Category Archives: Fall 2019

Global Media Seminar: Media Activism and Democracy (ITAL-UA 9513)

The course on “Media, Activism & Democracy” aims at, first, introducing students to the complex and fascinating topic of civil society activism; second, at illustrating them the linkages between activism and media; third, at showing them the impact of civil society’s advocacy on contemporary political systems. In a nutshell, the course aims at providing students with a closer understanding of the civil society activism-media-politics conundrums at the national and global levels.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITAL-UA 9513-000 (2451)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Masrani, Rahoul

Introduction to 3D (FMTV-UT 1110)

This is an introductory course to the fundamentals of 3D computer animation. Through in-depth discussions and hands-on assignments, students will gain a thorough beginner’s understanding of the 3D production process. Using industry-leading Autodesk Maya running on high-end Mac Pro workstations, students will learn the basics of modeling and proceed through UV layout, texturing, rigging, animation, lighting and final render. At the end of the class students will have completed a series of exercises that will culminate in a final scene that showcases all they learned.This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1110-000 (19491)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McNagny, Phil


FMTV-UT 1110-000 (19492)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Guevara, Cesar

Data Structures (CSCI-SHU 210)

Data structures are fundamental programming constructs which organize information in computer memory to solve challenging real-world problems. Data structures such as stacks, queues, linked lists, and binary trees, therefore constitute building blocks that can be reused, extended, and combined in order to make powerful programs. This course teaches how to implement them in a high-level language, how to analyze their effect on algorithm efficiency, and how to modify them to write computer programs that solve complex problems in a most efficient way. Programming assignments. Prerequisite: ICS or A- in ICP. Equivalency: This course counts for CSCI-UA 102 Data Structures (NY). Fulfillment: CS Required, Data Science Required, CE Required.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20398)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Tue3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)at ShanghaiInstructed by Tam, Yik-Cheung


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20399)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Thu3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)at ShanghaiInstructed by Simikin, Sven


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20400)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Wed3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)at ShanghaiInstructed by Simikin, Sven


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20401)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Mon11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at ShanghaiInstructed by Tam, Yik-Cheung


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20402)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Wed11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at ShanghaiInstructed by Simikin, Sven


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20403)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Fri11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at ShanghaiInstructed by Simikin, Sven

Terrorism and Political Violence in the Modern World (SOC-UA 474)

Following the 9/11 attacks, there has been much discussion of “terrorism” and political violence more generally by politicians, journalists, and scholars. But what exactly is “terrorism,” and how does it differ from other types of violence? This course addresses the following questions: How and for what purposes has the idea of “terrorism” been conceptualized and used by politicians, journalists, and scholars? How have scholars attempted to explain terrorism and political violence? Why and under what conditions does collective violence and terrorism in particular seem to arise? Are terrorism or other forms of political violence ever justified? And does terrorism or violence actually work? If so, how and under what circumstances? To answer these questions, we will examine a wide range of historical cases of terrorism and political violence in the modern world.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Construction Modeling and Data Structures I (CE-UY 2504)

This course introduces architectural drafting and computer graphics. It capitalizes on state-of-the-art computer applications in managing construction. The course familiarizes the student with two-dimensional construction drawings that represent the current industry standard, and it propels the student towards the future by teaching the basics of three-dimensional (3-D) computer modeling. This course also introduces the use of the 3-D model with associated databases to manage construction. | Prerequisite: CE-UY 1502 or CE-UY 1002 or permission of the Construction Management Program Advisor

Civil & Urban Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sensors, Body, & Motion (IM-UH 3114)

Using computer vision, machine learning, gesture recognition, wearable technology, projection mapping, a variety of sensors, and OpenFrameworks (C ), students will create interactive art and performances that leverage the full potential of the human body. Directly injecting “people-sensing” into an artwork via these readily accessible open source technologies, generates a unique feedback loop, or dialogue-like relationship, where a person and a computer are continuously reacting to each other’s senses. This course will examine this feedback loop, specifically how a person is directly integrated into the artistic expression of the work. Ultimately, students will create interactive installations and performances where the human body is the central component of the artwork.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


IM-UH 3114-000 (19156)

Construction of Authenticity in Contemporary Art (INTM-SHU 201T)

The possibility of truth telling has been challenged and debated throughout the history of art and across various genres. What does it mean to tell the truth in art? How does art cross the boundaries between the real and the fake, truthfulness and misrepresentation? This course will examine social engagement in art and the construction of authenticity in creating works based on trust rather than the truth and will investigate a variety of artistic sources and genres including, but not limited to, propaganda, documentary, video art, public art, and installation art. Students are expected to develop projects demonstrating a comprehensive understanding of the subject. Prerequisite: Interactive Lab, Communication Lab, Application Lab or permission of instructor Fulfillment: IMA/IMB elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Socialist Theory (POL-UA 140)

Concentrates on those socialist schools?Christian socialism, utopian socialism, Marxism, Fabianism, and anarchism?that have proved to be the most successful. Presents their major theories and examines the usefulness of such theories in helping us to understand and, in some cases, alter the world in which we live.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


POL-UA 140-000 (10065)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ollman, Bertell

Set Theory (PHIL-UA 73)

An introduction to the basic concepts and results of set theory.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


PHIL-UA 73-000 (19544)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fine, Kit


PHIL-UA 73-000 (19545)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher


PHIL-UA 73-000 (19546)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher

History of Ancient Philosophy (PHIL-UA 20)

Examines some of the most important philosophical ideas and developments in Ancient Greece and Rome. Covers major writings by Plato and Aristotle, and a selection of writings by such thinkers as the Presocratics, Stoics, Epicureans, and Skeptics.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8864)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moss, Jessica


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8865)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lingle, Clara


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8866)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lingle, Clara


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8867)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beizaei, Banafsheh


PHIL-UA 20-000 (8868)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beizaei, Banafsheh

Northern Renaissance Art, 1400-1530 (MEDI-UA 303)

Addresses painting north of the Alps, ca. 1380–1530, partly late medieval, partly Renaissance. Examines the connection of breathtaking technique and deeply religious aspects of the art to function, symbolic thought, patronage, and changes in the society to which painting was related. Also explains ways in which we write history when most of the vital written documents are missing or destroyed. Artists discussed include Jan van Eyck, the Master of Flemalle, Rogier van der Weyden, Jean Fouquet, Hugo van der Goes, Enguerrand Quarton, Jerome Bosch, Albrecht Dürer, Matthias Grünewald, and Hans Holbein.

Medieval & Renaissance Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Grammatical Diversity (LING-UA 27)

Introduces the syntax of languages quite different from English, from various parts of the world. Considers what they may have in common with English and with each other and how to characterize the ways in which they differ from English and from each other.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


LING-UA 27-000 (19064)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Thoms, Gary · Kayne, Richard

Neural Bases of Language (LING-UA 43)

A state-of-the-art survey of the cognitive neuroscience of language, a rapidly developing multidisciplinary field at the intersection of linguistics, psycholinguistics, and neuroscience. Covers all aspects of language processing in the healthy brain, from early sensory perception to sentence-level semantic interpretation, as well as a range of neurological and development language disorders.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


LING-UA 43-000 (10444)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pylkkanen, Liina


LING-UA 43-000 (10445)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Blanco-Elorrieta, Esti

Ethics (PHIL-UA 40)

Examines fundamental questions of moral philosophy: What are our most basic values, and which of them are specifically moral values? What are the ethical principles, if any, by which we should judge our actions, ourselves, and our lives?

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHIL-UA 40-000 (23262)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHIL-UA 40-000 (23303)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Penn, Aidan


PHIL-UA 40-000 (23318)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Penn, Aidan


PHIL-UA 40-000 (23327)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferreira, Jorge


PHIL-UA 40-000 (23331)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferreira, Jorge

Limits of The Earth: Issues in Human Ecology (ENVST-UA 333)

Examines the array of environmental problems facing modern society, including global pollution and the impact of human population growth on land-use patterns, earth resources, energy supply and use, water, agriculture, and ecosystems.

Environmental Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


ENVST-UA 333-000 (9896)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Thu
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Volk, Tyler

Ethics & The Environment (ENVST-UA 400)

Environmental philosophy encompasses questions in metaphysics, the philosophy of science, and the history of philosophy, as well as in such normative areas as ethics, aesthetics, and political philosophy. Presents basic concepts in value theory and introduces some major controversies.

Environmental Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


ENVST-UA 400-000 (8289)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jamieson, Dale


ENVST-UA 400-000 (8290)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferguson, Kyle


ENVST-UA 400-000 (8291)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferguson, Kyle

Modern British & American Poetry (ENGL-UA 600)

Readings from major modern American, British, and Irish poets from the middle of the 19th century to the 1920s?specifically, from Whitman?s Leaves of Grass (1855) to T. S. Eliot?s The Waste Land (1922). Poets considered generally include Whitman, Dickinson, Hardy, Hopkins, Yeats, Pound, Stevens, Frost, Williams, and Eliot.

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


ENGL-UA 600-000 (19866)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McLane, Maureen

Amer Fiction Since WWII (ENGL-UA 640)

Examination of representative works by contemporary novelists. Authors generally include Barthelme, Bellow, Ellison, Gaddis, Hawkes, Mailer, Malamud, Morrison, Nabokov, Oates, Pynchon, Roth, Updike, and Walker.

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


ENGL-UA 640-000 (19863)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hendin, Josephine

Colloquium: Chaucer (ENGL-UA 320)

Introduction to Geoffrey Chaucer’s major poetry, with particular attention to The Canterbury Tales. General language training will be offered at the start of the course. Special attention will be given to Chaucer’s narrative skill, his techniques of characterization, style, varieties of formal invention, and particular thematic preoccupations. Students are also encouraged to explore Chaucer’s writing as a lens onto late medieval society and culture.

English (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Financial Crises (P) (ECON-UA 225)

This course will allow students to understand the origin and evolution of financial crises. Various policy options that may prevent and mitigate financial crises and the restructuring of the global financial architecture to prevent or limit future crises will be examined. Although the course will focus mostly on the US and on the most recent financial crisis, it will also examine earlier financial crises in the US (such as the Great Depression) and past financial bubbles such as the 17th century Dutch Tulip mania and the 1997 Asian crisis.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Privatization (ECON-UA 270)

This course will analyze the principles and practices underlying the privatization of public enterprises and governmental functions. After evaluating the criticism directed at public ownership, the course examines an alternative to privatization — reforming state-owned enterprises and public administration, using examples from the U.S., Great Britain, and New Zealand. Various issues of privatization such as the roles of ownership and competition in stimulating efficiency, the implications of separation of ownership from management in distinguishing between private and public enterprises, conditions for successful divestiture programs, privatization’s employment impact, and contracting out of government services are discussed both in principle and through the use of examples from industrial, transition, and less developed economies.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


ECON-UA 270-000 (8240)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Prager, Jonas

Japanese Animation & New Media (EAST-UA 708)

This course looks at the terms and conditions of Japanese animation (primarily, though not exclusively, anime) as, in many ways, a new and unique mode of expression. The course is framed in which anime might, or might not, shift earlier modes of expression (both literary and animated): the prevalence of mythology in animation and the tension between mythology and ideology; the importance of genre; and the impact of ?old? and ?new? media on narrative structure and reception. Implications of these conditions for thinking about ?Japanese? culture are also considered.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


EAST-UA 708-000 (19320)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Looser, Thomas

Principles of Animal Physiology (BIOL-UA 25)

A comparative course that encompasses vertebrate and invertebrate physiology. Extensive discussion of the anatomy and physiology of the human cardiovascular system, the human lung, the human kidney, and the human brain. There is a focus on the physiological integration of organ systems, underlying cellular/molecular mechanisms, and adaptation. Ventilation, organism scale and environment, blood, the cardiovascular system, acid-base regulation, osmoregulation, feeding, digestion and absorption, the nervous system and behavior, muscle, endocrine function, and reproduction are studied. Special topics include human physiology in extreme environments (high-altitude and diving), a detailed analysis of mammalian vision, animal sleep and hibernation, and the comparative physiology of animals that live at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. The laboratory includes traditional physiology experiments, as well as an introduction to bioinformatics.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Risk and Resilience (CAMS-UA 114)

The transition to college is a multifaceted challenge for many students, as they encounter new academic, interpersonal, emotional, and financial pressures. One third of undergraduates report feeling depression, and over half report feeling overwhelming anxiety. This course is grounded in the current understanding of adolescent and young adult development, neuroscience, and positive psychology. Our aim is to teach undergraduates both theoretical and empirically informed means to moderate risk and enhance resilience, by building knowledge and skills in key areas proven to enhance wellness, including communication, executive functioning, social support, self-efficacy, emotion regulation, and sense of purpose. Students will learn about healthy exercise, nutrition, and sleep habits, and develop skills in core components of cognitive-behavior therapy, mindfulness, and organizational skills.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Prehistoric Hunters and Gatherers (ANTH-UA 210)

Although they are no longer the dominant form of human sociality or adaptation, hunter-gatherers continue to play a pivotal role in anthropological theory. But who are hunter-gatherers? Some argue that the problem with trying to pigeon-hole hunter-gatherers is that this taxonomic unit holds little practical or evolutionary legitimacy. Others contend that people have evidently lived off the land without agriculture or animal husbandry, so at some level, hunter-gatherer is a meaningful category. Yet, few of the qualities assigned to hunter-gatherers hold up to detailed cross-cultural investigation. For example, hunter-gatherer subsistence is not inherently linked to peaceful coexistence, affluence, small group sizes or settlement mobility. Moreover, hunter-gatherer populations commonly thought to be deeply entrenched in evolutionary time are now known to result from complex historical processes of globalization and colonial expansion. This course will explore the diversity of lifeways subsumed under the banner of the hunter-gatherer. Drawing on a wide range of cross-cultural datasets, the course will unpack hunter-gatherer behavioral variability across broad topics, not paradigms. We will examine variations in hunter-gatherer subsistence, mobility, social organization, belief systems, landscape use, and material culture. Finally, we will ask to what degree the concept of the hunter-gatherer and the study of modern hunter-gatherers can help anthropologists understand and explore human behavior in the deeper past.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


ANTH-UA 210-000 (19127)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pargeter, Justin

Media, Culture, and Society (ANTH-UA 123)

This course examines the social and political life of media and how it makes a difference in the daily lives of people as a practice – in production, reception, or circulation. It is organized around the following key questions: What is media? What role do media play in producing or shaping our sense of reality? What is the relationship between media and culture? How are media implicated in social change? It provides an overview of the increasing theoretical attention paid to the mass media by anthropologists, and focuses on concrete ethnographic examples.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


ANTH-UA 123-000 (19130)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ganti, Tejaswini

Expressive Culture: Architecture (CORE-UA 725)

Please check the departmental website for description

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 725-000 (19742)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cohen, Jean-Louis


CORE-UA 725-000 (19743)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 725-000 (19744)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 725-000 (19745)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 725-000 (19746)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Renaissance Art (ARTH-UA 9005)

This course is an introduction to Renaissance Art by exploring in depth the historical, political and cultural evolution of Italy and Europe between the 14th and the 15th centuries. This overview will be not confined to works of art but will include social and patronage issues – i.e. the role of the guilds, the differences in private, civic and church patronage – that affected the style, form and content of the Italian rich artistic output, which reached a peak often nostalgically referred to by later generations as the “golden age”. Themes such as patronage, humanism, interpretations of antiquity, and Italian civic ideals form a framework for understanding the works of art beyond style, iconography, technique and preservation. The course analyzes the historical and social background of the beginning of the Renaissance during the 14th century and the impact of patronage on art. It then focuses on the early 15th century art in Italy and Europe and deals with the Medici Family’s age. Lastly it analyzes the ‘golden Age’ of the Renaissance, specifically focusing on Verrocchio, Botticelli, Perugino and Ghirlandaio. By the end of this course, students gain a thorough knowledge of the Italian and European Renaissance Age, developing practical perception and a confident grasp of the material, understanding the relationship between both historical and artistic events and valuing the importance of patronage. As the Renaissance works are often still in their original physical settings, during field-studies to museums and churches in Florence students will have a unique opportunity to experience the works as their original viewers did and as their creators intended.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTH-UA 9005-000 (2364)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Giorgi, Silvia

Animals and Public Policy (ANST-UA 500)

Considers how public policy is created, how social change occurs, and the influence of science, government, business, and non-governmental organizations on animal-related policies, legislation, litigation, and consumer campaigns, as well the meaning of “animal rights” and the impact of the modern animal protection movement.

Animal Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Introduction to Performance Studies (PERF-GT 1000)

Performance Studies (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


PERF-GT 1000-000 (6689)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PERF-GT 1000-000 (6690)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PERF-GT 1000-000 (6691)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PERF-GT 1000-000 (6692)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PERF-GT 1000-000 (22097)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cell Phone Cinema (OART-GT 2566)

Hollywood in your palm. That is what this combination of lectures, screenings, demonstrations and practical production workshop will offer to the students in this course. There will be several professional guests making presentations and Q&A sessions from the mobile phone filmmaking industry. In addition to the historical and critical overview of the emergence and exponential growth of global cell phone cinema, students will shoot all footage on cell phones and download them for computerized editing. The final project will be under three minute shorts. Projects will include all genres of film and television: news, mini-documentaries, animation, music videos and narrative shorts. Completed student projects will be suitable to be posted on the Internet and entered into domestic and international mobile phone film festivals. For example, two minute long improvisations of Bollywood Style Music Videos shot on Cell Phones by the students have been projected at the Tribeca Cinemas as part of the New York Indian Film Festival. It is suggested but not compulsory that students bring to the class a cell phone capable of recording video.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


OART-GT 2566-000 (17833)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bardosh, Karoly

Realtime (IMBX-SHU 9501)

This course explores the disruptions and creative possibilities that realtime emerging media provides through the lens of learning how to design, create, produce and perform in realtime. Students will be learning how to design and produce for realtime interactive audiences, understand the modern streaming media pipeline, the fundamentals of virtual production, digital content creation and the basics of game engines and other software – all in the service of delivering a more engaging and intimate connection between audience and performer. Students will design and perform 2 distinct realtime performances as well as work together with peers to conceptualize, design and produce a short realtime ‘pilot’ using the tools and techniques you’ve learned in the first two projects. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: Interactive Media Business Elective ; Interactive Media Arts Elective

Interactive Media and Business (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IMBX-SHU 9501-000 (24204)
01/25/2022 – 05/10/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by Prasanna Kumar, Archana


IMBX-SHU 9501-000 (24205)
01/25/2022 – 05/10/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by

Web Design (PHTI-UT 1238)

Prerequisite: Photography II or permission from the department. This course combines theory and practice as it pertains to making art projects for the World Wide Web. The course will investigate what it means to work in this new environment and how the medium might influence the work made. The course will investigate a variety of approaches such as conceptual, experimental, documentary and diaristic. Special consideration will be given to the ways in which structure (nonlinear vs. linear), interactivity and metaphor influence meaning. Formal design elements such as color, typography, scale and sequencing will also be examined. In addition, the nuance of html tags, hexadecimal colors and image compression will be explored. There will be several short projects as we get up-to-speed on the technical side. Two larger projects will comprise the remainder of the semester: a portfolio project that focuses on graphic and interface design; and a web project that uses “web space” as a medium for its own sake. Students should be prepared to exercise both sides of their brain. This course requires a nonrefundable lab fee.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2021)


PHTI-UT 1238-000 (6640)
05/24/2021 – 07/05/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kilroy, Elizabeth

Internship (MCC-UE 1100)

The internship program promotes the integration of academic theory with practical experience. Internships expand student understandings of the dynamics of the ever-changing field of communication.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
1-4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1100-000 (13988)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Battinelli, Olivia


MCC-UE 1100-000 (13989)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Battinelli, Olivia

Global Histories of Art (ARTCR-UE 58)

Designed for BFA (Studio Art) students, this course is an introduction to the global history of art, exploring the meanings associated with “art.” The class is a series of linked test cases involving specific art objects & the context of their creation. By working closely with a range of materials –– art history & theory, artist’s writings, & documentary film –– we will survey how artists have contributed to the history of art and question how this history matters for contemporary artists.

Art Theory & Critical Studies (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


ARTCR-UE 58-000 (13090)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fresko Madra, Lara · Harouni, Shadi


ARTCR-UE 58-000 (13091)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harouni, Shadi · Fresko Madra, Lara


ARTCR-UE 58-000 (13092)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harouni, Shadi · Fresko Madra, Lara

Realtime Audiovisual Performance Systems (INTM-SHU 280D)

From the history of visual music and abstract film to the contemporary notion of live cinema, this course will be an exploration of the synesthetic relationship between sound and visuals in a real-time performance setting. Dating back as far as the 18th century, systems have been invented to produce images alongside music linking the two through formalized arrangements. Current media technologies make developing such systems both more approachable and more expansive in their scope. Through readings, viewings, and case studies students will gain an understanding of the history and theory of live audiovisuals. During the course students will team up to develop and master a real-time audiovisual system of their own invention. The class will culminate in a show in which they will present their work through a live performance.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


INTM-SHU 280D-000 (22897)
09/14/2020 – 12/15/2020 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Parren, Eric

Performative Avatars (ITPG-GT 2153)

Whether it’s through photo realistic scans found in current-gen video games or the cartoonish and low-fi aesthetic of Bitmoji there is no limit to ways in which the body and the self are represented in digital spaces. This 2 credit class will look at how avatars have been historically used in the realm of art, commerce, and entertainment and utilize existing avatar creation tools to develop projects that examine identity, body politics, and contemporary performance. In class we will cover the basics of Unreal Engine, photogrammetry, 3D scanning, and model rigging although students will be encouraged to use existing skill sets and creative thinking to complete some of the smaller week-by-week assignments. The class will culminate with a short performance, small installation or single/multi-channel video piece using one or more of the techniques covered in class. This can be a solo project or a group project. In this class students will: – Explore how avatars can be utilized in your creative practice – Gain an introductory understanding of Unreal Engine, photogrammetry, model rigging, and 3D scanning. – Learn how to recontextualize digital spaces for the purposes of art, installation, and performance. – Broaden your thinking of what performance can be, both in a physical setting and digital setting. – Think critically about how physical bodies inhabit digital spaces and how the hardware and software we use reinforces the acceptance and value of certain kinds of bodies.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Intro to Programming for Games (GAMES-UT 180)

Introduction to Programming for Games is a course that introduces students to the concepts, problems, and methods of computer programming, and how these apply to the creation of video games. The course assumes no prior programming knowledge, and is designed to touch on the basic principles of digital design in the form of computer code. There will be an emphasis on programming fundamentals; they will be motivated through the lens of designing and producing video games.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


GAMES-UT 180-000 (14736)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pratt, Charles

Games 101 (GAMES-UT 101)

Games 101 is the foundational course for the NYU Game Center. The focus of Games 101 is game literacy – a shared understanding of games as complex cultural and aesthetic objects. The class will incorporate lectures, discussion, readings, and writing assignments, but the primary activity of the class is critical play – playing games in order to better understand and appreciate them. The class will cover games on and off the computer, including classic and contemporary board and card games, sports, and games on the PC, internet, and consoles.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14339)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Clark, Naomi


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14340)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Jones-Brewster, Jordan


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14342)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Porter, Caroline


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14341)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Boyer, Chapin


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14343)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Jones-Brewster, Jordan


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14344)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sorensen, Samuel


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14723)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Croasdill, D

Introduction to Machine Learning (ECE-UY 4563)

This course provides a hands on approach to machine learning and statistical pattern recognition. The course describes fundamental algorithms for linear regression, classification, model selection, support vector machines, neural networks, dimensionality reduction and clustering. The course includes computer exercises on real and synthetic data using current software tools. A number of applications are demonstrated on audio and image processing, text classification, and more. Students should have competency in computer programming. | Prerequisites: ECE-UY 2233, MA-UY 2233, MA-UY 3012, MA-UY 2224 or MA-UY 2222, MA-UY 3514

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 4563-000 (11607)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Introduction to Machine Learning (CS-UY 4563)

This course provides a hands on approach to machine learning and statistical pattern recognition. The course describes fundamental algorithms for linear regression, classification, model selection, support vector machines, neural networks, dimensionality reduction and clustering. The course includes computer exercises on real and synthetic data using current software tools. A number of applications are demonstrated on audio and image processing, text classification, and more. Students should have competency in computer programming. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 1134 AND (MA-UY 2034, MA-UY 2034G, MA-UY 3044 or MA-UY 3054) AND (MA-UY 2224, MA-UY 2222, MA-UY 2233, ECE-UY 2233, MA-UY 3012, MA-UY 3014, or MA-UY 3514) | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: (ENGR-UH 3510 or CS-UH 1050) (C- or better) AND (MATH-UH 1022 or MATH-UH 1023) AND (MATH-UH 2011Q or ENGR-UH 2010Q) | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 210 (C- or better) AND (MATH-SHU 140 or MATH-SHU 141) AND MATH-SHU 235

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4563-000 (12303)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sellie, Linda

Documentary Strategies (PHTI-UT 1006)

Prerequisite: Photography & Imaging II, or permission of the department. This course considers the creative possibilities of a variety of documentary strategies. The editing of images, their structuring into an essay form, the interpretation of their various meanings, and the impact of the documentary essay on the world are all discussed. Students are assigned a range of problems that explore visual description and interpretation ranging from the photojournalistic to the autobiographical. In addition each student devotes a significant amount of time to producing a single-subject documentary project. Classes are lecture-demonstration with critiques of student work and regular presentations of documentary photographs made throughout history, in different cultures and for different reasons, including the personal and the societal. Each student must have a still camera or a video camera. This course requires a nonrefundable lab fee.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


PHTI-UT 1006-000 (13387)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ross Smith, Bayete

Intro to Game Design (GAMES-UT 150)

This class is an intensive, hands-on workshop addressing the complex challenges of game design. The premise of the class is that all games, digital and non-digital, share common fundamental principles, and that under- standing these principles is an essential part of designing successful games. Learning how to create successful non-digital games provides a solid foundation for the development of digital games. In this workshop, students will: analyze existing digital and non-digital games, taking them apart to understand how they work as interactive systems; create a number of non-digital games in order to master the basic design principles that apply to all games regardless of format; critique each other’s work, developing communication skills necessary for thriving in a collaborative field; explore the creative possibilities of this emerging field from formal, social, and cultural perspectives; develop techniques for fast-prototyping and iterative design that can be successfully applied to all types of interactive projects.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


GAMES-UT 150-000 (14707)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Intro to Game Studies (GAMES-UT 110)

This class is an overview of the field of games that approaches them from several theoretical and critical perspectives. No special theoretical background or prior training is needed to take the course, but to have had a broad practical experience with and basic knowledge of games is a distinct advantage. Also, an interest in theoretical and analytical issues will help. You are expected to actively participate in the lectures, which are dialogic in form, with ample room for discussion. The course will prepare the student to: Understand and discuss games from a theoretical perspective, as well as the components of a game; Apply new theories and evaluate them critically; Assess and discuss game concepts and the use of games in various contexts; Analyze games, and understand and apply a range of analytical methods.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


GAMES-UT 110-000 (14536)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pratt, Charles


GAMES-UT 110-000 (14532)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pratt, Charles


GAMES-UT 110-000 (14533)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pratt, Charles

Hearing Difference: The Commercial Music Industry and the American Racial Imaginary (IDSEM-UG 1802)

In 1903, at the dawn of the commercial music industry, sociologist W. E. B. DuBois famously proclaimed that the foremost problem in twentieth century American society is “the problem of the color line.” Du Bois’s prescience sets the stage for this course’s exploration of racial identity in recorded, commercially available music. We will examine how racial performance has intermingled with music consumption in the United States since blackface minstrelsy in the 1830s. Our goal is to understand how deeply embedded race—both ascribed and claimed—is in American music culture, reverberating throughout the last century in debates on artists’ authenticity, propriety, and popularity. This course is organized chronologically; each week is devoted to a particular era and its corresponding musical genres leading up to the present. With the rising importance of visual media since the mid-20th century, a historically informed understanding of the confluences of race and ethnicity in American music culture through music media and technologies will offer an enhanced understanding of the past and our contemporary, internet-driven musical landscape.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Rhino and 3D Modeling (ART-UE 1896)

3D Modeling with Rhino is an introduction to 3D modeling using the Rhino computer program for Mac OS X. Students gain the technical knowledge needed to push rigorous exploration of 3D modeling, both in the physical and digital realm. The course covers basic model manipulation and rendering operations. The course also reviews the history of 3D printing and an examination of how modeling for 2D differs from modeling for physical output. By course end, students will have the opportunity to output their work via CNC milling, 3D printing, or 2D rendered visualization.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


ART-UE 1896-000 (19660)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Torimitsu, Momoyo

Energy and the Environment (CCEX-SHU 203)

This course explores the scientific foundations of current environmental issues and their implications for public policy. The syllabus is divided into sections that each examines a current environmental theme in depth. The first sections investigate the composition of the atmosphere and the chemical processes that cause air pollution, ozone depletion, and global warming. Moving to the study of water, the course explores the properties of this unique solvent and the effect of various aqueous pollutants. The course also includes an investigation of energy from chemical reactions, our continuing reliance on fossil fuels, and the potential of alternative energy sources. The laboratory experiments are closely integrated with the lecture topics and provide hands-on explorations of central course themes. Throughout the course we also will examine how scientific studies of the environment are intimately connected with political, economic and policy concerns.

Exper Discovery in Nat World (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


CCEX-SHU 203-000 (18237)09/02/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)at ShanghaiInstructed by Amrita, Pal


CCEX-SHU 203-000 (18238)09/02/2019 – 12/13/2019 Fri10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)at ShanghaiInstructed by Amrita, Pal

Children of Divorce (CAMS-UA 162)

This course provides an overview of current research on divorce in American families. The instructor is a child and adolescent psychiatrist who has researched trauma and resilience and has worked clinically with children and families affected by divorce. The course emphasizes how divorce impacts children and their capacity to grow into loving, well-functioning, relationship-forming adults. Theories of attachment, intimacy, and communication are examined in the context of successful and failed marital relationships.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Performing Comedy (ARTS-UG 1065)

This course explores the practices, principles and aesthetics of comedic performance. Questions examined include: What makes something funny? Why do audiences laugh? What is the relationship between performer and audience in comedy? How does a performer get the laugh without ‘asking’ for it? How is humor specific to certain cultures, historical periods, genders or age groups? Are any elements of humor universal? Does the nature of performing comedy change from medium to medium? The course investigates these questions through readings, lectures, discussion and experiential exercises. Students are challenged to synthesize theory, historical traditions, and practical application into viable comedic performances. Students will experiment with this synthesis through discussing, analyzing, rehearsing and performing scenes/monologues drawn from major comic traditions including: masked forms (such as Greek Old Comedy and Commedia dell’Arte), high comedy (like the comedies of Shakespeare and Moliere), low comedy (such as the slapstick of Charlie Chaplin, Mel Brooks, as well as modern sketch, improv and stand-up comedy) and that which defies easy categorization (such as Monty Python or Sacha Baron Cohen). The course will culminate in a public presentation, allowing students to share select comedic performances with an audience. Students are expected to rehearse outside of class time.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


ARTS-UG 1065-000 (14847)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Intro to 3D Computer Animation (FMTV-UT 1110)

This is an introductory course to the fundamentals of 3D computer animation. Through in-depth discussions and hands-on assignments, students will gain a thorough beginner’s understanding of the 3D production process. Using industry-leading Autodesk Maya running on high-end Mac Pro workstations, students will learn the basics of modeling and proceed through UV layout, texturing, rigging, animation, lighting and final render. At the end of the class students will have completed a series of exercises that will culminate in a final scene that showcases all they learned.This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


FMTV-UT 1110-000 (14326)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McNagny, Phil


FMTV-UT 1110-000 (14165)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Introduction to Performance Studies (PERF-UT 101)

This course is an introduction to the field of performance studies. In this course, performance will be broadly construed to include aesthetic performance (performance art, theater, music, dance, and visual culture) and everyday presentations of self. We will study the history of the field and its relation to other fields (anthropology, theatre studies, philosophy, dance studies, feminism, political science, critical race theory, legal studies, etc.) and ask questions of how the study of performance can help us to understand contemporary questions of aesthetics, politics, and social culture. We will study the theory and history of the field as grounded in documented performances in addition to attending live performances in New York City. This course will place particular emphasis on political performance (in the US and abroad), queer, and minority performance.

Performance Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


PERF-UT 101-000 (15700)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PERF-UT 101-000 (15829)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PERF-UT 101-000 (15830)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PERF-UT 101-000 (16102)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Modern Art (ARTH-UA 6)

Art in the Western world from the late 18th century to the present. The Neoclassicism and Romanticism of David, Goya, Ingres, Turner, Delacroix; the Realism of Courbet; the Impressionists; parallel developments in architecture; and the new sculptural tradition of Rodin. From postimpressionism to Fauvism, Expressionism, Futurism, Cubism, geometric abstraction in sculpture and painting, and modernism in architecture in the 20th century. After World War I, Dadaism and Surrealism. Developments since 1945, such as Action painting, Pop art, Minimal art, and numerous strands of Postmodernism.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ARTH-UA 6-000 (8174)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Robinson, Julia

Minds and Machines (PHIL-UA 9005)

An introduction to philosophy through the study of issues in cognitive science. Topics may include the conflict between computational and biological approaches to the mind; whether a machine could think; the reduction of the mind to the brain; connectionism and neural nets. Gives training in philosophical argument and writing.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


PHIL-UA 9005-000 (5786)

The Western History of Madness from the Bible to DSM-V (IDSEM-UG 1961)

Viewed as a natural kind or socially constructed, “madness” was defined and treated, examined and controlled, diagnosed and cured according to the spirit of the time. This course follows the varied social imageries of “madness” throughout Western history, from the Hebrew Bible to the contemporary and controversial Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM), also known as “the bible of psychiatry”, in its most recent 5th edition. Students read primary and secondary texts by philosophers, physicians, theologians, jurists, tragedians, novelists, psychologists, social reformers, policy makers, journalists, historians and individuals who suffered madness, also known as “experts from experience.” They also observe art and watch films that portray different aspects of madness. Reading includes: the Bible, Plato, Hippocrates, Ibn Sina, Margery Kempe, Erasmus, Robert Burton, Freud, George Canguilhem, Foucault, Ian Hacking, Elaine Showalter, Ruth Leys among others. The course explores the interaction between the social, cultural, scientific, political as well as economic factors that have shaped the views of “madness” and its treatment while paying ample attention to the history of ideas that informed and, often, framed them.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


IDSEM-UG 1961-000 (14205)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ophir, Orna

Hearing Difference: The Commercial Music Industry and the American Racial Imaginary (IDSEM-UG 1802)

In 1903, at the dawn of the commercial music industry, sociologist W. E. B. DuBois famously proclaimed that the foremost problem in twentieth century American society is “the problem of the color line.” Du Bois’s prescience sets the stage for this course’s exploration of racial identity in recorded, commercially available music. We will examine how racial performance has intermingled with music consumption in the United States since blackface minstrelsy in the 1830s. Our goal is to understand how deeply embedded race—both ascribed and claimed—is in American music culture, reverberating throughout the last century in debates on artists’ authenticity, propriety, and popularity. This course is organized chronologically; each week is devoted to a particular era and its corresponding musical genres leading up to the present. With the rising importance of visual media since the mid-20th century, a historically informed understanding of the confluences of race and ethnicity in American music culture through music media and technologies will offer an enhanced understanding of the past and our contemporary, internet-driven musical landscape.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Media and Fashion (IDSEM-UG 1618)

This course will examine the roles fashion plays in film, television and digital media and their cultural and economic significance. As a signifying system in its own right, fashion contributes to the semiotics of popular forms. It can also operate as a means of authentication (especially in period films and TV) or reveal a variety of ways in which media plays with space and time, purposeful or not. Besides evoking specific temporalities and narrative tone, fashion plays an important role in the construction of gender, both in terms of representation and address. This course will examine the history of the intersection of the fashion and media industries from the free distribution of film-related dress patterns in movie theaters of the 1910s to the current trend for make-over TV, networks like the Style network, the increasing proliferation of fashion blogs and the construction of specifically feminine video games. How does fashion’s specific configuration of consumerism, signification and visual pleasure lend itself to the articulation of modern/postmodern cultures and their presentation of the self? Texts will include Stella Bruzzi and Pamela Church Gibson, Fashion Cultures: Theories, Explanations and Analysis ; selections from Roland Barthes, The Fashion System ; Elizabeth Wilson, Adorned in Dreams: Fashion and Modernity ; assorted articles and selected clips from films and television shows including Marie Antoinette , What Not To Wear , The New York Hat, Fashions of 1934, Now, Voyager and Sex and the City .

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IDSEM-UG 1618-000 (16948)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Luckett, Moya

Art of Now (ARTCR-UE 55)

This course examines the current developments in contemporary art over the past decade – the art of ‘now’ – from the viewpoint of an artist’s practice & working ideas, looking at current global art production in aesthetic, economic, & social contexts. The major movements in painting, photography, sculpture, installation & performance are examined. Readings will be drawn from first hand interviews & point-of-view accounts, reviews, & critique; a major emphasis on interviews & online studio visits will accompany the texts. Guest artist lectures & off-site museum & gallery viewings will complement the weekly visual presentations & theory conversations. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Expressive Cultures

Art Theory & Critical Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ARTCR-UE 55-000 (12147)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Weiner, Andrew

Consumerism in Comparative Perspective (IDSEM-UG 1586)

Consumerism—the linking of happiness, freedom, and economic prosperity with the purchase and consumption of goods—has long been taken for granted as constitutive of the “good life” in Western societies. Increasingly, global economic shifts have made it possible for some developing countries to engage in patterns of consumption similar to those in the West, such that one quarter of humanity now belongs to the “global consumer class.” At the same time, however, nearly three billion people struggle to survive on less than $2 a day. This course takes an international and interdisciplinary approach to examine consumption in different societies, and we do so by asking several central questions: What are the key determinants of patterns of consumption, and how are they changed or reshaped over time? In turn, how do patterns of consumption shape class formation, racial inequality, identity, aesthetic sensibility, and international boundaries? How do practices of consumption inform the ways in which people understand their values and individuality, imagine success and failure, or conceive happiness? By reading widely in sociology, anthropology, and history we will develop a framework for analyzing the ethical, environmental and social justice implications of consumerism. Readings include case studies from the US, China, India, Europe and Africa Some likely authors include: Keynes, Marx, Marcuse, Benjamin, Mary Douglas, Bill McKibben; Arlie Hochschild, Lizabeth Cohen.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IDSEM-UG 1586-000 (16693)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dacosta, Kimberly

Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2)

Prerequisite: Algebra and Calculus (MATH-UA 9) or equivalent. Focuses on individual economic decision-makers—households, business firms, and government agencies—and how they are linked together. The emphasis is on decision making by households and firms and how these decisions shape our economic life. Explores the different environments in which businesses sell their products, hire workers, and raise funds to expand their operations; the economic effects of trade between nations; and the effects of various government policies, such as minimum-wage legislation, rent controls, antitrust laws, and more.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECON-UA 2-000 (7984)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Paizis, Andrew · Choksi, Keval · Galindo, Jimena · Bhatta, Rahul


ECON-UA 2-000 (7985)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Choksi, Keval


ECON-UA 2-000 (7986)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Choksi, Keval


ECON-UA 2-000 (7987)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Galindo, Jimena


ECON-UA 2-000 (7988)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Galindo, Jimena


ECON-UA 2-000 (7989)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhatta, Rahul


ECON-UA 2-000 (7990)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhatta, Rahul


ECON-UA 2-000 (7991)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhiladwall, Maharukh · Nguyen, Phuong Linh · Lee, Jiwon · Ishmaeva, Guzel


ECON-UA 2-000 (7992)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nguyen, Phuong Linh


ECON-UA 2-000 (7993)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nguyen, Phuong Linh


ECON-UA 2-000 (7994)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lee, Jiwon


ECON-UA 2-000 (7995)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lee, Jiwon


ECON-UA 2-000 (7996)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ishmaeva, Guzel


ECON-UA 2-000 (7997)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ishmaeva, Guzel

Introduction to the Galleries and Museums of New York (ART-UE 1002)

Survey a broad spectrum of visual art resources through guided lecture-tour visits to current exhibitions at leading museums, galleries and alternative art spaces located throughout New York City. Onsite meetings with art administrators affiliated with various organizations shed light on a wide range of career and management issues pertaining to the field and add to an understanding of the development and continued growth of New York’s exciting art world.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 1002-000 (9533)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schreibman, Vida


ART-UE 1002-000 (11619)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Barton, Nancy


ART-UE 1002-000 (11620)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Darts, David


ART-UE 1002-000 (9540)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Practical Human Physiology (BIOL-UA 7)

The course is geared toward the beginning health professional students. This physiology course will focus on how the human body works. Anatomy will also be discussed as the various physiological mechanisms are only possible due to its close interrelationship. Students will be introduced to both clinical and research methodologies and will be able to apply this knowledge in a laboratory setting.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Science, Technology and Society (STS-UY 1004)

This course introduces important issues, historical and contemporary, related to science and technology from a variety of social, political and philosophical viewpoints. The multidisciplinary approach helps students to understand the interaction between science, technology and society and to discover the conditions that foster technological innovation. The scientific and technological way of thinking becomes clear through historical examples, helping students to consider important issues of science and technology policy, such as how science and technology can be used to benefit society and how one can foster innovation in a society or an organization. | Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements. Co-requisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS Elective.

Science and Technology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


STS-UY 1004-000 (15489)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rafeh, Hined


STS-UY 1004-000 (15367)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sloane, Mona

Intro to Psychology (PSYCH-UA 1)

Amodio, Coons, Marcus, Phelps. Offered every semester. 4 points. Fundamental principles of psychology, with emphasis on basic research and applications in psychology’s major theoretical areas of study: thought, memory, learning, perception, personality, social processes, development, and the physiological bases of psychology. Included in the class is direct observation of methods of investigation through laboratory demonstrations and by student participation in current research projects.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8464)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cimpian, Andrei · Qu-Lee, Jennie


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8465)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8466)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8467)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8468)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8469)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8470)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8471)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8472)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8473)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8474)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8475)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Van Bavel, Jay · Dumitru, Oana


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8476)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8477)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8478)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8479)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8480)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8481)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8482)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8731)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (8988)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (9067)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (10591)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (10595)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (25978)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PSYCH-UA 1-000 (25980)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Introduction to Cosmology (PHYS-UA 15)

This course is a technical but elementary introduction to the modern understanding of cosmology, intended for non-science students. Proficiency with algebra is required. We will cover advances in cosmology over the last 100 years, with special emphasis on more recent developments in the field. We will cover topics ranging from the early universe to galaxy formation in the present day universe, through the lens of the theory of relativity and the expanding universe. We will cover the Big Bang, the Cosmic Microwave Background, dark matter, dark energy and the associated evidence for these phenomena. This class is mathematically-based; most topics will be explored both qualitatively and quantitatively. Homework and exams will require calculations.

Physics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


PHYS-UA 15-000 (10211)09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by

Media Korean (EAST-UA 261)

This course is designed to improve students? understanding of written and spoken Korean through exposure to various media sources, such as newspapers, magazines, TV, and film. Class discussions help enhance the students? speaking proficiency as well.

East Asian Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


EAST-UA 261-000 (9336)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Cheun Mi


EAST-UA 261-000 (9707)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kim, Cheun Mi

Love Actually (CAMS-UA 147)

Ah, love. L’amour. The very word stirs our imaginations and pulls at our heartstrings. This most fundamental of emotions has long been a source of creative inspiration – a muse for literature, song, and art. The importance of love and intimacy in human life is clear, but what can the latest observations and scientific discoveries about the brain tell us about this supreme emotion? Through discussions, papers, and projects, we will examine the concepts of love and intimacy through various lenses, including those of neurobiology, evolutionary psychology, culture, and art. Focusing on the development of love throughout the lifecycle, we will study how people seek intimacy, how love evolves over time, the influence of love on human behavior, and love and intimacy’s relation to psychological well-being.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CAMS-UA 147-000 (8860)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Voleti, Deepa


CAMS-UA 147-000 (8873)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferrari, Francesco A


CAMS-UA 147-000 (9049)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Busa, Samantha · Happer, Kaitlin


CAMS-UA 147-000 (9125)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mansouri, Tia


CAMS-UA 147-000 (9228)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Knepley, Mark · Watson, Bethany


CAMS-UA 147-000 (9475)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Donnelly, Lauren · Lee, Michelle


CAMS-UA 147-000 (9697)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wernick, Jeremy · Pochtar, Randi


CAMS-UA 147-000 (9698)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Haroon, Maleeha


CAMS-UA 147-000 (9699)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brown, Adam


CAMS-UA 147-000 (19789)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mansouri, Tia


CAMS-UA 147-000 (19790)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Knepley, Mark · Durwood, Lily

Collective Play (IMNY-UT 225)

Rules of play shape competitive games from checkers to football. But how do the rules of interaction shape non-competitive play? In this course, we will explore, code and test design strategies for playful group interactions while at the same time interrogating both what it means to play and how individual identities and group behaviors. Some of the questions we will ask and attempt to answer: What motivates participation? What hinders it? When does participation become oppressive? What’s the difference between self-consciousness and self-awareness? Who has power? Who doesn’t? Are leaders necessary? What’s the difference between taking turns and engaging in conversation? What happens when the slowest person sets the pace? Interaction inputs we will play with will include: mouse, keyboard, mobile device sensors, and microphone. Outputs will include, visuals, text and sound. We will use p5, websockets and node.js for real-time interaction. Class time will be split between playing with and critiquing examples and translating design strategies into code and logic.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


IMNY-UT 225-000 (23604)
09/03/2019 – 12/12/2019 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Yin, Yue

Introduction to Machine Learning for the Arts (IMNY-UT 224)

An introductory course designed to provide students with hands-on experience developing creative coding projects with machine learning. The history, theory, and application of machine learning algorithms and related datasets are explored in a laboratory context of experimentation and discussion. Examples and exercises will be demonstrated in JavaScript using the p5.js, ml5.js, and TensorFlow.js libraries. In addition, students will learn to work with open source pre-trained models in the cloud using Runway. Principles of data collection and ethics are introduced. Weekly assignments, team and independent projects, and project reports are required.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


IMNY-UT 224-000 (15837)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Online
Instructed by

Introduction to 3D Printing (IMNY-UT 244)

3D environments and objects are powerful prototyping tools. This class will introduce the basics of 3D modeling techniques in Rhino and students will learn to create assets for prototyping and 3D printing. The class will take an industrial design approach to design and build with specifications and materials in mind. Students will learn to think, plan, design, and produce well thought out objects to fit their specific needs. (examples: motor mounts, enclosures, wearables etc.)

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


IMNY-UT 244-000 (16086)
09/02/2020 – 10/21/2020 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Performative Avatars (IMNY-UT 284)

Whether it’s through photo realistic scans found in current-gen video games or the cartoonish and low-fi aesthetic of Bitmoji there is no limit to ways in which the body and the self are represented in digital spaces. This 2-credit class will look at how avatars have been historically used in the realm of art, commerce, and entertainment and utilize existing avatar creation tools to develop projects that examine identity, body politics, and contemporary performance. In class, we will cover the basics of Unreal Engine, photogrammetry, 3D scanning, and model rigging although students will be encouraged to use existing skill sets and creative thinking to complete some of the smaller week-by-week assignments. The class will culminate with a short performance, small installation or single/multi-channel video piece using one or more of the techniques covered in class. This can be a solo project or a group project. In this class students will: – Explore how avatars can be utilized in your creative practice – Gain an introductory understanding of Unreal Engine, photogrammetry, model rigging, and 3D scanning. – Learn how to recontextualize digital spaces for the purposes of art, installation, and performance. – Broaden your thinking of what performance can be, both in a physical setting and digital setting. – Think critically about how physical bodies inhabit digital spaces and how the hardware and software we use reinforces the acceptance and value of certain kinds of bodies.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IMNY-UT 284-000 (22291)
03/22/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Romein, Matt

Creative Computing (IMNY-UT 101)

This course combines two powerful areas of technology that will enable you to leap from being just a user of technology to becoming a creator with it: Physical Computing and Programming. The course begins with Physical Computing, which allows you to break free from both the limitations of mouse, keyboard & monitor interfaces and stationary locations at home or the office. We begin by exploring the expressive capabilities of the human body and how we experience our physical environment. The platform for the class is a microcontroller (Arduino brand), a very small inexpensive single-chip computer that can be embedded anywhere and sense and make things happen in the physical world. The core technical concepts include digital, analog and serial input and output. The second portion of the course focuses on fundamentals of computer programming (variables, conditionals, iteration, functions & objects) as well as more advanced techniques such as data parsing, image processing, networking, computer vision. The Javascript ‘p5’ programming environment is the primary vehicle. P5 is more oriented towards visual displays on desktops, laptops, tablets or smartphones but can also connect back to the physical sensor & actuators from the first part of the class. The course is designed for computer programming novices but the project-centered pedagogy will allow more experienced programmers the opportunity to go further with their project ideas and collaborate with other students. What can computation add to human communication? You will gain a deeper understanding of the possibilities of computation–– possibilities that will augment and enhance the perspectives, abilities and knowledge you bring from your field of study (e.g. art, design, humanities, sciences, engineering). At first it may feel foreign, as foreign as learning a new language or way of thinking. But soon, once you get some basic skills under your belt, you’ll be able to make projects that reflect your own interests and passions.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


IMNY-UT 101-000 (15826)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


IMNY-UT 101-000 (15827)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


IMNY-UT 101-000 (15828)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Quick Introduction to Physical Computing (IMNY-UT 103)

Physical Computing is an approach to learning how humans communicate through computers that starts by considering how humans express themselves physically. In this course, we take the human body as a given, and attempt to design computing applications within the limits of its expression. To realize this goal, you’ll learn how a computer converts the changes in energy given off by our bodies (in the form of sound, light, motion, and other forms) into changing electronic signals that it can read and interpret. You’ll learn about the sensors that do this, and about simple computers called microcontrollers that read sensors and convert their output into data. In the other direction you will learn how to actual physical things in the world with devices like speakers, lights and motors. Finally, you’ll learn how microcontrollers communicate with other computers. To learn this, you’ll watch people and build devices. You will spend a lot of time building circuits, soldering, writing programs, building structures to hold sensors and controls, and figuring out how best to make all of these things relate to a person’s body.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
1 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


IMNY-UT 103-000 (15822)
09/02/2021 – 12/22/2021 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Internet Famous (IMNY-UT 201)

How does someone become famous on the internet? What does it take to capture our digital attention? While movie stars, rock gods, and other mainstream A-listers struggle to find their place in a sea of emerging technologies and platforms, a new swarm of micro celebrities and influencers has coasted into the cultural space they once filled. Riding a wave of viral content and memes, the newly-famous rule an internet where anyone can have adoring fans… for a price. They are nimble, niche, obnoxious, empowering, and sometimes disturbing. This class explores what happens when fame is freed from the traditional intermediaries of print, television, and radio, when social media provides everyone with the tools to be their own marketing studio and PR department. It examines the transformation of celebrity, from a 19th century sales gimmick to the formidable cultural, social, and technological force it is today. Students will study a wide array of fame-related topics, from the privacy effects of trolling to the class implications of selfies. And we will engage in practices and exercises that produce real-world instances of celebrity in case we, too, wish to join the ranks of the internet famous.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


IMNY-UT 201-000 (15834)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

What is New Media? (INTM-SHU 205)

This course will explore the fundamentals of new media scholarship. Together, we will review and engage with different theories of emerging media in its social, cultural, political, and historical contexts. Students will be able to research, think and write critically about some of the central debates in media studies, including new media forms and aesthetics, issues of gender, race, and labor, platforms, infrastructure and various emerging paradigms. Classes consist of theoretical readings, media example discussion, and writing workshops. Prerequisite: WAI (or co-requisite). Fulfillment: IMA Major Foundations/Elective; IMB Major Emerging Media Foundation/Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 205-000 (17295)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Konior, Bogna

Remade in China (INTM-SHU 271)

Re-make: make (something) again or differently. In this class students will investigate why China became the world’s largest importer of waste. They will study local communities in China, how they manage their waste, and explore innovative ways to transform discarded materials or products around us into something new and precious in areas such as art, graphic and industrial design, architecture, fashion, textiles, etc,. Through research and development, students will learn how traditional techniques and new technologies among the sustainable design philosophy can be utilized as powerful tools for addressing social and environmental problems.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


INTM-SHU 271-000 (18538)
09/14/2020 – 12/15/2020 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Godoy, Marcela

Machine Learning for New Interfaces (INTM-SHU 215)

Machine Learning for New Interfaces is an introductory course with the goal of teaching machine learning concepts in an approachable way to students with no prior knowledge. We will explore diverse and experimental methods in Machine Learning such as classification, recognition, movement prediction and image style translation. By the end of the course, students will be able to create their own interfaces or applications for the web. They will be able to apply fundamental concepts of Machine Learning, recognize Machine Learning models in the world and make Machine Learning projects applicable to everyday life. Prerequisite: Creative Coding Lab or equivalent programming experience Fulfillment: IMA/IMB elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


INTM-SHU 215-000 (19661)
01/24/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Moon, Jung Hyun

Critical Data & Visualization (INTM-SHU 232)

Data is at the heart of the increasing role technology has in our lives. Data collection and algorithmic processing are not only central to recent technical breakthroughs such as in AI and automation but have created new economic paradigms where data equals value and shape political approaches to power and control. Decisions based on algorithms affect society at large whether it’s changing the way we transport and distribute goods, or influencing the things we buy, the news we read or even the people we date. The *world* that algorithms *see* is data. For the average person, however, data is seldom more than an abstract idea. So what exactly is data? How is value extracted from it? And why should we care? How can we ethically balance the positive uses of data-driven systems with the threats they pose to discriminate and infringe basic human rights? This class seeks to untangle some of these issues practically and theoretically. Each week will include a lecture introducing contemporary theorists, artists, groups, and in-class discussions or exercises. Potentially there will be a guest speaker, too. Topic sections may include surveillance and privacy, data journalism and activism or automation and machine bias. What we cover will be complemented by reading and research assignments. The other half of the week is a programming lab in which you will learn the fundamentals of web-based data visualization using JavaScript. Programming assignments will allow you to further practice what we learn. Throughout the semester, you will work on three main visualization projects that are inspired by the theoretical subjects that we cover. The form of these projects will usually be a website. Successful projects feature data visualizations that are both playful as well as effective in conveying information and a reflection that links the practical work to the theoretical learnings. Prerequisite: Interaction Lab, Communications Lab or Application Lab

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


INTM-SHU 232-000 (21436)09/02/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)at ShanghaiInstructed by

Artificial Intelligence Arts (INTM-SHU 226)

Artificial Intelligence Arts is an intermediate class that broadly explores issues in the applications of AI to arts and creativity. This class looks at generative Machine Learning algorithms for creation of new media, arts and design. In addition to covering the technical advances, the class also addresses the ethical concerns ranging from the use of data set, the necessarily of AI generative capacity to our proper attitudes towards AI aesthetics and creativity. Students will apply a practical and conceptual understanding of AI both as technology and artistic medium to their creative practices.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


INTM-SHU 226-000 (18540)
09/14/2020 – 12/15/2020 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Zhou, Le

Creating Assistive Technology (INTM-SHU 253)

This interdisciplinary project-based class focuses on the design, development, and use of technology that increases the quality of life of individuals of disabilities. Students will be introduced to various assistive technology and strategies, including no-tech and low-tech as well as software and online-based practices. This class features lectures, discussions, guest lectures, field trips, and project presentations by students. Software programming, physical computing, machine learning, and 3D fabrication will be introduced for developing an assistive device. Field trips of local facilities will be scheduled during the semester. They provide an off-campus real-world learning experience as well as an opportunity for students to interact with users of assistive technology in the local community. Students will participate in a team-based design project that identifies challenges for an individual of disabilities and create an innovative and useful assistive device to meet their needs. Prerequisite: Interaction Lab

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Top. in New Media & Entertainment: Realtime Audiovisual Performance Systems (INTM-SHU 280D)

From the history of visual music and abstract film to the contemporary notion of live cinema, this course will be an exploration of the synesthetic relationship between sound and visuals in a realtime performance setting. Dating back as far as the 18th century, systems have been invented to produce images alongside music linking the two through formalized arrangements. Current media technologies make developing such systems both more approachable and more expansive in their scope. Through readings, viewings, and case studies students will gain an understanding of the history and theory of live audiovisuals. During the course students will team up to develop and master a realtime audiovisual system of their own invention. The class will culminate in a show in which they will present their work through a live performance. Prerequisite: None.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


INTM-SHU 280D-000 (21439)
09/02/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by

Digital Heritage (INTM-SHU 266)

This course investigates and explores the integration between cultural heritage and digital conservation, specifically towards the objects, deities, sites, and gardens of China. Through the reflection of Chinese cultural heritage from the global perspective of Chinese history, the course raises awareness of heritage conservation and critical heritage studies towards the origins and the transformations of China in the contemporary era. Academic readings and oral presentations revolving around this theme will enhance students’ skills for documentation and restoration by innovative digital techniques in China. Conservator presentations, field trips, gallery visits and art projects enable students to communicate with practitioners in the field and examine the values of Chinese cultural heritage from a global perspective. Prerequisites: None Fulfillment: IMA/IMB elective; GCS Chinese Media, Arts, and Literature.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


INTM-SHU 266-000 (18254)
01/25/2021 – 05/14/2021 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Chen, Wu Wei

The Cultivated City (INTM-SHU 267)

This class examines the idea and practices of ‘cultivation’ in relation to the challenging environment of the 21st century city. Through field trips, readings and discussions, the class explores the concept of cultivation, and how it can be used as a basis for researching the urban ecology of Shanghai, both as a past and future city. The class incorporates a major project in the digital humanities, in which students use the tools of interactive media (audio, video and cartographic technologies) to research, map and narrativize the ways in which architects, designers, artists and thinkers engage with the traditions of cultivation in order to imagine and recreate the future metropolis. Prerequisite: Writing as Inquiry

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


INTM-SHU 267-000 (21431)09/02/2019 – 12/13/2019 Wed1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)at ShanghaiInstructed by

Acoustic Ethnography of the Yangtze Delta (INTM-SHU 268)

We live in a world immersed in sound yet we rarely attend to how sound can reflect our social structure or reveal cultural meaning. This course introduces students to acoustic ethnography, soundscape studies and narrative, non-narrative audio storytelling. We will gather and analyze the acoustic environment of China, using recorded sounds to create ethnography through text and sound. Ethnography (literally, “culture-writing”) is both the act of gathering data about culture through observation and interviews as well as the practice of writing analytically about cultural difference. Visual ethnography incorporates the analysis of visual and material aspects of our social environment into creative, multimedia rich projects. With an ethnographic approach to sound, we will document the rich tapestry of sounds around us in the context of the Yangtze River Delta region and think about how this conveys China’s culture, society and history. Through lectures, discussion, readings, listening assignments, field studies and projects, we will re-learn how to listen, observe and record the sounds in our environment. We will study Chinese sound art and Chinese cultural productions in music, film, television and multimedia installation. We will contextualize Chinese sound art against major theoretical approaches to sound including archives and preservation, form versus content, and social studies of science. Students will work collaboratively or individually on a final project that combines sound recording and production, to create an ethnographic analysis of an aspect of social and cultural life in the Yangtze River Delta region. Students will gain experience in gathering ethnographic data and they will transform it into an analytical or creative project integrating sound art and text. Prior knowledge of sound editing and Chinese language is not required. Prerequisite: None

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


INTM-SHU 268-000 (21433)09/02/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)at ShanghaiInstructed by Lee, Leksa

Introduction to Robotics (INTM-SHU 222)

Since the beginning of civilization people have fantasized about intelligent machines sensing and acting autonomously. In this course we will discover what robots are, learn how to design them, and use simple tools to build them. Students will use open source hardware to explore sensors and electronics, as well as design and build robot bodies and actuators through a variety of digital fabrication technologies. Using a set of community developed tools, students will become familiar with concepts such as mechatronics, inverse kinematics, domotics and machine learning. No previous programming or electronics experience is necessary, however students will be guided through a series of design challenges that their robots should be able to accomplish. With an emphasis on experimentation, peer learning, and teamwork, the objective of this course is to share in the excitement of robotics by enabling students to make their own creations. By the end of the course, students will present a short research paper and documentation about their robotic explorations. Co-requisite or Prerequisite: Interaction Lab or Creative Coding Lab. Fulfillment: CORE ED; IMA Majors Electives; IMB Major Interactive Media Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 222-000 (17301)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Cossovich, Rodolfo

Programming Design Systems (INTM-SHU 223)

Programming Design Systems is a course focused on the intersection between graphic design and code. Class time is divided between design topics like form, color, grid systems, and typography, and more computational topics like randomization, repetition, transformation and generative form. The students work to write software that abstract design theories into the code, and show the work in class for design critique. Weekly readings include relevant writings from the history of graphic design, articles from the history of computation, and everything in between. The class aims not only to teach the students how to create designs via code, but also to have something interesting to say about it. The course is based on the Programming Design Systems book, and more background info can be found in the book’s introduction. Prerequisite:Communications Lab

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


INTM-SHU 223-000 (18304)
09/02/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by

VR / AR Fundamentals: A Practical Guide to Big Ideas (INTM-SHU 280C)

This course will be like the two previous ones (http://ima.nyu.sh/vr-ar-fundamentals/), with the first half-semester as seminar and the second half semester as production. For Fall 2019, production will be something in complement with Zaanheh: A Natural History of Shanghai (https://zaanheh.research.shanghai.nyu.edu/), a new NYU Shanghai interdisciplinary project. Prerequisite: None

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


INTM-SHU 280C-000 (21411)
09/02/2019 – 12/13/2019 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by

Performing Robots (IM-UH 2117)

Intelligent robots living amongst ordinary people used to be a storyline relegated to the world of science-fiction. However, the 21st century has witnessed a rapid adoption of automated machinery in many aspects of daily life. In this course, students will explore the significance of today’s robots through the context of art by learning about and building experimental robots for theatrical performance. Robots will be defined broadly, incorporating a wide range of machines both autonomous and remote-controlled. Students will be exposed to critical analysis regarding the historical and contemporary use of machines in art and theatrical performance. In parallel, students will also learn about electronics, programming, robotics and mechanical construction techniques. Over the course of the semester, students will iterate through multiple projects exploring how robots can convey meaning and emotion. The course will culminate with a final public performance by the robots. Experience with physical computing through Introduction to Interactive Media or a course equivalent is highly encouraged.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IM-UH 2117-000 (19987)

Decoding Nature (IM-UH 2318)

How can we capture the unpredictable evolutionary and emergent properties of nature in software? How can understanding the mathematical principles behind our physical world help us to create digital worlds? And how can implementing these code-based simulations offer insight and perspective on both environmental and human behaviors. This course attempts to address these questions by focusing on the programming strategies and techniques behind computer simulations of natural systems using p5.js (a JavaScript library in the spirit of Java’s Processing framework). We will explore a variety of forces and behaviors that occur naturally in our physical world. This includes properties of movement, physics, genetics, and neural networks. For each topic, we will write code to simulate those occurrences in a digital environment. The results will usually be visual in nature and manifested in the form of interactive animated coding sketches.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IM-UH 2318-000 (4453)

Communication and Technology (IM-UH 1012)

From early alphabets to modern virtual reality experiences, this course will explore the development, reaction, and impact of some of humankind’s most transformative innovations – its forms of communication. How have these inventions, such as writing, printing, the telegraph, television, radio, the internet and beyond, influenced human behavior throughout the course of history. How have humans shaped their development and direction? And what role are they playing in shaping our lives both today and tomorrow? Toward the end of the course, students will speculate on the future of communication technologies in a connected world by proposing their own transformative innovation. Readings and discussion will cover communication theory, technical processes, creative applications, and critical investigation. Writing assignments will be paired with practical assignments where students will be challenged to bring their analysis and ideas to life. The web will also be utilized as a test bed for experiencing and experimenting with various forms of communication both old and new.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IM-UH 1012-000 (4260)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Niroobakhsh, Sara

Mashups – Creating with Web APIs (IM-UH 2310)

(Formerly MDMED-AD 116) As the World Wide Web continues to grow and pervade our everyday lives, an ever-increasing amount of data and digital services are accessible to us via public web APIs—Application Programming Interfaces. Common to many web sites, including YouTube, Twitter, Google Maps, Wikipedia and more, these web APIs offer a way to programmatically request and re-purpose endless troves of information. How might we use these available resources to create unique, creative, and compelling web experiences of our own? Taking a hands-on approach, much of class time will be spent creating projects and writing code, primarily JavaScript, for client-side (front-end) web development.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


IM-UH 2310-000 (17326)

Circuit Breakers! (IM-UH 1110)

Circuit Breakers! is a course designed to introduce students to the world of hardware hacking and circuit bending for artistic and mainly sonic ends. By literally opening up common battery powered objects such as toys and finding their circuit boards, one can change the behavior of the object by interrupting the flow of electricity, creating novel, unexpected, outcomes. This technique has both predictable and unpredictable outcomes, but it is almost always satisfying. In addition to hacking off-the-shelf toys, students will also build their own circuits with a minimum amount of components. Many of the projects in this course center on common integrated circuits, which students will cajole, trick, and abuse in order to create art.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


IM-UH 1110-000 (18829)

Sensors, Body, & Motion (IM-UH 2114)

(Formerly MDMED-AD 209) Through the use of readily accessible open source technologies, such as sensors and computer vision, it is possible to create interactive art that leverages the full potential of the human body. Directly injecting “people-sensing” into an art work via wearables, cameras and code, generates a unique feedback loop, or dialogue-like relationship, where a person and a computer are continuously reacting to each other’s senses. This course will examine this feedback loop, specifically how a person is directly integrated into the artistic expression of the work. Ultimately, students will create interactive installations and performances where the human body is the central component of the art work. No experience is necessary but having taken Introduction to Interactive Media or a course equivalent is highly encouraged.

Interactive Media (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


IM-UH 2114-000 (17638)

Science of Language (CSCD-UE 110)

This course provides an overview of the scientific study of the human language faculty, focusing on the cognitive & neural processing mechanisms that underlie linguistic knowledge & use. We describe contemporary approaches to delineating levels of language structure & review various scientific methodologies used to study language. Topics include language knowledge & use as well as language change & variation. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Natural Science for non-CSCD majors

Communicative Sciences & Disorders (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


CSCD-UE 110-000 (11854)09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Buchwald, Adam


CSCD-UE 110-000 (12396)09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Thu9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)at Washington SquareInstructed by Instructor, Tba


CSCD-UE 110-000 (12397)09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Thu11:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)at Washington SquareInstructed by Instructor, Tba


CSCD-UE 110-000 (12398)09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Thu12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Instructor, Tba


CSCD-UE 110-000 (12399)09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Thu2:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Instructor, Tba


CSCD-UE 110-000 (13226)09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Fri9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)at Washington SquareInstructed by Instructor, Tba


CSCD-UE 110-000 (13227)at Washington SquareInstructed by


CSCD-UE 110-000 (19753)09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Fri12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by

Documentary Strategies: Documenting Downtown Using New Media (PHTI-UT 1006)

IMA students are welcome to fill out the non-major course request form if they are interested in taking this course (this is the workflow we use for all interested non-photo majors).
This course systematically examines downtown New York City neighborhoods, businesses, institutions and communities. Using new media technology, such as 360 degree photography and video, augmented reality, and spatial sound, students will document histories that have unfolded around New York University’s Greenwich Village campus: the evolution of Bowery, changing Chinatown, the diminishing family-owned businesses; disappearing sub cultures of the East and West Village; Italian, Jewish, Dominican and Puerto Rican enclaves in the Lower East Side. The students learn how to work together in teams and with families and institutions, and how to gain access to other cultures, using new media.

Prerequisite: Photography & Imaging II, or permission of the department. This course considers the creative possibilities of a variety of documentary strategies. The editing of images, their structuring into an essay form, the interpretation of their various meanings, and the impact of the documentary essay on the world are all discussed. Students are assigned a range of problems that explore visual description and interpretation ranging from the photojournalistic to the autobiographical. In addition each student devotes a significant amount of time to producing a single-subject documentary project. Classes are lecture-demonstration with critiques of student work and regular presentations of documentary photographs made throughout history, in different cultures and for different reasons, including the personal and the societal. Each student must have a still camera or a video camera. This course requires a nonrefundable lab fee.

Photography and Imaging (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


PHTI-UT 1006-000 (15273)09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue5:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by

Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1)

Focuses on the economy as a whole (the ?macroeconomy?). Begins with the meaning and measurement of important macroeconomic data (on unemployment, inflation, and production), then turns to the behavior of the overall economy. Topics include long-run economic growth and the standard of living; the causes and consequences of economic booms and recessions; the banking system and the Federal Reserve; the stock and bond markets; and the role of government policy.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECON-UA 1-000 (7970)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McIntyre, Gerald · Gong, Qinzhuo · Yu, Vincent · McCarthy, Odhrain


ECON-UA 1-000 (7971)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Vincent


ECON-UA 1-000 (7972)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Vincent


ECON-UA 1-000 (7973)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McCarthy, Odhrain


ECON-UA 1-000 (7974)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McCarthy, Odhrain


ECON-UA 1-000 (7975)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gong, Qinzhuo


ECON-UA 1-000 (7976)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gong, Qinzhuo


ECON-UA 1-000 (7977)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Paizis, Andrew · Pang, Tianzan · Zambrano, Cesar · Astinova, Diva


ECON-UA 1-000 (7978)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zambrano, Cesar


ECON-UA 1-000 (7979)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zambrano, Cesar


ECON-UA 1-000 (7980)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pang, Tianzan


ECON-UA 1-000 (7981)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pang, Tianzan


ECON-UA 1-000 (7982)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Astinova, Diva


ECON-UA 1-000 (7983)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Astinova, Diva

Language & Society (LING-UA 15)

Considers contemporary issues in the interaction of language and society, particularly work on speech variation and social structure. How social factors affect language. Topics: language as a social and political entity; regional, social, and ethnic speech varieties; bilingualism; and pidgin and creole languages.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LING-UA 15-000 (20304)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Davidson, Lisa · MacKenzie, Laurel


LING-UA 15-000 (20305)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Repetti-Ludlow, Chiara


LING-UA 15-000 (20306)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pena, Jailyn

Physical Science: Energy & the Environment (CORE-UA 9203)

This course explores the scientific foundations of current environmental issues and the impact of this knowledge on public policy. One goal of the course is to examine several topics of pressing importance and lively debate in our society – e.g., global warming, the quest for clean air and water, atmospheric ozone depletion, and the continuing search for viable sources of energy. A parallel goal is to develop the chemical, physical, and quantitative principles that are necessary for a deeper understanding of these environmental issues. The relevant topics include the structure of atoms and molecules, the interaction of light with matter, energy relationships in chemical reactions, and the properties of acids and bases. Throughout the course we also examine how scientific studies of the environment are connected to political, economic and policy concerns. The laboratory experiments are closely integrated with the lecture topics and provide hands-on explorations of central course themes. Overall, this course will provide you with the foundation to carefully evaluate environmental issues and make informed decisions about them.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Quantitative Reasoning: From Data to Discovery (CORE-UA 9111)

Today’s technology enables us to collect massive amounts of data, such as images of distant planets, the ups and downs of the economy, and the patterns of our tweets and online behavior. How do we use data to discover new insights about our world? This course introduces ideas and techniques in modern data analysis, including statistical inference, machine learning models, and computer programming. The course is hands-on and data-centric; students will analyze a variety of datasets, including those from the internet and New York City. By the end of the course, students will be able to (1) apply quantitative thinking to data sets; (2) critically evaluate the conclusions of data analyses; and (3) use computing tools to explore, analyze, and visualize data. Throughout the course, we will also examine issues such as data privacy and ethics

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 9111-000 (18965)
09/01/2022 – 12/07/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Accra (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9111-000 (22967)
at NYU Accra (Global)
Instructed by

Life Science: Brain and Behavior (CORE-UA 9306)

The relationship of the brain to behavior, beginning with the basic elements that make up the nervous system and how electrical and chemical signals in the brain work to effect behavior. Using this foundation, we examine how the brain learns and how it creates new behaviors, together with the brain mechanisms that are involved in sensory experience, movement, hunger and thirst, sexual behaviors, the experience of emotions, perception and cognition, memory and the brain’s plasticity. Other key topics include whether certain behavioral disorders like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder can be accounted for by changes in the function of the brain, and how drugs can alter behavior and brain function.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CORE-UA 9306-000 (2587)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Kelemen, Eduard


CORE-UA 9306-000 (2589)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Kelemen, Eduard

Quantitative Reasoning: From Data to Discovery (CORE-UA 111)

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CORE-UA 111-000 (9469)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Clarkson, Corrin


CORE-UA 111-000 (21464)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kotwal, Adit


CORE-UA 111-000 (21465)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kotwal, Adit


CORE-UA 111-000 (21466)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mishra, Prerna


CORE-UA 111-000 (21467)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mishra, Prerna

Expressive Culture: Music in Prague Field Study (CORE-UA 9731)

This is a chance to immerse yourself in the musical culture of Prague. You will attend five music performances together with the class and two on your own. Each of the concerts will be in a different style, and performed in a different sort of venue. Each concert will be preceded by a lecture/listening session, often involving the actual performers; you will also be assigned a reading excerpt relevant to the music you will hear. The concerts, scheduled about once every two weeks on evenings between Mondays and Thursdays, will be supplemented by architecture walks and film showings, which will usually take place during class time. In addition, you will undertake a “Personal Connection Project”, in groups of two or three, in which you will choose a local genre, performer or composer to research. The research will include reading relevant contextual material, attendance at a live concert or rehearsal, and an interview with a performer. You will share your project with the class in an oral presentation, which will take place at the end of the semester. after which you will submit your conclusions in a final paper, in lieu of a final exam.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CORE-UA 9731-000 (2833)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Ackerman, Anthony

Expressive Culture: Film (CORE-UA 9750)

The course description for this CORE class varies on the location where taught. Please view the course description in the course notes below.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CORE-UA 9750-000 (4855)
at NYU Buenos Aires (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9750-000 (2814)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by


CORE-UA 9750-000 (2654)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by Dadak, Muzeyyen


CORE-UA 9750-000 (2505)
08/29/2024 – 12/04/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Vela, Carlos


CORE-UA 9750-000 (2845)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by Barnes, Annette


CORE-UA 9750-000 (2846)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by Barnes, Annette

Expressive Culture: Images (CORE-UA 9720)

Contemporary Art in Britian. Contemporary art raises vigorous debate and criticism. But what is contemporary about contemporary art? We consider some key issues in dealing critically with contemporary art with a focus on work on display in exhibitions in London, both major national collections and private galleries, exploring art produced since the late 1950s through case studies of the work of individual artists and through themes which include photography, representations of the body, gallery display, video practice, and installation art. Topics include how contemporary art came to look as it does, with a focus on British art; the different forms of material and presentation artists have employed; why and how diverse audiences are addressed; and how markets, national prizes, and private collections shape the kinds of art produced and inform public taste. We also look at the collection and display of contemporary art, on a private and a public scale; dealer galleries, and issues of curation. Critical and historical writings by artists and theorists will be considered.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CORE-UA 9720-000 (2742)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by

Life Science: Human Reproduction (CORE-UA 315)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


CORE-UA 315-000 (9630)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 315-000 (9631)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 315-000 (9632)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Thu
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 315-000 (9790)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 315-000 (9945)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Thu
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 315-000 (9946)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 315-000 (10451)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Quantitative Reasoning: Great Ideas in Mathematics (CORE-UA 110)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CORE-UA 110-000 (8659)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sanfratello, Andrew


CORE-UA 110-000 (8660)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sinha, Sid


CORE-UA 110-000 (8661)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sinha, Sid


CORE-UA 110-000 (8662)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhu, Randy


CORE-UA 110-000 (8663)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhu, Randy

Expressive Culture: Film (CORE-UA 750)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 750-000 (8025)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Polan, Dana


CORE-UA 750-000 (8026)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 750-000 (8027)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 750-000 (8028)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 750-000 (8029)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 750-000 (8030)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 750-000 (8031)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 750-000 (10351)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Expressive Culture:Performance (CORE-UA 740)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


CORE-UA 740-000 (24546)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 740-000 (24547)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Adams, Kimberly


CORE-UA 740-000 (24548)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Adams, Kimberly


CORE-UA 740-000 (24549)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Guaraná, Bruno


CORE-UA 740-000 (24550)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Guaraná, Bruno

Expressive Culture: Sounds (CORE-UA 730)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 730-000 (8786)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dang, Christine


CORE-UA 730-000 (8787)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 730-000 (8788)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 730-000 (8789)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 730-000 (8790)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 730-000 (8925)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Teyssier, Alice


CORE-UA 730-000 (8926)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 730-000 (8927)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 730-000 (8928)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 730-000 (8929)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Expressive Culture: The Graphic Novel (CORE-UA 711)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 711-000 (8822)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Borenstein, Eliot


CORE-UA 711-000 (8823)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 711-000 (8824)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 711-000 (8825)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 711-000 (8826)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 711-000 (8870)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 711-000 (9112)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 711-000 (10188)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 711-000 (22137)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 711-000 (22197)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 711-000 (22408)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 711-000 (22441)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 711-000 (22506)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 711-000 (22528)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Life Science: The Brain, A User’s Guide (CORE-UA 313)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


CORE-UA 313-000 (19925)09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by


CORE-UA 313-000 (19926)09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Thu11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)at Washington SquareInstructed by


CORE-UA 313-000 (19927)09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Thu1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by


CORE-UA 313-000 (19928)09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Thu3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by


CORE-UA 313-000 (19929)09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Thu5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by


CORE-UA 313-000 (19930)09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Fri9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)at Washington SquareInstructed by


CORE-UA 313-000 (19931)09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Fri11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)at Washington SquareInstructed by

Quantitative Reasoning: Prob,Stats & Decisn-Mkng (CORE-UA 107)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CORE-UA 107-000 (8865)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sondjaja, Mutiara


CORE-UA 107-000 (8866)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xu, Bill


CORE-UA 107-000 (8867)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xu, Bill


CORE-UA 107-000 (8868)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Sixian


CORE-UA 107-000 (9382)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liu, Sixian

Introduction to Computer Programming (CSCI-UA 3)

This course introduces object-oriented programming, recursion, and other important programming concepts to students who already have had some exposure to programming in the context of building applications using Python. Students will design and implement Python programs in a variety of applied areas.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


CSCI-UA 3-000 (21167)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Versoza, Joseph

Introduction to Machine Learning (CSCI-UA 473)

Students will learn about the theoretical foundations of machine learning and how to apply machine learning to solve new problems. Machine learning is an exciting and fast-moving field at the intersection of computer science, statistics, and optimization, with many consumer applications such as machine translation, speech recognition, and recommendation. Machine learning also plays an increasingly central role in data science, enabling discoveries in fields such as biology, physics, neuroscience, and medicine. In the first part of the course, students will learn about supervised prediction methods including linear and logistic regression, support vector machines, ensemble methods, and decision trees. In the second part of the course, students will learn about methods for clustering, dimensionality reduction, and statistical inference.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


CSCI-UA 473-000 (9300)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wilson, Andrew

Introduction to Machine Learning (CSCI-UA 9473)

Machine learning is an exciting and fast-moving field of computer science with many recent consumer applications (e.g., Microsoft Kinect, Google Translate, Iphone’s Siri, digital camera face detection, Netflix recommendations, Google news) and applications within the sciences and medicine (e.g., predicting protein-protein interactions, species modeling, detecting tumors, personalized medicine). This course introduces undergraduate computer science students to the field of machine learning. Students learn about the theoretical foundations of machine learning and how to apply machine learning to solve new problems. Assuming no prior knowledge in machine learning, the course focuses on two major paradigms in machine learning which are supervised and unsupervised learning. In supervised learning, we learn various methods for classification and regression. Dimensionality reduction and clustering are discussed in the case of unsupervised learning

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CSCI-UA 9473-000 (22400)
09/01/2022 – 12/08/2022 Tue,Thu
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by Cosse, Augustin Marie Dominique


CSCI-UA 9473-000 (22964)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Basic Algorithms (CSCI-UA 310)

Prerequisites: Data Structures (CSCI-UA 102); Discrete Mathematics (MATH-UA 120); and either Calculus I (MATH-UA 121) OR Math for Economics I (MATH-UA 211). An introduction to the study of algorithms. Two main themes are presented: designing appropriate data structures, and analyzing the efficiency of the algorithms which use them. Algorithms for basic problems are studied. These include sorting, searching, graph algorithms and maintaining dynamic data structures. Homework assignments, not necessarily involving programming.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CSCI-UA 310-000 (7819)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Regev, Oded


CSCI-UA 310-000 (7820)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Song, Min Jae


CSCI-UA 310-000 (7821)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Regev, Oded


CSCI-UA 310-000 (8906)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fenteany, Peter


CSCI-UA 310-000 (9912)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nassajianmojarrad, Seyed · Mundra, Jaya


CSCI-UA 310-000 (9913)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jin, Yifan


CSCI-UA 310-000 (20845)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Karthikeyan, Harish


CSCI-UA 310-000 (20846)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Agarwal, Ishan


CSCI-UA 310-000 (10617)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhao, Xinyi

Operating Systems (CSCI-UA 202)

This course covers the principles and design of operating systems. Topics include process scheduling and synchronization, deadlocks, memory management including virtual memory, input-output and file systems. Programming assignments.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CSCI-UA 202-000 (7818)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Walfish, Michael


CSCI-UA 202-000 (9186)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gottlieb, Allan


CSCI-UA 202-000 (20844)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gottlieb, Allan

Computer Systems Org (CSCI-UA 201)

This course covers the internal structure of computers, machine (assembly) language programming, and the use of pointers in high-level languages. Topics include the logical design of computers, computer architecture, the internal representation of data, instruction sets, and addressing logic, as well as pointers, structures, and other features of high-level languages that relate to assembly language. Programming assignments will be both in assembly language and other languages.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CSCI-UA 201-000 (7816)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moody, Douglas L


CSCI-UA 201-000 (7817)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by R D, Harshitha


CSCI-UA 201-000 (9059)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Benjamin


CSCI-UA 201-000 (9060)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Viswanathan, Adithya


CSCI-UA 201-000 (9188)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aljabbouli, Hasan


CSCI-UA 201-000 (9189)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gurrala, Jaya Amit Sai


CSCI-UA 201-000 (20841)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Franchitti, Jean-Claude


CSCI-UA 201-000 (20842)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gurrala, Jaya Amit Sai


CSCI-UA 201-000 (9910)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Iyer, Shraddha


CSCI-UA 201-000 (9384)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zare, Samvid Avinash


CSCI-UA 201-000 (9911)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pabba, Rishika


CSCI-UA 201-000 (20843)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by He, Yang

Web Development and Programming (CSCI-UA 61)

Students that have successfully completed CSCI-UA 467 Applied Internet Technology are not eligible to take CSCI-UA 61 Web Development and Programming. This course will provide a practical approach to web technologies and programming. Students will build interactive, secure and powerful web programs. This course will cover client and server side technologies for the web.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CSCI-UA 61-000 (8622)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kapp, Craig

Intro to Computer SCI (CSCI-UA 101)

Students learn how to design algorithms to solve problems and how to translate these algorithms into working computer programs. Experience is acquired through programming projects in a high level programming language. CSCI-UA 101 is intended as a first course for computer science majors, and for students of other scientific disciplines. Programming assignments.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


CSCI-UA 101-000 (7675)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McIntosh, Suzanne


CSCI-UA 101-000 (7676)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schneider, Teseo


CSCI-UA 101-000 (9503)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CSCI-UA 101-000 (7677)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Locklear, Hilbert


CSCI-UA 101-000 (8814)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cabo, Candido


CSCI-UA 101-000 (9071)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bloomberg, Amos


CSCI-UA 101-000 (9859)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Berger, Marsha


CSCI-UA 101-000 (10064)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nassar, Nader

Database Design and Implementation (CSCI-UA 60)

Students that have successfully completed CSCI-UA 479 Data Management and Analysis are not eligible to take CSCI-UA 60 Database Design and Implementation. Introduces principles and applications of database design and working with data. Students use python as they prepare, analyze and work with data; SQL to study the principles and implementations of relational databases; and are introduced to other database paradigms such as NoSQL. Students apply these principles to computer systems in general and in their respective fields of interest.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CSCI-UA 60-000 (7808)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bloomberg, Amos

Introduction to Web Design and Computer Principles (CSCI-UA 4)

Prerequisite: Three years of high school mathematics or equivalent. No prior computing experience is assumed. Students with computing experience should consult with the computer science department before registering. Offered every semester. 4 points. This course introduces students to both the practice of web design and the basic principles of computer science. The practice component of the course covers not only web design but also current graphics and software tools. The principles section includes an overview of hardware and software, the history of computers, and a discussion of the impact of computers and the internet.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Introduction to Data Science (DS-UA 112)

Introduction to Data Science offers the fundamental principles and techniques of data science. Students will develop a toolkit to examine real world examples and cases to place data science techniques in context, to develop data-analytic thinking, and to illustrate that proper application is as much an art as it is a science. In addition, students will gain hands-on experience with the Python programming language and its associated data analysis libraries. Students will also consider ethical implications surrounding privacy, data sharing, and algorithmic decision making for a given data science solution.

Data Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Data Science for Everyone (DS-UA 111)

Data Science for Everyone is a foundational course that prepares students to participate in the data-driven world that we are all experiencing. It develops programming skills in Python so that students can write programs to summarize and compare real-world datasets. Building on these data analysis skills, students will learn how draw conclusions and make predictions about the data. Students will also explore related ethical, legal, and privacy issues.

Data Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


DS-UA 111-000 (9775)09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Jones-Rooy, Andrea · Spirling, Arthur


DS-UA 111-000 (9776)09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by López Peceño, Alejandro


DS-UA 111-000 (9778)09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Palmer, Lexi


DS-UA 111-000 (9779)09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by López Peceño, Alejandro


DS-UA 111-000 (9780)09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri8:00 AM – 8:00 AM (Morning)at Washington SquareInstructed by Kottur, Ankita Vijaya Kumar


DS-UA 111-000 (9781)09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Fri2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Palmer, Lexi

Design II for Non-Majors (ART-UE 402)

This class acquaints the student with the fundamentals of Design by focusing primarily on layout, composition & color through use of the grid. The grid is a fundamental building block for publication design (print & digital), website design, & animation design. This class focuses primarily on Graphic Design but proposes basic concepts that can be extrapolated into other design fields. Classes will be client & solutions-based and will assume a professional career orientation. Additionally the class will provide a current overview of what’s happening in the contemporary design world through field trips, readings & presentations.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ART-UE 402-000 (12509)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stark, Jeff


ART-UE 402-000 (12442)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
5:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sullivan, Jennifer M


ART-UE 402-000 (12948)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fuller, Sean

Design I for Non-Majors (ART-UE 401)

This course serves to familiarize the student with the fundamentals of typography. Typography forms the basis of our contemporary communication. Students will gain design abilities based on analogue techniques as well as digital software. The class explores letterform design & moves subsequently to typesetting exercises performed using the letterpress printer & computer. Compositions exploring typography as color, form, & image will be examined for visual impact as well as meaning. The history of typography is incorporated beginning with Guttenberg in the 1400’s through the classic designers of the 17th & 18th centuries, type-design through Russian Constructivism, the Bauhaus, & Modernism to contemporary digital type design.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ART-UE 401-000 (12947)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
5:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ART-UE 401-000 (12474)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
5:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Verdoux, Jeanne


ART-UE 401-000 (12527)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
5:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Digital Art I for Non-Majors (ART-UE 303)

Assignments, critiques, & demonstrations related to the specific level on which the course is being given. The use of the computer to augment & expand conceptualization & expression has provided the artist with some of the most important new means for visual thinking since the Renaissance invention of perspective. Students learn how to use the computer as an extension of the visualization process & its specific applications in both two-dimensional & three-dimensional art.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ART-UE 303-000 (12787)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carideo, Gregory


ART-UE 303-000 (12041)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Khoshooee, Bahareh


ART-UE 303-000 (12945)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kleeman, Harry


ART-UE 303-000 (12946)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
5:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Calabrese, Nickolas

Intro to Programming for Games (OART-UT 1617)

Introduction to Programming for Games is a course that introduces students to the concepts, problems, and methods of computer programming, and how these apply to the creation of video games. Throughout the semester, students will have weekly programming assignments, first using Processing with the Java programming language, then the Unity3D Game Engine with C#. There will be a midterm game in Processing and a final game in Unity. The course assumes no prior programming knowledge, and is designed to touch on the basic principles of digital design in form of computer code. There will be an emphasis on programming fundamentals; they will be motivated through the lens of designing and producing video games.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 1617-000 (14383)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Popp, Karina


OART-UT 1617-000 (14792)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Smith, Kate


OART-UT 1617-000 (14793)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pratt, Charles


OART-UT 1617-000 (20571)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Parker, Matthew

Collaborative Arts Lab I (OART-UT 100)

Collaborative Arts Lab engages students across disciplines and schools in a layered process of inquiry, dialogue, and creative research in response to different issues of urgency in our community. Each semester, a theme is chosen for the course which serves as both the introduction to the frame for research and the introduction to the class group. This semester, the course will be rooted in performance as a frame to examine what culture is built around the body as subject and explore perceptions of art based on the body and different physicalities. You will work individually and in groups in movement-based exercises, as well as in other artistic mediums, to explore social, historical, and cultural contexts, analyze existing research, develop questions for creative inquiry, and experiment with new ways of thinking about the body as subject and as inspiration for the creative process. This course has no prerequisites and welcomes students from all schools and from all/any creative backgrounds – writers, dancers, actors, musicians, visual artists, filmmakers, designers, photographers, etc. Students will be expected to create works together, and each student will have the opportunity to integrate different creative forms into their class projects.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
6 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


OART-UT 100-000 (20657)09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Bitel, Mary

Games 101 (OART-UT 1600)

Games 101 is the foundational course for the NYU Game Center. The focus of Games 101 is game literacy – a shared understanding of games as complex cultural and aesthetic objects. The class will incorporate lectures, discussion, readings, and writing assignments, but the primary activity of the class is critical play – playing games in order to better understand and appreciate them. The class will cover games on and off the computer, including classic and contemporary board and card games, sports, and games on the PC, internet, and consoles.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 1600-000 (14221)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by Clark, Naomi


OART-UT 1600-000 (14345)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by Jones-Brewster, Jordan


OART-UT 1600-000 (14346)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by


OART-UT 1600-000 (14347)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by


OART-UT 1600-000 (14348)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by


OART-UT 1600-000 (14349)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at Brooklyn CampusInstructed by


OART-UT 1600-000 (14722)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by

Intro to Game Design (OART-UT 1605)

This is an intensive, hands-on workshop addressing the complex challenges of game design. The premise of the class is that all games, digital and non-digital, share common fundamental principles, and that understanding these principles is an essential part of designing successful games. Learning how to create successful non-digital games provides a solid foundation for the development of digital games. Students will analyze existing digital and non-digital games, taking them apart to understand how they work as interactive systems. A number of non-digital games will be created in order to master the basic design principles that apply to all games regardless of format. This course is subject to a non-refundable department fee, please see the Notes section for more detail.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 1605-000 (14719)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


OART-UT 1605-000 (14720)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Georgescu, Mary


OART-UT 1605-000 (14721)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


OART-UT 1605-000 (22965)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


OART-UT 1605-000 (22966)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed,Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Intro to Game Studies (OART-UT 1606)

This class is an overview of the field of video games that approaches them from several theoretical and critical perspectives. No special theoretical background or prior training is needed to take the course, but to have had a broad practical experience with and basic knowledge of games is a distinct advantage. Also, an interest in theoretical and analytical issues will help. You are expected to actively participate in the lectures, which are dialogic in form, with ample room for discussion. The course will prepare the student to: – Understand and discuss games from a theoretical perspective – what are the components of a game? – Apply new theories and evaluate them critically. – Assess and discuss game concepts and the use of games in various contexts. – Analyze games, and understand and apply a range of analytical methods.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 1606-000 (14537)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pratt, Charles


OART-UT 1606-000 (14534)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pratt, Charles


OART-UT 1606-000 (14535)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pratt, Charles

Cell Phone Cinema (OART-UT 566)

Hollywood in your palm. That is what this combination of lectures, screenings, demonstrations and practical production workshop will offer to the students in this course. There will be several professional guests making presentations and Q&A sessions from the mobile phone filmmaking industry. In addition to the historical and critical overview of the emergence and exponential growth of global cell phone cinema, students will shoot all footage on cell phones and download them for computerized editing. The final project will be under three minute shorts. Projects will include all genres of film and television: news, mini-documentaries, animation, music videos and narrative shorts. Completed student projects will be suitable to be posted on the Internet and entered into domestic and international mobile phone film festivals. For example, two minute long improvisations of Bollywood Style Music Videos shot on Cell Phones by the students have been projected at the Tribeca Cinemas as part of the New York Indian Film Festival. It is suggested but not compulsory that students bring to the class a cell phone capable of recording video.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 566-000 (14368)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bardosh, Karoly

3D Modeling (DM-UY 2133)

In this studio, students will learn to produce and render high-quality 3D models. Upon completion of this course, students will have a solid understanding of the fundamentals of modeling, texturing, animation and lighting using industry standard software. Students may create content for video games, web, film, or other interfaces.

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 2133-000 (12635)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Guevara, Cesar


DM-UY 2133-000 (12636)

Documentary Cinema (DM-UY 3123)

This course provides an overview of documentary film and video history and theory, centered on hands-on production. The course will include readings, workshops, screenings, discussions, assignments, critiques, and technical instruction around documentary and pseudodocumentary forms. | Prerequisite: DM-UY 2263

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 3123-000 (12649)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Nagaraj, Vandana

Narrative Cinema (DM-UY 2123)

In this course, students complete a coordinated sequence of short projects that add up to a finished, live-motion video project. The course strongly emphasizes the relevance of particular tools and techniques to the specific project Concepts are introduced through the screening of historical examples, from 1895 to the present. The course format is modeled on professional standards and workflow for preproduction, production and postproduction. | Prerequisites: DM-UY 2263

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


DM-UY 2123-000 (15422)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Media Audiences (MCC-UE 9016)

An examination of the great debate concerning the effects of mass media and mass communication on our society. Analysis and application of major perspectives and approaches used in formulating modern theories of mass communication.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9016-000 (2409)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by

History of Media and Comm (MCC-UE 9003)

This course introduces students to key concepts in the history of media and communication, and to the stakes of historical inquiry. Rather than tracing a necessarily selective historical arc from alphabet to Internet or from cave painting to coding, the course is organized around an exploration of case studies in context. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent for Societies and the Social Sciences.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Media and the Environment (MCC-UE 9027)

This course will investigate the dominant critical perspectives that have contributed to the development of Environmental Communication as a field of study. This course explores the premise that the way we communicate powerfully impacts our perceptions of the “natural” world, and that these perceptions shape the way we define our relationships to and within nature. The goal of this course is to access various conceptual frameworks for addressing questions about the relationship between the environment, culture and communication. Students will explore topics such as nature/ wildlife tourism, consumerism, representations of the environment in popular culture and environmental activism.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


MCC-UE 9027-000 (14132)
08/31/2020 – 12/10/2020 Tue
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by

Television: History and Form (MCC-UE 9006)

An exploration of television as a medium of information, conveyor and creator of culture and a form of aesthetic expression. Course examines the historical development of television as both a cultural product and industry.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9006-000 (2406)
at NYU Los Angeles (Global)
Instructed by

Introduction to Visual Culture (MCC-UE 1412)

This course is an introduction to the key issues of the field of visual culture, looking at the social role of images & visuality (the structures & power relations of looking, being seen & unseen, & vision in society). It introduces students to some of the foundational aspects of visual culture theory & concepts, in contemporary culture, with particular attention to the US context in relation to the global. This course will introduce some of central themes of visual culture, looking at the history of modern forms of visuality & the history of visual technologies, concepts of spectacle & scale, museums & image collections, image icons, taboo images, & the relationship of images to memory. We will examine how images circulate through digital media, remakes, & viral networks, & the cross-fertilization of images between various social arenas, such as art, advertising, popular culture, comic books, news, science, entertainment media, video games, theme parks, architecture, & design.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Video Games: Culture and Industry (MCC-UE 9008)

Examines the emergence of video games as sites of contemporary cultural production & practice. Special attention is given to the symbolic & aesthetic dimensions of video games, including their various narratives forms and sub-genres, & concentrates on their interactive dimensions. The course provides insight into the emerging trends in the interface between humans & media technologies. The course also situates video games within the business practices of the entertainment industries.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MCC-UE 9008-000 (22914)
01/25/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Krobova, Tereza

Journalism and Society: Leaks and Whistleblowers (MCC-UE 9111)

In 2010, WikiLeaks, in a partnership with some of the most important news publications, began releasing thousands of classified diplomatic cables sent between the U.S. State Department and consulates and embassies around the world. Three years later, Edward Snowden leaked top secret information about surveillance activities by the NSA. More recently, the Panama Papers became the biggest data leak in the history of journalism. These events signal the beginning of the big leak era, which this course will focus on. We will analyze the role of media concentration and technological innovation as twin driving forces in the inception of this big leak era over recent years. We will study the consequences of these changes at three different levels: (i) the legal consequences for whistleblowers; (ii) the resulting birth of global networks and partnerships that expose technical, cultural and economic limitations in the traditional media; and (iii) the geopolitical implications, as a breach in one government ́s security apparatus is a victory for that government ́s opponents. Finally, we will confront one larger question: whether the big leak era means that transparency will (could?) replace fairness as journalism ́s main paradigm. .

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9111-000 (2671)
at NYU Buenos Aires (Global)
Instructed by

Tango and Mass Culture (MCC-UE 9121)

This course explores Tango as an aesthetic, social and cultural formation that is articulated in interesting and complex ways with the traditions of culture and politics in Argentina and Latin America more generally. During the rapid modernization of the 1920s and 1930s, Tango (like Brazilian Samba), which had been seen as a primitive and exotic dance, began to emerge as a kind of modern Field available for additional information in footer primitive art form that quickly came to occupy a central space in nationalist discourse. The course explores the way that perceptions of a primitive and a modern converge in this unique and exciting art. In addition, the course will consider tango as a global metaphor with deeply embedded connections to urban poverty, social marginalization, and masculine authority. .

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9121-000 (4866)
at NYU Buenos Aires (Global)
Instructed by

Media Events and Spectacles (MCC-UE 1065)

This course examines the role played by media events & spectacle in the shaping of belief, attitudes, & actions, with particular attention paid to the concept of the masses & its changed meaning over time. The course examines concepts of mass culture, the decentralization of cultural forms, & the rise of convergence culture. It explores the history of the media event & the theories that have shaped it, & the role of spectacle in society from the Renaissance to modern society to the age of digital media.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1065-000 (14052)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fallica, Salvatore

Global Media: Sydney, Australia (MCC-UE 9456)

This course examines the fast-changing landscape of global media. Historical and theoretical frameworks will be provided to enable students to approach the scope, disparity and complexity of current developments. These frameworks will be supplemented with the latest news and developments. In short, we ask: what is going on in the hyperlinked and hyper-turbulent realm of blogs, Buzzfeed and The Sydney Morning Herald? Key issues examined include: shifts in patterns of production, distribution and consumption; the implications of globalisation; the disruption of established information flows and emergence of new information channels; the advent of social media; the proliferation of mobile phones; the ethics and regulation of modern media; the rise of celebrity culture; the demise (?) of privacy; the entertainment industry and its pirates; Edward Snowden and the NSA; and the irrepressible octogenarian Rupert Murdoch. The focus will be international, with an emphasis on Australia.Ultimately, the course will examine the ways in which global communication is undergoing a paradigm shift, as demonstrated by the Arab spring and its uncertain legacy, as well as the creeping dominance of Google, Facebook and Twitter. In other words Toto, I’ve a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


MCC-UE 9456-000 (12301)
08/31/2020 – 12/10/2020 Wed
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by

Digital Media Theory & Practice (MCC-UE 1031)

This course offers students a foundational understanding of the technological building blocks that make up digital media & culture, & of the ways they come together to shape myriad facets of life. Students will acquire a working knowledge of the key concepts behind coding, & survey the contours of digital media architecture, familiarizing themselves with algorithms, databases, hardware, & similar key components. These technological frameworks will be examined as the basic grammar of digital media & related to theories of identity, privacy, policy, & other pertinent themes.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


MCC-UE 1031-000 (11229)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bianco, Jamie

Consumption, Culture and Identity (MCC-UE 1409)

This course offers students the opportunity to engage with theories of communication & culture through the context of consumption & contemporary consumer society. Our focus will be on the role of commodities & consumer practices in everyday life & in culture at large. We will give particular attention to consumption’s role in the construction of social & cultural identities. Students will consider critical responses to consumer culture, including the resistance & refusal of consumption as well as the attempted mobilization of consumption toward social change.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1409-000 (14054)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kopenkina, Olga

Health Media and Communication (MCC-UE 1040)

The meanings of health & disease are shaped not only by scientific & Medical discourses, but by media, communication, & the cultures of health. This course examines the impact of media & health cultures on what counts as normal & pathological, how medical environments are understood & experienced, popular tactics for communicating & contesting biomedical information, public understandings of biotechnology, & how media representation & popular culture help to shape understandings of disease & health. readings, films (& other sources) will be drawn from a variety of genres, including epidemiology, public health, anthropology, history, communication studies, & medical memoir.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


MCC-UE 1040-000 (14114)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Media and Culture of Money (MCC-UE 1404)

This course examines the culture of money& finance, and the role of the media & popular culture in making sense of economics. It engages with the ways that money, finance, & economics are shaped in part through media representations, that finance is not simply a system but also a culture, & that capitalism shapes world views. The course examines the history of ways of thinking about money, the centrality of financial markets in 20th-21st century globalization, & the examination of financial systems in the wake of the 2008 financial meltdown. Students will explore the role of money media in shaping attitudes toward consumerism, financial decisions, & finance systems.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Queer Identity and Popular Culture (MCC-UE 1408)

In this course, we will explore queerness as identity, practice, theory, & politics, all through the lens of popular culture. Our approach will be grounded in theories, methods & texts of communication & media studies, thus it will serve as a complement to other queer theory & culture courses offered across the university. Readings will include both theoretical texts & case studies both historical & contemporary. Students will complete the course with a critical understanding of what it means to be & “do” queer in contemporary culture. Students will also be equipped to bring queer analytical tools to their everyday & professional encounters with popular culture.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Social Media Networking (MCC-UE 9032)

This course will examine “social media” from a cultural perspective, with a focus on how media technologies figure in practices of everyday life and in the construction of social relationships and identities. This course is based closely on one offered in New York by Professor Laura Portwood-Stacer, but we will examine many of the issues in the context of Central and Eastern Europe and compare the “Western” experience of social media with the situation in the post communist world. Although many of our readings will deal with Social Network Sites (SNSs), we will attempt to form an expansive definition of what constitutes “social media.” We will also work from an expansive definition of “technology,” considering the term in a cultural sense to include various practices and tools used to communicate in everyday life. The course will also look closely at the impact of social media on journalism and activism, including a dissection of the recent debates on the power of social media to transform these fields.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MCC-UE 9032-000 (22905)
01/25/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Druker, Jeremy

Global Media Seminar: Latin America (MCC-UE 9455)

Using a historical perspective, the course aims to acquaint students with Latin American theories, practices and representations of the media. Departing from a critical approach to Habermas theory of the public sphere, the course will trace the arc of the media in Latin America since independence to the incumbent post-neoliberal area and the so-called “Media Wars”. Given that Argentina is facing an extraordinary conflict between the government and the Clarín media conglomerate (the largest of its kind in Latin America), the students will engage in the current incendiary debates about the role of the media, the new media law and the complex relationship between the media, politics and the state.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9455-000 (2664)
at NYU Buenos Aires (Global)
Instructed by

Media and the Environment (MCC-UE 1027)

This course will investigate the dominant critical perspectives that have contributed to the development of Environmental Communication as a field of study. This course explores the premise that the way we communicate powerfully impacts our perceptions of the “natural” world, & that these perceptions shape the way we define our relationships to & within nature. The goal of this course is to access various conceptual frame woks for addressing questions about the relationship between the environment, culture & communication. Students will explore topics such as nature/wildlife tourism, consumerism, representations of the environment in popular culture & environmental activism.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1027-000 (11413)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Govindarajan, Padmapriya

Social Media Networking (MCC-UE 1032)

This course will examine “social media” from a cultural perspective, with a focus on how media technologies figure in practices of everyday life & in the construction of social relationships & identities. We will work from an expansive definition of what constitutes “social media,” considering social network sites, smartphone apps, & online games, among other technologies. The course itself will involve communication in social media channels in addition to the traditional seminar format, thus we will be actively participating in the phenomena under study as we go.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


MCC-UE 1032-000 (12661)09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)at Washington SquareInstructed by Ali, Isra

Media and Music (MCC-UE 1037)

This course investigates the mediation of music & music-like sounds in both private & public life. Commercial venues, from restaurants to rest rooms, pipe Muzakl into its spaces; radios broadcast more music than any other content today; soundtracks imprint the texture of signifying associations for television shows & films; we carry personal playlists on mobile music players; & musical media & technological, ideological & metaphysical dimension; as well as the relation of music to mass media (radio, television, the internet) & the film and music industries.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1037-000 (14049)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Huda

Global Media Seminar: Media Activism and Democracy (MCC-UE 9452)

The course on “Media, Activism & Democracy” aims at, first, introducing students to the complex and fascinating topic of civil society activism; second, at illustrating them the linkages between activism and media; third, at showing them the impact of civil society’s advocacy on contemporary political systems. In a nutshell, the course aims at providing students with a closer understanding of the civil society activism-media-politics conundrums at the national and global levels.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9452-000 (2445)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Masrani, Rahoul

Global Media Seminar: East-Central Europe (MCC-UE 9453)

This course aims to bring together diverse issues and perspectives in the rapidly evolving and changing area of international/global communication. Through a historical perspective, a framework will be established for the appreciation of the development of the immense scope, disparity, and complexity of this rapidly evolving field. Students will be encouraged to critically assess shifts in national, regional, and international media patterns of production, distribution, and consumption over time, leading to a critical analysis of the tumultuous contemporary global communication environment. Essential concepts of international communication will be examined, including trends in national and global media consolidation, cultural implications of globalization, international broadcasting, information flows, international communication law and regulation, and trends in communication and information technologies. The focus of the course will be international, with attention being paid both to Western-based multimedia conglomerates, as well as to the increasing global prominence of media corporations based in other regions, contributing to the reversal of international media flows and challenging the global hegemony of the Western media producers. Particular emphasis will be on the Czech Republic, as an empirical example of a national media system affected by global media flows.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9453-000 (2563)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Klvana, Tomas

Global Media Seminar: Media & Cultural Globalization in France (MCC-UE 9454)

This course introduces students to the basic structures and practices of media in Europe and their relationship to everyday social life. It pays special attention to the common models and idioms of media in Europe, with an emphasis on national and regional variations. Specific case studies highlite current rends in the production, distribution, consumption, and regulation of media. Topics may include: national and regional idioms in a range of media genres, from entertainment to advertising and publicity, to news and information; legal norms regarding content and freedom of expression; pirate and independent media; and innovations and emerging practices in digital media.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9454-000 (2560)
09/02/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Paris (Global)
Instructed by

Architecture as Media: (MCC-UE 1030)

This class reads architecture and the built environment through the lenses of media, communication, and culture. The course takes seriously the proposition that spaces communicate meaningfully and that learning to read spatial productions leads to better understanding how material and technological designs are in sustained conversation with the social, over time. Through analyses of a range of space – from Gothic cathedrals to suburban shopping malls to homes, factories, skyscrapers and digital cities – students will acquire a vocabulary for relating representations and practices, symbols and structures, and for identifying the ideological and aesthetic positions that produce settings for everyday life.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1030-000 (14046)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gilmore, Daniel

Media and Cultural Analysis (MCC-UE 9014)

This course provides an overview of critical thinking on contemporary media production, media outcomes and media systems. Introduce theoretical approaches and practice used to analyze the content, structure, and context of media in society. We will explore factors shaping media texts, including: politics, economics, technology, and cultural traditions. The dominant critical perspectives that contribute to our understanding of media will be read, discussed, and employed. The course has three broad objectives: 1. Develop a critical awareness of media environments, 2. develop a familiarity with concepts, themes and theoretical approaches of media criticism, and the terms associated with these approaches and 3. develop an ability to adopt and adapt these frameworks in your own analyses of mediated communication.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MCC-UE 9014-000 (22886)
01/25/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Trampota, Tomas

Advertising and Society (MCC-UE 9015)

The course will include an introduction of the influential sociological theory of consumerism by Zygmunt Bauman. Other theories (see the syllabus bellow) will be presented as well. After the presentation of the mentioned theories, we will concentrate on their application to the Central European environment, which will be discussed in the context of globalization. The main aim is to show the relationship between the advertisement and the society in the current phase of society’s development, which can be characterized as a mutual discussion, but a discussion of unequal partners. In this context we will discuss the impact of current mechanisms of consumer society, which through the advertisement influences issues like i.e.: gender, politics, art, national identity, ethnic relations and democracy. We will also discuss chosen types of advertisement messages, how they influence the viewer and which ethical problems arise from such an influence.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MCC-UE 9015-000 (22887)01/25/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)at NYU Prague (Global)Instructed by Murad, Salim


MCC-UE 9015-000 (22888)at NYU Prague (Global)Instructed by

Culture, Media and Globalization (MCC-UE 9400)

A veritable buzzword globalization refers to several newly emerged trends. To name the three most visible ones these are the economy, culture and politics. Media do not only describe and interpret globalization but also are its important part. A study of globalization is inherently diverse and eclectic. So is this course. Students will read, watch, analyze and discuss. In class discussions and writings they are expected to engage questions connected to globalization, culture and the media. Through a series of lectures and discussions the course explores how the process of globalization transforms the media and examines the impact of new technologies on global communications. Emphasizing the transnational context of media and culture the course approaches global media and cultural production from a wide range of theoretical frameworks relevant to contemporary condition.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


MCC-UE 9400-000 (12588)
02/04/2019 – 05/16/2019 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


MCC-UE 9400-000 (25657)
02/04/2019 – 05/16/2019 Mon,Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by

Rise of Internet Media (MCC-UE 1571)

This course examines the emergence of the Internet as a commercial business. It pays particular attention to the various business models and practices employed in media-related enterprises, tracing their development from the late 1990s to the most recent strategies and trends. Case studies include the Internet Service Providers (ISPs), portals, search engines, early game platforms, the Internet presence of traditional media organizations, social network platforms.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1571-000 (14032)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Govindarajan, Padmapriya

History of Media & Comm (MCC-UE 3)

This course introduces students to key concepts in history of media and communication, and to the stakes of historical inquiry. Rather than tracing a necessarily selective historical arc from alphabet to Internet or from cave painting to coding, the course is organized around an exploration of case studies in context.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


MCC-UE 3-000 (10672)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ali, Isra


MCC-UE 3-000 (11292)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sinett, Arel


MCC-UE 3-000 (11293)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sinett, Arel


MCC-UE 3-000 (11294)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ozkiral, Alijan


MCC-UE 3-000 (11295)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ozkiral, Alijan


MCC-UE 3-000 (11296)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chenery, Ashley


MCC-UE 3-000 (11376)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chenery, Ashley


MCC-UE 3-000 (11377)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Fotsch, Paul

Advertising & Marketing (MCC-UE 1775)

An introduction to the professions of marketing, promotion, and advertising, with an emphasis on industry structure, branding, integrated marketing communication, effective techniques, and changing communication strategies.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1775-000 (14043)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Secunda, Eugene


MCC-UE 1775-000 (14044)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Secunda, Eugene

Media Activism & Social Movements (MCC-UE 1826)

This interactive & discussion-oriented course provides an introduction to the politics & tactics underlying five broad categories of media activism: media interventions at the levels of representation, labor relations, policy, strategic communication, & “alternative” media making. The course will rely on both a survey of the existing scholarship on media activism, as well as close analyses of actual activist practices within both old & new media. As a class, we will examine a wide-range of digital media as well as local, national, and global media activist institutions.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1826-000 (14045)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jupiter, Marz

Privacy and Media (MCC-UE 1303)

Few values have been as unalterably disturbed as privacy by developments in new media and other information technologies. This course presents an inquiry into the impact of information and digital communications technologies upon privacy and its meanings. In order to examine at a deep level technology’s place in society and the complex ways that technology and privacy each shape the other in interactive cycles of cause and effect. Philosophical analysis is balanced with significant contributions by legal scholars, computer scientists, social scientists, and popular social critics.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Transnational Media Flows (MCC-UE 1306)

This class examines the intersecting dynamics of media genres and geo-linguistic cultural markets in the configuration of global and regional media flows. It looks in particular at the way media genres travel and how their circulation raises issues about the cultural power of certain media narratives in specific historical, political and social conditions of consumption. We will examine the battle for national, regional, and global media markets as a struggle for the ’Slegitimate’ cultural and political view of the world expressed through information (news), scientific discourse (documentaries), and popular culture (films, tele novels, reality television, music) to understand the complex global flow of television programs and films.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


MCC-UE 1306-000 (13380)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
11:un AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pinon, Juan

Empire, Revolution, and Media (MCC-UE 1352)

This course examines the role of media in the history of empires and revolutions and the history of media empires. It focuses on the investment in media forces by both empires and revolutions, and the tendency of media to form empires that are subject to periodic ’revolution’ in the marketplace with the contexts of colonization, decolonization and globalization. Media discussed include prints, paintings, photography, journalism, fiction, cinema, the Internet and digital media.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MCC-UE 1352-000 (13177)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shamel, Salma

Postcolonial Visual Culture (MCC-UE 1403)

This class addresses how colonialism and postcolonialism are shaped and mediated through images and the gaze. The dynamics of colonial history motivate and shape colonial and postcolonial perceptions and influence their patterns of global circulation when the boundary between the world out there and the nation at home is increasingly blurred. Course surveys a range of image texts through various media (photography, television, cinema) and sites (war, the harem, refugee camps, prisons, disasters); nationalist mobilization, counter-insurgency, urban conflict, disaster management, the prison system, and the war on terror.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1403-000 (14030)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fattaleh, Nadine

Political Rhetoric (MCC-UE 1800)

Looking at the rhetoric of public relations we examine the principles and assumptions in the process of analyzing the process of political campaigns. Focuses on an analysis of what is reported to the mass media and how the ’gatekeepers,’ reporters, editors and producers of news filer the messages. Also, discussion on how public relations participates in the creation of viewpoints that eventually become well established and widely held.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MCC-UE 1800-000 (22153)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McKenzie, Ian

Public Speaking (MCC-UE 1805)

Analysis of the problems of speaking to groups and practice in preparing and presenting speeches for various purposes and occasions. Hours are arranged for student evaluation and practice.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1805-000 (14025)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Makar, Ivan


MCC-UE 1805-000 (14026)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ross, Alan

Persuasion (MCC-UE 1808)

Analysis of factors inherent in the persuasive process, examination and application of these factors in presentations. Hours are arranged for student evaluation and practice.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MCC-UE 1808-000 (11476)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Strugatz-Seplow, Beth


MCC-UE 1808-000 (26067)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MCC-UE 1808-000 (26073)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Strugatz-Seplow, Beth

Interpersonal Comm (MCC-UE 1830)

The application of various systems of communication analysis to specific behavioral situations. Through the case-study method, students apply communication theories and models to practical, everyday situations.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 12 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2024)


MCC-UE 1830-000 (5313)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MCC-UE 1830-000 (5312)
07/03/2024 – 08/15/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kurlenkova, Aleksandra


MCC-UE 1830-000 (5721)
07/03/2024 – 08/15/2024 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kurlenkova, Aleksandra

Amateur Media (MCC-UE 1024)

This course will track the various manifestations of media amateurism over time and medium, while also exploring theoretical concerns and cultural discourses that surround their work and social construction, especially in relation to notions of professionalism, community, networks, artistic practice, collectivism, and marginalization.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1024-000 (11391)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Resendiz, Ramon

Interviewing Strategies (MCC-UE 1740)

This course focuses on the principles and practices of successful interviewing techniques. Students are provided with background on the structure of an interview and learn how to analyze success and/or potential problems. Review of case studies and practice in holding interviews enables students to gain experience and to improve their own abilities.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1740-000 (14015)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Werner, Dawn


MCC-UE 1740-000 (14016)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Werner, Dawn


MCC-UE 1740-000 (14017)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Online
Instructed by White, Karen


MCC-UE 1740-000 (14018)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Online
Instructed by White, Karen


MCC-UE 1740-000 (14019)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lynch, Ashley


MCC-UE 1740-000 (14020)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Online
Instructed by Battinelli, Olivia

Innovations in Marketing (MCC-UE 1760)

This course is an analysis of changing trends in marketing ranging from corporate social responsibility to guerrilla and viral marketing. Discussion of theoretical concepts are applied through fieldwork and project-based learning. Guest lectures on emerging topics are featured.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1760-000 (14021)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Family, Cheryl


MCC-UE 1760-000 (14022)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hashim, Sara


MCC-UE 1760-000 (14023)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wolfe, Samantha


MCC-UE 1760-000 (14024)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Online
Instructed by Moore, Jessica

Public Relations: Theory and Process (MCC-UE 1750)

Public relations means different things to different things to different people but it has one undeniable element: communication. This course is concerned with arranging, handling, and evaluating public relations programs. Students work with actual case histories and deal with contemporary topics such as the use of the computer in public relations.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2021)


MCC-UE 1750-000 (3198)
07/06/2021 – 08/15/2021 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Devitt, James

Public Relations: Principles and Practices (MCC-UE 1755)

This course focuses on techniques of communication in public relations including creation of press releases, press packets and kits, and developing public relations campaigns.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1755-000 (14009)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MCC-UE 1755-000 (14010)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kaye, Michael


MCC-UE 1755-000 (14011)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kaye, Michael

Argumentation and Debate (MCC-UE 1835)

An examination of the art of debate using current issues of public policy & social justice. Students will learn the skills of critical thinking, evidence evaluation & persuasion. Hours are arranged for fieldwork & student evaluation.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MCC-UE 1835-000 (11478)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baker, William


MCC-UE 1835-000 (26076)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baker, William

Race and Media (MCC-UE 1025)

America’s founding principles of equality and equal opportunity have long been the subject of interpretation, debate, national angst, and widespread (oftentimes violent) conflict. No more is this the case than when we talk about the issue of race. While biological notions of race have lost their scientific validity, race remains a salient issue in American life as a social and political reality sustained through a wide variety of media forms. The broad purpose of this course is to better understand how notions of race have been defined and shaped in and through these mediated forms. Specific attention may be given o the ways that race is articulated in forms of mass media and popular culture.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Print, Typography and Form (MCC-UE 1508)

An overview of the history and cultures of print. Examines typography communication and the persuasive power of print. Topics include print ’revolution’ in early modern Europe, printedness and the public sphere, as well as contemporary relationships between print and digital media. How are digital media making it possible to see new things about print? What can e-books tell us about books?

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1508-000 (14002)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brideau, Katherine

Photography and The Visual Archive (MCC-UE 1517)

This course examines the role and history of photography within the historical landscape of media and communication. Special emphasis is placed on the accumulative meaning of visual archives, tracing how images relation and establish cultural territories across a variety of texts and media. The course investigates and contrasts the mimetic visual strategies within western and nonwestern traditions, looking at historical and contemporary images in a variety of forms.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1517-000 (11370)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Resendiz, Ramon

Gender and Communication (MCC-UE 1700)

This course explores the ways people create, maintain, and augment the meaning of gender, developing insight into understanding gender ideology and the media representation of gender. The course examines how ideas about gender shape our communication practices, and how our practices of communication produce gender.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


MCC-UE 1700-000 (11885)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed
2:un PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Borisoff, Deborah


MCC-UE 1700-000 (11886)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
2:un PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heard, Elizabeth

Listening: Noise, Sound and Music (MCC-UE 1717)

This course examines theories, technologies, and practices of listening in the modern world. How has our experience of sound changed as we move from the piano to the personal computer, from the phonoautograph to the mp3? How have political, commercial, and cultural forces shaped what we are able to listen to, and how we listen to it? Finally, how have performers, physiologists, and philosophers worked to understand this radical transformation of the senses?

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

War as Media (MCC-UE 1351)

This course examines the proposition that contemporary war should be understood as media. Was has become mediatized and media has been militarized. This course treats war and political violence as communicative acts and technologies and focuses on how they shape our understanding and experience of landscape, vision, body, time and memory.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Global Cult/Identities (MCC-UE 1401)

This course examines globalization as it is inscribed in everyday practices through the transnational traffic of persons, cultural artifacts and ideas. The course will focus on issues of transnational mobility, modernity, the local/global divide and pay specific attention to how categories of race, gender and ethnicity intersect with transnational change.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Marxism and Culture (MCC-UE 1402)

Explores the various political and philosophical debates within western Marxism. Pays particular attention to the influence of the cultural turn in twentieth century Marxist thought on feminism, postcolonialism, and theories of mediation. Themes include: the commodity, alienation and reification, surplus value, culture, ideology, hegemony and subjectivity.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1402-000 (14001)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Halperin, Yoav

Media & Identity (MCC-UE 1019)

This course will examine the relationship between mediated forms of communications the formation of identities, both individual and social. Attention will be paid to the way mediated forms of communication represent different social and cultural groupings, with a particular emphasis on gender, race, ethnicity, class and nationality.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1019-000 (11353)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Huda

New Media Research Studio (MCC-UE 1029)

A project-based, research-intensive course that explores emerging practices and trends in new media with particular emphasis on interactive and immersive environments, such as social networking sites,mulit-player online environments, the blogosphere, the open source movement, social activist groups, and internet-based art. Students engage in a semester-long participatory research project using collaborative web tools.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1029-000 (13987)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Media, Technology and Society (MCC-UE 1034)

An inquiry into the ways that technology — mechanical, electronic, analog, and digital — shapes and is shaped by cultural, political, and social values. Students become acquainted with key concepts and approaches to understanding the interplay of technology and society (e.g. technological determinism, social construction of technology, actor networks, affordances) and how these have been applied to such cases as the clock, the automobile, the assembly line, household technology, the telephone, and more recent communication technology.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


MCC-UE 1034-000 (21952)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Media and Global Communication (MCC-UE 1300)

This course examines the broad range of activities associated with the globalization of media production, distribution, and reception. Issues include: the relationship between local and national identities and the emergence of a ’global culture’ and the impact of technological innovations on the media themselves and their use and reception in a variety of settings.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Psychoanalysis: Desire and Culture (MCC-UE 1009)

Explores the subject of desire in modern media and culture. Freud’s ideas have had a profound influence on everything from the earliest manuals on public relations to the struggles of modern feminism. We will read a range of psychoanalytic theorists while studying how their insights have been put to work by both the culture industry and its critics.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1009-000 (13983)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Watter, Seth

Political Communication (MCC-UE 1013)

This course focuses on the essentially communicative aspects of American government, including the preparation of candidates, the electoral process, political advertising and public relations. It also includes the use of strategic communication to influence political agendas, the formation of public policy, and the process of political debate.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MCC-UE 1013-000 (11348)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Benson, Rodney

Mass Persuasion and Propaganda (MCC-UE 1014)

This course presents a critical analysis of the development, principles, strategies, media, techniques, and effects of propaganda campaigns from ancient civilizations to modern technological society. The course focuses on propaganda in the context of government, religion, revolution, war, politics, and advertising, and explores implications for the future of propaganda in the cybernetic age.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


MCC-UE 1014-000 (12423)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MCC-UE 1014-000 (14107)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Advertising and Society (MCC-UE 1015)

This course will examine the emergence of advertising as a form of communication, its influence upon other forms of mediated communication and its impact upon culture and society.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


MCC-UE 1015-000 (11874)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
11:un AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sturken, Marita

Media Audiences (MCC-UE 1016)

An examination of the great debate concerning the effects of mass media and mass communication on our society. Analysis and application of major perspectives and approaches used in formulating modern theories of mass communication.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1016-000 (13985)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Halperin, Yoav


MCC-UE 1016-000 (13986)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Online
Instructed by Pandit, Sujay

Television:History/Form (MCC-UE 1006)

An exploration of television as a medium of information, conveyor and creator of culture and a form of aesthetic expression. Course examines the historical development of television as both a cultural product and industry.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1006-000 (13980)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Freda, Isabelle

Film:History and Form (MCC-UE 1007)

An exploration of film as a medium of information, conveyor and creator of culture and a form of aesthetic expression. Course examines the historical development of film as both a cultural product and industry.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1007-000 (13981)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lariviere, Jason


MCC-UE 1007-000 (13982)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lariviere, Jason

Video Games: Culture and Industry (MCC-UE 1008)

The course approaches video games through the lens of political economy. This means examining games foremost as commodities, transactional goods through which various modes of economic life occur. This course is designed to introduce students to the structure and economics of the game industry since its emergence in the 1970s, particularly across the United States, China, and Japan. Special attention is brought to the dramatic industry changes catalyzed by digital distribution, mobile gaming, live streaming, and other contemporary developments.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Media and Cultural Analysis (MCC-UE 14)

An introduction to the theoretical approaches & methods used to analyze the content, structure, & contexts of media in society. Students will develop a familiarity with concepts, themes, & approaches in media criticism, & they will develop an ability to adopt, adapt, & employ a variety of methodologies for the analysis of mediated communication.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


MCC-UE 14-000 (11861)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stielau, Anna


MCC-UE 14-000 (11862)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fernandez, Yesenia


MCC-UE 14-000 (11863)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kulkarni, Kavita


MCC-UE 14-000 (11864)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McKenzie, Ian


MCC-UE 14-000 (11865)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed
11:un AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gotkin, Kevin


MCC-UE 14-000 (12668)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gotkin, Kevin


MCC-UE 14-000 (12902)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heard, Elizabeth


MCC-UE 14-000 (13509)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Guaraná, Bruno


MCC-UE 14-000 (20492)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
11:un AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Doughty, Aaron


MCC-UE 14-000 (20493)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pandit, Sujay


MCC-UE 14-000 (21509)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue
2:un PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bianco, Jamie Skye

Space and Place in Human Communication (MCC-UE 1002)

This course will build on a core concept of Lewis Mumford who understood media ecology as a component of spatial and urban ecology. Emphasis will be given on how space socially organizes human meaning and on the ’inscription’ of space. How do people, through, their practices and their being in the world, form relationships with the locales they occupy (both the natural world and the build environment)? How do they attach meanings to spaces to create places? and how do the experiences of inhabiting viewing and hearing those places shape their meanings, communicative practices, cultural performance memories and habits? Course themes include; mapping and the imagination; vision and space, soundscape, architecture and landscape; new media and space/time compression; space and identity; spatial violence; spatialization of memory. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent – satisfies the requirement for Cultures & Contexts

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1002-000 (13978)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Feldman, Allen

3D for Interactive Applications (DM-UY 4133)

In this course students will build form the skills they learned in 3D Modeling and 3D Animation to produce 3D for Interactive Applications. Projects may be geared to scientific, engineering or entertainment applications according to individual skills and professional aspirations. | Prerequisites: DM-UY 2133

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


DM-UY 4133-000 (16649)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by McDevitt, Bernard

Experimental Game Narratives (DM-UY 4153)

How do games tell stories? How can we move beyond the traditional narrative in games? Is there a more holistic approach that embeds the story deeply into the interaction? In this class, students will begin to answer these questions by analyzing games and developing their own experimental narrative games. | Prerequisite: DM-UY 2153

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


DM-UY 4153-000 (10430)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pizza, Toni

Mobile Application Development (DM-UY 4193)

Today’s applications are increasingly mobile. This course teaches students how to build mobile apps for Android or iOS devices, as well as how to deploy them in app stores. The history of mobile computing is also explored. | Prerequisite: DM-UY 2193

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


DM-UY 4193-000 (12666)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Adee, Katie

Photography and Words (DM-UY 3183)

This course explores various image editing techniques and outputs, utilizing various styles of text, including fiction and non-fiction. The assignments foreground how text influences viewers’ perception of images, and how images can enrich a body of writing. Students will use a range of production skills to create work — using After Effects for animation, HTML/CSS for website creation, book and print design, and archival printing methods. All projects are accompanied by readings that provide historical and theoretical grounding to support the concepts explored through practice. An emphasis on refining technical and aesthetic photography skills are central throughout the semester. Prerequisites: DM-UY 2183 or DM-UY 2263

Integrated Digital Media (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


DM-UY 3183-000 (9246)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Toolin, Jack Craig

Art Artist & Social Change (ASPP-UT 1002)

4 points – will count toward general education requirements (Humanities) Social, political, and economic upheavals produce shattering transformations in human life, yet some of the most significant artistic works in literature, visual arts, theatre, film, and music have been created under these extreme circumstances. The focus of this course is on developing an interdisciplinary approach to an understanding of the arts, artists, and the artists’ response as a catalyst for social and political change. We will explore the history of various practical crises and examine how they have influenced art and artists. Some of the examples include the works of Czechoslovakian films during Soviet Occupation, Protest Theatre during Apartheid South Africa, Shostakovich’s Trio during Soviet Era, underground music scene in present day Iran, Cindy Sherman’s photography in the USA, Croatian artist Sanjan Ivekovic and Bangali writer Taslima Nasrin’s. We will also look at some examples of propaganda artists and their work as well, artists like Morteza Avini in Iran and Liu Wenxi of China. By investigating the artist’s understanding of political, social, and economic forces that impact upon art and their own lives we will examine this question: What are the complex dynamics that are involved in the emergence of movements in the arts?

Ctr for Art, Society & Pub Pol (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Art & Public Policy All School Seminar: (ASPP-UT 1000)

In many political movements, the festive emerges as a major force shaping alternative social practices, forms of gathering, being together, and moving together. These alternative modes of being in collectivity are actively redefining the political. This sense of collectivity becomes particularly evident in the aesthetics of the Global South and its Diasporas. Consequently, this course explores the festive’s role in forming political movements beyond the traditional scope that reduces it to a simple byproduct of social life. It also explores how the pandemic has forced us to reimagine what coming together means. Taking Latin American and Caribbean aesthetics as an initial case, this seminar engages in a detailed interpretation of performances that challenge traditional definitions of both the festive and the political. A wide range of performance practices, such as carnival parties, sound systems, cabaret shows, popular dance styles, artworks, organized slave riots, and indigenous uprisings, shape the modes students will engage in theory and practice. For this course iteration, we will focus on questions around Black and Indigenous relations to carnival performance, structures of mutual aid as festive practice, and how they enact utopian modes of communal life, and how these modes of communal life redefine current understandings of art and politics. The class involves field trips, visits to several performance events, and conversations with artists and organizers who use the festive as a political tool to engage in political action in NYC. Questions regarding race, gender, and class will be directed to the philosophical, anthropological, and historical texts paying close attention to their involvement in the formation of colonial oppression. Performance studies’ methodologies will serve as the guiding mode to articulate these questions.

Ctr for Art, Society & Pub Pol (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ASPP-UT 1000-000 (6418)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rincon Alba, Luis