Category Archives: Fall 2021

Climate Change and Environmental Justice (SCA-UA 632)

Readings from climatologists, economists, anthropologists, geographers, cultural analysts, and activists. Examines the natural and social impact of global warming in the context of the climate justice movement, which is modeled on American-derived principles of environmental justice in the 1990s and poses a legal and humanitarian challenge to those who place their faith in market-driven solutions. Examines how populations are unevenly affected by climate change, and how this imbalance is being addressed by advocates of decarbonization.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


SCA-UA 632-000 (10318)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ross, Andrew

Devising & Documentary (OART-UT 144)

Note this class is called “Devised Theater: History and Practice.” This intensive focuses on both historic evolution of ritual-based/early theater models through contemporary theater philosophies (accentuating history of Futurist/Dada theater innovations to present), and on anatomizing the nature of performer, performance, story and storytelling via the non-traditional philosophies and methods of contemporary experimental theater. The class will be rigorously participatory in terms of discussing/physicalizing these experimental methods and will culminate in the creation and performance of simple class collaboration-generated stage narratives. Students will investigate the meaning and application of physical/environmental ’neutrality’ on stage as they simultaneously investigate and define for themselves the most essential markers needed for the viewer to perceive ‘story’ in performance. As the staged pieces are constructed from these anatomized building blocks of performance and story, more complex qualities of character, identity, archetype, mannerism, linguistic disfluencies (verbal and non-verbal) and psychological subtext will be introduced as tools for each performer’s role in the story. In the final phases of piece creation, simple analog elements of music, sound, light, mask, craft materials, dance, virtuosic/specialized skill, props will be introduced as tools. The final performance will aspire to clear and effective applications of the performance/story elements discussed (or discovered) in class. Techniques and exercises derived from the worlds of Futurism/Dada, Richard Maxwell, Blue Man Group, Elevator Repair Service, Ann Bogart, Joshua Fried, and others will be discussed and employed.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
1 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


OART-UT 144-000 (15799)

Portrait of an Artist: Walter Murch (OART-UT 901)

This course examines the artistic career and creative work of Walter Murch, Oscar-winning film editor and sound designer, and the first and only artist to win Academy Awards for both film editing and sound mixing on a single film (The English Patient, 1997). The class will provide an unprecedented inside look into Mr. Murch’s processes of sound designing, editing, mixing, writing, and directing on such acclaimed and memorable films as THX 1138, American Graffiti, The Conversation, Apocalypse Now, The Godfather, Return to Oz, The English Patient, Touch of Evil, and Cold Mountain. Through interviews, articles, and materials from his private archives never before publicly available, students learn about the creative world of an artist who has brought the importance of sound and editing to a new level. In addition to his work in film and his inventions used in the filmmaking process, two additional areas of interest of Mr. Murch will be examined: translations of Curzio Malaparte’s writings and his passion for astronomy. Mr. Murch will participate on several occasions in the course as a guest lecturer by visiting the class and/or via video conferencing.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


OART-UT 901-000 (15488)09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Zivkovic, Brane

Experiential Learning Seminar: Fashion Industry: Creativity & Business (MULT-UB 104)

Fashion companies, as business entities, have always been faced with balancing technological and operational necessities with creative and imaginative artistry. Today, this challenge is even more difficult to manage, as the industry’s traditional modes of operation (e.g. a multitude of physical retail locations, seasonally driven creation & distribution of products, near total dependency on foreign production, and the producer’s sense of fashion trend entitlement) has given way to omnichannel retailing, merchandise “drops” and smaller collections, reimagining production systems (aka “Supply Chains”)and the ascendency of the consumer as the controlling factor in confirming fashion trends and determining market outcomes, to name just a few of the disruptive changes. This has been underscored by the industry struggling to contain its role as a major source of global pollution, and global warming. The ESG/CSR Sustainability challenge has intensified Fashion’s need to manage these disruptive changes and incorporate new operational modes while, in the same space and time, embracing the new digital ways of thinking about business and fashion, including the impact of the Metaverse, NFT’s, Blockchain and virtual try-on processes and platforms. This course and this class is charged with finding new, untried but business-driven, solutions to these challenges placed within the Sustainability context.

Multidisciplinary (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


MULT-UB 104-000 (10943)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carr, Jeffrey

Arts Marketing (MKTG-UB 24)

This course is designed to be a self contained introduction to marketing in the arts. It will focus primarily on live performing arts, but also include museums and gallerias. The arts category is rife with change. This presents enormous challenges for artists, producers, venue managers and marketers. In addition, the practice of marketing is changing just as quickly if not more so. Strategy and tactics are at more of a premium than ever. Marketers in arts related businesses must find a way to flourish in this new world, by working smarter, faster, and with great ingenuity. COURSE OBJECTIVE : ● To garner an understanding of the concepts that drive arts marketing ● To explore the competitive landscape and uncover what leads to a successful arts business ● To practically apply coursework towards a project of students interest and focus ●

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Living a Good Life: Greek and Jewish Perspectives (RELST-UA 422)

Key questions: Does living well require acquiring knowledge and wisdom? What is the place of moral responsibility in the good life? Is the good life a happy life, or does it require sacrificing happiness? Does religion lead to living well or does it hinder it? What is friendship and how does it contribute to the good life? Study of primary texts by Plato, Aristotle, Seneca, Avot, Maimonides, Spinoza, and Hermann Cohen.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


RELST-UA 422-000 (20451)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gottlieb, Michah

Introduction to Mechanical Engineering (ME-UY 1012)

This course introduces students to the range of mechanical engineering and emphasizes the basic principles and devices for storing and using energy, directing motion and satisfying needs. Case studies look at design issues and related ethical and professional practice issues. Emphasis is on a mindset of exploration. Engineering standards and standard parts. Teams work on and present two design challenges. | Prerequisite: Only first-year students are permitted to enroll in this course.

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 1012-000 (12688)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Wilson-Small, Nialah

Alter Egos: Assuming New Identities Through Costume and Performance (ITPG-GT 3024)

Throughout history, musicians have channeled their creativity into outrageous fashion statements and invented personas: think MF DOOM, Sun Ra, Ghostface Killah, Daft Punk, Leikeli47 and Rammellzee. By embracing their alter egos in extreme and outlandish ways, artists have found their authentic creative voices. This course will introduce participants to the art of masquerade using their resourcefulness to create costumes from found materials, and performance as an exploration in creative expression using new media and technology. Students will be introduced to ideas surrounding abstract storytelling, experimental audio video production, and A/V performance using a combination of technical and hands-on approaches. This course requires CL: Hypercinema or equivalent experience. Prerequisite: CL: Hypercinema (ITPG-GT 2004)

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3024-000 (15733)
09/09/2024 – 12/09/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Santana, Ali

Multisensory Storytelling in Virtual Reality and Original Flavor Reality (ITPG-GT 3026)

“In this course, we will explore how to create narratives that leverage our lesser used senses like touch, taste and smell as well as lesser-known ones like space, time, balance and scale. We will dig into the history of experiential storytelling, starting from immersive theater and Smell-O-vision to cutting-edge haptics and mind-bending illusions of proprioception. To help center this back in practical applications, we will also explore how this evolving art is commonly used in exhibition design, experiential marketing and brick and mortar retail. The class will be a healthy mixture of game theory as well as experienced based learning (meaning there will be a couple field trips and multisensory VR projects to explore). A basic knowledge of game engines is ideal but not mandatory because we will be using predesigned templates in Unreal engine to be experienced and manipulated in real-time through virtual reality hardware.”

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3026-000 (15735)
09/05/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Porter, Winslow

Hedonomic VR Design: Principles & Practices (ITPG-GT 3025)

To be a VR creator, it’s not enough to learn the hard skills—it’s also our responsibility to prime ourselves for the human impact of our work. As a means to design VR that is both enjoyable and accountable, this class proposes we borrow design principles from Hedonomics, a branch of ergonomic science that facilitates pleasurable human-technology interaction. Through the Hedonomic Pyramid, we’re able to section our thinking off into regions (Safety, Function, Usability, Pleasure and Individuation) and map out industry-tested VR design guidance for each. The result is a hierarchical checklist of proven principles, specifications and practices—that promote a culture of inclusive and holistic design—built to serve as a quickstart guide to designing accountable VR interfaces and systems. This class, divided into units that represent each level of the Hedonomic pyramid, will unpack both technical and conceptual strategies for creating VR, from visual interface fidelity to avoiding locomotion cybersickness to designing safer social VR spaces.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3025-000 (15734)
09/05/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Cortese, Michelle

Streaming Against the Current (ITPG-GT 3022)

Live streaming is so seamlessly embedded into our online experience. We lay in bed, on our phones watching hearts flicker across the screen as the person we’re watching greets all of the competing messages in the chat, asking for birthday shout outs and follow-backs. While the ability to live stream feels more accessible than ever, it feels very tied to corporate structures, branding and self promotion. How can we push the concept of a live stream in a new direction and rethink what a live stream can be?

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ITPG-GT 3022-000 (21881)
09/08/2023 – 10/20/2023 Fri
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Soto, Amalia

DIGITAL LOGIC AND STATE MACHINE DESIGN (ECE-UY 2204)

This course covers combinational and sequential digital circuits. Topics: Introduction to digital systems. Number systems and binary arithmetic. Switching algebra and logic design. Error detection and correction. Combinational integrated circuits, including adders. Timing hazards. Sequential circuits, flipflops, state diagrams and synchronous machine synthesis. Programmable Logic Devices, PLA, PAL and FPGA. Finite-state machine design. Memory elements. A grade of C or better is required of undergraduate computer-engineering majors. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 1114 (C- or better) or CS-UY 1133 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UH 1001 (C- or better) or ENGR-UH 1000 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 101 (C- or better)

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11545)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11546)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11547)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11548)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11549)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Reagen, Brandon

Imagining the Future through the Arts (OART-UT 300)

The world-wide pause caused by the pandemic created a space of reflection and concern, and brought us to a consideration of meaning. As artists and scholars, we have been called to make sense of the ways we have told the stories of our communities, and been summoned to imagine a future world that is vibrant, inclusive and just, one that embraces our deepest values. As the vanguards of culture, we are now recording and creating new history together, constructed from examples of reexamined experience and awakened by new ideas. The important work of reinvigorating arts education, of imagining and designing the future through the arts, now more than ever before, must be a part of our mission as a school in a great research university. A Tisch education has always been about access to the people who create our community: the great thinkers and creators among our faculty, staff and alumni in cross collaboration with NYU, New York City and the globe. Together, we have already led transformative change, and continue to be leaders in fields that will adapt to our changing times. You too are the advocates, artists, innovators, scholars, and storytellers who collectively reflect upon the past, record the present, and imagine our future. We are co-creators of humanity’s most important re-set. Spark your imagination of the future through conversations with the leading creators in their fields. NYU Tisch School of the Arts Dean Allyson Green will moderate twelve talks with outstanding faculty and alumni of the school from a range of artistic disciplines. Create your own role in a movement to catalyze innovation and creativity to create a more beautiful, more just, more inclusive and more connected world. Please reach out to tisch.openarts@nyu.edu if you have any questions about the course.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Design Your NYU Shanghai (IMBX-SHU 1)

Design Your NYU Shanghai is a first-year course to help you make the most out of your college experience. You’ll be introduced to design thinking as a creative approach to explore majors and interests, craft global opportunities, and engage in intercultural connections. This action-oriented course uses rapid prototyping and reflection activities to ignite personal growth as you navigate this transformative time of your life.

Interactive Media and Business (Undergraduate)
1 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


IMBX-SHU 1-000 (27175)
08/30/2021 – 12/10/2021 Tue
9:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Tsiang, Emily

Introduction to Computer Programming (CSCI-SHU 11)

An introduction to the fundamentals of computer programming. Students design, write, and debug computer programs. No prior knowledge of programming is assumed. Students will learn programming using Python, a general purpose, cross-platform programming language with a clear, readable syntax. Most class periods will be part lecture, part lab as you explore ideas and put them into practice. This course is suitable for students not intending in majoring in computer science as well as for students intending to major in computer science but having no programming experience. Students with previous programming experience should instead take Introduction to Computer Science. Prerequisite: Either placed into Calculus or at least a C in Pre-Calculus Fulfillment: Core Curriculum Requirement Algorithmic Thinking; EE Required Major Courses. Note: Students who have taken ICS in NY, Abu Dhabi, and Shanghai cannot take ICP.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (17503)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (17504)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23632)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23633)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Liu, Yijian


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23634)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23767)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Liu, Yijian


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (26252)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
9:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Spathis, Promethee


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (26253)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
9:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Spathis, Promethee

Discrete Mathematics (CS-UH 1002)

Discrete mathematics concerns the study of mathematical structures that are discrete rather than continuous, and provides a powerful language for investigating many areas of computer science. Discrete structures are characterized by distinct elements, which are often represented by integers. Continuous mathematics on the other hand deals with real numbers. Topics in this course include: sets, counting techniques, logic, proof techniques, solving recurrence relations, number theory, probability, statistics, graph theory, and discrete geometry. These mathematical tools are illustrated with applications in computer science.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UH 1002-000 (3526)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fernandes, Joao Paulo · Ahmad, Liza


CS-UH 1002-000 (3624)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Mumtaz, Sara


CS-UH 1002-000 (3917)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Chaqfeh, Moumena · Ahmed, Dena


CS-UH 1002-000 (19983)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 1002-000 (19984)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by


CS-UH 1002-000 (19985)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by

Mobile Food as Media Infrastructure (INTM-SHU 293)

This course examines mobile food networks as a method to research and map the contemporary city. In Shanghai, over the past few years, there has been an enormous transformation in the way the city feeds itself. Street food stalls, restaurants and marketplaces have all migrated online. This tendency towards virtualization was intensified during the Coronavirus pandemic, when, during lockdown, people used their phones to order food, which was delivered straight to their door.This course treats mobile food delivery as a media infrastructure. It examines how these new delivery systems form part of a distributed urban ecosystem that underlies the emergence of a Sentient City. Students will use the tools of critical cartography and digital storytelling to explore the cultural, economic and political issues that are raised by the explosive growth of mobile food delivery. Research topics include the economics of company platforms; logistical networks; the reorganization of food production; the socio-economic conditions of delivery workers; changing cultural habits of urban residents; the shifts in the city’s built environment as well as the design of the apps themselves. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: IMA Major Electives; IMB Major Interactive Media Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

VFX in the Age of Virtual Production (INTM-SHU 257T)

In this era of virtual production, time-based media faces new opportunities and challenges in terms of pipelines, workflows, and distribution. Decentralizing, hybridizing, and outsourcing among film studios, production houses, broadcast design, interactive studios, and the gaming industry have become major topics of discourse in academia and industry. This course focuses on the history/context, present practice, and the emerging trends of VFX studies and its applications. Through collaborative research with academia and industry, the course investigates the theory and practice of VFX studies and further examines the feasibility of emerging technologies through the spirit of entrepreneurship. Prerequisite: Interaction Lab / Creative Coding Lab / Communications Lab / Application Lab Fulfillment: IMA Major Electives; IMB Major Interactive Media Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


INTM-SHU 257T-000 (20125)
08/30/2021 – 12/10/2021 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Chen, Wu Wei

After Earth: Technology & Ecology (INTM-SHU 196T)

This class focuses on the history and theory of ecology-related digital media, emerging technological solutions to the environmental crisis, and cultural imaginations that address the possibility of human extinction and ecosystem collapse. Zooming in on both luddite and futurist proposals for post-carbon futures across the global political and cultural spectrum, the class discusses emerging technologies in scientific and popular discourses about ecological futures. From geo-enginnering to terraforming, space colonialism, genetic engineering, and other scenarios that relate to the technological survival of humanity in fraught environmental conditions, it aims to take students to the forefront of contemporary technological imaginations related to our future on (and off) this planet. Prereq: None. Fulfillment: IMA Major Electives; IMB Major Interactive Media Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Advanced Lab: Shaders (INTM-SHU 303T)

Learn how to creatively harness the power of your computer’s graphics card by writing your own shaders! Shaders are small programs that run on the GPU and are used for purposes most commonly related to graphic effects, video post-processing, and the generation of geometry. They are an incredibly powerful tool for creating hardware accelerated graphics and form the building blocks of the modern graphics pipeline. Vertex, fragment, and geometry shaders will be the main focus of the course. However, if time permits, compute shaders (GPGPU) will also be explored. The topic will be approached platform-agnostic, so that it can be applied to the different implementations in various software environments such as WebGL, Unity, Max, Touch Designer, etc. This an advanced-level 2-credit course. Prerequisite: Instructor Consent Fulfilment: IMA/IMB elective; IMA advanced elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Design Project (CS-UY 4523)

Students or several students work with a faculty member and/or graduate students on a current topic in computer science. Each term, a project course with a particular theme is offered by the Department of Computer and Information Science. A faculty member assigns individual or group projects. The project course is highly structured and supervised closely by faculty. Students are expected to use the design and project-management skills they learned in CS-UY 4513 Software Engineering. Alternatively, students may work with a faculty member on an individual project of mutual interest. A written report and oral presentation are required. | Prerequisite: CS-UY 4513 or CS-UY 3513.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4523-000 (12266)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred


CS-UY 4523-000 (12267)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred

Design Projects (PHTI-UT 1020)

Prerequisite: Photography & Imaging: Multimedia or permission by the department. This is an intense design class for the crossover creature who yearns to design their own exhibit, create a street poster, develop an ad campaign, design titles for a film, invent a visual identity for a musical score, etc. This will be a hands-on process-driven class that will push you to imagine, create, and produce. Students must know InDesign.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


PHTI-UT 1020-000 (13240)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cuomo, Yolanda

Race, Football and American Culture (SCA-UA 153)

This interdisciplinary course explores the evolution of American football into a mirror of black life and politics and a reflection of race relations in American culture. Students will examine the growth of black players since the NFL was integrated in the late Sixties. Student writing and research will explore the growth of football as a vehicle and model for black protest and support for movements such as Black Lives Matter. Students will go to two football games this semester. The focus will also include a study of the segregated American Football League and its integration of the NFL.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Queer NYC (SCA-UA 421)

How queer is New York City? How do queerness and the city shape each other? This course crosses time and space, examining the history, politics and culture of the Big Apple. Ranging from Harlem to Times Square to Greenwich Village to Park Avenue, and beyond Manhattan to Queens, Brooklyn and Fire Island outposts, we follow people and money, high and underground culture, protests and politics. Materials include fiction and poetry, music, theater and performance, photography and film, and works of urban studies, history and ethnography. Assignments may include archival research and digital cartographic work.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Approaches to Latinx Studies (SCA-UA 501)

Explores a set of principles that have guided Latino/a presence in the United States. These principles can be found in many but not necessarily all of the readings. They include urban/rural life, freedom/ confinement, memoir as source of voice/other sources of voice, generational separation and identity, and loss and healing. The course traces a movement through time from masculinist nationalism to the recognition of variations in gender, sexuality, race, class, region, and national origin. Other principles may be added to this list as the course proceeds.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Approaches to Metropolitan Studies (SCA-UA 601)

A broad and interdisciplinary introduction to the field of urban studies, surveying the major approaches deployed to investigate the urban experience in the social space of the modern city. Explores the historical geography of capitalist urbanization with attention to North American and European cities, to colonial and postcolonial cities, and to the global contexts of urban development. Major topics include urban politics and governance; suburban and regional development; urban social movements; urban planning; the gendering of urban space and racial segregation in urban space.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Filming Asian America: Documenting Community (SCA-UA 361)

Focuses specifically on the Asian American communities of New York and their histories. Presents filmmaking as a mode of community documentation and filmmakers as historians. Students meet as theorists and field researchers. The first phase is largely historical and theoretical, while the latter mainly deals with hands-on filmmaking. Students document various aspects of Asian/Pacific American communities in New York?sociocultural and political issues surrounding them, histories, personal stories, geodynamics of ethnic localities, domestic lives, professions, ethnic festivals and performances, etc. At the end of the course, students have made at least two collective documentaries (10 to 12 minutes each), which may be interrelated or on entirely different subjects.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Elementary Yoruba I (SCA-UA 182)

Yoruba is a language spoken in West Africa by approximately 20 million people. This course is an introduction to Yoruba language, people and culture and is designed for students without prior knowledge. The main goal is to develop elementary communicative competence in the language. It is designed to enable students read, write, listen to and talk about simple concepts, ensuring that they can minimally understand and be understood in the language, while developing a fundamental knowledge of the Yoruba culture. Emphases are on Yoruba as used by contemporary native speakers in the present day West Africa. Skills are developed through intensive interactive conversations, grammar exercises, and classroom activities designed for a learner to use the language in various daily activities.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


SCA-UA 182-000 (9690)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mabayoje, Moses

Introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies: The Politics of Indigeneity (SCA-UA 747)

This course is a general introduction to the field of Native American and Indigenous Studies (NAIS). The course will introduce students to the central questions and debates of NAIS, including but not limited to: Native American hidden histories and oral histories; comparative indigeneities; questions of “discovery” and colonialism; the politics and representations of lands, massacres, and museums; and questions of law, gender and sexuality. It begins by asking students to consider the history of the field and weaves throughout questions about the complicated and contested terrain of the term Indigeneity. It ends with discussions about decolonizing research and indigenous futures, thus preparing students to consider theories and methodologies they will encounter in more advanced courses for the NAIS minor. By the end of the semester, students will have gained both historical and ethnographic perspectives on how museums and other forms of representation help us to know and reproduce ourselves and “others,” and how institutions craft, control, and circulate cultural heritage in various social lives.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Community Empowerment (SCA-UA 613)

Empowerment is defined as those processes, mechanisms, strategies, and tactics through which people, as well as organizations and communities, gain mastery over their lives. It is personal as well as institutional and organizational. Addresses these issues in a wide variety of community settings. Designed to be challenging and rewarding to those students interested in helping people work together to improve their lives.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Constitution and People of Color (SCA-UA 366)

Examines how the American legal system decided constitutional challenges affecting the empowerment of African, Latino, and Asian American communities from the 19th century to the present. Topics include the denial of citizenship and naturalization to slaves and immigrants, government-sanctioned segregation, the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, the prison industry, police brutality, post-9/11 detention issues, and voting rights. Course requirements include attendance at a community function involving constitutional issues, a midterm, and an interactive oral and written final project comparing a present-day issue affecting racial minorities in New York City and proposing measures to collectively address the issue.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Elementary Swahili I (SCA-UA 121)

Provides students with an elementary understanding of Swahili, a Bantu language with a rich oral and written tradition that is spoken by about 100 million people from Somalia to Mozambique and Zanzibar. After a short presentation of Swahili?s history, codification, and relation to other languages, students are drilled in phonetics and grammar. They are also introduced to poems, songs, and oral narratives.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


SCA-UA 121-000 (9390)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nanji, Abdul

Theories of Symbolic Exchange (RUSSN-UA 860)

Marcel Mauss developed a concept of an alternative, non-market type of economy, based on a nonmonetary exchange of such symbolic values as social recognition, sovereignty, and political participation. Today, this concept has acquired a new relevance in relation to the economy of the Internet. Examines various theories of the symbolic that expand the original Maussian model and encompass multiple aspects of culture.

Russian & Slavic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


RUSSN-UA 860-000 (21730)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Groys, Boris

Civil Liberties (POL-UA 332)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Interpretation of the Bill of Rights, the Civil War amendments, and other rights in the U.S. Constitution through the reading of Supreme Court opinions. Topics include freedom of speech and press; free exercise of religion and separation of church and state; the right of privacy; rights of the criminally accused; equal protection of the law against race, gender, and other discrimination; and the rights of franchise and citizenship. Cases are read and discussed closely for their legal and philosophical content.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


POL-UA 332-000 (10012)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harrington, Christine · Holfeuer, Kristen

Astrophysics (PHYS-UA 150)

Introduction to modern astrophysical problems with an emphasis on the physical concepts involved?radio, optical, and X-ray astronomy; stellar structure and evolution; white dwarfs, pulsars, and black holes; and galaxies, quasars, and cosmology.

Physics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


PHYS-UA 150-000 (10148)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scoccimarro, Roman


PHYS-UA 150-000 (10149)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Politics of The Middle East (MEIS-UA 750)

Historical-political background of the Middle East and its contemporary social and political problems, including the impact of the West; religious and liberal reactions; conflict of nationalisms (Arab, Iranian, Turkish, and Zionist); and revolutionary socialism. Specific social, political, and economic problems?using a few selected countries for comparison and analysis?including the role of the military, the intelligentsia, the religious classes, the legitimization of power, urban-rural cleavages, bureaucracy, and political parties.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9142)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Keshavarzian, Arang


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9143)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bell, Robert


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9144)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by ODell, Kelley


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9145)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bell, Robert


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9146)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by ODell, Kelley

Calculus III (MATH-UA 123)

Prerequisite: MATH-UA.0122 with a grade of C or better, departmental placement exam, or permission of the department. Functions of several variables. Vectors in the plane and space. Partial derivatives with applications. Double and triple integrals. Spherical and cylindrical coordinates. Surface and line integrals. Divergence, gradient, and curl. Theorem of Gauss and Stokes.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 123-000 (8378)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Normand, Raoul


MATH-UA 123-000 (9179)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ristroph, Leif


MATH-UA 123-000 (9180)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Shizhu


MATH-UA 123-000 (8379)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Shizhu


MATH-UA 123-000 (8380)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leingang, Matthew


MATH-UA 123-000 (24839)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Calculus II (MATH-UA 122)

Techniques of integration. Further applications. Plane analytic geometry. Polar coordinates and parametric equations. Infinite series, including power series.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 122-000 (8373)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sondjaja, Mutiara


MATH-UA 122-000 (8374)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 122-000 (8375)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shum, Fanny


MATH-UA 122-000 (8376)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sondjaja, Mutiara


MATH-UA 122-000 (8377)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Feklistova, Mariya


MATH-UA 122-000 (8677)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Feklistova, Mariya


MATH-UA 122-000 (10117)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flek, Ruslan


MATH-UA 122-000 (10118)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shum, Fanny


MATH-UA 122-000 (24841)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kalaycioglu, Selin

Discrete Mathematics (MATH-UA 120)

A first course in discrete mathematics. Sets, algorithms, and induction. Combinatorics. Graphs and trees. Combinatorial circuits. Logic and Boolean algebra.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 120-000 (8370)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sia, Charmaine


MATH-UA 120-000 (8371)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flek, Ruslan


MATH-UA 120-000 (8372)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flek, Ruslan


MATH-UA 120-000 (8694)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chikhany, Ralph


MATH-UA 120-000 (8807)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MATH-UA 120-000 (8985)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leingang, Matthew


MATH-UA 120-000 (9437)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sanfratello, Andrew


MATH-UA 120-000 (9476)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sanfratello, Andrew


MATH-UA 120-000 (10639)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chikhany, Ralph


MATH-UA 120-000 (24840)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Oveys, Hesam


MATH-UA 120-000 (24904)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Oveys, Hesam


MATH-UA 120-000 (26350)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Clarkson, Corrin


MATH-UA 120-000 (26380)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Clarkson, Corrin

Calculus I (MATH-UA 121)

Any one of the following: a score of 670 or higher on the mathematics portion of the SAT, a score of 650 or higher on the SAT Subject Test in Mathematics 1, a score of 650 or higher on the SAT Subject Test in Mathematics 2, an ACT mathematics score of 30 or higher, a score of 3 or higher on the AP Calculus AB exam, an AB subscore of 3 or higher on the AP Calculus BC exam, a score of 3 or higher on the AP Calculus BC exam, a grade of C or higher in Algebra and Calculus (MATH-UA 9), or a passing score on a departmental placement exam. Derivatives, antiderivatives, and integrals of functions of one variable. Applications include graphing, maximizing, and minimizing functions. Definite integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Areas and volumes.

Math (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MATH-UA 121-000 (10098)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kalaycioglu, Selin


MATH-UA 121-000 (10099)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saha, Shuvadeep


MATH-UA 121-000 (10100)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saha, Shuvadeep


MATH-UA 121-000 (20793)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patki, Sarvesh


MATH-UA 121-000 (20794)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patki, Sarvesh


MATH-UA 121-000 (10102)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Foster, Joseph


MATH-UA 121-000 (10103)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Agostino, Marina


MATH-UA 121-000 (10104)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by D’Agostino, Marina


MATH-UA 121-000 (10105)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Salha, Fatima


MATH-UA 121-000 (10106)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Salha, Fatima


MATH-UA 121-000 (10107)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sia, Charmaine


MATH-UA 121-000 (10108)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vasantha, Rajashekar


MATH-UA 121-000 (10109)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Star, Zachary


MATH-UA 121-000 (10110)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vasantha, Rajashekar


MATH-UA 121-000 (10111)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Star, Zachary


MATH-UA 121-000 (10112)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Foster, Joseph


MATH-UA 121-000 (10113)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cortes, Julian


MATH-UA 121-000 (10114)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cortes, Julian


MATH-UA 121-000 (10115)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gangan, Pradyuman


MATH-UA 121-000 (10116)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gangan, Pradyuman

Field Methods (LING-UA 44)

Analysis (LING-UA 13), or permission of the instructor. Offered every year. Collins, Gallagher, Gouskova. 4 points. Students interview a native speaker of an unfamiliar language to study all aspects of the language’s grammar: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics. We evaluate and organize real, nonidealized linguistic data and formulate generalizations that serve as the basis for research.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


LING-UA 44-000 (9373)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gallagher, Gillian · Collins, Christopher

Dante’S Divine Comedy (ITAL-UA 270)

Students study the Divine Comedy both as a mirror of high medieval culture and as a unique text that breaks out of its cultural bounds. The entire poem is read, in addition to selections from the Vita Nuova and other complementary minor works.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITAL-UA 270-000 (9783)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cornish, Alison · Stemwedel, Nina

The Social Challenges of Climate Change (SOC-UA 454)

This seminar examines how sociology can help us understand the challenge of climate change. We will briefly overview the climate science and learn about the rise of “weird weather,” but the core themes of the course concern questions about communication and cognition, cultural values and material consumption, politics and persuasion, mitigation and adaptation, economics and social justice, power and social movements, and the possibility of creating new, more sustainable ways of living on earth. We will dedicate several sessions dedicated to Superstorm Sandy and its aftermath, with a focus on the question of how to rebuild a more resilient city and region in anticipation of more extreme weather events.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


SOC-UA 454-000 (21743)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Klinenberg, Eric


SOC-UA 454-000 (21744)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Haile, Sewheat


SOC-UA 454-000 (21745)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Haile, Sewheat

First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar: Science and Literature (FIRST-UG 85)

In a 1959 lecture titled “The Two Cultures,” C. P. Snow famously declared, “the intellectual life of the whole of western society is increasingly being split into two polar groups,” with “literary intellectuals at one pole—at the other scientists.” Snow asserted that the two are separated by “a gulf of mutual incomprehension,” even “hostility and dislike.” Snow’s view of a fundamental antagonism between science and literature has its roots in the nineteenth-century; his concept of “two cultures” remains influential today. But was he right? This course addresses that question, seeking to deepen our understanding of the relationship between science and literature. Our readings will pair literary and scientific texts: we may consider Ted Chiang’s short fiction and the laws of thermodynamics; Michael Frayn’s play Copenhagen and quantum physics; Amitav Ghosh’s novel The Calcutta Chromosome and sociological theories of scientific knowledge; and the poetry of ecologist Madhur Anand; and Robin Wall Kimmerer’s interdisciplinary meditations on the environment in Braiding Sweetgrass. The class is a discussion-based seminar; assignments will include short response papers, brief contributions to a class blog, and formal essays.

First Year program (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Black Women in America (HIST-UA 661)

Mitchell. Offered every year. 4 points. Explores varieties of African American women’s experiences (including class, ethnicity, sexuality, region, and generation). Endeavors to go beyond the black/white binary by considering black women’s relationships to both intraracial and broader communities. Additionally, assesses how gender, race, and class have influenced black women’s work, activism, political involvement, and creative output in the United States. Takes an interdisciplinary approach by drawing from history, memoir, sociology, feminist theory, film studies, legal theory, and the popular press.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Espionage and the Making of the Modern World (HIST-UA 23)

Wikileaks and Edward Snowden reveal the dark side of the secret world just as the actions of Vladimir Putin in Ukraine remind us of why we need good intelligence. Since World War II ushered in the modern espionage era, secret intelligence and intelligence services have shaped the course of international history. This course introduces the student to the great sweep of world history from 1939 to 2015 through the lens of the role played by spies, code-breakers, saboteurs, intelligence analysts and the organizations for which they worked. How much did all of this secret stuff matter? Why did countries set up organizations to undertake spying and covert action? Have these activities made them, especially the US, more or less secure? And what has been the cost to private individuals of these activities? Although the focus will mainly be on the activities of US, Russian (Soviet) and British intelligence, the class will also explore cases involving Chinese, Cuban, French, German, Iranian, Israeli, Jordanian, Saudi and Vietnamese intelligence.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

The Early Middle Ages, 300-1050 (HIST-UA 111)

Identical to V65.0111. Bedos-Rezak, Griffiths. Offered every other year. 4 points. Europe in the early Middle Ages was created out of a mixture of ingredients: the legacy of the Roman Empire; the growth and development of Christianity; invading peoples who settled within the boundaries of the former Roman Empire; and the clash of competing languages, religions, and legal systems. This tumultuous time forged a new entity, medieval Europe, whose development, growing pains, and creative successes this course examines. Uses the records and artifacts of the period itself as central elements for investigating the period.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


HIST-UA 111-000 (21499)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Underwood, Norman

Jewish Europe after the Holocaust (HBRJD-UA 689)

Concentrates on the social, political, and cultural forces that shaped Jewish life in post-1945 Europe. Topics: reconstruction of Jewish communities, repression and anti-Semitic campaigns in the Soviet Union and Poland, the impact of Israel, emigration and migration, Jewish-Christian relations, and assimilation and acculturation. Students also learn about various reactions to the Holocaust.

Hebrew & Judaic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


HBRJD-UA 689-000 (21549)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Estraikh, Gennady

Living a Good Life: Greek and Jewish Perspectives (HBRJD-UA 422)

What makes a life well-lived? Central questions to be explored include: Does living well require acquiring knowledge and wisdom? What is the place of moral responsibility in the good life? Is the good life a happy life or does it require sacrificing happiness? Does religion lead to living well or does it hinder it? What is friendship and how does it contribute to the good life? Thinkers to be studied may include: Aristotle, Seneca, Maimonides, Glikl, Spinoza, and Levinas.

Hebrew & Judaic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


HBRJD-UA 422-000 (9624)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gottlieb, Michah

Techniques of Translation (GERM-UA 153)

Offered periodically. 4 points. Introduces students to the history, theory, and practice of translation through German and English texts taken from a variety of cultural backgrounds. While engaging in the craft of translation first hand, students encounter diverse grammatical, syntactical, and stylistic problems, thus gaining a deeper understanding of the German language. Also stresses the acquisition of vocabulary and complex idiomatic structures necessary for effective reading comprehension, as well as written expression.

German (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


GERM-UA 153-000 (23761)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dortmann, Andrea

Acting French (FREN-UA 109)

Use of dramatic situations and readings to help students overcome inhibitions in their oral use of language. The graduated series of exercises and activities is designed to improve pronunciation, intonation, expression, and body language. These include phonetic practice, poetry recitation, skits, improvisation, and memorization of dramatic texts. Reading, discussion, and performance of scenes from plays by renowned dramatists. Extensive use of audio and video material.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


FREN-UA 109-000 (21236)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Prost, Anna-Caroline

Existentialism & The Absurd (FREN-UA 867)

Main expressions of existential thought in Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, and Albert Camus. Attention to the French existentialists? concern for commitment in political and social affairs of the times. Examines absurdist literature since the 1950?s in the ?theatre of the absurd,? in fiction, and in critical work of other contemporary French writers. Covers Ionesco, Beckett, Genet, Robbe-Grillet, and Barthes; precursors of the absurd such as Kafka and C?line; and practictioners of the absurd outside of France (e.g., Pinter, Albee, Barthelme).

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Intens Intermed French (FREN-UA 20)

Completes the equivalent of a year’s intermediate level in one semester. Offered every semester. 6 points.

French (Undergraduate)
6 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


FREN-UA 20-000 (8291)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ait Jafour, Samira


FREN-UA 20-000 (8292)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bali, Fatiha


FREN-UA 20-000 (8293)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu,Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Prost, Anna-Caroline

Business French (FREN-UA 110)

Designed for students who wish to learn the specialized language used in French business. Emphasis on oral and written communication and the acquisition of a business and commercial vocabulary dealing with the varied activities of a commercial firm (e.g., advertising, transportation, banking). Stresses group work in simulated business situations and exposure to authentic spoken materials.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


FREN-UA 110-000 (8814)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dubois, Stephanie

French: Approaches to Francophone Literature (FREN-UA 145)

Offered every year. 4 points. Examines literature from a network of French-speaking countries that form a Francophone space. Addresses the colonial past as well as the anticolonial and postcolonial situations in which French colonialism is replaced by more complex relationships and ideologies. Special attention is paid to language and the role of the writer in elaborating a postcolonial national identity. Writers studied may include Edouard Glissant and Patrick Chamoiseau of Martinique, Jacques Roumain of Haiti, Ahmadou Kourouma of the Ivory Coast, and Assia Djebar of Algeria.

French (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


FREN-UA 145-000 (21231)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kirby, Elizabeth

Contemporary Europe (EURO-UA 950)

This course will explore the changing meaning of Europe, European unity, and European identity over the last century, with an emphasis on the formation of the European Union during the last 65 years and current European Union issues today. After a brief introduction that explores the deeper history behind the geographical and cultural concept of Europe, this course will trace the emergence of a European identity in contrast to national identities, as well as the emergence of a desire to integrate Europe from the late nineteenth century to the present. Class readings and discussion will focus on four main questions. What has Europe meant to intellectuals, politicians, and citizens in the past 100 years, as a concept, as a locus of identity, and as an alternative or counterpart to the nation state? What has been the geography of Europe, and how has this changed over time? How and why have European leaders and citizens fashioned an integrated continent, and how have the obstacles to integration evolved over time? Finally, how have Europe’s recent crises—from refugees to the problems of the Euro—led people to reevaluate European integration, national identities and institutions, and globalization more generally?

European and Mediterranean Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Arts and Cultures of Modernity (ACM-UF 201)

This course explores the arts from the late17th/early18th-century to the post-World War II era, examining how they define and reflect both local cultural views and rapidly shifting global understandings of the world. The course considers how the diverse conceptions and conditions of modernity both shaped and were shaped by the arts around the world. Many of the issues pertinent to the course — industrialization/urbanization; the dislocations, disasters, and opportunities that followed cross-cultural contact; colonialism, decolonization, conflicts of political ideology, and liberation struggles; fundamental redefinitions of mind, language, gender, and sexual identity — have had very different effects in various parts of the world; instructors encourage students to explore what it means to study the arts from global perspectives and what “globalization” itself has meant and means in the context of the arts.

Art and Cultures of Modernity (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ACM-UF 201-000 (19000)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nickowitz, Peter


ACM-UF 201-000 (19001)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Culver, Brian


ACM-UF 201-000 (19002)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nickowitz, Peter


ACM-UF 201-000 (19003)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hatcher, Jessamyn


ACM-UF 201-000 (19004)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hatcher, Jessamyn


ACM-UF 201-000 (19005)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Thomas


ACM-UF 201-000 (19006)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Culver, Brian


ACM-UF 201-000 (19007)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yearous-Algozin, Joseph


ACM-UF 201-000 (19008)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hussein, Linnea


ACM-UF 201-000 (19009)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tharoor, Tilottama


ACM-UF 201-000 (19010)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yearous-Algozin, Joseph


ACM-UF 201-000 (19011)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Squillace, Robert


ACM-UF 201-000 (19012)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schwarzbach, Fredric


ACM-UF 201-000 (19013)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Matos Martin, Eduardo


ACM-UF 201-000 (19014)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Matos Martin, Eduardo


ACM-UF 201-000 (19015)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hatcher, Jessamyn


ACM-UF 201-000 (19016)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hussein, Linnea


ACM-UF 201-000 (19017)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Thomas


ACM-UF 201-000 (19018)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Thomas


ACM-UF 201-000 (19019)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Newman, Roberta


ACM-UF 201-000 (19020)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Matos Martin, Eduardo


ACM-UF 201-000 (19021)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Newman, Roberta


ACM-UF 201-000 (19022)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Paliwoda, Daniel


ACM-UF 201-000 (19023)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tharoor, Tilottama


ACM-UF 201-000 (19024)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Paliwoda, Daniel


ACM-UF 201-000 (19025)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Deutsch, Katherine


ACM-UF 201-000 (19026)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Deutsch, Katherine

Life Science (LISCI-UF 101)

The course examines some of the fundamental principles and processes of biological science. The primary focus is on evolution, genetics, and the physiology and molecular function of the cell, with special emphasis on the human species. Also included is a series of readings and discussions on how our knowledge of the life sciences has been put to practical use, the function and treatment of HIV infection, and other current frontiers and ethical issues in the discipline. The course takes a historical approach to the material: readings include some of the fundamental texts upon which our understanding of life is based, such as works by and about Charles Darwin, Gregor Mendel, Oswald Avery, James Watson, Rosalind Franklin, and Francis Crick. This course satisfies the requirement in Life Science.

Life Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Climate and Society (ENVST-UA 470)

This is an intermediate Environmental Studies elective about how societies understand and respond to climate change. We will analyze the values, assumptions, and perceptions that contribute to our understanding of climate change. The main topics are ethics, justice, and responsibility; definitions of nature; cost-benefit analysis and the precautionary principle; geo-engineering; contrarianism; framing and communication; social engagement; and education. Central questions include: Is climate change a technical or social problem? What makes climate change uniquely challenging to understand and respond to? Which ethical and perceptual frameworks are best suited for both understanding and responding to climate change? Who is responsible, and what moral implications does this have? What assumptions about values, behavior, economics, and nature do we make when discussing climate change? How does climate change challenge our conceptions of nature, morality, society, and economics? Does climate change pose a special challenge to society, or does it simply amplify existing challenges?

Environmental Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ENVST-UA 470-000 (10047)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlottmann, Christopher

Science Fiction (ENGL-UA 728)

Considers contemporary science fiction as literature, social commentary, prophecy, and a reflection of recent and possible future trends in technology and society. Writers considered include such authors as Isaac Asimov, J. G. Ballard, Octavia Butler, Arthur C. Clark, Samuel Delany, Philip K. Dick, William Gibson, Robert Heinlein, Frank Herbert, Ursula K. Le Guin, Neal Stephenson, and Bruce Sterling.

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Colloquium: Milton (ENGL-UA 450)

Emphasis on the major poems (Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes) with some attention to the early poems and the prose. Traces the poet’s sense of vocation, analyzes the gradual development of the Miltonic style, and assesses Milton’s position in the history of English literature, politics, and theology.

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ENGL-UA 450-000 (21462)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Archer, John

18th and 19th Century African American Lit (ENGL-UA 250)

Survey of major autobiographies, fiction, and poetry from the early national period to the eve of the New Negro Renaissance. Writers considered generally include Olaudah Equiano, Phillis Wheatley, Harriet Jacobs, William Wells Brown, Frederick Douglass, Frances E. W. Harper, and Harriet Wilson.

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ENGL-UA 250-000 (21460)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McHenry, Elizabeth

Ownership & Corporate Control (ECON-UA 340)

Discusses the conceptual foundations and empirical evidence concerning the effects of private ownership on corporate perfor-mance. The corporate control mechanisms in the United States, Germany, Japan, and the emerging market economies of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the role of capital markets (takeovers and other shareholder control devices), banks and other financial institutions, and various corporate institutions (such as boards of directors and meetings of shareholders) in facilitating or hindering corporate control and the efficient allocation of resources.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Honors Tutorial (ECON-UA 410)

The objective of the course is to train students to write on economic topics and perform economic analysis efficiently and quickly, as well as to develop rhetorical skills. Once a week, two students each present a paper on an assigned topic that has been distributed previously to the other students. The students not presenting that week critique the paper and the presentation, as will the instructor. Each paper is to be revised and submitted to the instructor with a cover sheet that indicates how the student dealt with each of the criticisms.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ECON-UA 410-000 (8061)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saini, Viplav

Structural DNA Nanotechnology (CHEM-UA 828)

This is a course on a new field of research, which has been growing exponentially since the start of the twenty first century. The field deals primarily with the control of molecular structure on the nanometer scale through programming it by means of DNA secondary structures. The course will consist of a series of lectures by the instructor and then a series of presentations of recent papers in the field. A nascent textbook will be used as appropriate.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CHEM-UA 828-000 (9533)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Seeman, Nadrian


CHEM-UA 828-000 (9534)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ohayon, Yoel

Advanced Organic Chemistry (CHEM-UA 911)

This course focuses on structure and theory in organic chemistry with a particular emphasis on the application of stereoelectronic and conformational effects on reaction mechanisms, catalysis and molecular recognition.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CHEM-UA 911-000 (9647)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Trauner, Dirk


CHEM-UA 911-000 (9648)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Software Engineering (CSCI-UA 474)

An intense hands-on study of practical techniques and methods of software engineering. Topics include advanced object-oriented design, design patterns, refactoring, code optimization, universal modeling language, threading, user interface design, enterprise application development, and development tools. All topics are integrated and applied during the semester-long group project. The aim of the project is to prepare students for dynamics in a real workplace. Members of the group meet on a regular basis to discuss the project and to assign individual tasks. Students are judged primarily on the final project presentations.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CSCI-UA 474-000 (21436)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bloomberg, Amos

Object Oriented Programming (CSCI-UA 470)

Object-oriented programming has emerged as a significant software development methodology. This course introduces the important concepts of object-oriented design and languages, including code reuse, data abstraction, inheritance, and dynamic overloading. It covers in depth those features of Java and C that support object-oriented programming and gives an overview of other object-oriented languages of interest. Significant programming assignments, stressing object-oriented design.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Social Neuroscience (PSYCH-UA 35)

This course will provide a broad overview of social neuroscience. We will consider how social processes are implemented at the neural level, but also how neural mechanisms help give rise to social phenomena and cultural experiences. Many believe that the large expansion of the human brain evolved due to the complex demands of dealing with social others—competing or cooperating with them, deceiving or empathizing with them, understanding or misjudging them. What kind of “social brain” has this evolutionary past left us with? In this course, we will review core principles, theories and methods guiding social neuroscience, and research examining the brain basis of social processes, including theory of mind; empathy; emotion; reading faces, bodies, and voices; morality; among others. Overall, this course will introduce students to the field of social neuroscience and its multi-level approach to understanding the brain in its social context.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Introduction to Game Engines (OART-UT 1621)

Introduction to Game Engines is a course intended for students who already have an understanding of programming fundamentals that introduces concepts, problems, and methods of developing games and interactive media using popular game engines. Game engines are no longer just used for the development of games, they have increasingly gained popularity as tools for developing animations, interactives, VR experience, and new media art. Throughout the semester, students will have weekly programming assignments, using a popular game engine. There will be a final game assignment, as well as weekly quizzes and a final exam. The course assumes prior programming knowledge, if students do not have the appropriate prerequisites a placement exam may be taken. There will be an emphasis on using code in a game engine environment as a means of creative expression.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 1621-000 (14528)
10/26/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hawk, Danny

The Cold War in Asia: 1945-2001 (EAST-UA 552)

This course will focus on U.S. foreign policy in Asia since 1945. The ways U.S. global interests and concerns sought to shape Asian realities (and were shaped in turn by them) will be the touchstone for examining the Cold War in Asia. We will examine the following topics: the occupation of Japan and early US global economic visions; the US and the Chinese revolution before the Korean War; the Korean War and the isolation of China; the Vietnam War and the Kennedy/Johnson years; Nixon’s global geopolitical vision and his policies towards Vietnam, China, and Japan; Carter and the meaning of human rights diplomacy in Asia; Reagan and the Asian issues involved in an intensified Cold War against Russia; George H. W. Bush and Asia’s place in “a New World Order;” and finally, the Clinton and George W. Bush years. Throughout the course, we shall examine key de-classified National Security documents, interpreting their meaning and language, while carefully assessing the arguments used to justify American policy.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Intro to Buddhism (EAST-UA 832)

An introduction to this complex religion, emphasizing its history, teachings, and practices. Discusses its doctrinal development in India, then emphasizes certain local practices: Buddhism and the family in China; Buddhism, language, and hierarchy in Japan; the politics of Buddhist Tibet; and Buddhist art. Finally the course touches on Buddhism in the United States.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Elementary Chinese for Advanced Beginners (EAST-UA 231)

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


EAST-UA 231-000 (9307)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Catherine


EAST-UA 231-000 (8905)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Xin


EAST-UA 231-000 (8906)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Xin


EAST-UA 231-000 (21453)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Tue,Wed,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jiao, Xiao-Xiao

Asia’S Revolutns: China/ India/Vietnam, 1885-1962 (EAST-UA 531)

The aim of this introductory course is to develop a comparative understanding of the national independence movements in China, India, and Vietnam, as well as the context within which they unfolded, in the period 1885-1962. The course will introduce students to some of the figures in modern Asian history who played a major role in the transition of India and Vietnam from colonial subordination to independent nationhood and of China from its semi-colonial status to liberation. The principal figures whose writings will be studied and compared are Mohandas Gandhi, Mao Zedong, and Ho Chi Minh in order to develop a third angle of comparison. The course will give due attention to other relevant figures such as Gokhale, Tilak, Jinnah, and Nehru in the case of India; Li Hongzhang, Sun Yatsen, Chen Duxiu, La Dazhao, and Chiang Kai-shek in the case of China; Phan Boi Chau in the case of Vietnam.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Readings in Chinese Poetry I (EAST-UA 213)

Designed to help students understand and appreciate the linguistic and aesthetic features of Chinese language rendered in poetic form and to improve their ability to read and interpret authentic texts in general. Integrates language learning with poetry study, introduces the formal structure of Chinese classical poetry and surveys its stylistic variations at different historical conjunctures. Conducted primarily in Chinese. English translations of the poems are provided as references from time to time.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Readings in Chinese Culture I (EAST-UA 221)

Designed to enhance Chinese proficiency through reading authentic materials rich in cultural connotations. Stresses primarily reading and writing. The objectives are: to develop speaking skills needed for semi-formal or formal presentation on academic topics; to develop specialized vocabulary; to further improve reading speed and develop skills needed to conduct textual analysis on and, on some occasions, translate texts with syntactical sophistication and stylistic nuance; to develop responsiveness to and ability to interpret linguistic features of different genres and writing styles; to advance strategies for autonomous learning of Chinese from an analytical perspective.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


EAST-UA 221-000 (21447)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jiao, Xiao-Xiao

Introduction to Classical Chinese (EAST-UA 226)

This course is designed to give students an introduction to basic syntax, grammar, and vocabulary of Classical Chinese through close readings of authentic texts. Almost all these texts are historically significant canon texts that are extremely rich in classical Chinese cultural connotation. They are selected from a wide variety of genres, such as historical literature, philosophical and political writings, written correspondence, poetry, essay, some of which are unique to Chinese culture. The course aims to develop the students’ reading and comprehension skills in this highly stylized form of written Chinese, acquaint students not only with the classic Chinese cultural heritage but also underlying working mechanism that is in many ways relevant to the form and usage of today’s Mandarin Chinese.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Advanced Latin: (CLASS-UA 875)

With extensive readings from Horace?s, Juvenal?s, and Persius?s satires, this class traces the development of the satiric mode from its earliest beginnings in Rome to its flowering under the Empire. The relationship of satire to the social world of Rome, including its treatment of money, women, political figures, and social climbers, is also examined.

Classics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CLASS-UA 875-000 (9837)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Barchiesi, Alessandro

Urban Ecology (BIOL-UA 390)

We are currently living in a time where city residents outnumber rural residents. In addition, the projected expansion of human population growth is largely predicted to occur in urban areas. Urban Ecology is an interdisciplinary and emerging field of research focused on the consequences of urbanization on ecological processes. In addition to a physically transformed natural landscape, cities are unique from other systems in terms of hydrology, temperature, noise, air quality and many other abiotic factors. In this course we will investigate the consequences of urban constructs on ecological systems. We will discuss factors such as nutrient cycling, organismal behavior and phenology, disease, and the drivers and patterns of biodiversity in urban systems. We will also talk about green spaces, urban planning, and the future of these expanding manmade landscapes. A significant component of this course will involve discussion of current literature. This is an upper-level reasoning course designed primarily for students majoring in biology (ecology track) and environmental studies.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


BIOL-UA 390-000 (21172)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schneider Paolantonio, Katie

Bioinformatics in Medicine and Biology (BIOL-UA 103)

Due to recent advancements in High Throughput Genomics technology we are able to study the function of many genes. We have the ability to compare genes in normal vs. diseased cells, to help us better understand the molecular mechanisms of the different diseases. In this course students will learn how to program in R, a powerful statistical programming language, use statistical methods to analyze real biomedical data, and learn how to interpret the results.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory (BIOL-UA 223)

This laboratory course applies concepts learned in the Molecular and Cell Biology course (BIOL-UA 21) to a molecular biology research project. The research project will introduce students to standard genetic and biochemical techniques common in a molecular biology lab, such as DNA isolation, agarose-gel electrophoresis, and transformation. The project also will provide students with a hands-on understanding of how modern DNA-sequencing technology, along with bioinformatic tools, can be used to discover genetic differences and understand cellular function.

Biology (Undergraduate)
1 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


BIOL-UA 223-000 (9053)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Osmundson, Joseph


BIOL-UA 223-000 (9054)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tuncer, Alara


BIOL-UA 223-000 (9209)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carrozza, Michael


BIOL-UA 223-000 (9210)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carrozza, Michael


BIOL-UA 223-000 (25644)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Murray, Sean


BIOL-UA 223-000 (25645)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Knoll, Marissa


BIOL-UA 223-000 (26031)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leon, Victor


BIOL-UA 223-000 (26657)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carrozza, Michael

Fundamentals of Ecology (BIOL-UA 63)

Students investigate the relationship between abiotic and biotic components of an ecosystem. Building upon an introduction to environmental factors, students examine the interplay between these components at the organismal, population, community and ecosystem levels. Throughout the course, we discuss current ecological applications and issues, such as habitat destruction, sustainability, disease, invasive species, and global climate change. Intended for students majoring in biology (ecology track) and environmental studies.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Developmental Biology (BIOL-UA 26)

Introduction to the principles and experimental strategies of developmental biology. Covers the cellular and molecular basis for pattern in the embryo; the determination of cell fate; cell differentiation; the genes controlling these events; how they are identified and studied; and the cellular proteins that affect shape, movement, and signaling between cells. Special emphasis on the experimental basis for our knowledge of these subjects from studies in fruit flies, nematodes, frogs, plants, and mice.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


BIOL-UA 26-000 (21113)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Birnbaum, Kenneth · Desplan, Claude

Microbiology and Microbial Genomics (BIOL-UA 44)

Intended for majors and minors in biology as a comprehensive description of microbes, the most abundant and diverse organisms on the planet. Organized into four modules: the microbial cell, microbial genomics, microbial development and adaptation, and microbial interactions with the host and the environment. Through lectures and critical analysis of primary literature, students are led to realize how the advent of genomics has revolutionized microbiology, a scientific discipline that is more than a century old.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


BIOL-UA 44-000 (7855)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Eichenberger, Patrick


BIOL-UA 44-000 (7856)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Akbary, Zarina


BIOL-UA 44-000 (7857)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Akbary, Zarina

Ecological Field Methods (BIOL-UA 16)

Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Ecology (BIOL UA-63) (may be taken concurrently). Students learn the skills needed to design and implement field experiments, interpret data and present ecological research. While investigating real habitats (forests, salt marshes, urban landscapes), students perform biological surveys and measure abiotic parameters. Ecological techniques are nested within questions in biodiversity and community structure, invasion biology, urban ecology, habitat alteration and climate change. During approximately half of the lectures, class meets at off-campus field sites. Students should not schedule meetings or classes either directly before or after class time.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


BIOL-UA 16-000 (9815)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
8:00 AM – 4:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schneider Paolantonio, Katie

Molecular and Cell Biology I (BIOL-UA 21)

In-depth study of cell biology, with an emphasis on the molecular aspects of cell function. Topics include protein structure and synthesis, gene expression and its regulation, cell replication, and specialized cell structure and function. The course provides an introduction to genomics and bioinformatics and examines developmental biology, evolution, and systems biology.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7841)


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7842)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7843)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7844)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7845)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferreira, Amanda


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7846)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 21-000 (8866)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferreira, Amanda


BIOL-UA 21-000 (8867)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mathis, Sallie


BIOL-UA 21-000 (8985)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Obaji, Daniel


BIOL-UA 21-000 (8986)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lou, Karen


BIOL-UA 21-000 (9398)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mathis, Sallie


BIOL-UA 21-000 (10649)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferreira, Amanda


BIOL-UA 21-000 (10723)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Obaji, Daniel


BIOL-UA 21-000 (21108)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 21-000 (21109)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aharonoff, Avrami


BIOL-UA 21-000 (21110)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 21-000 (21111)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aharonoff, Avrami


BIOL-UA 21-000 (21112)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mathis, Sallie

Principles of Biology I (BIOL-UA 11)

Introductory course mainly for science majors, designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental principles and processes of biological systems. Subjects include the basics of chemistry pertinent to biology, biochemistry and cell biology, genetics and molecular biology, anatomy and physiology, neurobiology, ecology, population genetics, and history and classification of life forms and evolution. Laboratory exercises illustrate the basics of experimental biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, and genetics, as well as the diversity of life forms and organ systems.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7819)


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7820)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Savin, Avital


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7821)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Hailey


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7822)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nguyen, Emma


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7823)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jallad, Raya


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7824)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jin, Dongmin


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7825)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lotka, Lauren


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7826)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jin, Dongmin


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7827)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gupta, Selena


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7828)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gupta, Selena


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7829)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jallad, Raya


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7831)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by De, Titir


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7832)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sookdeo, Akash


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7833)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Podolska, Natalia


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7834)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hart, Sydney


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7835)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nguyen, Emma


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7836)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lisi, Brianna


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7837)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nikulkova, Maria


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7838)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Podolska, Natalia


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7839)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by De, Titir


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7840)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hart, Sydney


BIOL-UA 11-000 (9211)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Hailey


BIOL-UA 11-000 (9212)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lisi, Brianna


BIOL-UA 11-000 (9213)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sookdeo, Akash


BIOL-UA 11-000 (21100)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nikulkova, Maria


BIOL-UA 11-000 (21101)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Elorza, Setiembre


BIOL-UA 11-000 (21103)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lotka, Lauren


BIOL-UA 11-000 (21105)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Savin, Avital


BIOL-UA 11-000 (21106)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Elorza, Setiembre


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7830)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 11-000 (21107)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vikraman, Pooja

Making Medical Decisions (CAMS-UA 155)

Do parents always know what’s best for their kids? Should a child be allowed to refuse lifesaving treatment? Is it moral to include minors in research, or maybe morally necessary? When can a teen’s right to change gender outweigh parental permission? In this course, we study the doctor-patient relationship where the patient is a child – a child with family, a child with legal rights, and a child with a developing brain. We review the principles of medical ethics and the concept of informed consent, and focus on the child’s own development in her capacities to reason and make medical decisions in these contexts. We then join current debates on sexual health, psychiatric treatment, end-of-life care and research, and we raise new question about how doctor’s, kids, and families decide.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Play & Creativity (CAMS-UA 149)

How do we conceptualize the elusive phenomenon of “play”? Is there a biological imperative to play? How does play influence child development and maintain psychological health as we mature? In this course we survey the historical, scientific, clinical, cultural, and artistic perspectives on the role of play through the life cycle. Is the play-element a catalyst for creativity and innovation? We explore various theories of creativity through the lens of neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and mysticism. We consider the use of improvisation and free play in life, art, clinical work, and scientific discovery. Topics include: exploration of play styles, observations of animal play, the role of play in child development and education, how play influences attachment and social bonding, the aesthetics and cultural value of play, the consequences of play deprivation, the art and science of creativity, and the relationship between creativity, mental illness, and genius.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CAMS-UA 149-000 (9680)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Castellanos, Francisco · Amanbekova, Dinara

Mental Health and Society (CAMS-UA 153)

Have you ever wondered how society impacts mental health? In this class, we will take a public health approach to mental health, examining how social factors (e.g., discrimination, media, poverty, education, and trauma) influence mental health, and what it means to think about and measure a population’s health. We will consider the pros and cons of various methods to improve child, adolescent, and family mental health within the context of our current mental health system. Course readings mainly come from the field of public health, but also include popular media and Internet sources.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Before Me Up To Age 3: A Mental Health Perspective on Parent and Early Childhood Development. (CAMS-UA 148)

What memories do you have from before you were three? Probably not many, but your early experiences continue to shape who you are today. This course takes an intimate look at the trajectory of human development from before conception, through birth and infancy, and continuing up to early preschool for children and their parents. At each stage we will consider influences that can push development off track. We will employ a clinical mental health perspective to inform assessment of social and emotional problems in young children and present current approaches to treatment. Course readings are pulled from clinical early childhood mental health and parent mental health sources and supplemented by documentary videos.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

The Nature of Success (CAMS-UA 113)

What makes a person successful? What contributes to failure? What do these terms really mean anyway? This course is designed for students who want to learn about processes known to contribute to success (and failure) in a wide variety of domains. Students will be introduced to an exciting area of study called Systems Science that offers a powerful and useful perspective to understand how success (and failure) happen. Throughout the course, we will consider the occurrence of success and failure in a wide variety of systems including biological systems, ecologies, families, peer groups, business organizations, and societies. Human beings are comprised of systems, and we grow up, live, and work as part of systems. This course will particularly emphasize human development and encourage students to apply the concepts and knowledge they have acquired to those systems they most want to understand and/or within which they most wish to succeed.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Global Perspectives in Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMS-UA 152)

Children and adolescents suffer worldwide from significant mental health stressors, but how mental health and illness are perceived and addressed varies greatly around the world. The first part of the course will provide a brief overview of human rights, child development, social determinants of mental health, trauma and resilience, and the global public health significance of mental illness. Using this framework, the impact of selected salient cross-cultural factors affecting mental health (i.e. poverty, war and conflict, and gender-based exploitation) on children’s development and wellbeing will be studied. Throughout the course, various perspectives will be considered, while dominant paradigms will be recognized and critically examined. Lastly, the course will conclude on a pragmatic level—deliberating specific settings, available resources, barriers, and preventative proposals. Selected case studies from the Americas, Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East will be used to illustrate key concepts. Through lectures, readings, documentaries, and active discussion this course will provide an engaging forum to consider and debate child and adolescent mental health issues globally.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Cultural Perspectives on Mental Health & Illness (CAMS-UA 151)

How do different cultures view mental health and illness? Why do some ethnic groups readily accept mental health care while others generally avoid the psychiatrist or psychologist at all costs? How does bicultural or multicultural identity and minority status affect one’s psychological development? This course seeks to explore what we know about how culture, ethnicity, race and minority status affect the mental health of children, adolescents, and young adults in modern America. We will start by studying the process of acculturation and mental health issues specific to immigrant youth and children of immigrants. We will delve into the cultural aspects of identity development, family dynamics, parenting, stigma, and mental health disparities and then segue into stereotypes and intergroup bias. Readings will draw from the growing body of research literature, and examples from popular arts, media and entertainment will be incorporated as supplemental material for class discussion. Students will review current treatments and participate in class discussions. Students of all backgrounds will be encouraged to explore mental health and illness with a broadened cultural perspective.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CAMS-UA 151-000 (9418)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reliford, Aaron

Twentysomething (CAMS-UA 146)

Are 20-somethings really overeducated, afraid of commitment, self-centered, and spendthrift? It is a fact that people in most countries are marrying, having children, and becoming financially independent at a later age than in any previous generation. In the last 10 years a critical new developmental period between adolescence and adulthood has started to gain recognition. “Emerging Adulthood” has been characterized as the age of identity exploration, instability, self-focus, feeling “in-between,” and infinite possibilities. This course will analyze whether this theory has validity, explore the factors that contribute to diverging developmental pathways, review the typical life of the American 20-something, and uncover the truth behind the stereotypes.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Morality in Childhood (CAMS-UA 145)

How do children learn right from wrong? Today’s youth face an onslaught of mixed messages about morality. Parents and teachers champion honesty, integrity and empathy, while sports stars use steroids, music and video games glorify sexual violence, and politicians pander for votes based on prejudice and fear. At the same time, children are confronted with uniquely modern moral challenges, as they navigate bullying and privacy invasion on the Internet, easily accessible drugs of abuse, and gang and relationship violence. This course will examine how children negotiate these challenges and learn moral principles, using perspectives from developmental neurobiology, evolutionary biology, philosophy, and multiple theoretical frameworks within cognitive and social psychology. Topics will include gender, culture, socioeconomic status, education, and parenting and their influence on moral development from infancy through adolescence.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Complementary & Alternative Mental Health (CAMS-UA 103)

Complementary and alternative treatments comprise the most rapidly expanding segment of American healthcare. This course will examine the role of non-conventional care in the mental wellness of children, adolescents and young adults. We will survey the historical, clinical, and scientific aspects of mind-body treatments, biologically-based alternative therapies, spirituality, and the traditional medical systems of China and India. In addition, we will investigate the social, political, and economic forces influencing the role and status of complementary and alternative practices in America. Students will assess these practices by participating in class discussion, reviewing research literature, and engaging in several group experiential exercises.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CAMS-UA 103-000 (8903)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chai, Marianne

Sex Matters: Identity Behavior & Developement (CAMS-UA 143)

Sexual identity is central to our sense of who we are and how we relate to the world. The development of this identity is essential to becoming a well-rounded, effective, and high functioning adult, and failure to develop a cohesive sexual identity can lead to dysfunction. Sexual development involves a complex interplay of biological, psychological and sociological components. Sexual differentiation begins in utero, as the fetus is exposed to hormones and growth factors. As children age, their primary and secondary sex organs develop, and their ideas about the function, use and meaning of these organs change. At each stage the environment, social milieu, and hormones, among other factors, influence the direction of these changes. In this course we will explore the impact of sexual identity development on the mental health of children and adolescents.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Looking Back On Growing Up (CAMS-UA 144)

What is the impact of our upbringing? This course provides an overview of child development with the goal of understanding the complexity of human growth, adaptation, and responses to adversity. To this end, we will trace a variety of overlapping trajectories, including the development of cognitive, emotional, interpersonal, and moral capacities. The course reviews historical and modern-day developmental theories as well as more complex interpersonal constructs, such as family systems, peer relations, gender and sexual identity, and cultural variation. Special emphasis is placed upon examining the dynamic interplay between biology and environment. The course consists of two interactive lectures per week based upon introductory readings on child development. Students are also assigned one film to view at home each week to illustrate the myriad of ways in which human beings evolve and adapt through life’s transitions and challenges.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CAMS-UA 144-000 (8812)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Knickerbocker, Lauren

When Nightmare is Real: Trauma in Child &Adolesc (CAMS-UA 104)

Every childhood is fraught with complications, but some children are exposed to traumatic experiences that have a lasting impact on their development and health. Many children in New York City are still reeling from the effects of September 11, yet these numbers pale in comparison to the more than three million reported cases of child abuse and neglect in the United States annually, in addition to the many more cases that go unreported. This course examines the neurobiological and psychological effects of trauma on children, adolescents, and their families. We investigate the impact of physical, emotional, and sexual abuse and neglect, war, terrorism, natural disasters, bereavement, and medical illness. In addition, we explore the concepts of vulnerability and resilience to discover why most affected children successfully traverse their trauma. Finally, we discuss the treatment modalities commonly employed with traumatized children, adolescents, and their families.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Independent Study (CAMS-UA 997)

The independent study program offers upper-division students the opportunity to investigate an advanced topic with a faculty member in the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Areas of study may include research methods, clinical interviewing, systems of care, and education and training.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
1-4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CAMS-UA 997-000 (7744)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Esquenazi-Karonika, Shari

The Adolescent Paradox (CAMS-UA 142)

Adolescence is a remarkable time of growth and development; in just a few years, children transition dramatically towards adulthood across multiple domains. While adolescence is physically the healthiest period of the lifespan, it is also marked by an enormous rise in morbidity and mortality. This seeming paradox can be explained, in part, by biological and psychological changes during puberty that affect emotion regulation, cognition, and consequent risk-taking behavior. At the turn of the twentieth century, adolescence was described as a developmental period inevitably filled with “storm and stress.” In what ways does this vision of adolescence still apply? How should current scientific findings inform our understanding of the propensity for risk-taking behavior during this period (including substance use, increasing sexual activity, and disordered eating)? In exploring the factors that shape emotions, behavior, and emerging identity during adolescence, this course will examine such questions from biological and psychosocial perspectives.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

The Literature of Children & Adolescents (CAMS-UA 191)

Considers children’s and adolescents’ literature as a rich, untapped source of insight into child development for students of psychology, child development, and related disciplines. Over the last century, a vibrant, many-faceted literature for young people has grown in tandem with our understanding of child and adolescent psychology to pre-sent young readers with an increasingly finely calibrated perspective on such basic developmental issues as the formation of trust, the emergence of a sense of autonomy, and the complexities of family and peer relationships. Students explore these and other topics as they read and discuss a wide range of picture books, longer fiction, and relevant professional literature.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Drugs & Kids (CAMS-UA 180)

Approximately 72 percent of youth in the United States report using alcohol at least once and 47 percent report using illicit drugs at least once by the time they reach 12th grade. While the majority of youth who use substances will not develop a substance abuse disorder, substance abuse and addiction are major public health problems affecting approximately 9 percent of the U.S. population age 12 and older. The majority of individuals with substance abuse disorders began using substances during adolescence or even childhood. This course briefly reviews the classes of psychoactive substances, including alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs and their basic neurophysiological effects before exploring the historical, social, and psychological factors related to substance use and abuse in adolescents and children. The second half of the course considers substance abuse prevention, treatment, and policy related to children and adolescents.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

The Art & Science of Parenting (CAMS-UA 161)

After spending our early lives with our parents, what can we say about how they influenced our personalities and development? How have our parents affected what we learn, how we act, and how we manage our health? Just as you have wondered about these questions, so have scientists and professionals. We study parenting styles in detail to identify qualities that foster healthy child development. The course reviews research on the importance of parenting practices within a family context. Students also learn how to interact effectively with parents, how to mobilize parents, and what efforts have been successful in changing detrimental parenting actions. This course is for the curious and those interested in careers in education, health, and mental health.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CAMS-UA 161-000 (7743)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gallagher, Richard

Children & The Media (CAMS-UA 150)

Consuming media has far outstripped reading storybooks or playing make-believe as the average American child’s favorite pastime. Children between the ages of two and 18 spend an average of five-and-a-half hours a day using some form of media. This course reviews the current literature on how media use affects children’s mental health, as well as their cognitive, emotional, and social development. Designed for those who wish to learn to think critically, this course provides a comprehensive, research-oriented review of how children and adolescents are influenced by the media. Discussions include an examination of controversial issues, such as media’s effects on children’s violent behavior and substance use, as well as the potential benefits of media.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Child Brain Devel: App Frm Neurosci to Practice (CAMS-UA 141)

This course covers the fundamentals of human brain development from birth to young adulthood. The focus is on normal brain functioning, but illustrative pathological development and dysfunctional conditions are reviewed as well, such as developmental dyslexia, autistic disorders, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Once students have developed a foundational knowledge of neurocognitive functioning, the course addresses three additional sections that reflect methods of examining brain-based activity: observation, assessment, and intervention. At the end of each section, students should have a greater understanding of the neurocognitive developmental perspective and be able to apply their knowledge of brain-based skill sets to understanding the environmental demands that children and teens confront, including learning in school, handling complex social interactions, remembering autobiographical experiences, and managing emotional reactions. Students read a sampling of research articles, relevant clinical materials, and textbooks chapters.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CAMS-UA 141-000 (9235)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Montalto, Daniela

Skepticism & Proof: Rsch Methods in Child Mh (CAMS-UA 120)

Clinical practice and public policy in child mental health is too often driven by the media, conventional wisdom, and prejudice rather than by scientific data. Evidence-based clinical care seeks to guide practitioners in the critical appraisal of data on risk factors, prevention, and treatment. This course is designed for those who wish to read the health research literature and draw their own conclusions. It provides a practical means to learn and apply research methods and focuses on the knowledge and skills needed to design, carry out, and evaluate a research study. Discussion of topical “hot-button” issues, such as the apparent “epidemic” of certain diagnoses, the influence of the environment or culture on child mental health, and the risks/benefits of widely prescribed medications, are combined with a systematic review of the existing evidence base on current empirically supported treatment for child mental health problems.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CAMS-UA 120-000 (9679)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gallagher, Richard

From Huck Finn to Columbine:Understanding Disruptive Behaviors in Chldrn & Adolscnt (CAMS-UA 133)

What makes kids do bad things? Who is accountable for their acts? How can we prevent childhood violence? In this course we will explore these questions and seek to understand the spectrum of “bad” behavior from biological, psychological, and sociological perspectives. We will address broad topics ranging from the nature vs. nurture debate to biased media reporting to medicating disruptive behaviors. We will examine the increased exposure to media violence and its influence on children and adolescents; how the criminal justice system responds to delinquent behavior; and gender differences in disruptive behavior. We will study atrocities perpetrated by children and adolescents, the growing scientific literature detailing neurodevelopment as it relates to behavior, and historical descriptions of disruptive behavior and delinquency. Students will analyze case studies, debate controversial issues (e.g., the influence of violent gaming), and review online discussion boards in an effort to determine sensible efforts aimed at prevention and treatment.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Child & Adolescent Psychopathology (CAMS-UA 101)

While psychopathology courses are commonplace among undergraduate psychology curricula, courses focusing on child and adolescent psychopathology are relatively rare. More novel still is the opportunity to receive instruction in child and adolescent psychopathology from practicing psychiatrists and psychologists at an internationally renowned clinical and research center. Through lecture presentations and discussions, this course focuses on disease etiology, epidemiology, phenomenology, nosology, and diagnosis. It engages students in a critical review of common child and adolescent psychopathology and challenges social and cultural assumptions of what constitutes ?normal? vs. ?pathological? behavior, cognition, and emotion. Students also complete one practicum by participating with a clinician (psychologist or psychiatrist) during the evaluation of a child or adolescent patient at the NYU Child Study Center.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CAMS-UA 101-000 (7739)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shatkin, Jess · Evans, Lori

Early Masters of Italian Renaissance Painting (ARTH-UA 306)

Achievements of the chief painters of the 15th century with special attention to the Tuscan tradition. A brief introduction to Giotto and his time provides background for the paintings of Masaccio and his artistic heirs (Fra Angelico, Filippo Lippi, Piero della Francesca). In the later 15th century, social and cultural changes generated by power shifts from Medici Florence to papal Rome also affected art patronage, creating new tensions and challenges for artists and fostering the emergence of new modes of visualization. Topics include the role of pictorial narrative, perspective, and mimesis; the major techniques of Renaissance painting; and the relationship of painting to the other visual arts.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ARTH-UA 306-000 (21099)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Majeski, Anna

East Asian Art I: China, Korea, Japan to 1000 Ce (ARTH-UA 510)

Formerly ARTH-UA 91. Identical to EAST-UA 91. Offered periodically. 4 points. An introduction to the art and culture of the Far East. The materials are presented in a chronological and thematic approach corresponding to the major dynastic and cultural changes of China, Korea, and Japan. Teaches how to “read” works of art in order to interpret a culture or a historical period; it aims at a better understanding of the similarities and differences among the cultures of the Far East.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Museums & The Art Market (ARTH-UA 701)

An overview of history and theory. Presents a series of lectures and case studies examining such issues as the birth of the museum, the role played by world’s fairs and biennials, the impact of collectors, the art market, and the gallery system. Visits to museums, galleries, and auction houses in New York.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ARTH-UA 701-000 (20963)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Basilio, Miriam · Sluiter, Johanna

History of Western Art I (ARTH-UA 1)

Identical to MEDI-UA 1. Students who have taken ARTH-UA 3 or ARTH-UA 4 will not receive credit for this course. Introduction to the history of painting, sculpture, and architecture from ancient times to the dawn of the Renaissance, emphasizing the place of the visual arts in the history of civilization. Includes the study of significant works in New York museums, such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Cloisters, and the Brooklyn Museum.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ARTH-UA 1-000 (9056)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krinsky, Carol


ARTH-UA 1-000 (9058)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krinsky, Carol


ARTH-UA 1-000 (9057)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krinsky, Carol


ARTH-UA 1-000 (9059)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Raitt, Louisa


ARTH-UA 1-000 (23838)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Raitt, Louisa


ARTH-UA 1-000 (9061)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jordan, Dashiell


ARTH-UA 1-000 (9062)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jordan, Dashiell

Art of Early Middle Ages (ARTH-UA 201)

Christian architecture, sculpture, painting, mosaic, manuscript illumination, and luxury arts in the Greek East and Latin West from 200 C.E. through ca. 950 C.E. Considers visual and material culture of Christianity in light of the religious, historical, political, social, and cultural contexts. Style periods: Christian, early Byzantine, barbarian, insular, Merovingian, and Carolingian. Topics include: the commemoration of the dead; art and theology; emergence of the cult of saints; early medieval patrons; arts of pilgrimage and early monasticism; word and image in early medieval culture; and iconoclasm and debates about the role of images in early Christianity.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Discovering Archaeology in NYC (ANTH-UA 225)

In this course, New York City is our archaeological site. The archaeology of New York City extends back some 10,000 years, from Native American societies, to the colonial encounter, into the industrial era, and through to the present day. In this course we will study the archaeological investigations that have taken place throughout the five boroughs of New York City. In doing so we will see how the city became a locus of global trade, in people, goods, and ideas. We will investigate how, as a nodal point in this global system, it came to develop its own cultures and ideologies. We will also learn about the federal, state, and local laws that mandate when and how archaeology is conducted in advance of construction activities and the extent to which Native American Tribes and local communities are involved in this process.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Global Biocultures: Anthropological Perspectives on Public Health (ANTH-UA 36)

Surveys the mutual shaping of culture and biology in diverse contexts around the world. Starts with sociocultural theories of biocultural process and ends with ethnographies of disability, drugs, food, place, pain, and biotechnology. Examines the relationship between larger political economic structures and individual subjectivities, and examines biological experience as simultaneously material and socioculturally plastic.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Anthropology of Gender and Sexuality (ANTH-UA 112)

This course examines the social and cultural forces that shape the construction of sex, gender, and sexuality. It takes these categories as nonbinary and fluid. Using an intersectional approach, it considers how various subject positions including race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, immigration status, religion, and ability impact gender and sex roles. It traces historical trajectories of foundational feminist anthropology, while also exploring queer theories and performativity. It seeks to interrogate social hierarchies based on sex, gender, and sexuality, exploring who has been traditionally excluded from positions of power and privilege. Topics such as race and porn, BDSM, asexuality, heteronormativity, transgender identities, queer coming out narratives, down-low sexual practices, polyamory, sex work, and queer kinship will be explored in order to challenge normative frameworks of sex and gender.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Introduction to Forensic Anthropology (ANTH-UA 326)

Biological anthropology examines the evolutionary history and adaptability of humans and our ancestors. Forensic anthropology is an applied subfield of biological anthropology that provides expert analysis of the skeleton in a medicolegal setting by utilizing methods developed in skeletal biology, archaeology, and the forensic sciences. Forensic anthropologists play critical roles in identifying victims of mass fatalities (such as World Trade Center and Oklahoma City bombings), in investigating homicides (such as identifying the Russian tsar?s family), and in distinguishing cause of death. We examine how forensic anthropologists approach modern and historic crimes in the laboratory and the field. Students are introduced to the underlying theory and the applied techniques that forensic anthropologists use to recover and identify individuals and assess cause of death.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ANTH-UA 326-000 (9746)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ortiz, Alejandra · Hernandez, Jasmine

Human Rights & Culture (ANTH-UA 331)

This course offers an overview of the human rights system, looking at its basic elements and studying how it works. It focuses on the relationships between human rights and culture and between global ideas and practices and local ones. Human rights campaigns frequently encounter resistance in the name of protecting cultural differences. This is particularly common with issues concerning women, children, and the family. The course explores several issues that raise questions of human rights and culture, such as female genital cutting, trafficking of persons, food justice, and indigenous peoples’ rights to culture. Using these examples, the course considers how the human rights system deals with tensions between global standards and local ways of life. It examines the meanings of rights and of culture in these debates and shows the implications of adopting an anthropological analysis of these situations. The goal of the course is developing an understanding of human rights in practice.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Primate Communication (ANTH-UA 59)

Examines how primates communicate and why their communication takes the forms it does. Discusses general issues associated with the study of animal communication: potential functions of communication, different modalities by which communicative signals can be transmitted, types of information that can be conveyed via each of these modalities, and ways in which researchers go about studying animal communication systems. Examines ways environmental and sociological factors influence the evolution of forms of communication.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ANTH-UA 59-000 (20885)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lawrence, Jenna

Emerging Diseases (ANTH-UA 80)

Integrates evolutionary biology, genetics, immunology, ecology, and behavioral ecology, along with sociocultural anthropology, politics, and economics, to better understand newly emerging and reemerging diseases as they affect human health. General evolutionary theory and an introduction to Darwinian medicine are provided before the course examines viral, bacterial, parasitic, and prion-based diseases along with their hosts, vectors, and other organisms. Particular attention is paid to how humans have purposely and inadvertently created both biological and cultural environments for the transmission of different diseases. Media representations and misrepresentations are examined throughout the course.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Language, Power, Identity (ANTH-UA 16)

Explores how identity is a process of “becoming” rather than a mode of “being” by examining how speakers enact their gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, nationality, religion, and socioeconomic class through everyday conversations, narratives, performances, literacy activities, and public debates. Also explores the moral and political consequences of people’s identification strategies by examining how their beliefs about language reinforce or contest normative power structures. Readings on the relationship between bilingual education and accent discrimination, multilingualism and youth counterculture, migration and code-switching, media and religious publics, linguistic nationalism and xenophobia, and literacy and neo/liberalism in different areas of the world.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ANTH-UA 16-000 (20883)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Das, Sonia · Franco, Pedro

Culture, Power, Society (ANTH-UA 1)

What does it mean to think anthropologically? This course considers historically foundational practices of anthropological thought, its core method, fieldwork, and its most influential product, the ethnography, in order to think practically and creatively along the lines of what constitutes cultures, societies, translation, and difference. A central goal is to advance the concept of culture, with its attendant solidarities, hierarchies, and exclusions, in order to better understand continually changing systems of collective identifications.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ANTH-UA 1-000 (7762)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Amy


ANTH-UA 1-000 (7763)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jaramillo, Alejandro


ANTH-UA 1-000 (7764)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sengupta, Rohan


ANTH-UA 1-000 (7765)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Peckham, Moira


ANTH-UA 1-000 (7766)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jaramillo, Alejandro


ANTH-UA 1-000 (9371)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martinez, Katrina


ANTH-UA 1-000 (9372)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Thomas, Sujit


ANTH-UA 1-000 (10568)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Thomas, Sujit


ANTH-UA 1-000 (10569)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sengupta, Rohan


ANTH-UA 1-000 (26334)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martinez, Katrina

Literature and the Environment (ANST-UA 475)

This class explores the role of literature in creating empathy – how can it help us imagine the lives of “others” & that of animals? By querying the politics of meat mainly through contemporary literature, we put three similar (yet often disconnected) disciplines in conversation with each other: food studies, environmental studies, and animal studies. Two key questions we will address are: 1. What relationship – if any – is there between what we eat and who we are? 2. How are the intimate spaces of both human and nonhuman bodies – and their cultivation – related to notions of ecological violence?

Animal Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ANST-UA 475-000 (21118)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Athanassakis, Yanoula

ENTREPRENEURSHIP (MG-UY 4404)

This course focuses on key aspects of entrepreneurship as a critical engine for innovation. It also treats entrepreneurship as a state of mind that is not limited to small firms. Students discuss current theories and practices related to starting and managing entrepreneurial enterprises, emphasizing firms in technology- , information- and knowledge-intensive environments. Particular attention is paid to the critical issues of (1) identifying opportunities that provide competitive advantage; (2) the development of a solid business plan; (3) the marketing of new ventures; (4) entrepreneurial business operations, including human-resource and process management; (5) ethical and social issues in entrepreneurial firms; and (6) financial management and fund raising for entrepreneurial firms. | Prerequisites: Junior or senior student status.

Management (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 4404-000 (14073)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Husain, Badrul


MG-UY 4404-000 (14074)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Jimenez Leon, Bertha

Disability Studies (CAM-UY 2204)

This course dynamically engages students in the world of disability. As a member of a team including a guest consultant with a disability, students will discover that person’s interests, abilities, and desires and portray them with digital storytelling. This active learning approach, carefully guided by the instructor, is enhanced with readings, guest lectures, videos and field trips. Students will learn about disability history, assistive technology and universal design. The end-of-semester is celebrated with a formal presentation of the person-centered projects. The aim is to show the individual, making the “invisible visible.” Satisfies a HuSS Elective.

Culture, Arts, and Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CAM-UY 2204-000 (16608)


CAM-UY 2204-000 (16609)


CAM-UY 2204-000 (16610)


CAM-UY 2204-000 (16611)

Food Management Theory (NUTR-UE 91)

Organization and management of commercial and institutional food service facilities in hotels, restaurants, and educational and community program sites.

Nutrition & Dietetics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


NUTR-UE 91-000 (13048)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zagor, Stephen


NUTR-UE 91-000 (13196)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zagor, Stephen

Jazz History (MPAJZ-UE 1121)

This course surveys the history and development of jazz music in America from the mid 1800s to current trends in popular music. Through a historical timeline, student will study jazz music’s range of styles as informed by social, regional, cultural, technological, and political trends. Realizing that all music is a reflection of historical events and the cultures they are informed by, students will analyze the close connection between jazz music and why it is known as America’s true original artform.

Music Instrumental: Jazz (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPAJZ-UE 1121-000 (9959)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Drummond, Willis

Dance as an Art Form (MPADE-UE 1278)

Dance is an integral & defining component of cultures throughout the world & throughout history. This course introduces students to dance as a live & performing art through a variety of experiences including attendance at live performances, examination of videos & theoretical texts, & physical participation in the practice & performance of dance. Through discussions, written assignments, & the creation of original dance compositions, students will explore the history & cultural relevance of a variety of forms of dance within their own lives, larger society, & the global community beyond. Liberal Arts Core/CORE-MAP Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Expressive Cultures

Dance Education (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPADE-UE 1278-000 (14664)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gallace, Carmela


MPADE-UE 1278-000 (14665)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gallace, Carmela

Screening History: (MCC-UE 1140)

This course explores the ways in which popular Hollywood films construct the historical past, the ensuing battles among historians and the public over Hollywood’s version of American history, and the ways such films can be utilized as historical documents themselves. We will consider films as products of the culture industry; as visions of popularly understood history and national mythology; as evidence for how social conflicts have been depicted; and as evidence of how popular understanding and interpretations of the past have been revised from earlier eras to the present.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1140-000 (14041)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Miller, Mark


MCC-UE 1140-000 (14042)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Loven, Hillevi

From Polenta to Marinara: History of Italian Food (FOOD-UE 1052)

In this course we will cover the varieties of Italian food in their past and present forms. First, we will explore the history of food from past civilizations, leading up to World War I, just after the great immigration to the New World. Time periods examined will be ancient Rome, Medieval, Renaissance, Risorgimento, leading to the modern era. This course includes topics ranging from Pellegrino Artusi’s famous cookbook in the contest of Italian unification to the relationship between Italian Futurism and food. The second part of the course will introduce students to the regional diversity of Italian food using mediums such as TV, art, and film. We will examine the ways in which food shapes contemporary Italian society, from the more intimate family kitchen to the most elegant Italian restaurant in New York City.

Food Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FOOD-UE 1052-000 (10587)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scarcella Perino, Roberto

Mindfulness (UNDSW-US 54)

Social justice and wellbeing are one and the same”- Dr. Sará Yafa King. How can you care for yourself while shaping change in a world that is overwhelmed with narratives, systems, and structures of oppression? In order to care for our communities, we must care for ourselves, self-regulating with the wisdom of the body. This course is designed to help you deepen your practice and share mindfulness with your community and with the world. We’ll begin with an introduction to mindfulness, examining the theory and science from its origins in wisdom traditions to the modern mindfulness movement, and move toward a meaningful practice that will allow you to better heal and serve.

Undergrad Social Work (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Creative Nonfiction: From Idea to Essay (WRTNG-UG 1295)

Some of the strongest nonfiction writing out there—whether cultural criticism, the reported personal essay, an historical nonfiction narrative, or piece of long-form investigative journalism—grew from the flimsiest of tendrils: a hunch, a spark, an enthusiasm. In this advanced creative nonfiction writing course, you’ll learn how to hack your own unique brain into an idea-generating machine, and pair each idea with the genre that best suits it. Course readings will include essays by great practitioners past and present, among them James Baldwin, Eula Biss, Barbara Ehrenreich, Darryl Pinckney, Richard Rodriguez, Rebecca Solnit, Alice Walker, Ellen Willis, and Virginia Woolf. We will analyze these works to figure out how each idea was brought to fruition, and learn tricks of the trade that will in turn fuel your idea-generator. The class will be a combination of class discussions, lectures, and workshops.

Advanced Writing Courses (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Writing the Fantastic (WRTNG-UG 1260)

Tzvetan Todorov defines the fantastic as a “subgenre of literary works characterized by the ambiguous presentation of supernatural forces.” Donald Antrim, on the other hand, regards the fantastic not as a genre, but as a condition shared between author and reader: “a potential state” in which “everything is vivid, yet nothing is clearly defined,” where “the fantastical and the real are equally questionable, equally challenged by one another.” Frankenstein’s monster comes to life. Alice goes down the rabbit hole. How can [an] author make these events seem not only uncannily plausible, but even expectable—the sudden eruption of some carefully encrypted logic operating beneath our conscious awareness? How do we ground the fantastic in enough realism to sustain the reader’s suspension of disbelief? This class will explore the fantastic as the strangest and most explicit demonstration of what literary technique can achieve in any genre. We will focus on various kinds of world-making, from magical realms to dystopias to refracted versions of “realism.” Special attention will be devoted to how writers use altered states of consciousness like trauma, intoxication, and psychosis to create a hallucinatory space between the supernatural and the deeply improbable. Readings will also span a wide spectrum of cultures and historical periods, from canonical works like Frankenstein to Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities to contemporary novels like Ben Okri’s The Famished Road, Joy Williams’ The Changeling, and Donald Antrim’s The Hundred Brothers. Assignments will include several creative writing prompts and longer pieces of original fiction for workshop.

Advanced Writing Courses (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


WRTNG-UG 1260-000 (14201)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gladstone, Bret

The Art and Craft of Poetry (WRTNG-UG 1560)

In this workshop (practicum), poets will focus on the foundations and intricate dynamics of poetry as a writer’s process. A weekly reading of a new poem by each poet in the circle will serve as point of departure for discussion of the relationships of craft and expression. A final portfolio of polished poems is required at the end of the course.

Advanced Writing Courses (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


WRTNG-UG 1560-000 (12069)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hightower, Scott

Writing Cross-Culturally (WRTNG-UG 1230)

In this course, students will create writing that traverses identities, borders and cultures, as well as genres, as they explore and deepen their understanding of issues of form, craft and ethics. The class will read and discuss a variety of texts that center around various modes of culture crossing, such as travel and study abroad; third culture and diaspora identities; immigration and escape, and historical and/or political clashes and conflicts. Through an ongoing examination of structural and craft issues in the exemplary texts, students will make creative decisions to help write three main assignments dealing with themes of Memory, Identity and Conflict. We’ll use our discussions of Memory to help focus on expository and reflective rhetorical strategies, Identity as a way to experiment with point of view and character development, and Conflict as a method for exploring structure and dramatic tension. In order to write cross-culturally about personal experiences, students will be encouraged to create texts along the spectrum between creative nonfiction and autobiographical fiction. Theoretical essays will help inform how we ethically position ourselves as writers observing cultures not (necessarily) our own in order to inform audiences and to challenge our own prejudices. Through it all, we’ll consider how formal experiments across genres may help illuminate experiences and confront perceptions. Authors to be read include Gloria Anzaldua, Edwidge Danticat, Randa Jarrar, Salman Rushdie, Amy Tan, and Ocean Vuong.

Advanced Writing Courses (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


WRTNG-UG 1230-000 (19855)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Agabian, Nancy

Expressive Culture: Architecture (CORE-UA 725)

Please check the departmental website for description

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 725-000 (19742)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cohen, Jean-Louis


CORE-UA 725-000 (19743)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 725-000 (19744)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 725-000 (19745)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 725-000 (19746)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Theories of Memory and the Art of Autobiography (IDSEM-UG 2150)

How can we write about our past when memory can be so unreliable? Furthermore, to whom do we write when we write about ourselves and why? This course will investigate the variety of stylistic and formal choices that authors make when representing subjective experience, specifically past experience. We will examine a range of autobiographies and memoirs written in Europe, primarily Britain, and America from eras as diverse as the fourth century, the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries, and today, and in forms as various as verse, prose, avant-garde language experiments, and graphic novels. We inquire into different ways in which authors understood memory and its relationship to language, with the support of theoretical texts on memory, including writings on trauma, confession, neuroscience, psychoanalysis, dreams, mnemonics and repetition, selective memory, somatic memory, marginalized identity, and the relationship between selfhood and narrative. Authors include St. Augustine, William Wordsworth, Thomas De Quincey, W.E.B Du Bois, Lyn Hejinian, and Alison Bechdel. Students will have a chance to practice both analytical and creative writing that responds to and draws inspiration from our course texts.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Topics: Led Zeppelin (REMU-UT 1115)

In name alone, Led Zeppelin carries mountains of meaning: the most successful and arguably the most influential rock band of all time. The creators of a mythic, mystical, guitar-based style that gave birth to the sounds and iconography of heavy metal. Song-crafters whose studio mastery, utilizing recording technology of the day, generated some of the most enduring rock recordings of their era, establishing standards that still define a stylistic and emotional extreme of popular music. The four British musicians who came out of the electric blues scene of the late ‘60s, recording and touring as a unit for a mere twelve years, together achieved a legendary stature that requires much study to fully appreciate more than thirty years after their demise. This course will consider the history of Led Zeppelin from a variety of perspectives: social and stylistic context; the nuts and bolts of their music—live and in the studio; the hows and whys of the band as a business. Using books, articles, videos, and a generous sampling of music, the course will follow their arrival in the final, psychedelic heyday of swingin’ London of the ‘60s; through their roots in folk and acoustic blues and later experimentations with Indian and North African music, and their rise in an era that was hungry for a heavier, more bombastic sound. The course will include special focus on the group’s technical leader and visionary, guitarist Jimmy Page, who came with prior credits as a sessionman and guitarist in the blues-rock band the Yardbirds, as well as other major players in the Zeppelin story—engineer Glyn Johns, manager Pater Grant—who helped build the sonic and popular juggernaut that the band became. In-class guest speakers will be featured, many who participated or witnessed the Led Zeppelin phenomenon, as well as a screening of the group’s concert film The Song Remains The Same.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


REMU-UT 1115-000 (21549)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kahn, Ashley

Statistics for The Behavioral Sciences (PSYCH-UA 10)

Bauer. Offered every semester. 4 points. Students gain familiarity with data description, variance and variability, significance tests, confidence bounds, and linear regression, among other topics. Students work on psychological data sets, learn approaches to statistical prediction, and learn to interpret results from randomized experiments.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8659)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bauer, Elizabeth


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8660)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zuo, Shimiao


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8661)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Wenze


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8662)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zuo, Shimiao


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8663)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Stan


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8664)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Stan


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8665)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bauer, Elizabeth


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8666)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Glinton, Kristen


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8667)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Glinton, Kristen


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8668)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Parihar, Sushmeena


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8669)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Parihar, Sushmeena


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8670)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Judy


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (26969)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Wenze


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (27040)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Judy

Intro to Foods and Food Science (NUTR-UE 85)

Introduction to the foods of various world regions and the techniques used to prepare them through hand-on food preparation, demonstrations, lectures and field trips.

Nutrition & Dietetics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


NUTR-UE 85-000 (10938)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mortillaro, Lourdes


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12408)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12409)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12410)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12411)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (11672)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12412)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12413)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12414)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

The Archaeology of Climate Change (ANTH-UA 226)

Climate change is one of the greatest challenges facing humankind today and most of the public discourse on this topic focuses on the future. And yet, all of our experience with the natural world lies in the past. This course will delve into some of the issues that arise from contemplating climate change in a historical and human evolutionary perspective: what is humans’ natural environment? How many times did the climate change significantly during human history? Did climate determine the course of human evolution and/or social change? When did humans first begin to tinker with the environment? And finally: what solutions for the future can we glean from our collective historical experience? The course will use primary literature from the fields of archaeology, paleoanthropology, and paleoclimatology to guide students toward a better understanding of climate change at the human scale.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Human Evolution (ANTH-UA 2)

Investigates the evolutionary origins of humans. The study of human evolution is a multidisciplinary endeavor involving a synthesis of concepts, techniques, and research findings from a variety of different scientific fields, including evolutionary biology, paleontology, primatology, comparative anatomy, genetics, molecular biology, geology, and archaeology. Explores the different contributions that scientists have made toward understanding human origins and provides a detailed survey of the evidence used to reconstruct the evolutionary history of our own species.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7767)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Higham, James


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7775)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gunson, Jessica


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7768)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gunson, Jessica


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7769)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Galway-Witham, Julia


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7770)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Galway-Witham, Julia


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7771)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Xue


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7772)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dudas, Madelynne


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7773)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dudas, Madelynne


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7774)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Xue


ANTH-UA 2-000 (26376)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Guerra, Jordan

Introduction to Ancient Indian Literature (RELST-UA 335)

An introductory course designed to acquaint students with the great works of the ancient Indian literary tradition, a major part of which was written in Sanskrit. The earliest form of that language, called Vedic Sanskrit, is the language of the Vedic hymns, especially those of the Rig Veda. Sanskrit has had an unbroken literary tradition for over 3,000 years. This rich and vast literary, religious, and philosophical heritage is introduced in this course. In addition, students work with excerpts from the Jain and Buddhist canons written in Prakrits and examples of Tamil poetry. Selections from the Vedic literature, classical drama, epics, story literature, and lyric poetry are studied in English translation.

Religious Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Big Spaces (IMNY-UT 226)

If so much of life is circumstance, being in a certain place at a certain moment in time… Can we shape a life or at least a few brief moments of a life by designing the circumstances in which that life inhabits a space? In this course, we will treat space as a time-based medium and ask how interactive spaces can generate narratives that are lived rather than told. We will do so by interrogating four so-called “space-narrative” forms: Wandering The Desert, Processions, Circles and Territories. Through play, discussion and hands-on workshopping of both technical topics and ideas we will ask and attempt to answer some of the following questions: What constitutes a space? How do we experience a space over time? How does space shape our experience of time? How can space form a personal narrative? Media outputs we will employ include: lights, projection and sound. Interaction input sources will come from cameras and microphones. We will use p5.js, websockets and node.js for real-time interaction. Class time will be split between group improvisation exercises, playing with and critiquing examples and translating design strategies into code and logic.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IMNY-UT 226-000 (22297)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Yin, Yue

Emerging Media Studio: (PHTI-UT 1018)

The Emerging Media Studio courses explore methods to creatively think through and hybridize artistic photographic practice with emerging media technologies from medicine, the military, archaeology, urban planning, environmental science and other industries. Projects may take open-ended forms such as video, virtual reality environments, site-based performance, spatial imaging, 3D fabrication and photographic documentation. Critical readings and ideas drawn from artists as well as professionals in other fields are discussed. Our practice is learning how to adapt to and position ourselves as artists making unique contributions to the social dynamics of culture and a constantly shifting universe of media.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


PHTI-UT 1018-000 (18655)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fu, Snow Yunxue


PHTI-UT 1018-000 (18656)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fu, Snow Yunxue

Statistics (P) (ECON-UA 18)

Topics: descriptive statistics; introduction to probability; sampling; statistical inferences concerning means, standard deviations, and proportions; analysis of variance; linear regressions; and correlation. Laboratory periods cover sample problems drawn primarily from economics. Meets three times a week, plus a lab session.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECON-UA 18-000 (8009)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Roeper, Timothy · Gao, Jieyi · Sonthalia, Harsh


ECON-UA 18-000 (8010)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sonthalia, Harsh


ECON-UA 18-000 (10244)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sonthalia, Harsh


ECON-UA 18-000 (8011)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Jieyi


ECON-UA 18-000 (8012)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Jieyi


ECON-UA 18-000 (8013)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by shachmurove, Yochanan · Shrivastava, Isha · Lodha, Rakshit


ECON-UA 18-000 (8014)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shrivastava, Isha


ECON-UA 18-000 (8015)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shrivastava, Isha


ECON-UA 18-000 (8016)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lodha, Rakshit


ECON-UA 18-000 (8017)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fan, Xiaochen · Lu, Yucheng · Crema, Angela


ECON-UA 18-000 (8018)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Crema, Angela


ECON-UA 18-000 (8019)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lu, Yucheng


ECON-UA 18-000 (8020)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lu, Yucheng

Patterns in Language (LING-UA 6)

Can machines think? Do patterns in online searches predict the spread of the flu? Did Shakespeare really write that sonnet? Scientists use patterns in language to answer these questions, using the same concepts that underlie search engines, automatic translators, speech recognition, spell-checkers, and auto-correction tools. Focuses on the technological and linguistic ideas behind these applications and offers hands-on experience and insight into how they work. No programming experience required.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Political Economy of Education: Why Does College Cost So Much? (EDST-UE 1321)

Why do so many high school students apply to study at expensive institutions when there are cheaper alternatives available? Who is able to attend, and who is excluded? Why do college costs keep rising so fast? Shouldn’t college be free? Students explore answers to these kinds of questions in this course. Students explore a range of economic concepts and empirical evidence that speaks to the value of Field available for additional information in footerhigher education for individuals and societies; state and institutional financial aid policies; and university budgets and spending priorities.

Education Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


EDST-UE 1321-000 (11588)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by Brewer, Dominic

Political Economy of Education (EDST-UE 1320)

Students, teachers and schools exist within a larger political and economic ecosystem that shapes education institutions and opportunities. In this umbrella course, students learn how different social, political and economic forces shape education policies and practices as well as the choices that students and their parents make. Subtopic courses span a range of topics and case studies, including growing neoliberalism in education policy, the influence of the high cost of higher education, school choice and access, and trends in global education development.

Education Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Data: Code It, Make It (IM-UH 2323)

Data Physicalization is an emerging research area. It explores new techniques to design and encode data into physical artifacts through geometry or material properties. Recent advances in Computational Design and Fabrication offer novel opportunities to complement traditional screen-based visualizations enhancing people’s ability to discover, understand, and communicate data. This course uses a data visualization approach to define new methods of computational design and digital fabrication. Students will create unique, data-driven, everyday objects and sculpt meaning into them. Through the use of platforms such as Rhinoceros: a 3D modeling software, and Grasshopper: a visual programming language, students will be introduced to fundamental computational methods for designing and fabricating, as well as the understanding of digital fabrication strategies for parametrically generated design.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Critical Manifestations of Networks and Technology in the Developing World (ITPG-GT 2350)

Course description (optional): Not all innovation starts in the West and gets exported to other parts of the world. In many places with less developed capitalist economies and infrastructures, technology is rapidly developed and adapted for hyper-local use. We’ll gain inspiration from a broad spectrum of creative uses of technology in the developing world(s) — from art and design, hacktivism, and community-oriented work that increase social good, and then conceive of and prototype our own projects. Special attention will be paid to speculative 3D fabrication tools and processes, web-based platforms, circuit bending and making them all work together! Students will experiment and research at the intersections of art and technology to develop the beginnings of work grounded in post-colonial reality and the late capitalist near-future.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Intro to Celtic Music (MUSIC-UA 182)

Provides a comprehensive introduction to the traditional and contemporary music of the Celtic areas of Western Europe: Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Brittany, and Galicia. Recordings and live performances present the extraordinary range of singing styles and the musical instruments employed in each culture, including harps, bagpipes, and a variety of other wind, free reed, keyboard, and stringed instruments. Forms and musical styles are explored in depth, along with a study of their origin, evolution, and cultural links.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


MUSIC-UA 182-000 (9098)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moloney, Michael · Roman, Danielle

Introduction to Computer Programming (No Prior Experience) (CSCI-UA 2)

Prerequisite: Three years of high school mathematics or equivalent. No prior computer experience assumed. Students with any programming experience should consult with the computer science department before registering. Students who have taken or are taking CSCI-UA 101 will not receive credit for this course. Note: This course is not intended for computer science majors, although it is a prerequisite for students with no previous programming experience who want to continue in CSCI-UA 101. Offered every semester. 4 points. An introduction to the fundamentals of computer programming, which is the foundation of Computer Science. Students design, write and debug computer programs. No knowledge of programming is assumed.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CSCI-UA 2-000 (7802)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Steigman, Amanda


CSCI-UA 2-000 (9106)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liao, Susan


CSCI-UA 2-000 (7803)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kapp, Craig · Huh, Jung · Rozin, Yonatan


CSCI-UA 2-000 (7804)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kapp, Craig


CSCI-UA 2-000 (7805)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zeidenberg, Matthew


CSCI-UA 2-000 (8686)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lizardo, Julie


CSCI-UA 2-000 (9902)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Prager, David


CSCI-UA 2-000 (9107)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Clayton, Joshua


CSCI-UA 2-000 (8904)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhao, Emily


CSCI-UA 2-000 (9324)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lgarch, Saadia


CSCI-UA 2-000 (9528)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zeidenberg, Matthew


CSCI-UA 2-000 (9725)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tyson, Na’’im


CSCI-UA 2-000 (20825)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cardona, Michell

The Science and Psychology of Marijuana (CAMS-UA 502)

Weed. Pot. Bud. Grass. Ganja. Reefer. Mary Jane. Skunk. Herb. Cannabis. It’s all marijuana – the most commonly used, in most states still illicit, drug in the United States. Calming for some, anxiety provoking for others, perhaps medicinal, always controversial, marijuana causes wonder and confusion among physicians, parents, teachers, adolescents, and lawmakers. After 50 years of debate, marijuana remains one of our most visible modern-day conundrums – is it “okay?” Is marijuana safe and therapeutic, or is it dangerous and a gateway to more harmful drugs? Through lecture, discussion, and a thorough analysis of the current research literature in neuroscience and human development, we will seek to answer these questions and identify marijuana’s role in psychology, medicine, culture, and government policy.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CAMS-UA 502-000 (9683)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Phillips, Blake A · Nayak, Komal

Clicks, Likes, and Tweets: Behavioral Addiction in the Digital Space (CAMS-UA 503)

Is healthy media use possible? What does that look like? Most of us use our electronic devices more than we had planned, and a quarter of US college students are estimated to experience internet overuse. Electronic device overuse is associated with an increased risk of depression, anxiety, and loneliness, along with a host of neuropsychological changes. In this course, we will discuss the rise of internet overuse, its associated negative consequences and possible strategies to reduce excessive use.Specifically, the course covers: 1) the definition of internet and phone overuse, 2) the brain mechanisms and behavioral patterns which lead to excessive use, 3) how brain/behavioral mechanisms are exploited to make video-games, television programs, and websites as addictive as possible, and 4) what we can do to regain our balance at the personal and societal levels. Department of History Medieval France.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CAMS-UA 503-000 (9659)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baroni, Argelinda · Cervantes, Paige

Grand Rounds Seminar (CAMS-UA 501)

Grand Rounds are a traditional and effective teaching tool in medical education, where major research, education, and clinical problems and innovations are presented to an audience of medical students, residents, faculty, and the public at large. The NYU Child Study Center’s weekly Grand Rounds program is one of the foremost of its kind in the world, featuring invited thought leaders in the fields of child and adolescent psychiatry and psychology. This seminar course provides undergraduate students with a unique opportunity to attend the weekly Grand Rounds presentation and then discuss these topics in depth with CAMS faculty. Students will gain a deep and broad understanding of many challenges within the field of child and adolescent mental health, along with novel theories, research findings, and clinical treatments.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CAMS-UA 501-000 (9218)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Esquenazi-Karonika, Shari

Nutrition and Health (NUTR-UE 119)

Introduction to nutrition science and its role in health and society: nutrient characteristics, requirements, and food sources, energy balance, weight control, dietary guides and food planning, and social and economic factors that affect food production and consumption. Liberal Arts CORE equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Natural Sciences for non-majors on an individual department basis-students should confirm with their Academic Advisor

Nutrition & Dietetics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


NUTR-UE 119-000 (11669)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Young, Lisa


NUTR-UE 119-000 (11670)


NUTR-UE 119-000 (11671)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zandes, Mitchell

Environmental Systems Science (ENVST-UA 100)

A comprehensive survey of critical issues in environmental systems science, focusing on: human population; the global chemical cycles; ecosystems and biodiversity; endangered species and wildlife; nature preserves; energy flows in nature; agriculture and the environment; energy systems from fossil fuels to renewable forms; Earth?s waters; Earth?s atmosphere; carbon dioxide and global warming; urban environments; wastes; and paths to a sustainable future.

Environmental Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ENVST-UA 100-000 (9509)


ENVST-UA 100-000 (8090)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ENVST-UA 100-000 (8091)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ENVST-UA 100-000 (8092)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ENVST-UA 100-000 (8093)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ENVST-UA 100-000 (8094)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ENVST-UA 100-000 (9284)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Ethics and Animals (ANST-UA 400)

This course examines the morality of our treatment of nonhuman animals. We start by asking about the nature of moral rights and duties. What are rights, and where do they come from? How do we resolve conflicts among rights? Do animals have rights? Next, what are obligations, and where do they come from? What makes right actions right? Do we have special obligations to members of our own family, nation, or species? Is there a moral difference between killing and letting die? Do we have group obligations as well as individual obligations? We then ask how these issues apply to our treatment of nonhuman animals. Are we justified in treating animals as property under the law? Are we justified in using animals for food, clothing, entertainment, research, or companionship? Finally, what are the ethics of animal advocacy? Here we consider abolition vs. regulation, incrementalism vs. absolutism, and legal reform vs. direct action.

Animal Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Animals and Public Policy (ANST-UA 500)

Considers how public policy is created, how social change occurs, and the influence of science, government, business, and non-governmental organizations on animal-related policies, legislation, litigation, and consumer campaigns, as well the meaning of “animal rights” and the impact of the modern animal protection movement.

Animal Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Bioart Practices (IM-UH 2514E)

In this course we will take a tour of the materials and techniques utilized by artists in the emerging field of biological art – that is art which uses life itself as a medium. This hybrid art and science class will introduce concepts in genetic engineering, personal genomics, the microbiome, epigenetics, microscopic imaging, tissue culture/bioprinting, biopolitics, and bioethics as sites for artistic exploration. Organized in thematic modules students will learn basic lab techniques while studying the work of artists in this interdisciplinary field. The three core areas are: Input/Output (imaging and printing with biology, tissue culture), identity after the genome (genetics, personal genomics, microbiome, epigenetics, portraiture), and final projects. Weekly readings and written responses will supplement lab activities. The course will culminate in the creation of original biological artworks by each student, which will be exhibited in the Interactive Media Showcase at the end of the semester.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


IM-UH 2514E-000 (20014)

Live Coding (IM-UH 2322)

Live coding is a performing arts form and creativity technique where music and visuals are improvised through live edits of source code. Live coding is most visible in performance, however the ’live’ in live coding refers not to a live audience but to live updates of running code. Working across genres, live coding has been seen in algoraves (events where people dance to music generated from algorithms), jazz clubs, and concert halls. Code is projected during performances, exposing the underlying algorithms at work, and thus the patterns of creative thought the performer is developing in real time. Programs are instruments that can change and algorithms are thoughts that can be seen as well as heard. This course explores this new art form and the related themes of algorithmic thought, pattern transformation, artificial language, information theory, improvisation, listening, perception, and structural composition. Students will learn how to create music with code, as well as how to create advanced computer graphics. Students will develop algorithmic audio/visual pieces individually as well as in groups. The course culminates in an algorave.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IM-UH 2322-000 (19553)

A.rt I.ntel (IM-UH 3312)

Artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms affect many aspects of our lives whether we realize it or not: banking transactions, healthcare treatments and diagnoses, entertainment recommendations, smart car functionality, customer service agents, financial trading… the list goes on and on. The power of these algorithms lies in their ability to leverage computers to “study” and “learn”. Instead of programming a computer to do a specific task, we program the computer to train and teach itself how to do any number of tasks. As artists, how can we harness the power of these algorithms and apply them towards creative endeavors? This class will explore that basic question. Through a combination of high level applied machine learning techniques, speculative design of artificial intelligence, and some basic understanding of how these algorithms work at a low level, students will explore this rich new field. With their machine counterparts, they will create images, sounds, text, intuitive interactions, chatbots, and more.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IM-UH 3312-000 (4491)

Road to Resilience (CAMS-UA 114)

The transition to college is a multifaceted challenge for many students, as they encounter new academic, interpersonal, emotional, and financial pressures. One third of undergraduates report feeling depression, and over half report feeling overwhelming anxiety. This course is grounded in the current understanding of adolescent and young adult development, neuroscience, and positive psychology. Our aim is to teach undergraduates both theoretical and empirically informed means to moderate risk and enhance resilience, by building knowledge and skills in key areas proven to enhance wellness, including communication, executive functioning, social support, self-efficacy, emotion regulation, and sense of purpose. Students will learn about healthy exercise, nutrition, and sleep habits, and develop skills in core components of cognitive-behavior therapy, mindfulness, and organizational skills.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

While you were Sleeping (CAMS-UA 170)

Sleep is something akin to the ocean-it surrounds us, and we could not live without it, yet it remains a mystery, whose secrets we are only now beginning to unfold. Scientific research into sleep and dreams began in earnest about fifty years ago. Since that time, the small and burgeoning field of sleep medicine has taught us a great deal about how and why we sleep. This course will provide students with a comprehensive introduction to sleep and physiology, the evolution of sleep, circadian and biological rhythms, dreams, and the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders. Through exercises and assignments, students will learn the importance of sleep for mental and physical well-being and how to best establish a healthy sleep routine.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

The Science of Happiness (CAMS-UA 110)

Examines the state of college-student mental health and wellness on a personal and systems level. As undergraduate university students approach the end of adolescence, they often reevaluate the beliefs, values, and assumptions with which they left home. Young adulthood is a time of great promise, but the transition from child to adult is never easy. We look at how individuals can create positive change by reinterpreting their goals and identifying steps toward a successful college experience. Key findings from the fields of neuroscience and positive psychology are referenced to inform our study of the biopsychosocial underpinnings of success and happiness. Through lectures and discussions, students learn about a variety of wellness topics that include mindfulness, relationships, and self-esteem. The final project requires students to promote an area of mental wellness on campus.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CAMS-UA 110-000 (7390)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan · Lerner, Daniel Louis


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9676)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9677)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 8:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9678)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9679)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9680)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
8:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9682)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 8:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9683)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9684)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9685)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9686)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9687)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9688)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9689)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9690)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9691)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 8:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan · Lerner, Daniel Louis


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9692)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan · Lerner, Daniel Louis


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9693)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9694)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan · Lerner, Daniel Louis

Vertically Integrated Projects (VIP-UY 3000)

The Vertically Integrated Projects courses are designed to allow select students to participate in ongoing research, innovation, design, and entrepreneurial projects within student teams, under the direction of faculty from within Tandon, and other schools of NYU. This is the zero-credit version of the course. These courses are open to students from the first to senior years, and students must apply to engage in a specific project in a given semester. Decisions on acceptance will be made by the faculty advisors for the project, in consultation with the Director of the VIP Program. Students must commit to at least three semesters of participation in VIP, either enrolling in VIP-UY 300X or VIP-UY 3000.

Vertically Integrated Projects (Undergraduate)
0 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15545)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Jin, Weihua


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15561)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Loianno, Giuseppe


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15562)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dickey, Chris


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15563)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Milkis, Mark


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15564)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chiarelli, Lawrence · Pennella, Ronald


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15573)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dimauro, Christopher · Togelius, Julian


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15574)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Atashzar, Seyed Farokh


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15584)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Perlin, Kenneth


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15585)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pahle, Robert


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15587)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Huang, Danny


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15592)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Liu, Shizhu


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15712)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Samsonau, Sergey


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15713)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Porfiri, Maurizio


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15714)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Laefer, Debra


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15760)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sahin, Iskender


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15814)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Ghandehari, Masoud


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15815)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Ergan, Semiha · Feng, Chen


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15816)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15546)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15817)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15872)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Haverkamp, Sven


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15873)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15888)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Gilbert, Regine


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15889)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Bringardner, Jack


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15890)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Berberian, Marygrace


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15892)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Silverman, Andrea · Hoar, Catherine


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15895)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Leopold, Rebecca · Ptak, Lauren


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15897)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Luong, Dung Dinh


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15908)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rodriguez, Patricia


VIP-UY 3000-000 (19666)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Epstein, Jeff


VIP-UY 3000-000 (19667)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Levicky, Rastislav · Wang, Xin


VIP-UY 3000-000 (19668)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Joyce, Noel · Caridi, Phil


VIP-UY 3000-000 (19669)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred


VIP-UY 3000-000 (19670)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


VIP-UY 3000-000 (19671)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Shin, Jennifer


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15547)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Luong, Dung Dinh


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15548)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Silverman, Andrea


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15549)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Laefer, Debra


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15550)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Bill, Victoria G


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15551)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Behera, Rakesh


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15552)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Borowiec, Joseph


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15553)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hajesfandiari, Arezoo


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15554)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kim, Jin


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15555)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Feng, Chen


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15556)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15557)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Emara, Hebah


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15558)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DesPortes, Kayla · Piantella, Benedetta


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15559)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Youngerman, Ethan


VIP-UY 3000-000 (15560)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hurst, Amy

Vertically Integrated Projects (VIP-UY 300X)

The Vertically Integrated Projects I-IV courses are designed to allow select students to participate in ongoing research projects within student teams, under the direction of faculty from within Tandon, and other schools of NYU. These courses are open to students from the sophomore to senior years, and students must apply to engage in a specific project in a given semester. Decisions on acceptance will be made by the faculty advisors for the project, in consultation with the Director of the VIP Program. | Department Consent Required.

Vertically Integrated Projects (Undergraduate)
1-3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17658)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Jin, Weihua


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17782)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Angel, Luis


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17783)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Loianno, Giuseppe


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17784)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Moss, Andy


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17785)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chow, Ying Jun Joseph


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17786)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dickey, Christopher


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17898)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Milkis, Mark


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17900)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chiarelli, Lawrence · Pennella, Ronald


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17951)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Maidenberg, Yanir


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17952)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Dimauro, Christopher · Togelius, Julian


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17953)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Atashzar, Seyed


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17958)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Harden, Vanessa


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17997)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Gold, Michael · Perlin, Kenneth


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17998)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


VIP-UY 300X-000 (18002)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Brain, Tega · Piantella, Benedetta


VIP-UY 300X-000 (18003)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Huang, Danny


VIP-UY 300X-000 (18010)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Liu, Shizhu · Policastro, Christopher


VIP-UY 300X-000 (22923)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Samsonau, Sergey


VIP-UY 300X-000 (22930)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Porfiri, Maurizio


VIP-UY 300X-000 (22924)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Reznickova, Anna


VIP-UY 300X-000 (22925)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Laefer, Debra


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17659)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Payne, Willie


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17661)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Luong, Dung


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17662)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17663)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Zhu, Quanyan


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17664)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Knox, Michael


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17665)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Knox, Michael


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17666)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Silverman, Andrea


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17667)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Laefer, Debra


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17668)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Bill, Victoria G


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17669)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Strauss, Fred


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17670)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Bill, Victoria G


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17671)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Behera, Rakesh Kumar


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17672)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Borowiec, Joseph


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17674)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by DiZinno, Nicholas A.


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17675)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kim, Jin Ryoun


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17677)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Feng, Chen


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17678)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Levicky, Rastislav


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17679)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Frenkel, Matthew


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17680)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Piantella, Benedetta · DesPortes, Kayla


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17681)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Lee, Heather · Ludden, David


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17775)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Youngerman, Ethan


VIP-UY 300X-000 (17776)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hurst, Amy

Contemporary Techniques in Sound Art (DM-UY 3113)

This course explores sound as an art form and technical practice in its own right. Topics include contemporary techniques in composition, sound art, and interactive installation. Students will produce sound with narrative elements that evoke social, cultural & critical-thinking. Their final projects can be experimental podcasts, music (performance and/or recordings), multi-channel audio installations, or multimedia projects. | Prerequisite: DM-UY 1113 or MPATE-UE 1001

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 3113-000 (12650)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by O’Keefe, Timothy

ROBOT MOTION AND PLANNING (ROB-UY 3303)

This course covers the concepts, techniques, algorithms, and state-of-the-art approaches for robot localization, mapping, and planning. The course starts from basic concepts in 2D kinematics and probability and then introduces probabilistic approaches for data fusion. Then, the course introduces the trajectory planning problem in the time domain and free space. The motion planning problem is defined in a canonical version of the problem and the concept of configuration space is introduced. A selection of representative planning techniques is covered from probabilistic to heuristic techniques. Finally, some mapping representations and algorithms are presented. | Prerequisite: CS-UY 1114 and MA-UY 2034 and PH-UY 1013 or equivalents (see Minor in Robotics)

Robotics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ROB-UY 3303-000 (19176)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Loianno, Giuseppe

INTRODUCTION TO HAPTICS AND TELEROBOTICS IN MEDICINE (ROB-UY 3404)

In this course, the theoretical bases and applications, of haptics technologies with a particular focus on medical applications (specifically surgical, and neurorehabilitative) are taught. Basic technological aspects, such as instrumentation, actuation, control and mechanisms, are introduced. Also, some theoretical aspects related to telerobotic systems are discussed. Students are expected to have basic knowledge of programming. As part of this course, students will participate in experimental and simulation labs to acquire hands-on expertise in haptics implementation and programming. | Prerequisite: CS-UY 1114 and MA-UY 2034 and PH-UY 1013 or equivalents (see Minor in Robotics)

Robotics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ROB-UY 3404-000 (15568)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Atashzar, Seyed Farokh


ROB-UY 3404-000 (15569)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Atashzar, Seyed Farokh


ROB-UY 3404-000 (15570)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Atashzar, Seyed Farokh


ROB-UY 3404-000 (15567)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Atashzar, Seyed Farokh

Applied Internet Technology (CSCI-UA 467)

Students that successfully complete CSCI-UA 467 Applied Internet Technology are not eligible to take CSCI-UA 61 Web Development and Programming. Applied Internet Technology is a practical introduction to creating modern web applications. It covers full-stack (that is, every aspect of building a database driven web application: server programming, database implementation, frontend markup, styling and interactivity) web development. It includes topics such as database and data model design, web application architecture, separation of logic and presentation, handling user input and processing form data, managing asynchronous processes, strategies for creating real-time web applications, and handling client-side interactivity. Students will use current server and client-side web frameworks and libraries to build dynamic, data-driven sites. Various applications to support development will also be introduced, such as version control, static analysis tools, and build systems.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CSCI-UA 467-000 (20859)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Versoza, Joseph · Wu, Haodong


CSCI-UA 467-000 (20860)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Versoza, Joseph · Ngo, Yona · Wu, Haodong

Data Management and Analysis (CSCI-UA 479)

Extracting, transforming and analyzing data in myriad formats. Using traditional relational databases as well as non-relational databases to store, manipulate, and query data. Students will learn how to work with data by writing custom programs, creating queries, and using current data analysis tools and libraries… all on a wide array of data sets. Additional related topics will be covered, such as data modeling, cloud databases, and API programming.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CSCI-UA 479-000 (21440)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Versoza, Joseph

Data and Society (MCC-UE 1349)

Data is often considered the domain of scientists and statisticians, but its increasing dominance across nearly all aspects of life – from political and advertising campaigns to social media, dating, education, and public health — has social, political, and ethical consequences, presenting both new possibilities and new hazards. In this course we think critically about how collecting, aggregating, and analyzing data affects individual and social life, with a focus on the ways in which it reproduces and creates new structural inequalities and power asymmetries.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1349-000 (14055)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kang, Edward (Byungkwon)

Design Studio for Non-Majors (ART-UE 1421)

A continuing exploration of graphic design to help students refine their skills & develop more personally expressive ways to solving problems through visual communication. Assignments, readings, & research projects will allow students to consider the complex nature of graphic design. Both traditional & digital approaches to typography & layout will be incorporated with a wide range of assignment. A priority is placed on the use of concepts to dictate design techniques & on the pursuit of a genuinely creative vision.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 1421-000 (9687)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Darts, David


ART-UE 1421-000 (9689)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rader, Michael

Cultures & Contexts: Middle Eastern Societies (CORE-UA 9511)

An introduction to the peoples, cultures, and histories of the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the 20th century, surveying the development of political and social institutions and exploring the emergence of key intellectual currents, political and religious varieties, and cultural trends within what is often wrongly construed as a monolithic regional culture. We explore a range of literary, architectural, artistic, and scientific sources from pre-modern and modern Islamicate societies and study of the daily lives and contributions of Muslims and non-Muslims alike, highlighting a multi-layered representation of complex and vibrant Middle Eastern societies.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CORE-UA 9511-000 (23964)
08/30/2021 – 12/10/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Shanghai (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9511-000 (23965)
08/30/2021 – 12/10/2021 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Shanghai (Global)
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: New World Encounters (CORE-UA 541)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CORE-UA 541-000 (21350)


CORE-UA 541-000 (21351)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 541-000 (21352)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 541-000 (21353)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Quinton, Laura


CORE-UA 541-000 (21354)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Quinton, Laura


CORE-UA 541-000 (21355)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 541-000 (21356)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 541-000 (24148)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Quinton, Laura

Cultures & Contexts: Korea (CORE-UA 543)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CORE-UA 543-000 (21305)


CORE-UA 543-000 (21306)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 543-000 (21307)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 543-000 (21308)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 543-000 (21309)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Applied Data Science (CUSP-GX 6001)

This course equips students with the skills and tools necessary to address applied data science problems with a specific emphasis on urban data. Building on top of the Principles of Urban Informatics (prerequisite for the class) it further introduces a wide variety of more advanced analytic techniques used in urban data science, including advanced regression analysis, time-series analysis, Bayesian inference, foundations of deep learning and network science. The course will also contain a team data analytics project practice. After this class the students should be able to formulate a question relevant to urban data science, find and curate an appropriate data set, identify and apply analytic approaches to answer the question, obtain the answer and interpret it with respect to its certainty level as well as the limitations of the approach and the data.

Ctr for Urban Sci and Progress (Graduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CUSP-GX 6001-000 (7539)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sobolevsky, Stanislav


CUSP-GX 6001-000 (7540)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sobolevsky, Stanislav

Data Visualization (CUSP-GX 6006)

Visualization and visual analytics systems help people explore and explain data by allowing the creation of both static and interactive visual representations. A basic premise of visualization is that visual information can be processed at a much higher rate than raw numbers and text. Well-designed visualizations substitute perception for cognition, freeing up limited cognitive/memory resources for higher-level problems. This course aims to provide a broad understanding of the principals and designs behind data visualization. General topics include state-of-the-art techniques in both information visualization and scientific visualization, and the design of interactive/web-based visualization systems. Hands on experience will be provided through popular frameworks such as matplotlib, VTK and D3.js.

Ctr for Urban Sci and Progress (Graduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CUSP-GX 6006-000 (7543)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sun, Qi

Urban Data Science (CUSP-GX 1003)

The course targets current and future urban practitioners looking to harness the power of data in urban practice and research. This course builds the practical skillset and tools necessary to address urban analytics problems with urban data. It starts with essential computational skills, statistical analysis, good practices for data curation and coding, and further introduces a machine learning paradigm and a variety of standard supervised and unsupervised learning tools used in urban data science, including regression analysis, clustering, and classification as well as time series analysis. After this class, you should be able to formulate a question relevant to Urban Data Science, locate and curate an appropriate data set, identify and apply analytic approaches to answer the question, obtain the answer and assess it with respect to its certainty level as well as the limitations of the approach and the data. The course will also contain project-oriented practice in urban data analytics, including relevant soft skills – verbal and written articulation of the problem statement, approach, achievements, limitations, and implications.

Ctr for Urban Sci and Progress (Graduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CUSP-GX 1003-000 (23062)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at ePoly
Instructed by Sobolevsky, Stanislav

Urban Computing Skills Lab: Introduction to Programming for Solving City Challenges (CUSP-GX 1001)

The UCSL at CUSP is a series of online sessions designed to build a common skillset and familiarity with techniques, concepts, and models for urban informatics computing. The online sessions focus on data explorations, programming skills and statistical methods needed for scientific computing in the field of Urban Informatics.

Ctr for Urban Sci and Progress (Graduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CUSP-GX 1001-000 (7738)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Balestra, Martina

3D Printing & the Music Industry (REMU-UT 1234)

This course will introduce students to the basic concepts of 3D design and capture through the use of apps and other tools. Through examination and discussion of the current state of 3D printing technology we will explore current and future implications for music and the music business, including but not limited to, live and recorded music, music publishing, innovative tools, part and instrument fabrication, licensing, management, touring, copyright, distribution and marketing. Extra focus will be given to existing and potential merchandise platforms, as well as how 3D can lead to the growth of new industries and new opportunities for cross-pollination with a variety of sectors. Students will be encouraged to pursue both practical and abstract concepts in the furtherance of dynamic and newly inventive ideas – and will be required to develop and submit a concept and plan for their final project.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


REMU-UT 1234-000 (17780)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kolosine, Errol

Fundamentals of Audio Workstations I (REMU-UT 1020)

During this course, students will acquire an in-depth, theoretical and practical knowledge of Digital Audio Workstations using the industry standard Pro Tools software through a weekly, lab-based workshop. Each class will be a combination of lecture and immediate application. An emphasis will be placed on getting to know Pro Tools, getting inside Pro Tools, creating sessions, working with media in sessions, audio recording, audio editing, file management techniques, MIDI recording, editing techniques, mixing techniques, backups and stereo mix-down.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


REMU-UT 1020-000 (22452)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Otero, Nicole


REMU-UT 1020-000 (22453)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Carrero, Joanne


REMU-UT 1020-000 (22454)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Carrero, Joanne


REMU-UT 1020-000 (22455)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Painson, Phil


REMU-UT 1020-000 (22456)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Painson, Phil


REMU-UT 1020-000 (22457)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Painson, Phil

Surround & Immersive Sound Recording: A Mixed Reality (REMU-UT 1013)

This class builds upon the techniques of the recording studio and the techniques of producing recorded music begun in Engineering the Record I, IIand Producing the Record Side A and B and will explore advanced techniques used in surround and immersive sound recording and mixing. Today, surround and immersive audio can be found in all areas of popular entertainment: music, film, television, streaming, games, etc. By using the multichannel studio facilities of the Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music, students will further learn to record and mix in surround and immersive audio formats. Assigned work will take place in Studio 1 and Studio 4.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


REMU-UT 1013-000 (22415)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Anderson, Jim

Introduction to Performance Studies (PERF-GT 1000)

Performance Studies (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


PERF-GT 1000-000 (6689)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PERF-GT 1000-000 (6690)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PERF-GT 1000-000 (6691)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PERF-GT 1000-000 (6692)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PERF-GT 1000-000 (22097)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Flash Frames (OART-GT 2147)

Flash Frames explores the moving image, the pixel, color, and composition, through two weekends of intensive, hands on image fabrication. Students gain a coherent understanding of the technicalities involved in producing artistic and professional quality videos. The workshop applies technical and creative approaches to capturing video, editing, and adding the finishing touches on short productions. Projects are focused on strengthening design and editing skills, understanding media management practices, applying video effects, color correction, motion graphics, and sound. Students broaden their understanding of digital design and video production, while learning the basics of video editing, animation, sound mixing, and motion graphics.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
1 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


OART-GT 2147-000 (7451)

Cell Phone Cinema (OART-GT 2566)

Hollywood in your palm. That is what this combination of lectures, screenings, demonstrations and practical production workshop will offer to the students in this course. There will be several professional guests making presentations and Q&A sessions from the mobile phone filmmaking industry. In addition to the historical and critical overview of the emergence and exponential growth of global cell phone cinema, students will shoot all footage on cell phones and download them for computerized editing. The final project will be under three minute shorts. Projects will include all genres of film and television: news, mini-documentaries, animation, music videos and narrative shorts. Completed student projects will be suitable to be posted on the Internet and entered into domestic and international mobile phone film festivals. For example, two minute long improvisations of Bollywood Style Music Videos shot on Cell Phones by the students have been projected at the Tribeca Cinemas as part of the New York Indian Film Festival. It is suggested but not compulsory that students bring to the class a cell phone capable of recording video.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


OART-GT 2566-000 (17833)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bardosh, Karoly

Introduction to Game Engines (GAMES-UT 183)

Introduction to Game Engines is a course intended for students who already have an understanding of programming fundamentals that introduces concepts, problems, and methods of developing games and interactive media using popular game engines. Game engines are no longer just used for the development of games, they have increasing gained popularity as tools for developing animations, interactives, VR experience, and new media art. Throughout the semester, students will have weekly programming assignments, using a popular game engine. There will be a final game assignment, as well as weekly quizzes and a final exam. The course assumes prior programming knowledge, if students do not have the appropriate prerequisites a placement exam may be taken. There will be an emphasis on using code in a game engine environment as a means of creative expression.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


GAMES-UT 183-000 (15841)
10/27/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Intro to 2D Animation for Games (GAMES-UT 204)

2D Art and Animation for Games is a 1-semester, 4-credit class that builds fundamental skills around the design and production of art assets for games. Through a series of individual design assignments, critiques, and exercises, students will explore concepts like art direction, color theory, animation principles, and UI design while building a working knowledge of prominent industry tools.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


GAMES-UT 204-000 (15560)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Multisensory Storytelling in Virtual Reality and Original Flavor Reality (ITPG-GT 2347)

In this course, we will explore how to create narratives that leverage our lesser used senses like touch, taste and smell as well as lesser-known ones like space, time, balance and scale. We will dig into the history of experiential storytelling, starting from immersive theater and Smell-O-vision to cutting-edge haptics and mind-bending illusions of proprioception. To help center this back in practical applications, we will also explore how this evolving art is commonly used in exhibition design, experiential marketing and brick and mortar retail. The class will be a healthy mixture of game theory as well as experienced based learning (meaning there will be a couple field trips and multisensory VR projects to explore). A basic knowledge of game engines is ideal but not mandatory because we will be using predesigned templates in Unreal engine to be experienced and manipulated in real-time through virtual reality hardware.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2347-000 (23981)
09/02/2021 – 10/26/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Hedonomic VR Design: Principles & Practices (ITPG-GT 2354)

To be a VR creator, it’s not enough to learn the hard skills—it’s also our responsibility to prime ourselves for the human impact of our work. As a means to design VR that is both enjoyable and accountable, this class proposes we borrow design principles from Hedonomics, a branch of ergonomic science that facilitates pleasurable human-technology interaction. Through the Hedonomic Pyramid, we’re able to section our thinking off into regions (Safety, Function, Usability, Pleasure and Individuation) and map out industry-tested VR design guidance for each. The result is a hierarchical checklist of proven principles, specifications and practices—that promote a culture of inclusive and holistic design—built to serve as a quickstart guide to designing accountable VR interfaces and systems. This class, divided into units that represent each level of the Hedonomic pyramid, will unpack both technical and conceptual strategies for creating VR, from visual interface fidelity to avoiding locomotion cybersickness to designing safer social VR spaces.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2354-000 (23988)
10/27/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Sensor Data to Save the Planet (ITPG-GT 2351)

Buildings produce a large percentage of the carbon emissions threatening the planet and multi-family residential buildings make up a significant portion of it. With Covid-19 changing the way we live and work, and the increasing amount of data available from buildings, a key to fighting the climate crisis will be turning this data into action. In this course, learn how to analyze interval data and explore visualizing data to motivate tenants and building operators to change their behavior to reduce energy usage at the optimal times. This will involve analyzing the data streams coming from installed sensors and building equipment, understanding how usage varies over time, and transforming raw data into visual interfaces that mobilize us all in the fight to save the planet. This course will teach basics of how time series data can be stored, how to query time series data, and how to understand energy usage from a data set. With these new skills students will design a project using time series data and their JavaScript skills to visualize this data.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2351-000 (23985)
10/27/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Alter Egos: Assuming New Identities Through Costume and Performance (ITPG-GT 2353)

Throughout history, musicians have channeled their creativity into outrageous fashion statements and invented personas: think MF DOOM, Sun Ra, Ghostface Killah, Daft Punk, Leikeli47 and Rammellzee. By embracing their alter egos in extreme and outlandish ways, artists have found their authentic creative voices. This course will introduce participants to the art of masquerade using their resourcefulness to create costumes from found materials, and performance as an exploration in creative expression using new media and technology. Students will be introduced to ideas surrounding abstract storytelling, experimental audio video production, and A/V performance using a combination of technical and hands-on approaches.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2353-000 (23987)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Creative Resistance (ITPG-GT 2355)

Artists and creative practitioners are widely seen as responsible for destabilizing or critiquing dominant cultural norms and social systems; for example, in her book “Race After Technology”, Ruha Benjamin argues that artists “…can better understand and expose the many forms of discrimination embedded in and enabled by technology”. But when we talk about resistance or refusal enacted through creative means, what exactly do we mean? How does artistic work serve to resist, protest and subvert—and where does it sit in relation to the ideas it aims to critique? This class engages with the notion of “creative resistance”, unpacks the meanings and ethical stances associated with the term, and evaluates how it has been applied in both artistic and academic contexts. Students will explore theories of resistance, refusal and solidarity, and experiment with applying them to (or discussing them through) creative work. In the first half of the class, through reading, class discussion and student presentations, we will engage with scholarly and activist literature on resistance, protest and subversion, and look at examples of creative technological works that purport to achieve these goals. We will discuss commonly used strategies such as dark sousveillance (or “looking back” at the machine), speculative design, and distributed or guerrilla artmaking; examine their mechanisms of action; and debate their effectiveness in achieving their professed goals. In the second half, students will apply this thinking to their own project ideas. Students can choose to produce either a final project responding to the themes of the course, accompanied by a short written artist statement, or a more academic written piece that engages relevant literature from the class readings and beyond in service of an argument about the role of resistance in creative practice.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2355-000 (23989)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Augmented Spaces (ITPG-GT 2356)

With recent advances in hardware and software, millions of us now carry unprecedented spatial computing and world sensing technologies in our pockets. With these technologies in hand, how do we design AR experiences that are contextual at the core – that are sensitive to the spaces we inhabit and the behaviors of people in those spaces? How do we augment this better understanding of reality? This course will be a hands-on workshop where we create spatially aware, contextually driven AR applications unique to particular situations. We will examine the opportunities and challenges when designing for site-specific experiences – museums, live events, retail, medical settings, industrial environments, schools, and others. Topics will include image and object recognition, world mapping, people tracking, location anchors, the ARKit “depth api” (LiDAR enabled features), spatial audio, scene understanding and semantics, and more. For design and development, we’ll primarily use Apple technologies – ARKit, RealityKit and RealityComposer. We’ll also tap a variety of cloud services to store, move, process, and bring intelligence to the data generated and consumed in our experiences. 3D modeling skills are helpful but not required. While we’ll cover the basics, students should expect to spend additional time outside of class learning Swift and other related programming concepts. Full-time access to an iOS device (LiDAR-enabled is ideal but not required) and a Mac laptop running the latest operating systems are required. As part of the design process, we’ll host workshops and guest critiques with designers from top studios around New York City as well as directly interfacing with various teams at Apple.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2356-000 (23992)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

A Radical Thing (ITPG-GT 2357)

This course will serve as an incubator to imagine a speculative product advertisement in the year 2030. In films like Blade Runner, or Her adverts fill the world and become an important aspect of exposition for the film. And in the real world, works such as Alisha Wormlsey, Alexandra Bell, and Hank Willis Thomas begin to re-imagine advertisements as an art practice in society today. Our work will begin to speculate on near-future objects in which topics such as communication, energy storage, transportation can begin to be re-imagined in the next industrial revolution. Using 3D tools, students will gain experience in speculative design thinking, industrial design modeling, product lighting, and custom post-production methods. The final project will be a product advert that will be designed to promote a speculative design entirely made from 100% Biodegradable plastics. The course will look at the ready-made objects all around us as a launching pad. We will be starting with modeling an object in detail. Using Moi 3D, Maya, Render Engine TBD, After Effects, and premiere over the course of the semester. I will go through some of the latest tools within the VFX industry and support this course with a series of artists who have re-imaged the role of cultural production. The final will be an advertisement poster and animation.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2357-000 (23990)
10/27/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Interactive Storytelling for Liberation (ITPG-GT 2349)

If social change begins in the imagination, how then can creators better envision and render the more just and beautiful worlds we want to make? Storytelling has the power to be an alchemical force for revolutionary change. Together, we seek to interrogate and apply interactive storytelling as a technology we can deploy in service of our collective liberation. In this course, we pair a study of story as liberatory praxis with a hands-on grounding in emerging tech tools that allow viewers/players to take an active role. Interactive storytelling technology in video, audio, and text powerfully situates viewers inside constructed narrative worlds. Creators in these emerging media gain the capacity to design choices and respond accordingly, propelling imagination toward agency and enhancing empathic connections between viewers/players and characters. What will it mean to use these tools to tell deeper stories that ask urgent questions about how we want to live in the world? “Part of being a revolutionary is creating a vision that is more humane. That is more fun, too. That is more loving. It’s really working to create something beautiful.” —Assata Shakur

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2349-000 (23983)
09/02/2021 – 10/26/2021 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Technology in the Tropics – Doing More With Less (ITPG-GT 2350)

Not all innovation starts in the West and gets exported to other parts of the world. In many places with less developed capitalist economies and infrastructures, technology is rapidly developed and adapted for hyper-local use. We’ll gain inspiration from a broad spectrum of creative uses of technology in the developing world(s) — from art and design, hacktivism, and community-oriented work that increase social good, and then conceive of and prototype our own projects. Special attention will be paid to circuit-bending and designing custom PCB boards using open-source software like CircuitMaker and EAGLE.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2350-000 (23984)
10/27/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

What Happens Next? (ITPG-GT 2352)

Project-based development studio incorporating dramaturgy techniques, user/audience planning, and social/contextual awareness. You bring in a project. We explore how to make it more engaging through paying close attention to medium, context, and details. Students bring existing project ideas and we investigate various methods and ways to make and direct experience within the infinite combinations of contexts of the present moment together. This particular studio is just as appropriate for projects in the areas of interactive art, programming, physical computing, XR as it is in the areas of performance, sculpture, and sound walks (everything). Everything you make is time-based the moment a user interacts with it (even a painting). All time-based work can be thought of in terms of how a user is led (or not led) through it. I call this directing. We will apply various techniques of story-telling and world-building equally to seemingly “non-narrative” projects as we do to traditional-narratively structured projects. No matter what you are working on, I believe that you are a maker / director of experience. You are making / directing with intent (whether you know it or not). Your user (audience, tester, public, patron) brings with them the entirety of their life’s experience. Your intent cannot possibly meet every user’s lived experience. It is your job as the maker / director to draw a circle that encompasses both. This is the studio’s lens. Students will be directed to make using placeholders instead of waiting for perfection to manifest. Step one will tell you what step two is. We will pay rigorous attention to detail, while holding close to the notion that art-making thrives in adaptability. We will critique using various, structured, co-facilitated methods. Let’s pay close attention. Let’s learn through failure. Let’s listen to what we are making. And let’s listen to each other. Here we go.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2352-000 (23986)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Streaming Against the Current (ITPG-GT 2344)

Live streaming is so seamlessly embedded into our online experience. We lay in bed, on our phones watching hearts flicker across the screen as the person we’re watching greets all of the competing messages in the chat, asking for birthday shout outs and follow-backs. While the ability to live stream feels more accessible than ever, it feels very tied to corporate structures, branding and self promotion. How can we push the concept of a live stream in a new direction and rethink what a live stream can be?

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
1 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2344-000 (23976)

Learning the World One Thing at a Time (ITPG-GT 2345)

What can an object tell us about the world? What can the world tell us about an object? As students and practitioners in creative media, investigating the world around us is a core part of an art/design/tech practice. This course focuses on a specific research approach for doing so: the implosion method (developed by Joseph Dumit based on Donna Haraway’s work). Over the course of this two-weekend workshop, we will individually and collectively critically examine, break down, rearrange and communicate as Haraway says, the “sticky economic, technical, political, organic, historical, mythic, and textual threads that make up [an object’s] tissues.” Students will choose an object at the beginning of the class and over the course of a week will follow the implosion method process, culminating in a presentation of findings the following weekend. The implosion methodology will be supplemented by lectures, group conversation, hands-on activities and skill building of complementary research methods. The final presentation will be to communicate findings and learnings through a multimedia or art/design/tech-based form. By working through the implosion method, students will build skill sets in methods and tools for 1) conducting research in the media studies/creative tech/art fields and 2) structuring and communicating the information they collect by creating a media-based representation. This class is for students interested in fostering, developing, starting, or deepening a research-based art practice with topical interests in how technology relates to society, social issues, and ethics.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
1 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ITPG-GT 2345-000 (21867)

Biomaterials Multispecies Relations (ITPG-GT 2346)

This course traces along the scholarship of Anna Tsing and Donna Haraway, and Animist and Perspectivist cosmologies to study and consider our positions within multispecies relations via material exploration and interspecies storytelling. This is a hands-on course engaging in communal growing and fabrication using biomaterials such as bacterial cellulose, mycelium, lactobacilli, yeast, and more. During the course students will participate in guided somatic exercises and writing as a generative pathway to create their own multispecies allegories and exploratory projects. We will look over and talk about the work by artists such as: Natalie Jeremijenko, CAConrad, Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Anicka Yi, Bo Zheng, Una Chaudhuri, Agnieszka Kurant and Ernst Karel.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Shape Our Future Through Speculative Design (ITPG-GT 2348)

This course aims to provide students with the analytical skills to interpret current trends, policies and problems into futuristic (5 years) product proposals and the thought leadership and communication skills to clearly articulate and pitch those ideas. Projects can range from how prolonged quarantine will impact home exercise to the future of entertainment in self driving cars. Students will research and explore an opportunity space of their choosing where they will infer future problems from current trends then create a speculative solution. They will package their product thinking into a pitch deck and present back to the class. The class format will include lecture, in-class and out-of-class design exercises that apply the concepts covered in the class lecture and a final presentation and critique.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2348-000 (23982)
09/02/2021 – 10/26/2021 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Sensing the City (ITPG-GT 2090)

For most of its brief history, the domain of “smart cities” has belonged to large corporate vendors who promise and offer ubiquitous, citywide intelligence that utilizes their proprietary systems. More recently, an increasing number of startups have developed solutions which can make the technology somewhat more accessible. Unfortunately for municipalities, working with product vendors can be a heavy lift and the commitments involve lengthy procurement and contracting processes. In the past five years or so, the access to connected technology has increased and the hobbyist or “maker” movement has seen an uptick in offerings related to IoT. From the Arduino IoT Cloud and Adafruit.io software, to the Raspberry Pi and Particle hardware, building connected IoT devices has become easier than ever before. Through platforms like Google Coral and Nvidia Jetson, even edge computing and AI has become available to those with coding skills and a modest budget. What this course aims to explore is what happens when low-cost, readily available electronics platforms address the data needs of municipal governments. Rather than thinking of smart cities as large scale, big data projects that provide intelligence across a city, we will look at targeted applications that would be too small or costly to pursue as a conventional IoT procurement. What intelligence can be gathered in a short period of time with a small budget? During this course, we will examine successful and troubled smart cities projects, discuss the ethics of public technology projects, and review the prevailing best practices and guidelines relating to the Internet of Things in government use. Thinking in terms of “rapid IoT” and “little big data,” students will partner with NYC agency representatives* to uncover insights about a particular issue related to their work. Students will undertake a semester-long project, working to understand the agency’s data needs and develop an IoT solution to gather data for analysis that could inform the agency on planning, policy, or operational issues. The course will cover current connected microcontroller platforms and connectivity options like WiFi, Cellular, and LoRaWAN as well as the software tools needed to store and present data in user-friendly dashboards.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2090-000 (22673)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Creating with TinyML (ITPG-GT 2339)

A new world is emerging at the intersections of machine learning and physical computation that will offer wide-scale access to bringing intelligence to everyday devices and spaces at extremely low costs. In this course, students are offered the opportunity to become pioneers in a new field of hardware machine learning as they are introduced to the most used machine learning platform in the world (TensorFlow) that has been embedded into an incredibly small microcontroller, called TinyML. Students will learn about building with machine learning, the ethics and societal impacts of ML, and how to start realizing creative computation through ML-based physical computing.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2339-000 (23970)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Stories of Illness: Graphic & Narrative Medicine (ITPG-GT 2340)

Narrative holds a place in discourses of health, illness, caregiving, and disability, carrying and conveying the densely detailed, nuanced, and complex threads of personal emotion, social experience, and cultural meaning that accompany all instances of these subjects. Narrative also plays a growing role in clinical practice, research, and health education, as increasingly registered in the burgeoning field of Medical Humanities. This course introduces students to texts, practices and major works in the emergent fields of Graphic Medicine and Narrative Medicine, using traditional humanities methods of critical reading and analysis as well as experimental and creative methods including field observation and art-making in a variety of media. Building upon a series of practice-based assignments throughout the semester, students will complete a final project that exemplifies some of the ways narrative and graphic design foster understanding and knowledge in contexts of illness.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2340-000 (23972)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Big Spaces (ITPG-GT 2342)

So much of life is circumstance, being in the right place at the right moment in time. Can we shape a life or at least a few brief moments of one by designing a space for it to inhabit? In this course, we will treat space as a time-based medium and ask how experiential spaces can generate narratives that are lived rather than told. We will look to a broad range of storytelling traditions to interrogate four so-called “space-narrative” forms: Wandering The Desert, Processions, Circles and Territories. Through play, discussion and technical and conceptual workshops, we will ask and attempt to answer some of the following questions: What constitutes a space? How do we experience a space over time? How does space shape our experience of time? How can space shape both a personal and collective narrative? We will build spaces with lighting, projection, sound and physical objects. Class time will be split between group improvisation exercises, playing-testing and critiquing projects. The class will culminate in a showing of work at the end of the semester.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2342-000 (23974)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Art Toy Design (ITPG-GT 2196)

Is it a plaything? Sculpture? Nostalgia? A Product? Art toys exist at the center of a unique Venn diagram. Each student in this class will develop an original limited edition art toy. We will cover toy fabrication, character design, material selection, packaging design, and art toy culture. The class will be fabrication heavy, there will be weekly assignments, and a final project.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2196-000 (22643)
09/02/2021 – 10/26/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

New Interfaces for Musical Expression (ITPG-GT 2227)

The course focus is on the design and creation of digital musical instruments. Music in performance is the primary subject of this class. We approach questions such as “What is performance?” “What makes a musical interface intuitive and emotionally immediate?” and “How do we create meaningful correlations between performance gestures and their musical consequences?” Over the semester, we look at many examples of current work by creators of musical interfaces, and discuss a wide range of issues facing technology-enabled performance – such as novice versus virtuoso performers, discrete versus continuous data control, the importance of haptic responsiveness as well as the relationship between musical performance and visual display. Extensive readings and case studies provide background for class discussions on the theory and practice of designing gestural controllers for musical performance. Students design and prototype a musical instrument – a complete system encompassing musical controller, algorithm for mapping input to sound, and the sound output itself. A technical framework for prototyping performance controllers is made available. Students focus on musical composition and improvisation techniques as they prepare their prototypes for live performance. The class culminates in a musical performance where students (or invited musicians) will demonstrate their instruments. Prerequisites: H79.2233 (Introduction to Computational Media) and H79.2301 (Physical Computing). Prerequisite: ICM / ICM: Media (ITPG-GT 2233 / ITPG-GT 2048) & Intro to Phys. Comp. (ITPG-GT 2301)

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2227-000 (15675)
09/09/2024 – 12/09/2024 Mon
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rios, David

Hearing Difference: The Commercial Music Industry and the American Racial Imaginary (IDSEM-UG 1802)

In 1903, at the dawn of the commercial music industry, sociologist W. E. B. DuBois famously proclaimed that the foremost problem in twentieth century American society is “the problem of the color line.” Du Bois’s prescience sets the stage for this course’s exploration of racial identity in recorded, commercially available music. We will examine how racial performance has intermingled with music consumption in the United States since blackface minstrelsy in the 1830s. Our goal is to understand how deeply embedded race—both ascribed and claimed—is in American music culture, reverberating throughout the last century in debates on artists’ authenticity, propriety, and popularity. This course is organized chronologically; each week is devoted to a particular era and its corresponding musical genres leading up to the present. With the rising importance of visual media since the mid-20th century, a historically informed understanding of the confluences of race and ethnicity in American music culture through music media and technologies will offer an enhanced understanding of the past and our contemporary, internet-driven musical landscape.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


IDSEM-UG 1802-000 (23278)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Coleman, Kwami

Front-End Web (IMNY-UT 228)

This course will provide a foundation for understanding modern web development with a focus on front end technologies and accessing public data. The forms and uses of these technologies are explored in a laboratory context of experimentation and discussion. This studio stresses interactivity, usability, and the quality and appropriateness of look and feel. Students will create two web applications, including one that leverages public APIs and Javascript libraries. The goal of the course is for students to learn how to think holistically about an application, both by designing a clear user experience and understanding the algorithmic steps required to build it. Assignments are arranged in sequence to enable the production of a website of high quality in design and engineering.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


IMNY-UT 228-000 (15924)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by

Real-Time Media (IMNY-UT 285)

Real-Time Media is a 4-credit class using MaxMSPJitter to survey how real-time and reactive media can be used for art installation and performance. Classes will be a mix of coding labs, surveys and lectures on historical examples of the medium, guest artists talking about their practice, class field trips, and in-class performances and critique. While the primary focus will be on video and sound there will also be attention given to sensors, electronics, web APIs, and more. The class has coding assignments building to solo video and audio performances and final group installation project.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


IMNY-UT 285-000 (15835)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Fairy Tales for the 21st Century (IMNY-UT 283)

Fairy tales, myths, and stories of magic have always served as a way for both children and adults to make sense of the unpredictabilities of the world around them. How do these stories serve us today? How do new technologies allow us to reinterpret them so that they have new meaning for our times? Through readings, weekly exercises, and a final project, students in this course will explore the historic role and structure of fairy tales as well as the potential contemporary frameworks that allow us to entertain the impossible. Students will work with stories of their choosing however we will examine their implementation through traditional material and book art techniques, as well as projection mapping, 3D and VR (using Unreal Engine.)

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


IMNY-UT 283-000 (15824)
at Distance Learning/Asynchronous
Instructed by

Intro to Physical Comp (ITPG-GT 2301)

This course expands the students’ palette for physical interaction design with computational media. We look away from the limitations of the mouse, keyboard and monitor interface of today’s computers, and start instead with the expressive capabilities of the human body. We consider uses of the computer for more than just information retrieval and processing, and at locations other than the home or the office. The platform for the class is a microcontroller, a single-chip computer that can fit in your hand. The core technical concepts include digital, analog and serial input and output. Core interaction design concepts include user observation, affordances, and converting physical action into digital information. Students have weekly lab exercises to build skills with the microcontroller and related tools, and longer assignments in which they apply the principles from weekly labs in creative applications. Both individual work and group work is required.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2301-000 (15684)
09/03/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Galvao Cesar de Oliveira, Pedro


ITPG-GT 2301-000 (15742)
09/03/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Feddersen, Jeffery


ITPG-GT 2301-000 (15685)
09/03/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rozin, Daniel


ITPG-GT 2301-000 (15686)
09/03/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Igoe, Thomas


ITPG-GT 2301-000 (15687)
09/03/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Song, Yeseul


ITPG-GT 2301-000 (15688)
09/03/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rozin, Daniel


ITPG-GT 2301-000 (15689)
09/03/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rios, David

Future of New Media (ITPG-GT 2297)

Can the future be foretold? No, but the long-term outcomes of present-day actions can be foreseen — and, as the 2008 economic crisis showed us, lack of foresight can have grave implications.Using a technique called scenario planning, students consider the present and future ramifications of knotty, large-scale problems related to the evolution of the internet and other aspects of the telecommunications infrastructure. In exploring this, we touch upon the global economy, demographics, international politics, environmental concerns, and other large-scale issues. Scenario planning is a rigorous but highly engaging technique, in which people share information and judgment to create a picture of the future larger than any individual could produce alone. The technique has been used since the mid-1950s decades to distinguish certainties from uncertainties, and to learn to be prepared for multiple eventualities. Students will conduct original research on significant trends, use those trends to develop compelling, plausible stories about possible futures, and present the futures – and the strategies they suggest – to a public audience. As part of the process that we co-develop, the class explores theories about system dynamics, organizational and societal change, the causes of economic failure and success, and the nature of technology.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2297-000 (23975)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: Modern Israel (CORE-UA 537)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CORE-UA 537-000 (21338)


CORE-UA 537-000 (21339)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 537-000 (21340)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 537-000 (21341)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 537-000 (21342)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 537-000 (21343)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 537-000 (21344)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Life Science: Molecules of Life (CORE-UA 310)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 310-000 (9800)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jordan, Trace


CORE-UA 310-000 (9801)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 310-000 (9802)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 310-000 (9803)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 310-000 (9804)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 310-000 (9805)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 310-000 (9806)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Applied Cryptography (CS-GY 6903)

This course examines Modern Cryptography from a both theoretical and applied perspective, with emphasis on “provable security” and “application case studies”. The course looks particularly at cryptographic primitives that are building blocks of various cryptographic applications. The course studies notions of security for a given cryptographic primitive, its various constructions and respective security analysis based on the security notion. The cryptographic primitives covered include pseudorandom functions, symmetric encryption (block ciphers), hash functions and random oracles, message authentication codes, asymmetric encryption, digital signatures and authenticated key exchange. The course covers how to build provably secure cryptographic protocols (e.g., secure message transmission, identification schemes, secure function evaluation, etc.), and various number-theoretic assumptions upon which cryptography is based. Also covered: implementation issues (e.g., key lengths, key management, standards, etc.) and, as application case studies, a number of real-life scenarios currently using solutions from modern cryptography. | Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6903-000 (15957)
at ePoly
Instructed by Chen, Zhixiong


CS-GY 6903-000 (15958)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Di Crescenzo, Giovanni


CS-GY 6903-000 (15959)
at ePoly
Instructed by Di Crescenzo, Giovanni

Application Security (CS-GY 9163)

This course addresses the design and implementation of secure applications. Concentration is on writing software programs that make it difficult for intruders to exploit security holes. The course emphasizes writing secure distributed programs in Java. The security ramifications of class, field and method visibility are emphasized. | Knowledge of Information, Security and Privacy equivalent to CS-GY 6813. Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 9163-000 (15952)
at ePoly
Instructed by


CS-GY 9163-000 (15953)
at ePoly
Instructed by


CS-GY 9163-000 (15954)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Satt, Mo

Big Data (CS-GY 6513)

Big Data requires the storage, organization, and processing of data at a scale and efficiency that go well beyond the capabilities of conventional information technologies. In this course, we will study the state of art in big data management: we will learn about algorithms, techniques and tools needed to support big data processing. In addition, we will examine real applications that require massive data analysis and how they can be implemented on Big Data platforms. The course will consist of lectures based both on textbook material and scientific papers. It will include programming assignments that will provide students with hands-on experience on building data-intensive applications using existing Big Data platforms, including Amazon AWS. Besides lectures given by the instructor, we will also have guest lectures by experts in some of the topics we will cover. Students should have experience in programming: Java, C, C , Python, or similar languages, equivalent to two introductory courses in programming, such as “Introduction to Programming” and “Data Structures and Algorithms. | Knowledge of Python. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6513-000 (16126)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rodriguez, Juan


CS-GY 6513-000 (16128)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rodriguez, Juan


CS-GY 6513-000 (16127)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Sat
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Patel, Amit


CS-GY 6513-000 (16129)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

COMPUTER VISION (CS-GY 6643)

An important goal of artificial intelligence (AI) is to equip computers with the capability of interpreting visual inputs. Computer vision is an area in AI that deals with the construction of explicit, meaningful descriptions of physical objects from images. It includes as parts many techniques from image processing, pattern recognition, geometric modeling, and cognitive processing. This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and techniques in computer vision. | Knowledge of Data Structures and Algorithms, proficiency in programming, and familiarity with matrix arithmetic. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6643-000 (15999)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Computer Networking (CS-GY 6843)

This course takes a top-down approach to computer networking. After an overview of computer networks and the Internet, the course covers the application layer, transport layer, network layer and link layers. Topics at the application layer include client-server architectures, P2P architectures, DNS and HTTP and Web applications. Topics at the transport layer include multiplexing, connectionless transport and UDP, principles or reliable data transfer, connection-oriented transport and TCP and TCP congestion control. Topics at the network layer include forwarding, router architecture, the IP protocol and routing protocols including OSPF and BGP. Topics at the link layer include multiple-access protocols, ALOHA, CSMA/CD, Ethernet, CSMA/CA, wireless 802.11 networks and linklayer switches. The course includes simple quantitative delay and throughput modeling, socket programming and network application development and Ethereal labs. | Knowledge of Python and/or C. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6843-000 (16008)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Reddington, Thomas


CS-GY 6843-000 (16009)
at ePoly
Instructed by Portnoy, Rafail


CS-GY 6843-000 (16010)
at ePoly
Instructed by Portnoy, Rafail


CS-GY 6843-000 (16011)
at ePoly
Instructed by Zhao, John

Artificial Intelligence I (CS-GY 6613)

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is an important topic in computer science and offers many diversified applications. It addresses one of the ultimate puzzles humans are trying to solve: How is it possible for a slow, tiny brain, whether biological or electronic, to perceive, understand, predict and manipulate a world far larger and more complicated than itself? And how do people create a machine (or computer) with those properties? To that end, AI researchers try to understand how seeing, learning, remembering and reasoning can, or should, be done. This course introduces students to the many AI concepts and techniques. | Knowledge of Data Structures and Algorithms. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 6613-000 (15997)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Monogioudis, Pantelis


CS-GY 6613-000 (15998)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Wong, Edward

Digital Photography (OART-GT 2013)

This is a standard digital photography course designed for those with little or no experience in photography. This course will emphasize personal expression through the application of technique to the presentation of subject matter. Open Arts will have enough Sony A7r cameras for students to share. If students plan to borrow the DSLR cameras, they are first required to purchase College Student Insurance, (CSI). While it is not required that you own your own digital camera to enroll in this course, it is recommended that you borrow or acquire your own camera for the duration of this course, or if you would like to avoid having to share one of the department’s cameras with another student. If you would like to purchase your own camera, a digital single lens reflex (SLR) or mirrorless digital camera is highly recommended for this course. The camera needs to have manual aperture and shutter speed controls. The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the technical and aesthetic aspects of making photographic images. We will apply fundamental photographic techniques such as composition, framing, lighting and manual camera controls to the images we create. We will discuss the way we see, compared to how cameras and lenses see, evaluate the similarities and differences and how that impacts the creation of images and how we analyze them. Students will make photographs that are effective as individual images and photographs that work together in a series. Students will learn how to create a narrative with a series of photographs and express a feeling or mood with a series of photographs. Class discussions will introduce students to a variety of concepts related to visual literacy. Students will also be introduced to the work of historically significant photographers from a broad range of backgrounds. Students will learn how to use Adobe Creative Cloud software to adjust images for print and digital publishing. By the end of the course, students will understand how to use a digital SLR or mirrorless camera to create compelling photographs using manual controls, process their images using Adobe Creative Cloud software and best practices for publishing their images digitally as well as best practices for printing their images. Finally, students will enhance their critical thinking skills while developing a deeper understanding of visual/photographic language. Students are expected to shoot a minimum of 108 exposures (photographs) each week.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


OART-GT 2013-000 (7438)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ross-Smith, Bayete

Choreography (OART-GT 2805)

The purpose of this course is to enable the student to gain a heightened awareness, appreciation, and knowledge of dance through movement and performance. We focus on the foundations of dance such as control, aesthetics, alignment, development of strength and flexibility, dynamics, athleticism, musicality, use of space, development of learning strategies within a group context, and personal, artistic expression. The student’s mastery of their body, expression with their body and creativity through their body is the center of the work. Through individual and collective kinesthetic participation in unfamiliar patterns, related, but not limited to China, West Africa, United States, and Japan, the student is physically and conceptually challenged and informed. Using these learned dances as inspiration, students go on to re interpret, improvise and choreograph their own variations on dance forms in their class assignments. Dance experience is not necessary.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


OART-GT 2805-000 (7359)09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Hoffbauer, Patricia

Live Video Performance Art (OART-GT 2567)

This course will combine a history of video art and experimental film with practical training in the use of live video performance art technology. Students will explore new ways to create and edit films and videos using VJ software, projections, and multi-channel video surfaces. Workshops will demonstrate concepts and software that can be integrated into the creative process of video performance art and video art installations. COURSE OBJECTIVES At the completion of this course, the student will be able to: Draw inspiration from the recent history of incredible video and multi-media artists. Develop an understanding of audio and visual hardware used by VJ’s. Use live VJ software to manipulate digital media in real time to create Video Performance Art. Use Projection Mapping techniques to project video art onto 3D surfaces. Create original video performance art, video installations, and other performance pieces. Utilize skills to make video art in the professional market.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


OART-GT 2567-000 (7246)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nova, Max

Urban Arts Workshop: New York (OART-GT 2925)

Urban Arts Workshop–New York is composed of lectures, presentations, screenings, readings, discussions, and visits from painters, photographers, filmmakers, writers, designers, architects, planners, restaurateurs, curators and critics designed to expose students to the key concepts and fundamental theories of urban studies, public art and the urban-inspired works of many great artists and writers based in New York City and around the world. Outside of class time, students will do readings, conduct research, watch movies, post reactions and do various assignments that engage the core course subject matter and themes. Each class will explore another form of urban art, including discussions about and encounters with graffiti, street photography, sculpture, installation art, architecture, music, dance, performance, theater, fashion, urban sound projects, large-scale projections, poetry, essays and short stories with an aim to understand how such art forms came into being and how they express a distinctly urban message to the inhabitants and visitors of New York City and cities across the planet. The instructor seeks to combine the critical and theoretical with the experiential and personal in order to lead students to a deeper and more fruitful relationship with cities, the arts and themselves. Further exploration will be conducted into the phenomenon of connectivity in the 21st century city providing a deeper perspective on globalism, the networked environment, and emerging technology’s role in the future of art, culture and urban living. Field trips may include: The Whitney, The High Line and Hudson Yards, Tiny Island, MoMA, Guggenheim, PS1, Museum of the City of New York, The New Museum, Transit Museum, Noguchi Museum, Governors Island and others based upon availability. Students will need a MetroCard for traveling around the city as well as approximately $50.00 to cover meals and museum tickets (this price varies depending on course itinerary).

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Intro to Digital Tools (OART-GT 2823)

This course will explore the basic tools of digital imaging. We will cover the three main Adobe products for creative imaging – Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. Through a series of short assignments we will look at various graphic design and layout ideas using Illustrator and InDesign and will touch on the wealth of image enhancement techniques afforded by Photoshop. The short assignments introduce the basics of design, typography and compositing images. Students have the opportunity to complete a small project of their own for the end of the term. Class time will be divided between lectures, critiques, and work in class sessions. This course is not intended to completely cover the software listed, but will give students a fundamental understanding of the possibilities of digital imaging. While the majority of the class focuses on print media (images, books and magazines), we discuss the growing importance of screen output. We do not have time to cover specific web or media projects, but will address transferable skills and understanding. We will incorporate some Adobe apps to augment the desktop applications. Additional reading materials will be distributed during the semester. Students should have access to the Adobe Creative Suite through the NYU license.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


OART-GT 2823-000 (7363)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fallon, Catherine


OART-GT 2823-000 (7364)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fallon, Catherine

Hand Held: Creative Tools for Phones (ITPG-GT 2068)

“The smartphone is not only the primary site for digital communication and consumption, it also hosts emerging forms of media production. Let’s investigate the potential of the mobile touchscreen as a creative instrument! This is a project based course, and we will explore by creating and testing a series of functioning web-based toys – including drawing apps, character creators, and writing tools. You can expect to sharpen your skills in javascript and design. “

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2068-000 (14779)
01/23/2024 – 04/30/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Bittker, Max

The Body, Everywhere and Here (ITPG-GT 2070)

Today’s internet, made up of mostly text documents and two-dimensional images and videos, is the result of historical limitations in bandwidth, graphics processing and input devices. These limitations have made the internet a place where the mind goes, but the body cannot follow. Recent advances in motion capture devices, graphics processing, machine learning, bandwidth and browsers, however, are paving the way for the body to find its place online. This course will explore embodied interactions in the browser and across networks. Specifically, we’ll explore TensorFlow.js models like PoseNet and BodyPix, and Microsoft Kinect in p5.js and Three.js. Assignments will consider designing engaging embodied experiences for individual and social interactions online. Experience with Node, HTML and JavaScript is helpful but not required. ICM level programming experience is required. The course will have weekly assignments that explore embodied interaction online. Assignments will begin with exploring single points of interaction (i.e. one mouse or one joint), and progress to considering full bodies and multiple bodies in one browser. Students will have a 2-3-week final project with which they will delve more deeply into the subject matter in one piece of work. Students will have readings/watchings focused on embodied and networked user experience. Some influential works that will likely be assigned/discussed are Laurie Anderson’s “Habeas Corpus,” Todd Rose’s “The End of Average,” and Myron Krueger’s “Artificial Reality.” The course examples will be taught in Javascript using web technologies/frameworks. However, students are welcome to work in their preferred medium.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2070-000 (22670)
09/02/2021 – 10/26/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Cybernetics of Sex: Technology, Feminisms, & the Choreography (ITPG-GT 2074)

What can cybernetics, the study of how we shape and are shaped by systems, teach us about the sexual and social reproduction of gender and sexism? How does sex become gender and what are the politics surrounding who gets reproduced? We will explore how social regulatory systems are encoded into technological platforms and disentangle how they produce social pressure and govern behavior through somatic exercises, discussion, and project making. In this class, we will not shy away from difficult conversations and work closely together to cultivate a space of openness and mutual support. Discussion and project-making is core to this class. Together we will read the work of scholars such as Donna Haraway, Ruha Benjamin, Paul Preciado, Silvia Federici, & Audre Lorde. Along with lecture, discussion, and in class activities, students will be encouraged to explore their own research interests and personal histories. When projects are discussed, we will practice communicating ideas through presentation as a medium and will co-create a culture of constructive feedback.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2074-000 (23969)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Visual Journalism (ITPG-GT 2071)

This course is designed to provide an overview of visual storytelling in the newsroom. We will explore a variety of narrative formats and design principles, learn about reporting techniques for visual stories, touch on the best practices and ethics of journalism and work on collaborative exercises and assignments.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2071-000 (15719)
09/06/2024 – 12/11/2024 Fri
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Parshina-Kottas, Yuliya

Experiential Comics: Interactive Comic Books for the Fourth (ITPG-GT 2072)

Juxtaposed to traditional comics, Experiential Comics combines emergent tech, unconventional comic book art/structure, and game engines to offer users a more immersive, continuous storyworld experience. Challenging the status quo of classic and contemporary digital comics, students will explore new technologies/world-building techniques better suited to craft innovative comic book narratives and formats –worthy of the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Students will ingest a brief history of classic and digital comics formats, collaborate with comic book artists to design engrossing characters, engage in world-building sessions, play with Unity/Unreal engines to generate avatars/ virtual environments, work with actors in motion capture/volumetric capture studios, learn the latest iteration of the Experiential Comics format, and share their unique expressions of Experiential Comics in a final presentation. Throughout a 7-week period, the course will be divided into 7 themes 1) The Disconnection of Digital Comics 2) Classic and Unconventional Comics Continuity 3) Marvel vs DC vs Insert Your Universe Here 4) Fourth Industrial Revolution Technologies 5) Capture & Creation 6) Infinite Engagement and Unlocking Immersive Format 7) Experiential Comics Presentations. Each weekly class will be divided into two halves 1) Exploration of Theme/Discussion 2) Process, Practices, & Play. This course requires CL: Hypercinema or equivalent experience.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2072-000 (15718)
09/05/2024 – 10/17/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Online
Instructed by Patrick, Tony

Masquerade (ITPG-GT 2044)

Masks have been used around the world since antiquity for ceremonial and practical purposes, as devices for protection, disguise, entertainment and bodily transformation, made to be worn or displayed. Sociologist Erving Goffman wrote about the everyday life as a masked theatrical performance. The performative aspect of our lives today is ever so present in our use of social media, where we present a curated version ourselves for the immediate visual consumption of others. In our `Selfies`, we can assume a multitude of identities and characters. Recent tools and platforms have evolved social media portraiture to an art form and have created new opportunities for artists to create and distribute interactive augmentations, forming new relationships between artists and viewers. This class explores the developing language of social media portraiture enhanced by Augmented Reality. Students will: – review masks in art history, leading up to today – ideate, design and develop an interactive mask (AKA effects/lenses/filters) – learn to use the Meta Spark software to create AR effects. This course requires CL: Hypercinema or equivalent experience.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
1 credits – 1 Week

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2044-000 (15711)

Designing Club Culture (ITPG-GT 2047)

How can light, sound and design transform the human experience within a given space? How can psycho-geography be manipulated through audio-visual techniques? In what ways have and will technology allow spaces for sonic entertainment to be more immersive and experimental? Through an exploration of audio-visual techniques (i.e. VJing, MIDI-ing devices, sound synthesis, projection mapping, experiments with spatial sonic composition) along with discussions on how counterculture movements have used music and design as a vehicle for political dissent and community building, students will be invited to imagine new club spaces for social contexts beyond pure aesthetics. Assignments will include the development of different forms of interactive spaces for expression. Ableton (and free DAWs), MaxMSP, Isadora, and Unity will be used within this course.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2047-000 (23971)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Drawing It Together (ITPG-GT 2538)

If we consider drawing as one of the most ancient forms of interaction, it has the power to engage users like no other technology. With the right setup and call for action – I’m always taken aback by how a cup full of crayons and a pile of paper can bring the child out of a serious businessman. But how do you pass the strong barriers of users who are afraid to draw? In this weekend workshop we’ll examine various techniques that can spark an interaction which is all focused on the action of drawing. Workshop topics include an exploring into collaborative drawing platforms, interactive drawing installations, drawing machines and drawing as a form of interactive storytelling. We’ll discuss the differences between digital and analog drawing and how to marry the benefits of both mediums. We’ll cover the work of important artist and researchers who are creating inspiring work in the field of drawing and interaction such as Shantell Martin, Zach Lieberman, Tobias Gutmann, David Ha and more There will be various collaborative drawing exercises in class. This workshop is meant for students who wish to focus on drawing as the driving force of their interactions and possibly expand it into thesis. Each student will design and prototype an interaction which is based on the subject of drawing. Alon Chitayat graduated from ITP in 2015, He works at Google as a Sr. UX and motion designer and on a collaborative digital whiteboard called Jamboard.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
1 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2538-000 (22646)

Textile Interfaces (ITPG-GT 2030)

Want to make an interface that can be squished, stretched, stroked, or smooshed? This course will introduce the use of electronic textiles as sensors. Focus will be placed on physical interaction design – working with the affordances of these materials to create interfaces designed to invite or demand diverse types of physical interaction. This course does not require knowledge or love of sewing – a variety of construction methods will be introduced. It will rely on a physical computing approach, with Arduino being used to read sensor values. Working with a breadth of conductive and resistive materials, students will learn to design and create bespoke alternative interfaces that can live in our clothing, furniture, and built environments. Prerequisite: Intro to Phys. Comp. (ITPG-GT 2301)

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
1 credits – 1 Day

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2030-000 (20916)

Machine Learning for the Web (ITPG-GT 2465)

Libraries like TensorFlow.js and ml5.js unlocked new opportunities for interactive machine learning projects in the browser. The goal of this class is to learn and understand common machine learning techniques and apply them to generate creative outputs in the browser. This class will start with running models in the browser using high-level APIs from ml5.js, as well as explore the Layer APIs from TensorFlow.js to train models using custom data. This class will also cover preparing the dataset for training models. At the completion of this course, students will have a better understanding of a few machine learning models, how do they work, how to train these models, and their use case to creative projects. Students will also be able to create interactive ML web applications with pre-trained models or their own models. Prospective students are expected to have taken an ICM (Introduction to Computational Media) course, or have an equivalent programming experience with JavaScript, HTML, CSS.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2465-000 (14764)
01/26/2024 – 05/03/2024 Fri
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Shi, Yining

Design Research (ITPG-GT 2997)

This course will focus on a range of human-centered design research and innovation workshop methodologies including Design Thinking, LEGO Serious Play, Lean UX, Google Ventures Sprints, Gamestorming, Futurecasting, and Service Design. Students will look for design opportunities within the unprecedented challenges that we are currently facing as global citizens. Students will define a problem space based on the drivers that they’re most interested in exploring and will have the option to work alone or form small design research teams. They will learn how to conduct primary and secondary research, creating deliverables such as personas, journey maps, concept canvasses, and prototypes. Students will be required to apply design research approaches and workshop methodologies, develop and test a rapid prototype and then share their work in a final presentation.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2997-000 (15702)
10/24/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Derby, David · Brant, Heidi

Hello, Computer: Unconventional Uses of Voice Technology (ITPG-GT 2988)

Computers are able to understand human speech better than ever before, but voice technology is still mostly used for practical (and boring!) purposes, like playing music, smart home control, or customer service phone trees. What else can we experience in the very weird, yet intuitive act of talking out loud to machines? The goal of this course is to give students the technical ability to imagine and build more creative uses of voice technology. Students will be encouraged to examine and play with the ways in which this emerging field is still broken and strange. We will develop interactions, performances, artworks or apps exploring the unique experience of human and computer conversation. Students will learn how to use text-to-speech and speech-to-text technologies, voice assistant devices, generative text techniques, open speech APIs, Node.js, and conversational UI design. There will be weekly assignments leading up to a final project. ICM or comparable programming experience required.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2988-000 (22644)
09/02/2021 – 10/26/2021 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Game Design and the Psychology of Choice (ITPG-GT 2161)

As game and interaction designers we create systems and choices that can either prey upon our psychological foibles or help us avoid decision pitfalls. It is our responsibility to understand how we decide, to consider the ethics of the systems we create and to practice designing systems in a purposeful manner. Game Design & The Psychology of Choice will provide interaction and game designers with an understanding of the factors that influence behavior and decision-making by looking at the intertwining of cognitive psychology and economics through the development of behavioral economics. These disciplines study behavior on the individual and group level, often revealing some of the why behind the rules of thumb and folk wisdom that game designers come to intuitively. But understanding the why—why we fall into decision traps; why certain tradeoffs tax our brain more than others; why we are overconfident about our abilities; why certain decisions make us uncomfortable—allows us to more purposefully apply our design craft, both in and out of games. Finally, as a class, we will take what we learn about how we think and create series of game experiences based around key cognitive science concepts. Assignments may include: •Mod a cognitive science experiment into a game or experience •Analyze and present a game through the lens of cognitive science and behavioral economics •Create game or experience based around a particular insight from cognitive science or behavioral economics

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2161-000 (22642)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Socially Engaged Art and Digital Practice (ITPG-GT 2156)

“Digital tools of all kinds are deeply embedded in how our society operates. Innovations in basic communication, data processing, image manipulation, and even financial systems have transformed our social worlds and our artistic practice. This became even clearer and more present during the global pandemic, where, during times of social isolation, digital and networked tools almost fully replaced in-person social life. This course will examine the ethical and esthetic implications of a digital and networked world through the lens of socially engaged art and explore how digital tools are and can be used in socially engaged art practice, where art and creative work intersect directly with people and civic life. This includes discussion of how digital and networked tools both increase and complicate physical, economic, and cultural accessibility, and the ethical and social implications of the newest technologies, including AI, Web3, and quantum computing. We will work on how digital tools have been used in socially engaged art and how they could be used further, guided by the understanding that working digitally with socially engaged concepts means both using digital tools within projects AND interrogating the inner workings of how digital practices operate socially and culturally. We will also have some meetings and activities in public spaces, field trips to organizations such as Eyebeam and Genspace, and guest lecturers. Please feel free to reach out to me directly if you have questions about taking the course, or the course content.”

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2156-000 (15701)
09/05/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by MacLow, Clarinda

Prototyping Electronic Devices (ITPG-GT 2845)

The most difficult part of prototyping is not the building process, but the process of deciding how to build. If we choose proper technology for prototypes, we can improve their robustness and simplicity. This course will cover available and affordable technologies for ITP students to build prototypes. The course will start with soldering, wiring and LED basics. Then students will design an Arduino compatible board in Eagle, get it fabricated, assembled. And then using the debugger to dig deeper to understand how a microcontroller works. The class will also cover multitasking, signal processing, communication, document writing and advanced skills beyond the Intro to Physical Computing class. Each session will have lectures followed by in-class practices with guidance. The 14-week long assignment is called Do It Once – Do It Again. Bringing an idea or ongoing projects is highly encouraged. This course requires Physical Computing or equivalent experience. Prerequisite: Intro to Phys. Comp. (ITPG-GT 2301)

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2845-000 (15700)
09/06/2024 – 12/11/2024 Fri
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sun, Deqing

Designing for Digital Fabrication (ITPG-GT 2890)

The ability to digitally fabricate parts and whole pieces directly from our computers or design files used to be an exotic and expensive option not really suitable for student or designer projects, but changes in this field in the past 5 years have brought these capabilities much closer to our means, especially as ITP students. ITP and NYU now offer us access to laser cutting, CNC routing, and 3D stereolithography. In this class we will learn how to design for and operate these machines. Emphasis will be put on designing functional parts that can fit into a larger project or support other components as well as being successful on a conceptual and aesthetic level. In this class we will discover methods to design projects on CAD applications for total control of the result, and we will develop algorithmic ways to create designs from software (Processing) to take advantage of the ability to make parts and projects that are unique, customizable, dependent on external data or random. The class will include 3 assignments to create projects using the three machines (laser, router, 3D) and the opportunity to work on a final project.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2890-000 (15695)
09/04/2024 – 12/04/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rozin, Daniel

Understanding Networks (ITPG-GT 2808)

“Interactive technologies seldom stand alone. They exist in networks, and they facilitate networked connections between people. Designing technologies for communications requires an understanding of networks. This course is a foundation in how networks work. Through weekly readings and class discussions and a series of short hands-on projects, students gain an understanding of network topologies, how the elements of a network are connected and addressed, what protocols hold them together, and what dynamics arise in networked environments. This class is intended to supplement the many network-centric classes at ITP. It is broad survey, both of contemporary thinking about networks, and of current technologies and methods used in creating them. Prerequisites: Students should have an understanding of basic programming. This class can be taken at the same time as, or after, Intro to Computational Media or an equivalent intro to programming. Some, though not all, production work in the class requires basic programming. There is a significant reading component to this class as well. Learning Objectives In this class, you will learn about how communications networks are structured, and you will learn how to examine those structures using software tools. By the end of this class, you should have a working knowledge of the following concepts: * The basics of network theory, some history of the internet and the organizations and stakeholders involved in its creation and maintenance * The Open Systems Interconnect (OSI) model and standard internet protocols such as Internet Protocol (IP), Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) , Universal Datagram Protocol (UDP), and Hypertext Transport Protocol (HTTP).  * Network addressing, private and public IP addresses * What hosts, servers, and clients are and a few ways in which they communicate * What a command line interface  (CLI) is and how to use the tools available in one * The basics of internet security * How telecommunications networks are similar to other infrastructural networks, like power and transportation, and how they are different.”

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2808-000 (15692)
09/04/2024 – 12/04/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Igoe, Thomas


ITPG-GT 2808-000 (15693)
09/05/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Igoe, Thomas

The Neural Aesthetic (ITPG-GT 2994)

Making words and images public used to be difficult, complex, and expensive. Now it’s not. That change, simple but fundamental, is transforming the media landscape. A publisher used to be required if you wanted to put material out into the public sphere; now anyone with a keyboard or a camera can circulate their material globally. This change in the economics of communication has opened the floodgates to a massive increase in the number and variety of participants creating and circulating media. This change, enormous and permanent, is driving several profound effects in the media landscape today. This course covers the transition from a world populated by professional media makers and a silent public to one where anyone who has a phone or a computer can be both producer and consumer. This change, brought about by the technological and economic characteristics of digital data and networks, is upending old industries — newspapers, music publishing, moviemaking — faster than new systems can be put in place. The result is chaos and experimentation as new ways of participating in the previously sparse media landscape are appearing everywhere. This course covers the history and economics of the previous media landscape, the design of digital networks that upend those historical systems, and new modes of participation from weblogs and wikis and Twitter to fan fiction and lolcats. The course centers on readings and field observation, with three papers due during the course of the term.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2994-000 (23993)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Programming from A to Z (ITPG-GT 2536)

This course focuses on programming strategies and techniques behind procedural analysis and generation of text-based data. We’ll explore topics ranging from evaluating text according to its statistical properties to the automated production of text with probabilistic methods to text visualization. Students will learn server-side and client-side JavaScript programming and develop projects that can be shared and interacted with online. This fall the course will also explore topics in machine learning as related to text. There will be weekly homework assignments as well as a final project.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2536-000 (15690)
09/04/2024 – 12/04/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Shiffman, Daniel

Developing Assistive Technology (ITPG-GT 2446)

Assistive or Adaptive Technology commonly refers to “products, devices or equipment, whether acquired commercially, modified or customized, that are used to maintain, increase or improve the functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities.” This multi-disciplinary course allows students from a variety of backgrounds to work together to develop assistive technology. Partnering with outside organizations students work in teams to identify a clinical need relevant to a certain clinical site or client population, and learn the process of developing an idea and following that through to the development of a prototype product. Teams are comprised of ITP students as well as graduate rehabilitation, physical and occupational therapy students. Prerequisites (for ITP students): H79.2233 Introduction to Computational Media and H79.2301 Introduction to Physical Computing. This course has a lab fee of $201.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2446-000 (12615)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Perr, Anita · Hurst, Amy

Cultures & Contexts: The Black Atlantic (CORE-UA 9534)

This course considers the Black Atlantic as a socio-cultural economic space from the first arrival of Africans in the ‘New World,’ beginning around in the 15th century, through the rise of slavery in the Americas. During this class we will trace the origins and importance of the concept of the Black Atlantic within broad political contexts, paying special attention to the changing social, cultural and economic relations that shaped community formation among people of African descent and laid the foundations for modern political and economic orders. Once we have established those foundations, we will think about the Black Atlantic as a critical site of cultural production. Using the frame of the Atlantic to ask questions about the relationship between culture and political economy. We will explore a range of genres–film, fiction, music, as well as formal scholarship–so as to explore questions of evidence in the context of the real and the imaginary. Topics to be covered include African enslavement and settlement in Africa and the Americas; the development of transatlantic racial capitalism; variations in politics and culture between empires in the Atlantic world; creolization, plantation slavery and slave society; the politics and culture of the enslaved; the Haitian Revolution; slave emancipation; and contemporary black Atlantic politics and racial capitalism.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CORE-UA 9534-000 (4806)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9534-000 (2315)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Accra (Global)
Instructed by Baku, Kofi


CORE-UA 9534-000 (2746)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9534-000 (2516)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9534-000 (2618)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Washington DC (Global)
Instructed by

Texts and Ideas: (CORE-UA 9400)

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CORE-UA 9400-000 (4853)
08/29/2024 – 12/04/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Buenos Aires (Global)
Instructed by Orellana, Patricio


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2609)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9400-000 (4939)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Giglioli, Matteo


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2508)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2510)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2512)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2520)
08/29/2024 – 12/04/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Soto, Teresa


CORE-UA 9400-000 (3460)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Thorne, Vanda


CORE-UA 9400-000 (2849)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by Hallsworth, Djuna

Cultures & Contexts: Germany (CORE-UA 556)

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 556-000 (9858)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wood, Christopher


CORE-UA 556-000 (9859)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 556-000 (9860)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 556-000 (9861)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 556-000 (9862)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 556-000 (9863)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 556-000 (9864)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Context: Brazil (CORE-UA 555)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CORE-UA 555-000 (10306)


CORE-UA 555-000 (10307)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 555-000 (10308)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 555-000 (10309)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 555-000 (10310)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 555-000 (10311)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 555-000 (10312)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: Egypt of The Pharaohs (CORE-UA 545)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 545-000 (9411)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Roth, Ann


CORE-UA 545-000 (9412)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 545-000 (9413)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 545-000 (9450)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 545-000 (9451)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: The Black Atlantic (CORE-UA 534)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CORE-UA 534-000 (21333)


CORE-UA 534-000 (21334)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 534-000 (21335)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 534-000 (21336)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 534-000 (21337)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: Asian / Pacific / American Cultures (CORE-UA 539)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 539-000 (9846)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saranillio, Dean


CORE-UA 539-000 (9847)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 539-000 (9848)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 539-000 (9849)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 539-000 (9850)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 539-000 (19710)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 539-000 (19711)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 539-000 (19712)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: Ancient Israel (CORE-UA 514)

The history and culture of the ancient Israelite societies of biblical times and the Greco-Roman period seen from the perspective of the process of urbanization and the role of cities in the development of classical Judaism, covering the period from c. 1250 b.c.e. through the third century c.e. Surveys the history and achievements of these cities and their contribution to the development of law and social organization, prophetic movements, history of Israelite religion and early Judaism, and the background of Christianity. The Bible and ancient Jewish texts preserve much evidence for the history of ancient Israel; and archaeological excavations, as well as the discovery of ancient writings in Hebrew and related languages, have added to our knowledge. In addition, new discoveries in the Dead Sea Scrolls contribute greatly to our understanding of the history of Judaism and the emergence of Christianity. Throughout, we remain focused on the growth of cities and their role in the creation and development of ancient Israel’s culture and literature.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 514-000 (8019)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fleming, Daniel


CORE-UA 514-000 (8020)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 514-000 (8021)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 514-000 (8022)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 514-000 (8023)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 514-000 (19709)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: Caribbean (CORE-UA 509)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CORE-UA 509-000 (9926)


CORE-UA 509-000 (9927)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 509-000 (9928)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 509-000 (9929)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 509-000 (9930)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 509-000 (10208)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martinez, Christine


CORE-UA 509-000 (10209)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martinez, Christine


CORE-UA 509-000 (21332)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martinez, Christine

Cultures & Contexts: African Diaspora (CORE-UA 532)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 532-000 (8791)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gomez, Michael


CORE-UA 532-000 (8792)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 532-000 (8793)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 532-000 (8794)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 532-000 (8795)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 532-000 (8827)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (