stories for this course—non-writers are welcome! The work of the class will involve reading, reading responses, active class discussion, and group work/play with projects riffing on assigned existing stories and narratives. For example, we might ask students to use a specific canonical story, poem, myth, parable, or film plot as a narrative jumping off point for assignments. The course is co-taught by Kio Stark, a researcher/writer of both fiction and nonfiction and Mia Rovegno, a theater writer/director who focuses on site-specific and immersive work. The semester is divided into three units. Unit 1: Narrative structures. In this unit, we dig into what it means to tell a story. Some of our major themes include: • What are the most commonly used story structures in media such as the novel, graphic novel, film, TV, and theater—and what expectations do they set up for the audience? • What are the techniques, tropes, and conventions of both western and nonwestern storytelling traditions? • What are some approaches that are in dialogue with or rebel against these traditions? • How do we understand and manipulate the audience’s narrative expectations? • What makes a story ‘work’ / how do we define a good or successful story? Unit 2: Using tech to tell a story. In this unit, we will do something that in other contexts is a terrible idea—we will start with the technology. We’ll explore briefly what counts as technology in our conversation, and then play with what specific technologies make possible, complicate, and make impossible when it comes to exploring narrative work. • What can and can’t we do with sensors, motion, projection, AR/VR, paper, film, light, voice etc in the context of the storytelling knowledge we’ve gained in Unit 1? • What unique storytelling conventions might be available to us as makers? • What kinds of objects, interfaces, situations, and places can be experienced as narrative? Unit 3: Non-linear storytelling. In this unit, we will play with situations in which the creators do not have total control over how the narrative is experienced and in what order it unfolds. • How do we use the viewer’s relationship/familiarity with conventions of linear storytelling to engage them in a non-linear narrative? • What are the storytelling conventions we see used in media beyond the page, big screen, and stage, where non-linearity is a common feature? For example, AR/VR, video games, social media, site specific performance, and museum design. • How do we make a story that works in more than one direction? • How do we play with the audience’s expectations? • How can we experiment with the temporal to establish duration and clear beginnings and endings for audience entry and exit? • How can we creatively engage both facility and innovation in a user journey? • How can we explore engagement of the audience’s “role” when the work demands a virtual, immersive or interactive experience? • How can we prime audiences for fluency in our storytelling modalities, without depending on cumbersome directions, real time interceptions or demonstrations of technology? In other words: how do we hide the man behind the curtain?!

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2076-000 (14778)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Stark, Kio · Rovegno, Mia

Time (ITPG-GT 2040)

Time is at once fundamental and mysterious. From the 2000-year-old Antikythera Mechanism to modern cesium-fountain clocks, humans have long sought to understand temporal patterns in nature, and build mechanisms to measure, reflect and predict those patterns. We’re at a unique moment, one in which we’ve developed the ability to perceive relativistic effects on time at the smallest scales, while struggling to think and plan across generations. In this course, we’ll reflect on the deep mysteries of time while also gaining hands-on skills applicable to temporal media and technologies. Topics will range from historical clock and orrery design through modern computer architecture (“A computer is a clock with benefits” writes Paul Ford in Bloomberg’s issue dedicated to code). Practically, we’ll build mechanical and software clocks; experiment with time-series data and time protocols; and survey techniques for digital signal processing and real-time operating systems. Students will execute several short assignments and a final project. Prerequisite: ICM / ICM: Media (ITPG-GT 2233 / ITPG-GT 2048) & Intro to Phys. Comp. (ITPG-GT 2301)

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2040-000 (15710)
09/09/2024 – 12/09/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Feddersen, Jeffery

Electronics for Inventors (ITPG-GT 2036)

Today we no longer solely connect to the digital world through computers. The result of this push to connect the digital and the analog world is the increase necessity for low cost, low power, and self-contained electronics. This course is an applications-driven intro to electronics for inventors. Through a hands-on approach students will learn basic concepts about analog circuits, boolean logic, digital devices interfaces, and low-cost code-free electronics. Topics will include basic principles of electricity, as well as understanding of electronics components such as resistors, capacitors, diodes, transistors, audio amplifiers, and timers.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 11 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2036-000 (14767)
01/25/2024 – 04/08/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Galvao Cesar de Oliveira, Pedro

Machine Learning for the Web (ITPG-GT 2465)

Libraries like TensorFlow.js and ml5.js unlocked new opportunities for interactive machine learning projects in the browser. The goal of this class is to learn and understand common machine learning techniques and apply them to generate creative outputs in the browser. This class will start with running models in the browser using high-level APIs from ml5.js, as well as explore the Layer APIs from TensorFlow.js to train models using custom data. This class will also cover preparing the dataset for training models. At the completion of this course, students will have a better understanding of a few machine learning models, how do they work, how to train these models, and their use case to creative projects. Students will also be able to create interactive ML web applications with pre-trained models or their own models. Prospective students are expected to have taken an ICM (Introduction to Computational Media) course, or have an equivalent programming experience with JavaScript, HTML, CSS.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2465-000 (14764)
01/26/2024 – 05/03/2024 Fri
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Shi, Yining

Making Media Making Devices (ITPG-GT 2998)

Small, affordable single board computers enable you to blend the principles of Physical Computing with media playback and capture. This course uses the Raspberry Pi computer as a platform for creating portable devices that have the capability to display graphics, play video, play audio, take photographs, and capture video. As a foundation for the course, students will learn the basic workflow of using the Raspberry Pi computer for physical projects. This foundation includes an gaining an understanding of the Linux software, Python, and digital input and output. Students will work independently or collaboratively to build on this foundation to create their own media playback and capture devices.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
1 credits – 1 Day

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2998-000 (14762)

Computational Approaches to Narrative (ITPG-GT 2198)

Beginning with the release of Crowther and Woods’ “Colossal Cave Adventure” in 1977, the potential and unique affordances of computation as a means of storytelling have become more and more apparent. Combining approaches from literary theory, anthropology, computational creativity and game design, this class considers how narrative structure can be represented as data and enacted through computation, and invites students to implement practical prototypes of their own interactive and procedurally-generated narratives using a variety of technologies. Topics include (but are not limited to) hypertext fiction, “choose your own adventure”-style branching narratives, text adventures, visual novels, story generation from grammars and agent-based simulations. Students will complete a series of bite-size weekly assignments to present for in-class critique. Each session will also feature lectures, class discussion, and technical tutorials.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2198-000 (14761)
01/24/2024 – 05/01/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Parrish, Allison

The Code of Music (ITPG-GT 2653)

This course explores music through the lenses of computation and interactivity. The first part of the semester consists of a structured exploration of rhythm, melody, timbre, and harmony, from the perspectives of code, design, and music theory. For each musical element, we will hold listening sessions, represent and manipulate the element in code, and create an interactive study around it. During the second half of the semester we will cover algorithmic composition techniques such as Markov Chains, Neural Networks and L-systems. As students work toward their final projects, assignments will take a more self-directed approach. Professional practitioners will come in to share their work in the field and give students feedback on their projects. In-class coding and assignments will be done in P5.js Tone.js, but students will be free to use other languages and frameworks for their final projects. ICM or equivalent programming experience is required. This class is a good fit for students who are interested in: – Creating interactive music pieces and digital instruments – Deepening their understanding of how music works – Continuing to develop coding skills acquired in ICM Prerequisites: Introduction to Computational Media (ICM) or equivalent programming experience is required. About Luisa Hors: https://www.luisapereira.net/

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2653-000 (14753)
01/25/2024 – 05/02/2024 Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pereira Hors Renner, Luisa