The Contemporary Literature Lab (ENGL-UA 9995)

This course bridges scholarly and professional training by providing students with an intensive introduction to the world of contemporary literature: its writers, its communities, and its organizations and institutions. Built around the English Department’s Contemporary Literature Series (CLS), which brings noted authors who are on course syllabi that semester to the NYU campus, the focus of the CLS Lab varies each semester depending on the featured authors. Some of the topics to be explored include: literary publishing, forums for literary discussion and criticism, literary organizations and institutions, and the possibilities and challenges of writing scholarly literary criticism about contemporary literature. By the end of the CLS Lab, students will have a firm grasp of the contemporary literary landscape and they will be better prepared to translate their interests and skills as English majors into the intellectual and professional contexts of the literary world.

English (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGL-UA 9995-000 (2758)
09/02/2024 – 12/06/2024 Wed
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Robson, Catherine

Intro to Urban Agriculture (FOOD-UE 1030)

This course provides a practical introduction to urban agriculture. Students will learn horticultural skills while performing tasks at the NYU Urban Farm Lab. They will also learn about the biological processes that these tasks manage & how they fit together in a system. Through visits to other sites around the city, students will be exposed to a wide variety of strategies for practicing horticulture in the urban environment.

Food Studies (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FOOD-UE 1030-000 (10584)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Metrick, Melissa


FOOD-UE 1030-000 (10585)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Metrick, Melissa

Making Dance: Space, Place and Technology (ARTS-UG 1211)

In this workshop, students will explore the possibilities of dancing across spatial categories, making dances in “real” and digital space. Taking our cues from contemporary experimental and primarily post-modern choreographers, we will examine how our arts practices and beliefs about bodies and space are linked to evolving ideas and cultural systems; we will ask questions that tug at the assumptions of what dance is, what bodies are, what space is, and how these elements are significant as components of choreography and of our dance experiences. We will make and watch dances ranging from low-tech works to high-tech experiments. In addition to making dances, we will read about contemporary dance, technology, and other practices and disciplines (e.g., architecture, philosophy, neuroscience), view performances of choreographers and visual artists, and meet with practitioners engaged in the questions and practices of our study. We will join with CultureHub, an organization housed at La MaMa E.T.C. (one of New York’s most noted experimental theaters) and working at the intersection of art, technology, and community. Readings might include work by Gaston Bachelard, Victoria Hunter, Matthew Frederick, Merce Cunningham, Steve Paxton, Andrew Gurian, Yi-Fu Tuan, and other artists and scholars. The course is open to all students: anyone interested in dance and/or technology is welcome. Note: all workshop members will be expected to participate as movers!

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTS-UG 1211-000 (16949)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Satin, Leslie

Editing I (FMTV-UT 1016)

This is a hands-on course designed to introduce the student to narrative and documentary editing techniques, and to the role of the editor in shaping the final form of film and video productions. Good editing is crucial to the success of every film and video. This class is recommended to students pursuing directing or producing who want a better understanding of how the post-production workflow functions, as well as to any student, from sophomore to senior, who would like to gain a clearer understanding of the role of the editor as an artist, a technician and a collaborator. To achieve this, the class will delve into the methods, objectives, and technical aspects of post-production. It will thoroughly explore two major editing programs (Avid Media Composer and Adobe Premiere Pro) used in today’s professional post-production environment, and acquaint the student with every stage of the editing workflow from capture to final output. Students will learn to approach these and other non-linear programs as variations on common themes rather than as completely new and foreign tools. In addition, the class will present examples of edited sequences from both narrative and documentary films for discussion, and have invited guests who will share their experiences in bringing films to completion. There will also be a course pack of assigned readings. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19414)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lewis, Emir


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19415)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reynolds, Frank


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19416)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lewis, Emir


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19417)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pollard, Jason


FMTV-UT 1016-000 (19418)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Weinstein, Yonatan

History of Documentary Film (OART-UT 1701)

The course traces the documentary film from its origins to the present day. Pioneer documentarians like Dziga Vertov and Robert Flaherty saw in documentary film the ability to portray life with a kind of truthfulness never before possible. Early Polish filmmaker Boleslaw Matuszewski wrote that while “the cinematograph does not give the whole truth at least what it gives is unquestionable and of an absolute truth.” Since those heady days, it has become all too clear that documentaries have no special access to the truth. Nevertheless, as this still-young art evolved, documentarians of different schools constantly sought new means to tell the human story. Documentary filmmaking has always been a blend of artistry and technical means and we will also explore this critical relationship. The course explores the development of the documentary and the shifting intentions of documentary filmmakers through the evolution of narrative approach and structure paying special attention to the documentary tradition’s relationship to journalism. Students examine how different filmmakers have gone about trying to convey “reality” on screen both through the use and avoidance of narration, through interviews, editing and dramatizations. Throughout the semester, students investigate how image-driven medium attempts to report stories and the ways an emotion-driven art can be problematic for journalistic objectivity. Finally, the ethical and journalistic responsibilities the documentary filmmaker are discussed. Special attention is given to dramatic re-creations, the filmmaker’s relationship to his/her subjects and the construction of narrative through editing.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


OART-UT 1701-000 (7218)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dorman, Joseph

Social Media Strategy (MKTG-UB 45)

The course covers marketing, advertising, and communications strategies in the new media landscape where traditional media (e.g., television, print) and the online social media (i.e., Web 2.0; e.g., online social networks, user-generated content, blogs, forums) co-exist. Students are expected to have knowledge about the fundamentals of traditional advertising methods and strategies. With this background knowledge, the primary focus of the course is on understanding social media, developing social media marketing strategies, and tracking their effectiveness. This course does not look at more tactical aspects of advertising/communications such as creative, message management, and publicity.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MKTG-UB 45-000 (10761)
02/03/2021 – 03/17/2021 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Entrepreneurship in Sustainable Protein (BSPA-UB 50)

Today, the food industry is the biggest emitter of greenhouse gases, accounting for up to 30% of emissions. A poor diet is now the leading cause of mortality in the U.S. As part of these huge global problems, animal production is arguably the biggest culprit. In recognition of this, consumers are dramatically altering diet patterns, and food entrepreneurs are rushing to solve the problem with desirable solutions. Vegetarianism and veganism are exploding and new alternative meat and dairy offerings are being launched at a frenetic pace. This undergraduate course—the first of its kind—is designed to put the idea of teaching entrepreneurship to its ultimate test—with the objective of incubating a series of ventures through the course of the semester that have the potential to be viable businesses and reverse negative externalities that arise from animal production. The course will start by exploring the chemistry of protein, the nutritional role of protein, the history of animal production and its environmental consequences. It will then take students through a series of frameworks to identify and implement solutions using entrepreneurship as the vehicle. These frameworks will include: (1) design thinking to identify opportunities, (2) sector / industry analysis models to identify need-gaps and validate the opportunity, (3) design thinking to prototype solutions and (4) business modeling in order to commercialize solutions. At the beginning of the semester, “start-up” teams of five to six students each will be formed and tasked with building a “blue-print” for a startup in the sustainable protein sector.

Business and Society (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


BSPA-UB 50-000 (19353)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Taparia, Hans

Global Media Seminar: Media Activism and Democracy (ITAL-UA 9513)

The course on “Media, Activism & Democracy” aims at, first, introducing students to the complex and fascinating topic of civil society activism; second, at illustrating them the linkages between activism and media; third, at showing them the impact of civil society’s advocacy on contemporary political systems. In a nutshell, the course aims at providing students with a closer understanding of the civil society activism-media-politics conundrums at the national and global levels.

Italian (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITAL-UA 9513-000 (2451)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Masrani, Rahoul

Storyboarding (FMTV-UT 1033)

Students will create a storyboard from an assigned literary property (i.e., fairy tales, folk tales, famous short stories, etc.) and research the chosen material visually in picture libraries, print and photo archives, museum/gallery libraries and online. From this basic research, the student will create and develop all the visual elements that lead to a final production storyboard; these elements include character model drawings; styling sketches for costumes and sets; experimental “inspirational” sketches exploring mood, color, and character relationships and experiments in animation and color test footage. Each week, students will “pitch,” (i.e. present material) as it is being developed. Through weekly critiques from the instructor and students, elements and shape of the production storyboard is refined to its final form. The approved storyboard at the end of the semester should be ready to go into production, and must reflect character ,attitude, design, entertainment, mood, expressions, feeling and type of action. It must use dialogue, music/sound effects, and tell the story in the best possible way. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19436)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moore, William


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19437)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baker, Zoya


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19438)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Baker, Zoya


FMTV-UT 1033-000 (19439)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: Topics (CORE-UA 500)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


CORE-UA 500-000 (10506)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Igsiz, Asli


CORE-UA 500-000 (10507)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10508)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10509)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10510)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10511)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Juette, Daniel


CORE-UA 500-000 (10512)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10513)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10514)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10515)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10516)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10517)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10518)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bottex-Ferragne, Ariane


CORE-UA 500-000 (10519)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10520)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10521)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10522)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10523)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Stark, Soren


CORE-UA 500-000 (10524)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Jingyi


CORE-UA 500-000 (10525)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Jingyi


CORE-UA 500-000 (10526)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fiorio, Soraya


CORE-UA 500-000 (10527)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fiorio, Soraya


CORE-UA 500-000 (10528)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cordivari, Braden


CORE-UA 500-000 (10529)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cordivari, Braden


CORE-UA 500-000 (10530)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 500-000 (10531)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Advanced Lab: Synthetic Media (INTM-SHU 306)

This advanced course investigates emerging trends in machine learning and artificial intelligence for generating media content – images, video, and sound. The course explores the idea of how artists, designers, and creators can use machine learning in their own research, production, and development processes. Students will learn and understand machine-learning techniques and use them to generate creative media content. We will cover a range of different platforms and models and also experiment with implementing the content with platforms for interaction design, such as Unity. Prerequisite: INTM-SHU 120 Communications Lab OR INTM-SHU 205 What’s New Media OR INTM-SHU 124 Emerging Technologies & Computational Arts

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


INTM-SHU 306-000 (6121)
01/22/2024 – 05/10/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Didakis, Stavros

History of Cinematography (FMTV-UT 1206)

This course deals with the history of the art and science of cinematography. A working Director of Photography will relate a perspective that is unique and factual to a theoretical discussion, which is traditionally academic. Cinematography has a strong tradition of adapting its tools to enhance the storytelling experience. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES. “Non-majors must process a “Permission Notice for Non-Majors” form” to register for the course (subject to availability).

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1206-000 (19531)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carmine, Michael

Global Media Capstone (MCC-UE 1220)

Specifically for students in the Global Media Scholars program, this course is the required culminating experience taken in the senior year, alongside a travel component during the January term. Course topics reflect faculty research interests, offering students a chance to explore emerging issues in the field of media studies, and will be site-specific based on the country chosen for January travel.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1220-000 (14063)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mills, Mara

Social Impact: Advertising for Social Good (MCC-UE 1051)

With the COVID-19 pandemic and the rise of social movements like Black Lives Matter and #metoo, the field of social good advertising has rapidly expanded as brands seek social relevance, governments and nonprofits look to inform, and activists try to persuade. In this course, students will learn to plan and execute powerful social advertising campaigns, while thinking critically about the blurred lines between advertising and information, and branding and politics, in what Sarah Banet-Weiser calls “Shopping for Change.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1051-000 (14065)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Railla, Jean

Inquiry Seminar (MCC-UE 1200)

MCC Research Inquiry Seminars, taken early in the major, expose students to the department’s culture of scholarly inquiry. Course topics reflect faculty research interests, offering students a chance to explore emerging issues in the field of media studies.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13990)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Benson, Rodney


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13991)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fleetwood, Nicole


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13992)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gitelman, Lisa


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13993)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hegde, Radha


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13994)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Robles, Erica


MCC-UE 1200-000 (5470)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ross, Andrew · Tawil-Souri, Helga


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13995)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13996)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hassan, Huda


MCC-UE 1200-000 (13997)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Intro to Marketing (MKTG-UB 9001)

This course evaluates marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and a catalyst of business activity. It presents a comprehensive framework that includes a) researching and analyzing customers, company, competition, and the marketing environment, b) identifying and targeting attractive segments with strategic positioning, and c) making product, pricing, communication, and distribution decisions. Cases and examples are utilized to develop problem-solving abilities.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4953)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Thu
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Donvito, Raffaele


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4981)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (21443)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (4834)
08/29/2024 – 12/04/2024 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Madrid (Global)
Instructed by Magarino, Victor


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (3462)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Mon
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Anton, Muriel


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (21026)
at NYU Tel Aviv (Global)
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 9001-000 (3380)
07/29/2024 – 10/31/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Sydney (Global)
Instructed by West, Andrew

The Beat: (JOUR-UA 201)

This course is designed to hone the student journalist?s ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test their ideas with the strength of their reporting and research, and then present them in story form.

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2023)


JOUR-UA 201-000 (2398)05/22/2023 – 07/05/2023 Tue,Thu11:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Morning)at OnlineInstructed by Flaherty, Francis


JOUR-UA 201-000 (2491)06/06/2023 – 06/29/2023 Tue,Wed,Thu3:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Mihai, Adrian

Dancing in the Here and Now: Making Dances, Knowing Bodies (ARTS-UG 1221)

Both dancing and everyday movement offer continual opportunities for embodied experience. Those who regularly dance or engage in movement practices such as yoga, jogging, cycling, and walking typically develop an appetite, even a need, for moving and the breadth of experience it brings. Whether you already feel this appetite or want to explore embodied experience for the first time, this Arts Workshop offers the opportunity for deep investigation of movement, focusing on active and contemplative exploration of bodies in space and time. We will be guided by several research strands linked to the existence and power of embodiment, noting experimental choreographer Susan Rethorst’s term, “the body’s mind”: ways of knowing (individually, culturally) through our bodies. Through many movement options, including dancing and somatic practices, walking and other everyday actions, and personal/cultural/political movement histories, we will encounter or create relationships between what we do and who we are. In the studio and elsewhere, we will consider how our lives as movers, and our sense of ourselves as embodied, bring us into contact with others—walkers, dancers, friends and family—and with our spaces, places, and sociocultural worlds. In this course (open to anyone with/without previous training), our research-in-action will be supported by interdisciplinary scholarship engaged with dance, embodiment, space, everyday culture, phenomenology, environmental studies, and life writing. Readings may include works by Thomas DeFrantz, Anna Halprin, Victoria Hunter, Einav Katan, Marcel Mauss, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Andrea Olsen, Steve Paxton, Georges Perec, Yvonne Rainer, Susan Rethorst, Kathleen Stewart, and Yi-Fu Tuan.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ARTS-UG 1221-000 (12594)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Satin, Leslie

Introduction to Mechanical Engineering (ME-UY 1012)

This course introduces students to the range of mechanical engineering and emphasizes the basic principles and devices for storing and using energy, directing motion and satisfying needs. Case studies look at design issues and related ethical and professional practice issues. Emphasis is on a mindset of exploration. Engineering standards and standard parts. Teams work on and present two design challenges. | Prerequisite: Only first-year students are permitted to enroll in this course.

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ME-UY 1012-000 (12688)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Wilson-Small, Nialah

Fund of Audio Tech II: Stu Maint (MPATE-UE 1009)

Advanced work in studio repair and maintenance focusing on digital equipment. Students will develop practical skills tracing schematics, using test equipment, and replacing components as required daily in the studio environment.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


MPATE-UE 1009-000 (18223)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Glanz, Jake

Shared Minds (ITPG-GT 3033)

“What capabilities does computational media have for depicting and conveying the experience of our minds? In this course we will start out using 3D graphics to depict the conventional physical reality that appears before us. Then we will turn inward to reflect the multidimensional reality of our minds, using artificial neural networks. Finally we return to embodied interfaces connected with cloud networking and databases to share with other people. The class will operate at a conceptual level, inviting students’ empirical psychological and philosophical investigations of the nature of their experience and how to convey it with art and story. It will ask students to look critically at existing computational media’s tendencies to bore, divide or inflame its users. But this is also very much a coding class where students will prototype their own ideas for new media first with 3D graphics using the threejs library, and then with machine learning models like Stable Diffusion using Huggingface APIs or Colab notebooks and finally with networking and databases using Firebase or P5 Live Media. Students can substitute other coding tools but game engines will not work for this class. The coding is in javascript, with a possible touch of python, and is a natural sequel to Introduction to Computational Media.” Prerequisite: ICM / ICM: Media (ITPG-GT 2233 / ITPG-GT 2048)

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3033-000 (15739)
09/04/2024 – 12/04/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by O’Sullivan, Daniel

Game Design & the Psychology of Choice (ITPG-GT 3028)

“As game and interaction designers we create systems and choices that can either prey upon our psychological foibles or help us avoid decision pitfalls. It is our responsibility to understand how we decide, to consider the ethics of the systems we create and to practice designing systems in a purposeful manner. Game Design & The Psychology of Choice will provide interaction and game designers with an understanding of the factors that influence behavior and decision-making by looking at the intertwining of cognitive psychology and economics through the development of behavioral economics. These disciplines study behavior on the individual and group level, often revealing some of the why behind the rules of thumb and folk wisdom that game designers come to intuitively. But understanding the why—why we fall into decision traps; why certain tradeoffs tax our brain more than others; why we are overconfident about our abilities; why certain decisions make us uncomfortable—allows us to more purposefully apply our design craft, both in and out of games. Finally, as a class, we will take what we learn about how we think and create series of game experiences based around key cognitive science concepts. Assignments may include: •Mod a cognitive science experiment into a game or experience •Analyze and present a game through the lens of cognitive science and behavioral economics •Create game or experience based around a particular insight from cognitive science or behavioral economics”

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3028-000 (15737)
09/04/2024 – 12/04/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Parker, Melissa

The Medium of Memory (ITPG-GT 3019)

“What is the medium of memory? In this 14-week studio class, we will dig into this question through creative storytelling. Starting from a lens-based practice, this class will introduce traditional and bleeding-edge documentary methods to inform our own varied approaches to activating archival material. Through weekly “readings” (articles, podcasts, films), written reflections, and creative assignments, we’ll explore: • how technology has impacted our relationship to memory; • how visual interventions can can surface alternative narratives; • how to make under- and unrecorded histories visible, and call into question the power dynamics embedded in “official” records; and • how we might recast objects and sites of memory-keeping, like heirlooms, journals, and memorials, as a mode of engaged preservation. Mid-way through the course, students will identify either personal or collective histories to open up to their own individual creative reexamination, memorialization, or transformation––each producing a final project with the technology and approaches of their choosing that serves to answer the question we started with––what is the medium of memory?”

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 3019-000 (15728)
10/23/2024 – 12/04/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Salvo, Simone

Interdisciplinary Projects: Guided Practice (ART-UE 9921)

This course provides space and guidance for students to work on self-driven, individual and group projects in art and media. Course content consists of texts, site visits, presentations, workshops, and critiques built around each student’s individual practice. Faculty and guest critics will hold regular studio visits, to help guide students through their process. Students’ material and technical investigations and theoretical inquiries will be addressed in group workshops and demonstrations. This course will culminate in a public presentation of students’ work.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 9921-000 (2387)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by Komarov, Aleksander

Disability Justice and Radical Inclusion (OT-UE 1403)

Explores the implications and meaning of having a disability in global contexts by introducing students to experts’ voices, especially disabled activists, as they seek to advance disability justice and inclusion and demand systemic change in spheres of influence including education, politics, healthcare, the arts, culture, social welfare, and everyday life. Examines how public (government) and private (outside of the government) policies and practices in these sectors affect the inclusion of persons with disabilities. Students explore and identify how international trends in disability and inclusion, local cultural beliefs, and biases influence inclusion.

Occupational Therapy (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OT-UE 1403-000 (11793)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patten, Kristie

Abrupt Climate Change (OART-UT 1058)

Combining science and the art of storytelling, this course will tackle one of the most pressing issues facing the future of humanity: Abrupt Climate Change. In a unique collaboration with NYU physical climate scientist Professor David Holland, students will research and create work that bridges the divide between science and the public through accurate, creative science-based storytelling. This highly multidisciplinary, hands-on course welcomes students from all backgrounds and fields of study to imagine and invent creative ways of telling stories about this global phenomenon and to investigate solutions. Weekly assignments will lead to a final collaborative project and an exhibition open to the public.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OART-UT 1058-000 (13226)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Terezakis, Peter

The Art of Sound (FMTV-UT 1007)

This is a critical studies course exploring the aesthetics and psycho-acoustics of sound: how sound works in art and life; how it affects emotions and stimulates the imagination; and how it is used in film, radio, television and other creative or artistic contexts, particularly its application as a key element in storytelling. This course examines the meaning and character of the soundscape (the acoustic environment) and the ways it has technically and aesthetically evolved throughout film history from the Kinetophone to the iPhone. The course includes reading in the theory of sound, and listening to examples of sound work by composers and sound designers. In previous semesters we have looked at the soundtrack in such films as: Playtime; Apocalypse Now, The Conversation, Aliens, The Evil Dead II, Saving Private Ryan, and Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Class meetings will be devoted to: 1) lecture and discussion based on assigned readings and listening and viewing assignments; and 2) screening of selected audio and video works. Students are graded on class participation, journals, a paper, and exams. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1007-000 (19411)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McKeever, Marsha

Traditions in Narrative (FMTV-UT 1031)

This course surveys narrative forms and representative works from literature that employ them, contributing to a familiarity with the literary tradition inherited by film, television, and radio. It examines the various strategies of narrative structure and its principal components (e.g., plot, theme, character, imagery, symbolism, point of view) with an attempt to connect these with contemporary forms of media expression. The course includes extensive readings, which are examined in discussions, and selected from English, American, and world literature. This course may be allocated to either History & Criticism or Gen Ed Humanities for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


FMTV-UT 1031-000 (6982)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Monda, Antonio

International Cinema: 1960 to Present (CINE-UT 56)

Cinema Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CINE-UT 56-000 (13919)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
6:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dominguez, Anthony


CINE-UT 56-000 (13920)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CINE-UT 56-000 (13921)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CINE-UT 56-000 (13922)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Electronics (ENGR-UH 3611)

This course focuses on fundamentals of electronics theory and design. The topics covered include semiconductor physics, diodes, diode circuits such as limiters, clamps; bipolar junction transistors; small-signal models; cut-off, saturation, and active regions; common emitter, common base and emitter-follower amplifier configurations; field-effect transistors (MOSFET and JFET); biasing; small-signal models; common-source and common gate amplifiers; and integrated circuit MOS amplifiers. The laboratory experiments include the design, building and testing of diode circuits, including rectifiers, BJT biasing, large signal operation and FET characteristics, providing hands-on experience of design, theory and applications, with emphasis on small signal analysis and amplifier design. The course also covers the design and analysis of small-signal bipolar junction transistor and field-effect transistor amplifiers; and, diode circuits. The students are introduced to designing and analyzing circuits using the LTPSpice or Cadence simulation tool.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3611-000 (3595)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Ha, Sohmyung


ENGR-UH 3611-000 (3596)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Sheikh, Muhammad Faraz · Ha, Sohmyung

Poverty and Inequality Around the Globe (SOCS-SHU 326)

This seminar examines the causes and consequences of poverty and rising inequality around the globe. Students will study the ways in which poverty and inequality are shaped by multifaceted contexts; understand the theories underlying strategies and programs which address key poverty and inequality issues faced by many developed, developing and least developed countries; and learn about different countries’ experiences addressing their own poverty and inequality issues. We consider philosophies of global justice and the ethics of global citizenship, and students are expected to critically reflect upon their own engagements with poverty relief activities and aspirations for social changes. Students should be prepared to tackle advanced social science readings, analysis, and writing. Open to seniors, and to other students with instructor’s permission. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. Fulfillment: Social Science Focus Political Economy/Sociology 300 level.

Social Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


SOCS-SHU 326-000 (20242)
01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Wed
8:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Zelleke, Almaz

Philosophy of Technology: Thinking Machines (PHIL-SHU 130)

This course aims to train students to think philosophically about our rapidly changing—and ever more intimate—relationship with machines. We focus in particular on the following subjects: artificial intelligence, robots, cyborgs, automation and science fiction speculation. Prerequisite: Global Perspectives on Society (GPS) Fulfillment: CORE STS; Humanities Interdisciplinary or Advanced course; IMA/IMB elective.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


PHIL-SHU 130-000 (20189)
01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Weslake, Brad · Greenspan, Anna

Electronic Rituals, Oracles and Fortune-Telling (IMNY-UT 289)

According to anthropologists Filip de Boeck and René Devisch, divination “constitutes a space in which cognitive structures are transformed and new relations are generated in and between the human body, the social body and the cosmos.” In this class, students will learn the history of divination, engage in the practice of divination, and speculate on what forms divination might take in a world where the human body, the social body, and even the cosmos(!) are digitally mediated. Starting with an understanding of ritual and folk culture, we will track the history of fortune-telling from the casting of lots to computer-generated randomness to the contemporary revival of Tarot; from reading entrails to astrology to data science; from glossolalia to surrealist writing practices to the “ghost in the machine” of artificial intelligence. Weekly readings and assignments culminate in a final project.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


IMNY-UT 289-000 (21942)
09/07/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Parrish, Allison

Media-making as Healing Practice (ITPG-GT 2358)

Where does healing reside in media-making? How do we approach creating artistic processes and tools that move towards minimizing harm, supporting collective care, and understanding what healing means for ourselves and with one another? This course examines socially-engaged artistic processes and frameworks that reconstruct, reclaim, and decolonize ‘healing.’ Together, we will gather embodied data from our bodyminds, build language through readings, and map out artists in the field exploring disability, racial trauma, queerness, and diaspora within media and performing arts. Subsequently, we will develop our own processes as our final project: weaving together storytelling, embodied strategies, tool-making, performances, and/ or space-making.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ITPG-GT 2358-000 (22317)
01/25/2023 – 05/03/2023 Wed
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Lin, Yo-Yo

Web Art as Site (ITPG-GT 2094)

WEB ART AS SITE addresses the history and practice of art made for and inseparable from the web, while teaching basic coding for the web. We explore key examples of web art from the early days of the internet through today, asking questions about this idiosyncratic artistic medium like: How do different forms of interaction characterize the viewer and/or the artist? What happens to our reading practice when text is animated or animates? How is an internet-native work encountered, and how does the path we take to reach it affect our reading? Who is able to see a work of web art, and what does access/privilege look like in this landscape? How are differently-abled people considered in a web artwork? What feels difficult or aggressive in web art, and when is that useful? How do artists obscure or reveal the duration of a work, and how does that affect our reading? What are the many different forms of instruction or guidance online? As we ask these questions, we exploit the internet pedagogically, collaborating online, playing with anonymity, and breaking the internet spaces we know. Students learn web coding through specialized online tutorials; most of class time is reserved for discussion (of web art and supplementary readings) and critique. Throughout the semester, students will produce two major works of web art. Students need only a standard laptop, and will not be expected to purchase any software or text (cost of materials: $0).

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2094-000 (14781)
01/24/2024 – 05/01/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Ballew, Theo Ellin

FOUNDATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT (MG-UY 1002)

This course introduces the principles and practices of management. Management is viewed as a system of tasks and activities, including environmental scanning, planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Within each major task, is a series of processes, which show how to do what has to be done. Management is a science and an art; both aspects of management are covered in this course. Areas covered are management history, philosophy and the theory and practice of management planning, decision making, organizing, motivating and leading. Special emphasis is on providing the technical and managerial challenges presented by emerging and transformative technologies. Particular consideration is given to the managerial options available to both legacy and entrepreneurial organizations.

Management (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MG-UY 1002-000 (14075)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by COHEN, MATHIAS


MG-UY 1002-000 (14076)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Driscoll, Michael

Video Game Economies (MCC-UE 9008)

The course approaches video games through the lens of political economy. This means examining games foremost as commodities, transactional goods through which various modes of economic life occur. This course introduces students to the structure and economics of the game industry since its emergence in the 1970s, particularly across the United States, China, and Japan. Special attention is brought to the dramatic industry changes catalyzed by digital distribution, mobile gaming, live streaming, and other contemporary developments. Examines the emergence of video games as sites of contemporary cultural production & practice. Special attention is given to the symbolic & aesthetic dimensions of video games, including their various narratives forms and sub-genres, & concentrates on their interactive dimensions. The course provides insight into the emerging trends in the interface between humans & media technologies. The course also situates video games within the business practices of the entertainment industries.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MCC-UE 9008-000 (2834)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Prague (Global)
Instructed by Krobova, Tereza

Introduction to 3D (FMTV-UT 1110)

This is an introductory course to the fundamentals of 3D computer animation. Through in-depth discussions and hands-on assignments, students will gain a thorough beginner’s understanding of the 3D production process. Using industry-leading Autodesk Maya running on high-end Mac Pro workstations, students will learn the basics of modeling and proceed through UV layout, texturing, rigging, animation, lighting and final render. At the end of the class students will have completed a series of exercises that will culminate in a final scene that showcases all they learned.This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1110-000 (19491)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McNagny, Phil


FMTV-UT 1110-000 (19492)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Guevara, Cesar

Introduction to Engineering and Design (EG-UY 1004)

This course introduces selected aspects of the history, philosophy, methodology, tools, and contemporary topics in engineering. Also included are basic engineering experimentation, data analysis, and a team-design project. This course will provide an understanding of what professional engineers do. In this context, an emphasis will be placed on developing oral and written communication skills. EG1004 is a survey course that introduces students to NYU Tandon academic opportunities, professional and career development, and teamwork skills. Design and project management skills are developed throughout a semester-long design project. Disciplines within engineering will be introduced during lecture, and explored through practice in laboratory assignments.

General Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


EG-UY 1004-000 (12431)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12432)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12433)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12434)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12435)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12436)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12437)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12438)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12439)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12440)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12441)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12442)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12443)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12444)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12445)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12446)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12447)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12448)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12449)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12450)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12451)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12452)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12453)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12454)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rom, Cindy


EG-UY 1004-000 (12455)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12456)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12598)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12457)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12458)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12459)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12460)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12461)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12462)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12463)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12464)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12465)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Clenance, Pamela


EG-UY 1004-000 (12466)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12467)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12468)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter · Röhr, Jason


EG-UY 1004-000 (12469)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12470)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12471)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12472)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12473)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12474)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12475)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12476)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12477)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12478)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12479)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12480)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rom, Cindy


EG-UY 1004-000 (12481)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12482)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12483)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12484)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12485)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12486)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Röhr, Jason · Li, Peter


EG-UY 1004-000 (12487)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12488)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12489)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Rui


EG-UY 1004-000 (12490)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12491)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid


EG-UY 1004-000 (12492)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paredes, Ingrid

DIGITAL LOGIC AND STATE MACHINE DESIGN (ECE-UY 2204)

This course covers combinational and sequential digital circuits. Topics: Introduction to digital systems. Number systems and binary arithmetic. Switching algebra and logic design. Error detection and correction. Combinational integrated circuits, including adders. Timing hazards. Sequential circuits, flipflops, state diagrams and synchronous machine synthesis. Programmable Logic Devices, PLA, PAL and FPGA. Finite-state machine design. Memory elements. A grade of C or better is required of undergraduate computer-engineering majors. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 1114 (C- or better) or CS-UY 1133 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UH 1001 (C- or better) or ENGR-UH 1000 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 101 (C- or better)

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11545)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11546)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11547)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11548)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 2204-000 (11549)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Reagen, Brandon

Data Structures (CSCI-SHU 210)

Data structures are fundamental programming constructs which organize information in computer memory to solve challenging real-world problems. Data structures such as stacks, queues, linked lists, and binary trees, therefore constitute building blocks that can be reused, extended, and combined in order to make powerful programs. This course teaches how to implement them in a high-level language, how to analyze their effect on algorithm efficiency, and how to modify them to write computer programs that solve complex problems in a most efficient way. Programming assignments. Prerequisite: ICS or A- in ICP. Equivalency: This course counts for CSCI-UA 102 Data Structures (NY). Fulfillment: CS Required, Data Science Required, CE Required.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20398)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Tue3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)at ShanghaiInstructed by Tam, Yik-Cheung


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20399)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Thu3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)at ShanghaiInstructed by Simikin, Sven


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20400)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Wed3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)at ShanghaiInstructed by Simikin, Sven


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20401)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Mon11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at ShanghaiInstructed by Tam, Yik-Cheung


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20402)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Wed11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at ShanghaiInstructed by Simikin, Sven


CSCI-SHU 210-000 (20403)01/30/2023 – 05/12/2023 Fri11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)at ShanghaiInstructed by Simikin, Sven

IRL/URL_Performing Hybrid Systems (COART-UT 212)

This course is a unique collaboration between the Collaborative Arts and IMA Tisch departments, and CultureHub at La Mama. During the pandemic many performing artists moved their work online, leading to an increasing acceptance of experimental practices that their predecessors developed in on-line work for the past 30 years. In Experiments in Hybrid (IRL/URL) Performance, students will have the opportunity to design, prototype, and present collaborative projects that build on this tradition, blending both physical and virtual elements. Over the course of the semester, students will have the opportunity to study at the CultureHub studio where they will be introduced to video, lighting, sound, and cueing systems. In addition, students will learn creative coding fundamentals allowing them to network multiple softwares and devices generating real-time feedback systems. The class will culminate with a final showing that will be presented online and broadcast from the CultureHub studio. 

Collaborative Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


COART-UT 212-000 (23156)01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Kananuruk, Tiriree

Comp Modern Societies: Pol & Soc in 20C Germany (HIST-UA 9133)

The history of Germany in the twentieth century offers rich material to explore various approaches to organizing modern society. Beginning with Imperial Germany in 1900 and moving forward to today’s reunited Germany, we will look at different ways in which the relationship between the state and the individual, and relationship between politics, economy, and society developed over five different political systems. We will interrogate how these institutional arrangements were envisioned and structured and how they were experienced in everyday negotiations. In this course, principle narratives and events will be situated in a European and global context, allowing us to place the concept of German modernity in a comparative framework. Lectures will provide an overview of Germany in the twentieth century; readings and in-class discussions will explore different approaches to analyzing German history and society. During museum visits and walking tours, we will analyze contestations over the various attempts to integrate – both in concerted efforts to memorialize as well as to forget and erase – Germany’s oft-problematic pasts within the narrative of Germany’s present.

History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


HIST-UA 9133-000 (2797)
08/29/2024 – 12/05/2024 Wed
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by

Statistics for Business and Economics (BUSF-SHU 101)

This course introduces students to the use of statistical methods. Topics include: descriptive statistics; introduction to probability; sampling; statistical inference concerning means, standard deviations, and proportions; correlation; analysis of variance; linear regression, including multiple regression analysis. Applications to empirical situations are an integral part of the course. Pre-requisites: None Fulfillment: This course satisfies the following: Major req: BUSF, BUSM, ECON, CS, DS Foundational course; Social Science: methods course; IMB Business elective.

Business and Finance (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


BUSF-SHU 101-000 (17187)
09/13/2022 – 12/16/2022 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Zheng, Dan


BUSF-SHU 101-000 (17188)
09/13/2022 – 12/16/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Zheng, Dan


BUSF-SHU 101-000 (17189)
09/13/2022 – 12/16/2022 Fri
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Zheng, Dan

British Art in London (ARTH-UA 9011)

The principal aim of this course is to familiarize students with the history of British art from the Stuarts to the early Victorian era. Teaching will be conducted entirely on sites in London or its immediate vicinity. The course will begin with the elite patronage of the Stuart court and end with the development of public institutions of art from the mid-eighteenth century. The social significance of portraiture, the cult of antiquity, the art market and the rise of landscape will all be studied as themes. There will be a strong emphasis on the European sources of British visual culture and the emergence of a distinctive national tradition of painting from Hogarth through to Turner.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ARTH-UA 9011-000 (2722)
09/02/2024 – 12/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Schuster, Jana


ARTH-UA 9011-000 (2723)
09/02/2024 – 12/06/2024 Thu
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU London (Global)
Instructed by Weiner, Julia

Advanced Seminar: (SOC-UA 9942)

This interdisciplinary course examines the works of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud, three German speaking writers who pioneered radically different and influential interpretations of modern life, which continue to shape our contemporary understanding of society and individuality. The seminar not only delves into the origins of these prominent traditions of modern Western thought, but also underscores their relevance in modern social theories and poetics. Hence, the course will also include references to the writings of their contemporaries, as well as explications of the direct and indirect influences of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud on other writers.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


SOC-UA 9942-000 (3750)
01/22/2024 – 05/02/2024 Wed
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by Michaelis-König, Andree

TrendingMentalHealth (CAMS-UA 504)

Addresses current problems facing our society and threatening our mental health, such as the opioid epidemic, gun violence, video game addiction, legal use of marijuana, and prolonged separation of children from their parents. Students contrast what is scientifically understood with what is commonly believed and learn critical reading and thinking skills as they parse fact from fiction, reality from supposition. Given the topical nature of this course, themes may vary by semester and instructor expertise (including a focus on social and cultural issues, novel neuroscience, digital health technology, etc.).

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CAMS-UA 504-000 (9479)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Waugh, Whitney


CAMS-UA 504-000 (9700)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Castellanos, Francisco · Baroni, Argelinda


CAMS-UA 504-000 (19793)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gerson, Ruth · Marsh, Akeem · Chhabra, Divya

Queer Cultures and Democracy (SPAN-UA 9481)

In the last decade, many Latin American nations have witnessed decisive progress in the legal recognition of non-normative sexualities and gender identities. The conventional map of “advanced democracies” crafting models of democratization to be exported to “less developed” nations seems definitely challenged: a new understanding of the multiple temporalities of queer cultures in North and South America is even more necessary than ever. In order to explore this multi-layered landscape, this course is aimed at reconstructing the historical detours of queer cultures in Buenos Aires and New York, considered enclaves of queer cultures in Argentina and the US respectively. The course revisits the last three decades in order to question the dominant and frequently reductive narratives of lineal progress. Taught simultaneously in Buenos Aires and New York, the class includes critical readings of queer cultural production as well as work on local archives and interviews with activists and GLTTBI organizations.

Spanish (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


SPAN-UA 9481-000 (8803)
01/25/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Buenos Aires (Global)
Instructed by Lopez Seoane, Mariano

Legal Aspects of The Entertainment Industry (FMTV-UT 1195)

A course that tracks the filmmaking process from its inception, at the idea phase and follows the creative process through development, pre-production, principal photography and post-production. The class will focus on the business and legal issues that arise during every phase of filmmaking. Key topics covered will include: copyright law; option agreements for underlying rights such as books, plays, magazine and newspaper articles; sources of financing; distribution agreements; licensing of music; agreements for actors, directors, producers and writers. This course allocates as a Craft for Film & TV majors. Students must have Junior or Senior standing. COURSE SUBJECT TO DEPARTMENTAL FEES.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1195-000 (19505)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lichter, Rosalind

COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN (ME-UY 2112)

The course covers sketching, drawing and computer-aided drafting. Topics: Projection theory—multiview, axonometric, oblique. Auxiliaries, sections, isometrics, dimensions, fasteners, detail and assembly drawings. Introduction to blueprint reading. Overview of CIM and CAD integration with other CIM concepts. A design project incorporates developed skills in visualization, drawing techniques, standards and CAD.

Mechanical Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ME-UY 2112-000 (15822)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Benbelkacem, Ghania


ME-UY 2112-000 (15906)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Benbelkacem, Ghania


ME-UY 2112-000 (15823)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
10:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Benbelkacem, Ghania

Business of Producing (MKTG-UB 49)

A specialized EMT course within the Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies designed to provide students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of producing (as a business profession) a finished creative product in the entertainment and media industries, developing a business model, and generating an income stream to repay and provide investors with a profit. Educates the student in the process of feature film and long-form television production from the initial concept of the story, through script development, to completion of the project. Covers the most important steps in the production of an independent film, a studio project, a network TV or cable show, a radio program, a Broadway production, and an advertising television commercial. Explores all the elements a producer must know, understand, and eventually become skilled with through mastery of development, including script selection, finance, budgeting, timetable development, team building, talent selection, sales, contract and union negotiation, regulations, technology, and other relevant core competencies.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 49-000 (18459)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 49-000 (18458)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Globalization of The Entertainment Industry (MKTG-UB 46)

Provides a framework for understanding the global expansion of media and entertainment companies. Examines the impact that the significant export growth of American leisure products and services has on the U.S economy. Analyzes the strategies of several leading entertainment and media multinational companies and the development of their entertainment businesses within the major world economic zones. International speakers, cases and readings are used in this course.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


MKTG-UB 46-000 (22222)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Brown, Colin


MKTG-UB 46-000 (22228)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)at Washington SquareInstructed by Brown, Colin


MKTG-UB 46-000 (23357)09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Maheswaran, Durairaj

Movie Marketing (MKTG-UB 22)

This course gives students a basic understanding of key business issues relating to producing, distributing, marketing, and exploiting feature films. The course examines key aspects of the movie business, including managing a creative enterprise, deal making, acquiring rights, building a library, branding, and all aspects of effective marketing. The concepts developed in the course are applied in a group project presentation.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


MKTG-UB 22-000 (18448)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 22-000 (18473)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


MKTG-UB 22-000 (18479)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Financial Information Systems (TECH-UB 50)

The financial services industry is being transformed by regulation, competition, consolidation, technology and globalization. These forces will be explored, focusing on how technology is both a driver of change as well as the vehicle for their implementation. The course focuses on payment products and financial markets, their key systems, how they evolved and where might they be going, algorithmic trading, market structure dark, liquidity and electronic markets. Straight through processing, risk management and industry consolidation and convergence will be viewed in light of current events. The course objective is to bring both the business practitioner and technologist closer together. Topics will be covered through a combination of lectures, readings, news, case studies and projects.

Computing and Data Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 12 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


TECH-UB 50-000 (21263)
09/23/2020 – 12/16/2020 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Donefer, Bernard

Projects in Photography (ART-UE 1380)

Students work directly with internationally recognized figures in photography. Topics for workshops range from the techniques of established photographers to discussions of issues in photographic theory, history, & criticism.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 1380-000 (9681)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harouni, Shadi

Aesthetics of Recording (MPATE-UE 1227)

A critical listening study of acoustic music recordings that develops the student’s ability to define and evaluate aesthetic elements of recorded music. Students explore recorded music attributes including dynamic range, stereo imaging, perceived room acoustics, the use of reverb and equalization, naturalness, and the listening perspectives.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1227-000 (12988)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wojcik, Leszek

Fundamentals of Music Technology (MPATE-UE 1801)

A general introduction to the fundamental concepts of music technology, including: MIDI and sequencing, the basics of digital audio, sound recording, mixing and sound synthesis,. The course will also briefly overview advanced topics and applications in the field.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (12129)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Geluso, Paul


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (10670)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Las Heras, Diego


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (10673)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mueller, Charles


MPATE-UE 1801-000 (12130)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mann, Mason

Midi Technology II (MPATE-UE 1014)

Programming for MIDI, C, and other appropriate techniques. Design and implementation of software sequencers, interface drivers, and hardware applications will be the focus.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1014-000 (12979)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krauss, Briggan

Fund of Audio Tech I: Stu Maint (MPATE-UE 1008)

An introduction to maintenance and troubleshooting concepts used in the recording studio. Procedures discussed are those necessary in utilizing sophisticated audio equipment and understanding essential aspects of studio design.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1008-000 (10656)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Glanz, Jake

Computer Vision (ENGR-UH 3331)

An important goal of artificial intelligence (AI) is to equip computers with the capability of interpreting visual inputs. Computer vision is an area in AI that deals with the construction of explicit, meaningful descriptions of physical objects from images. It includes the techniques for image processing, pattern recognition, geometric modeling, and cognitive processing. This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and techniques used in computer vision, which includes image representation, image pre-processing, edge detection, image segmentation, object recognition and detection, and neural networks and deep learning. In addition to learning about the most effective machine learning techniques, students will gain the practical implementation of applying these techniques to real engineering problems.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


ENGR-UH 3331-000 (22825)
01/24/2023 – 03/10/2023 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi


ENGR-UH 3331-000 (22826)
01/24/2023 – 03/10/2023 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Fang, Yi

Computer Organization and Architecture (ENGR-UH 3511)

The course introduces the principles of computer organization and basic architecture concepts. It discusses the basic structure of a digital computer and study in details formal descriptions, machine instruction sets design, formats and data representation, addressing structures, mechanization of procedure calls, memory management, arithmetic and logical unit, virtual and cache memory organization, I/O processing and interrupts, fundamental of reliability aspects. The course also covers performance and distributed system models. The labs emphasize experiential learning of computer organization and architecture concepts, and require students to use learned knowledge to create and build prototypes and evaluate their performance.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 3511-000 (3593)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Maniatakos, Michail


ENGR-UH 3511-000 (3594)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Maniatakos, Michail · Annor, Prince

Bio-sensors and Bio-chips (ENGR-UH 4142)

This course covers the principles, technologies, methods and applications of biosensors and bioinstrumentation beginning with an examination of the ethical, legal, cultural, religious, and social implications of nanotechnologies. The objective of this course is to link engineering principles to understanding of biosystems in sensors and bioelectronics. The course provides students with detail of methods and procedures used in the design, fabrication, and application of biosensors and bioelectronic devices. The fundamentals of measurement science are applied to optical, electrochemical, mass, and pressure signal transduction. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to be able to explain biosensing and transducing techniques; design and construct biosensors instrumentation.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


ENGR-UH 4142-000 (23421)
08/29/2022 – 12/13/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Song, Yong-Ak


ENGR-UH 4142-000 (23422)
08/29/2022 – 12/13/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Song, Yong-Ak

Computer Programming for Engineers (ENGR-UH 1000)

The objective of the course is for students to acquire the fundamental knowledge of computer programming, develop transferable programming skills, and learn to solve engineering problems via programming. The course is primarily based on the C programming language and an introduction to another programming language such as MATLAB (to demonstrate transferring programming knowledge from one language to another). The course explores the application of engineering computation in various engineering domains including mechanical, civil, computer, and electrical engineering. The following topics are covered: introduction to computer systems, standard input/output, file input/output, decision structures, loop structures, functions, arrays, addressing, dynamically allocated memory, structures, introduction to object oriented programming, problem solving via programming algorithm design, and applications in another programming language such as MATLAB.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3554)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3555)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Jamil, Muhammad Hassan · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3567)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Negoiu, Elena · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3588)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Negoiu, Elena · Eid, Mohamad


ENGR-UH 1000-000 (3991)
08/26/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Jamil, Muhammad Hassan · Eid, Mohamad

Circuits Fundamentals (ENGR-UH 2019)

This module provides an introduction to electrical circuits. The topics covered include DC circuits, passive DC circuit elements, Kirchoff’s laws, electric power calculations, analysis of DC circuits, nodal and loop analysis techniques, voltage and current division, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems, and source free and forced responses of RL, RC and RLC circuits.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (3560)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Gyorgy, Andras


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (3561)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mulugeta, Tadesse · Gyorgy, Andras


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (3812)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Rasras, Mahmoud


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (4062)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Mon,Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (3813)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Mulugeta, Tadesse


ENGR-UH 2019-000 (4063)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Avdeev, Alexander

Conservation Laws in Engineering (ENGR-UH 2012)

Conservation laws play a fundamental role in the analysis of engineering problems by providing a framework to derive the relationships between various physical properties of isolated systems. This course aims to introduce the students to these laws, namely, the conservation of mass, conservation of linear momentum, conservation of angular momentum, conservation of energy, and conservation of charge. These laws of conservation will be derived in integral forms and applied to selected case studies involving electrical, chemical, thermal, and fluid mechanical systems. In addition to the development of a unified framework for analysis of engineering problems, this course will also help the students develop a deeper understanding of the concepts of control volume and mass, work and heat, fluid pressure and hydrostatics, properties of pure substances, and the fundamental laws of thermodynamics.

Engineering (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (3794)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Hashaikeh, Raed


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (20078)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Julias, Margaret


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (3795)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Hashaikeh, Raed · Salim, Wahib


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (4364)
08/26/2024 – 10/11/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Julias, Margaret


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (3558)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Hashaikeh, Raed


ENGR-UH 2012-000 (3559)
10/21/2024 – 12/10/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Abu Dhabi
Instructed by Al-Chalabi, Mohammed

Introduction to Computer Programming (CSCI-SHU 11)

An introduction to the fundamentals of computer programming. Students design, write, and debug computer programs. No prior knowledge of programming is assumed. Students will learn programming using Python, a general purpose, cross-platform programming language with a clear, readable syntax. Most class periods will be part lecture, part lab as you explore ideas and put them into practice. This course is suitable for students not intending in majoring in computer science as well as for students intending to major in computer science but having no programming experience. Students with previous programming experience should instead take Introduction to Computer Science. Prerequisite: Either placed into Calculus or at least a C in Pre-Calculus Fulfillment: Core Curriculum Requirement Algorithmic Thinking; EE Required Major Courses. Note: Students who have taken ICS in NY, Abu Dhabi, and Shanghai cannot take ICP.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (17503)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (17504)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23632)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23633)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Liu, Yijian


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23634)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Simon, Daniel


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (23767)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Liu, Yijian


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (26252)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
9:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Spathis, Promethee


CSCI-SHU 11-000 (26253)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
9:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Spathis, Promethee

Introduction to Computer and Data Science (CSCI-SHU 101)

This course has three goals. First, the mastering of a modern object-oriented programming language, enough to allow students to tackle real-world problems of important significance. Second, gaining an appreciation of computational thinking, a process that provides the foundations for solving real-world problems. Finally, providing an overview of the very diverse and exciting field of computer science – a field which, arguably more than any other, impacts how we work, live, and play today. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Programming or placement exam. Equivalency: This course counts for CSCI-UA 101. Fulfillment: Core Curriculum Requirement Algorithmic Thinking; Computer Science Major Required Courses; Computer Systems Engineering Major Required Courses; Data Science Major Foundational Courses; Electrical and Systems Engineering Major Required Major Courses.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CSCI-SHU 101-000 (17449)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Gu, Xianbin


CSCI-SHU 101-000 (17509)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yin, Wen


CSCI-SHU 101-000 (17572)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Thu
8:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yin, Wen


CSCI-SHU 101-000 (17596)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Gu, Xianbin


CSCI-SHU 101-000 (17751)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Yin, Wen

Social and Cultural Analysis 101 (SCA-UA 101)

Introduces theories, methods, and political trajectories central to the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis (SCA). SCA 101 addresses how individuals and populations structure their worlds and navigate the resulting social, cultural, and political terrain. It privileges scholarly work with an intersectional approach, drawing on theoretical insights from such fields as social geography, feminism and queer studies, ethnic studies, urban and metropolitan studies, critical race theory, labor studies, and cultural studies.

Social and Cultural Analysis (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


SCA-UA 101-000 (9221)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Patros, Tyson


SCA-UA 101-000 (9222)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grimaldi, Nicole


SCA-UA 101-000 (9223)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grimaldi, Nicole


SCA-UA 101-000 (9224)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ghabin, Tamar


SCA-UA 101-000 (9225)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ghabin, Tamar

Social Psychology (PSYCH-UA 32)

Gollwitzer, Trope, Uleman. Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduction to theories and research about the social behavior of individuals, such as perception of others and the self, attraction, affiliation, altruism and helping, aggression, moral thought and action, attitudes, influence, conformity, social exchange and bargaining, group decision making, leadership and power, and environmental psychology.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8510)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gollwitzer, Peter


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8511)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Adjei Boateng, Fiona


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8512)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwak, Jasmine


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8513)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tao, Bradley


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8514)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tao, Bradley


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8515)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwak, Jasmine


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (8516)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liaquat, Usman


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (25991)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Adjei Boateng, Fiona


PSYCH-UA 32-000 (25995)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Liaquat, Usman

Cognitive Neuroscience (PSYCH-UA 25)

Curtis, Davachi. Offered every semester. 4 points. Provides students with a broad understanding of the foundations of cognitive neuroscience, including dominant theories of the neural underpinnings of a variety of cognitive processes and the research that has led to those theories. In doing so, students also learn about the goals of cognitive neuroscience research and the methods that are being employed to reach these goals.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8500)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Curtis, Clayton


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8501)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Babu, Deepika


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8502)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Babu, Deepika


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8503)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yan, Dongni


PSYCH-UA 25-000 (8504)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yan, Dongni

Introduction to Research Methods for Politics (POL-UA 850)

New research is the most exciting and important aspect of political science: we are able to pose novel questions, construct fresh theories, and provide new evidence about the way the world works. But before we start doing research, we have to learn how it is done. With this in mind, this class will introduce students to quantitative techniques used for research in the study of politics. Part of this task is conceptual: helping students to think sensibly and systematically about research design. To this end, students will learn how data and theory fit together, and how to measure the quantities we care about. But part of the task is practical too: students will learn a `toolbox’ of methods–including statistical software–that enable them to execute their plans.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 850-000 (9156)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Harvey, Anna


POL-UA 850-000 (9238)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by López Peceño, Alejandro


POL-UA 850-000 (9157)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by López Peceño, Alejandro


POL-UA 850-000 (9158)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pulejo, Massimo


POL-UA 850-000 (9159)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pulejo, Massimo


POL-UA 850-000 (9734)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Demin, Sasha


POL-UA 850-000 (25687)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Melnick, Justin

Doing Political Economy: Apprs to Public Policy (POL-UA 842)

Political economy is a field of inquiry that has made great strides in recent years in explaining political and economic behavior by characterizing the incentives of actors and the context in which these actors make decisions and influence outcomes. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to these theoretical approaches and show how they can be used to address contemporary policy questions.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 842-000 (8877)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lee, Sukwon

Comparative Politics (POL-UA 500)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Major concepts, approaches, problems, and literature in the field of comparative politics. Methodology of comparative politics, the classical theories, and the more recent behavioral revolution. Reviews personality, social structure, socialization, political culture, and political parties. Major approaches such as group theory, structural-functionalism, systems analysis, and communications theory and evaluation of the relevance of political ideology; national character; elite and class analysis; and problems of conflict, violence, and internal war.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 500-000 (8257)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Slough, Tara


POL-UA 500-000 (8258)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Mark


POL-UA 500-000 (8259)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Williamson, Mark


POL-UA 500-000 (10534)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Niu, He


POL-UA 500-000 (9210)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Niu, He


POL-UA 500-000 (9360)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by He, Ning


POL-UA 500-000 (9361)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by He, Ning


POL-UA 500-000 (25686)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cheng, Mengfan

Power & Politics in America (POL-UA 300)

A survey of national political institutions and behavior in the United States, which introduces students to a variety of analytical concepts and approaches useful for the study of domestic politics. Concepts typically covered include public goods and collective action; preference aggregation and the median voter theorem; delegation, representation, and accountability; agenda control; inter-branch bargaining; and the mechanisms of private influence on public policy.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 300-000 (8252)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dawes, Christopher Todd


POL-UA 300-000 (8253)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wirsching, Elisa


POL-UA 300-000 (8254)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, Lexi


POL-UA 300-000 (8255)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Palmer, Lexi


POL-UA 300-000 (8256)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wirsching, Elisa


POL-UA 300-000 (8796)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heo, Kun


POL-UA 300-000 (8797)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Heo, Kun


POL-UA 300-000 (10192)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McGrath, David

Political Theory (POL-UA 100)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Introduces students to some outstanding theories of politics. The theories treated offer alternative conceptions of political life, and they are examined from both theoretical and historical perspectives. Among the theorists included are Plato, Aristotle, Locke, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Rousseau, Mill, and Marx.

Politics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


POL-UA 100-000 (9202)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pevnick, Ryan


POL-UA 100-000 (9203)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bose, Amartya


POL-UA 100-000 (9204)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bose, Amartya


POL-UA 100-000 (9205)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yi, Sophie


POL-UA 100-000 (9206)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yi, Sophie

Electricity & Magnet I (PHYS-UA 131)

Introduction to Maxwell’s equations with applications to physical problems. Topics include electrostatics, magnetostatics, the solution of the Laplace and Poisson equations, dielectrics and magnetic materials, electromagnetic waves and radiation, Fresnel equations, transmission lines, wave guides, and special relativity.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


PHYS-UA 131-000 (8212)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gruzinov, Andrei


PHYS-UA 131-000 (8213)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 131-000 (9331)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Physics II (PHYS-UA 93)

Continuation of PHYS-UA 91. Topics include electrostatics; dielectrics; currents and circuits; the magnetic field and magnetic materials; induction; AC circuits; Maxwell’s equations.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8451)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hogg, David


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8452)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lant, Caspar


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8453)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lant, Caspar


PHYS-UA 93-000 (8454)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Dynamics (PHYS-UA 120)

Topics include conservation laws, central force motion, Lagrange’s and Hamilton’s equations, non-inertial frames, inertia tensor, rigid body dynamics, coupled oscillators and particles, eigenvalues, eigenvectors and normal modes.

Physics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHYS-UA 120-000 (9318)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Moscatelli, Frank


PHYS-UA 120-000 (9319)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Loizeau, Nicolas


PHYS-UA 120-000 (9503)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Loizeau, Nicolas

General Physics II (PHYS-UA 12)

Continuation of PHYS-UA 11. Topics include electric charge, field, and potential; magnetic forces and fields; resistive, capacitive, and inductive circuits; electromagnetic induction; wave motion; electromagnetic waves; geometrical optics; interference, diffraction, and polarization of light; relativity; atomic and nuclear structure; elementary particle physics.

Physics (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10171)


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10172)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Somawanshi, Prajwal Prakshep


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10173)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (23490)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10175)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (23495)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10177)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10178)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10179)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
1:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10180)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Meng, Marvin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10181)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10182)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Noorikuhani, Milad


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10183)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Engstler, Justin


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10184)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by La Madrid, Joan


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10185)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by La Madrid, Joan


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10186)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10187)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10188)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yu, Siqing


PHYS-UA 12-000 (10642)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shah, Rushi Bhavesh


PHYS-UA 12-000 (25702)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Somawanshi, Prajwal Prakshep

Set Theory (PHIL-UA 73)

An introduction to the basic concepts and results of set theory.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2019)


PHIL-UA 73-000 (19544)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fine, Kit


PHIL-UA 73-000 (19545)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher


PHIL-UA 73-000 (19546)
09/03/2019 – 12/13/2019 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Scambler, Christopher

Global Ethics (PHIL-UA 6)

This course aims to accomplish two things. The first is to introduce three broad traditions of normative thinking about social issues from around the globe: a Confucian tradition, one based in Islamic legal traditions, and one derived from European liberalism. The second is to address three current areas of normative debate: about global economic inequality, about gender justice and human rights. We shall explore these first-order questions against the background of the three broad traditions. Our aim will be to understand some of differences of approach that shape the global conversation about these issues that concern people around the world.

Philosophy (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20339)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Appiah, Kwame Anthony


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20340)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wu, Patrick


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20341)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wu, Patrick


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20342)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zacek, Justin


PHIL-UA 6-000 (20343)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zacek, Justin

Cellular & Molecular Neurobiology Lab (NEURL-UA 211)

Lecture and laboratory course that provides students with broad exposure to current questions and experimental approaches in cellular neuroscience. Lectures and laboratories are organized into three areas: cell structure and organization of the vertebrate central nervous system, mechanisms underlying neural signaling and plasticity, and control of cell form and its developmental determinants. Laboratory instruction in anatomical, physiological, and biochemical methods for investigating the biology of nerve cells.

Neural Science (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


NEURL-UA 211-000 (8176)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aoki, Chiye · Shapley, Robert

Music Theory II (MUSIC-UA 202)

Music Major Distribution Requirement. Chromatic harmony as developed and practiced by composers of the 19th century and beyond. Introduction to score reading and principles of musical analysis applied to larger musical structures. Continuation of species counterpoint and an introduction to invertible counterpoint and fugue.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MUSIC-UA 202-000 (9126)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beeferman, Gordon


MUSIC-UA 202-000 (9127)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zamcheck, Akiva


MUSIC-UA 202-000 (9128)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zamcheck, Akiva

Elements of Music (MUSIC-UA 20)

Explores the underlying principles and inner workings of the tonal system, a system that has guided all of Western music from the years 1600 to 1900. It includes a discussion of historical background and evolution. Focuses on concepts and notation of key, scale, tonality, and rhythm. Related skills in sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard harmony are stressed in the recitation sections.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MUSIC-UA 20-000 (8415)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ha, Moon Young


MUSIC-UA 20-000 (8416)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rose, Michael


MUSIC-UA 20-000 (8417)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rose, Michael

Music Theory I (MUSIC-UA 201)

Students study principles of tonal music composition including 18th and 19th century harmonic, formal, and contrapuntal practices. Exercises in four-part voice-leading and species counterpoint are supplemented by analyses of music from around the world and from a variety of genres, including concert and popular music. Weekly lab sections are devoted to skills in musicianship and are required throughout the sequence.

Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


MUSIC-UA 201-000 (9130)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hoffman, Elizabeth


MUSIC-UA 201-000 (9132)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vlasis, Konstantine


MUSIC-UA 201-000 (9133)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vlasis, Konstantine

Politics of The Middle East (MEIS-UA 750)

Historical-political background of the Middle East and its contemporary social and political problems, including the impact of the West; religious and liberal reactions; conflict of nationalisms (Arab, Iranian, Turkish, and Zionist); and revolutionary socialism. Specific social, political, and economic problems?using a few selected countries for comparison and analysis?including the role of the military, the intelligentsia, the religious classes, the legitimization of power, urban-rural cleavages, bureaucracy, and political parties.

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9142)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Keshavarzian, Arang


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9143)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bell, Robert


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9144)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by ODell, Kelley


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9145)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bell, Robert


MEIS-UA 750-000 (9146)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by ODell, Kelley

Language and Mind (LING-UA 3)

Introduces the field of cognitive science through an examination of language behavior. Begins with interactive discussions of how best to characterize and study the mind. These principles are then illustrated through an examination of research and theories related to language representation and use. Draws from research in both formal linguistics and psycholinguistics.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


LING-UA 3-000 (8921)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cournane, Ailis · McElree, Brian


LING-UA 3-000 (8922)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grosu, Ioana


LING-UA 3-000 (8923)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Flower, Nigel

Language (LING-UA 1)

Language is a social phenomenon, but languages share elaborate and specific structural properties. Speech communities exist, exhibit variation, and change within the strict confines of universal grammar, part of our biological endowment. Universal grammar is discovered through the careful study of the structures of individual languages, by cross-linguistic investigations, and the investigation of the brain. Introduces fundamental properties of the sound system and of the structure and interpretation of words and sentences against this larger context.

Linguistics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


LING-UA 1-000 (8354)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Champollion, Lucas


LING-UA 1-000 (8355)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Grosu, Ioana


LING-UA 1-000 (8356)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Okon, Thaddeus


LING-UA 1-000 (9146)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Thoms, Gary


LING-UA 1-000 (9147)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Blix, Hagen


LING-UA 1-000 (9148)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhao, Zhuoye

Strategies for Independent Producing (FMTV-UT 1092)

Today’s content creators must be entrepreneurs, navigating dynamically changing industry. How does emerging talent gain traction in a ’tsunami wave’ of independent films, episodics, webisodes and podcasts? This class explores development, funding, and legal strategies to make, market and distribute DIY low and ultra-low budget projects. Ones you can make now. Students will develop core competencies, culminating in a pitch deck for a viable indie feature film.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1092-000 (19479)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Pichirallo, Joe

Adv Reporting: (JOUR-UA 301)

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


JOUR-UA 301-000 (9062)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Newkirk, Pamela


JOUR-UA 301-000 (10023)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Swarns, Rachel


JOUR-UA 301-000 (8962)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Maloney, Jason

Honors Senior Seminar (JOUR-UA 352)

The following semester, honors students are required to take a specially designed honors senior seminar, which culminates in each student?s writing a large (6,000-10,000 word/15-20 minutes for broadcast) feature, completing the capstone. The student has to defend his/her work orally before at least two members of the faculty and perhaps a member of the profession.

Journalism (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


JOUR-UA 352-000 (9155)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Boynton, Robert


JOUR-UA 352-000 (9160)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Samuels, Jason

Intro to Sociology (SOC-UA 1)

Offered every semester. 4 points. Survey of the field of sociology: its basic concepts, theories, and research orientation. Threshold course that provides the student with insights into the social factors in human life. Topics include social interaction, socialization, culture, social structure, stratification, political power, deviance, social institutions, and social change.

Sociology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


SOC-UA 1-000 (20398)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Morning, Ann


SOC-UA 1-000 (20399)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martin-Caughey, Ananda


SOC-UA 1-000 (20400)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Um, Sejin


SOC-UA 1-000 (20401)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nelson, Christina


SOC-UA 1-000 (20420)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sieffert, Claire


SOC-UA 1-000 (20403)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martin-Caughey, Ananda


SOC-UA 1-000 (20404)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sieffert, Claire


SOC-UA 1-000 (20405)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cera, Michelle


SOC-UA 1-000 (20406)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Um, Sejin


SOC-UA 1-000 (20407)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nelson, Christina


SOC-UA 1-000 (20408)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cera, Michelle

Advanced Modern Greek I (HEL-UA 107)

Focus is on advanced composition and oral practices, with the aim of refining an understanding and general facility with written and spoken Greek. Course work is designed to help students develop a comprehensive vocabulary, improve pronunciation, and increase their effectiveness, accuracy, and fluency in writing and speaking the language. Enhances and perfects reading, speaking, conversational, and writing skills through the close study of selected modern Greek literary texts, current newspaper articles and essays, films, advertisements, and comprehensive discussions of contemporary Greek society. Explores major facets and phenomena of Greek culture: current social and political issues, events, and controversies in Greece; Greece’s position “in the margins of Europe” and at the crossroads of East and West; gender politics; the educational system; the political landscape; discourses on the question of Greek identity; and topics in popular culture. Through individual projects, oral reports, class presentation, and written assignments, students are expected to pursue an in-depth “reading” of present-day Greece.

Hellenic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


HEL-UA 107-000 (8033)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Venetsanos, Anna

Seminar On Modern Greek Culture (HEL-UA 130)

Topics in Hellenic Studies vary; please consult Notes section below for current course offering.

Hellenic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


HEL-UA 130-000 (9294)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Theodoratou, Helen


HEL-UA 130-000 (20589)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Astrinaki, Eleftheria

Entertainment & Media Industries (MKTG-UB 40)

This course provides students with a framework for understanding the economics and key strategic issues facing organizations in the entertainment industry. It establishes a basis for the formulation of marketing tactics and strategies for firms competing for consumers’ discretionary spending. Recent developments in major sectors of the entertainment industry are covered, including movies, television and cable, theatre, and sports. Issues that cut across all types of entertainment industries are examined, including licensing, promotion, and new technologies.

Marketing (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10507)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Tuschman, Robert


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10508)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)at Washington SquareInstructed by Krushel, Kenneth J


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10509)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Hardart, Paul


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10510)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Lieberman, Alvin


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10547)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Lieberman, Alvin


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10601)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Narayanan, Sunder


MKTG-UB 40-000 (10640)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Thu4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Narayanan, Sunder


MKTG-UB 40-000 (22981)09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)at Washington SquareInstructed by

Money and Banking (ECON-UA 231)

Money supply; banking as an industry; banks as suppliers of money; the Federal Reserve System and monetary control; monetary theory; and contemporary monetary policy issues.

Economics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ECON-UA 231-000 (8025)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhiladwall, Maharukh · Lin, Yuannan · Goyal, Anchit


ECON-UA 231-000 (8026)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lin, Yuannan


ECON-UA 231-000 (8027)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lin, Yuannan


ECON-UA 231-000 (8898)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goyal, Anchit


ECON-UA 231-000 (8897)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bhiladwall, Maharukh · Alferova, Aleksandra · Silva, Matheus


ECON-UA 231-000 (8899)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Silva, Matheus


ECON-UA 231-000 (9293)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Alferova, Aleksandra


ECON-UA 231-000 (9294)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Alferova, Aleksandra

Advanced Organic Chemistry (CHEM-UA 911)

This course focuses on structure and theory in organic chemistry with a particular emphasis on the application of stereoelectronic and conformational effects on reaction mechanisms, catalysis and molecular recognition.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CHEM-UA 911-000 (9647)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Trauner, Dirk


CHEM-UA 911-000 (9648)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Experimental Biochem & Laboratory (CHEM-UA 885)

Introduction to molecular analysis of biomolecules. Selected experiments and instruction in analytical techniques used in biochemical research, including chromatography, spectrophotometry, and electrophoresis; isolation and characterization of selected biomolecules; kinetic analysis of enzymatic activity; analysis of protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions that direct basic biochemical pathways.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 885-000 (9379)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mitra, Somdeb


CHEM-UA 885-000 (9380)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 885-000 (9381)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 885-000 (21009)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tate, Patrick


CHEM-UA 885-000 (21010)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mitra, Somdeb

Organic Chemistry II & Laboratory (CHEM-UA 226)

This course constitutes a continuation of the study of chemistry of organic compounds. The material is presented in the functional group framework, incorporating reaction mechanisms. Topics include structure and bonding of organic materials, nomenclature, conformational analysis, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, and reactions of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, amines, and carbonyl compounds. Multifunctional organic compounds are covered, including topics of relevance to biochemistry, such as carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, and nucleic acids. Laboratories provide training in the syntheses of organic precursors in high yields and high purity needed for multistep procedures. An extensive research project involving unknown compounds is conducted. The use of IR and NMR spectroscopy is explored.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7921)


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20984)


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20985)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wlodarczyk, Marek


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20986)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wlodarczyk, Marek


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20987)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwok, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20988)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwok, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20989)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tosovska, Petra


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20990)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tosovska, Petra


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20991)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tosovska, Petra


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20992)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tosovska, Petra


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20993)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwok, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20994)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwok, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20995)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7931)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tosovska, Petra


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7932)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wlodarczyk, Marek


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9570)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Angelo, Nicholas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9943)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Helm, Elena


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20998)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9571)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Burnham, Erica


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7933)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Navarro, Abel


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7934)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwok, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7935)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tosovska, Petra


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9572)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wlodarczyk, Marek


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7936)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ben-Zvi, Benjamin


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7937)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Angelo, Nicholas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7938)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwok, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9944)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7939)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Helm, Elena


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7940)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Paolillo, Joshua


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9573)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Navarro, Abel


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9574)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ben-Zvi, Benjamin


CHEM-UA 226-000 (20999)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kelly, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (21000)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mitchell, Joshua


CHEM-UA 226-000 (7941)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wlodarczyk, Marek


CHEM-UA 226-000 (8957)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kelly, Thomas


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9575)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Seraydarian, Matthew


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9576)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zang, Shihao


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9577)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Whittaker, St. John


CHEM-UA 226-000 (9945)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Andia, Alexander


CHEM-UA 226-000 (25985)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Whittaker, St. John


CHEM-UA 226-000 (25990)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 226-000 (25994)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 226-000 (26004)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

General Chemistry II & Laboratory (CHEM-UA 126)

See General Chemistry I and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 125), above. Laboratories are a continuation of CHEM-UA 125, with emphasis on the analysis of quantitative data rather than its collection. Experiments are selected to provide illustration and reinforcement of the topics covered in the course, including solution chemistry, kinetics, equilibrium, buffers, solubility, and electrochemistry.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7866)


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7867)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gustafson, Afton


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7868)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gustafson, Afton


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7869)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shtukenberg, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7870)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9505)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tariq, Mehrin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9506)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7871)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7872)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shtukenberg, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9924)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reyes, Rhea-Donna


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7873)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7874)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7875)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gustafson, Afton


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7876)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7877)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7878)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7879)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9925)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7880)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mandziuk, Malgorzata


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7881)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Burt


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9926)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9927)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reyes, Rhea-Donna


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9928)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tariq, Mehrin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (20976)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (20977)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7882)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7883)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Geggier, Stephanie


CHEM-UA 126-000 (20978)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tariq, Mehrin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9930)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9931)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7884)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Singh, Vidya


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7885)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Chengtong


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7886)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ohayon, Yoel


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7887)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dar, Aisha


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7888)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Malwana, Lakshika


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7889)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cuen, Jackie


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7890)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sandler, Sterling


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7891)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Andia, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7892)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reyes, Rhea-Donna


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7893)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Garabaghli, Humay


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7894)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Shengguo


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9932)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shtukenberg, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7895)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Crispell, Gavin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (8935)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Chengtong


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7896)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Andia, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7897)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Shtukenberg, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7898)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reyes, Rhea-Donna


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7899)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tariq, Mehrin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7900)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Geggier, Stephanie


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7901)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Shengguo


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9933)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mandziuk, Malgorzata


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9565)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sasazawa, Moeka


CHEM-UA 126-000 (8931)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kurikka Valappil Pallachalil, Muhammed Shafi


CHEM-UA 126-000 (8932)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Savino, Brian


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7902)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Reyes, Rhea-Donna


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7903)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sheshova, Mia


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9569)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tariq, Mehrin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7904)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Cuen, Jackie


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7905)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Andia, Alexander


CHEM-UA 126-000 (7906)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tariq, Mehrin


CHEM-UA 126-000 (9566)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bae, Jessica


CHEM-UA 126-000 (20979)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Soper, Nathan


CHEM-UA 126-000 (20980)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Organic Chemistry I & Laboratory (CHEM-UA 225)

This course constitutes an introduction to the chemistry of organic compounds. The material is presented in the functional group framework, incorporating reaction mechanisms. Topics include structure and bonding of organic materials, nomenclature, conformational analysis, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, and reactions of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, amines, and carbonyl compounds. Multifunctional organic compounds are covered, including topics of relevance to biochemistry, such as carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, and nucleic acids. Laboratories provide training in the basic techniques of the organic chemistry laboratory, including crystallization, distillation, extraction, and other separation techniques, such as column chromatography. Experiments involving the synthesis of organic compounds are introduced, as well as qualitative organic analysis.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7907)


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7908)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhao, Hong


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7909)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhao, Hong


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7910)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhao, Hong


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7911)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhao, Hong


CHEM-UA 225-000 (20981)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Navarro, Abel


CHEM-UA 225-000 (9234)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Navarro, Abel


CHEM-UA 225-000 (25932)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Navarro, Abel


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7912)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Kenneth


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7913)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sasazawa, Moeka


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7914)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Spencer, Rochelle


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7915)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martinez Zayas, Gabriel


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7916)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Spielvogel, Ethan


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7917)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Crispell, Gavin


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7918)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aguilar, Glen


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7919)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Kenneth


CHEM-UA 225-000 (7920)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tosovska, Petra


CHEM-UA 225-000 (20982)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wlodarczyk, Marek


CHEM-UA 225-000 (20983)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Spencer, Rochelle

General Chemistry I & Laboratory (CHEM-UA 125)

This course constitutes an introduction to inorganic and physical chemistry for science majors, engineers, and the prehealth professions. Emphasizes the fundamental principles and theories of chemistry. Topics include the theories of atomic structure; stoichiometry; properties of gases, liquids, solids, and solutions; periodicity of the properties of elements; chemical bonding; equilibrium; kinetics, thermodynamics; acid-base reactions; electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. The underlying unity of chemistry is a basic theme. Laboratories provide an introduction to basic techniques used in experimental chemistry. Many experiments use a computer interface to provide experience in modern methods of data collection and to allow thorough analysis of experimental results. Proper laboratory procedures, chemical safety rules, and environmentally sound methods of chemical disposal and waste minimization are important components of the course. Experiments are selected to provide illustration and reinforcement of course topics, including manual and automated titrations, basic chromatography, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, and colorimetry.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
5 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7849)


CHEM-UA 125-000 (9353)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7850)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7851)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7852)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 125-000 (9300)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Klopfenstein, Mia


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7853)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ellis, Stephen


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7854)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ellis, Stephen


CHEM-UA 125-000 (10575)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Klopfenstein, Mia


CHEM-UA 125-000 (25574)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ellis, Stephen


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7855)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7856)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chen, Yizhen


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7857)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McHenry, Trent


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7858)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dar, Aisha


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7859)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mazzaferro, Nicodemo


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7860)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sburlati, Sophia


CHEM-UA 125-000 (10576)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kurikka Valappil Pallachalil, Muhammed Shafi


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7861)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7862)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tiwari, Akash


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7863)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by McHenry, Trent


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7864)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chen, Yizhen


CHEM-UA 125-000 (7865)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Epstein, Sam


CHEM-UA 125-000 (25832)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chong, Sarah


CHEM-UA 125-000 (25833)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Klopfenstein, Mia


CHEM-UA 125-000 (25834)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ellis, Stephen


CHEM-UA 125-000 (25835)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yardumian, Isabelle

Intermediate Poetry Workshop (CRWRI-UA 817)

The intermediate workshops offer budding fiction writers and poets an opportunity to continue their pursuit of writing through workshops that focus on a specific genre. The workshops also integrate in-depth craft discussions and extensive outside reading to deepen students’ understanding of the genre and broaden their knowledge of the evolution of literary forms and techniques.

Creative Writing (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8090)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rohrer, Matthew


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8091)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Popa, Maya


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8692)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fitterman, Robert


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8092)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gallagher, Jean


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (8628)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nutter, Geoffrey


CRWRI-UA 817-000 (20174)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
7:00 PM – 10:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Eye, David

The Directors Process (FMTV-UT 125)

This class is an introduction to the craft of directing. We will take a step-by-step look at the director’s process and responsibilities in this most collaborative of arts. Our focus will include script, character and scene analysis; performance, casting and rehearsal; design and visual style; assembling the final form. We’ll talk about what an actor wants from a director, how to talk to the cinematographer and production/costume designers and why we look at editing as the final rewrite. Through lectures, screenings, assignments and discussions with working professionals, the class will offer a comprehensive foundation for the director on which to build a rich creative experience at Tisch and a long and satisfying professional career thereafter.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


FMTV-UT 125-000 (14309)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zentelis, Enid


FMTV-UT 125-000 (14375)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Brown, Alrick

Introduction to Comp Lit: (COLIT-UA 116)

For a course description, please see the Comp Lit web site at http://complit.as.nyu.edu/object/complit.undergrad.courses

Comparative Literature (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


COLIT-UA 116-000 (7965)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Paul, Zakir


COLIT-UA 116-000 (9474)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ernst, Michael


COLIT-UA 116-000 (20169)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kumar, Eesha

Evolutionary Zoology (BIOL-UA 700)

Animals are one of life’s most successful lineages, occupying nearly every environment. This course provides an introduction to the diversity of animal form and function in the context of phylogeny and evolution, with a focus on the invertebrates, the majority of animals. Lectures will be devoted alternately to individual branches of the tree of animals and to common themes in the ways animals have evolved to fit and shape their environments. We will discuss morphology, physiology, reproduction, development, and ecology. We will discuss the unique genomic and molecular characteristics of each branch of animal life, with attention to the ways that nonmodel organisms can provide insights into core cellular and molecular processes, including cell-cell communication and biomineralization. We will also discuss the intersection of these animals with human interests, including economic zoology, ecosystem services, and medicine. In laboratory and field exercises, students will learn to collect and identify invertebrate animals and to form and test hypotheses about their attributes.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


BIOL-UA 700-000 (19677)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rockman, Matthew


BIOL-UA 700-000 (19678)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rockman, Matthew

Biostatistics and Human Genetics (BIOL-UA 45)

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


BIOL-UA 45-000 (9642)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gresham, David


BIOL-UA 45-000 (9752)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Avecilla, Grace


BIOL-UA 45-000 (9753)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Buzby, Cassandra


BIOL-UA 45-000 (24768)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Buzby, Cassandra


BIOL-UA 45-000 (24772)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Avecilla, Grace


BIOL-UA 45-000 (24773)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Avecilla, Grace

Principles of Biology Laboratory (BIOL-UA 123)

Biology (Undergraduate)
1 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8768)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bijou, Christopher


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8776)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Bessie


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8777)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Murray, Sean


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8778)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Creighton, Kathryn


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8779)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mestvirishvili, Tamara


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8780)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bijou, Christopher


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8781)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Meng


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8782)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vikraman, Pooja


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8783)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Hailey


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8784)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lisi, Brianna


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8790)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Akum, Barbara Fei


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8785)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Meng


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8786)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tuncer, Alara


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8787)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tuncer, Alara


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8788)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lisi, Brianna


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8789)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mestvirishvili, Tamara


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8791)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vikraman, Pooja


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8792)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 123-000 (8793)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Hailey


BIOL-UA 123-000 (10308)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Bessie


BIOL-UA 123-000 (10309)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Murray, Sean


BIOL-UA 123-000 (25642)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Molecular and Cell Biology II (BIOL-UA 22)

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


BIOL-UA 22-000 (7840)


BIOL-UA 22-000 (10390)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mason, Guy


BIOL-UA 22-000 (10391)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mason, Guy


BIOL-UA 22-000 (7842)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chen, Yu-Chieh


BIOL-UA 22-000 (7843)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Garcia, Jeremy


BIOL-UA 22-000 (7844)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Elorza, Setiembre


BIOL-UA 22-000 (8746)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 22-000 (7841)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Osmundson, Joseph


BIOL-UA 22-000 (8987)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Elorza, Setiembre


BIOL-UA 22-000 (10568)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Podolska, Natalia


BIOL-UA 22-000 (20118)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Osmundson, Joseph


BIOL-UA 22-000 (25732)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Chen, Yu-Chieh


BIOL-UA 22-000 (25734)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Podolska, Natalia

Principles of Biology II (BIOL-UA 12)

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7826)


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7827)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xu, Winnie


BIOL-UA 12-000 (10442)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7828)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gilligan, Conor


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7829)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7830)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7831)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7832)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nguyen, Emma


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7833)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7834)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krishnamurthi, Smrthi


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7835)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abulimiti, Akida


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7836)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Krishnamurthi, Smrthi


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7837)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bamidele, Ifeoluwa


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7838)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mieles, Dave


BIOL-UA 12-000 (8681)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rangel Valenzuela, Jesus


BIOL-UA 12-000 (7839)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gilligan, Conor


BIOL-UA 12-000 (8800)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 12-000 (8801)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rangel Valenzuela, Jesus


BIOL-UA 12-000 (10305)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abulimiti, Akida


BIOL-UA 12-000 (10607)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mieles, Dave


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20130)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Xu, Winnie


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20131)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gupta, Selena


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20113)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bamidele, Ifeoluwa


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20114)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gupta, Selena


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20115)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20116)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 12-000 (20117)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nguyen, Emma

Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory (BIOL-UA 223)

This laboratory course applies concepts learned in the Molecular and Cell Biology course (BIOL-UA 21) to a molecular biology research project. The research project will introduce students to standard genetic and biochemical techniques common in a molecular biology lab, such as DNA isolation, agarose-gel electrophoresis, and transformation. The project also will provide students with a hands-on understanding of how modern DNA-sequencing technology, along with bioinformatic tools, can be used to discover genetic differences and understand cellular function.

Biology (Undergraduate)
1 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


BIOL-UA 223-000 (9053)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Osmundson, Joseph


BIOL-UA 223-000 (9054)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Tuncer, Alara


BIOL-UA 223-000 (9209)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carrozza, Michael


BIOL-UA 223-000 (9210)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carrozza, Michael


BIOL-UA 223-000 (25644)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Murray, Sean


BIOL-UA 223-000 (25645)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Knoll, Marissa


BIOL-UA 223-000 (26031)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Leon, Victor


BIOL-UA 223-000 (26657)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Carrozza, Michael

Molecular and Cell Biology I (BIOL-UA 21)

In-depth study of cell biology, with an emphasis on the molecular aspects of cell function. Topics include protein structure and synthesis, gene expression and its regulation, cell replication, and specialized cell structure and function. The course provides an introduction to genomics and bioinformatics and examines developmental biology, evolution, and systems biology.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7841)


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7842)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7843)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7844)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7845)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferreira, Amanda


BIOL-UA 21-000 (7846)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Abdul-Rahman, Farah


BIOL-UA 21-000 (8866)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferreira, Amanda


BIOL-UA 21-000 (8867)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mathis, Sallie


BIOL-UA 21-000 (8985)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Obaji, Daniel


BIOL-UA 21-000 (8986)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lou, Karen


BIOL-UA 21-000 (9398)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mathis, Sallie


BIOL-UA 21-000 (10649)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ferreira, Amanda


BIOL-UA 21-000 (10723)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Obaji, Daniel


BIOL-UA 21-000 (21108)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 21-000 (21109)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aharonoff, Avrami


BIOL-UA 21-000 (21110)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 21-000 (21111)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Aharonoff, Avrami


BIOL-UA 21-000 (21112)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mathis, Sallie

Principles of Biology I (BIOL-UA 11)

Introductory course mainly for science majors, designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental principles and processes of biological systems. Subjects include the basics of chemistry pertinent to biology, biochemistry and cell biology, genetics and molecular biology, anatomy and physiology, neurobiology, ecology, population genetics, and history and classification of life forms and evolution. Laboratory exercises illustrate the basics of experimental biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, and genetics, as well as the diversity of life forms and organ systems.

Biology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7819)


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7820)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Savin, Avital


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7821)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Hailey


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7822)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nguyen, Emma


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7823)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jallad, Raya


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7824)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jin, Dongmin


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7825)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lotka, Lauren


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7826)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jin, Dongmin


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7827)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gupta, Selena


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7828)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gupta, Selena


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7829)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Jallad, Raya


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7831)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by De, Titir


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7832)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sookdeo, Akash


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7833)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Podolska, Natalia


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7834)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hart, Sydney


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7835)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nguyen, Emma


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7836)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lisi, Brianna


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7837)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nikulkova, Maria


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7838)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Podolska, Natalia


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7839)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by De, Titir


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7840)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Hart, Sydney


BIOL-UA 11-000 (9211)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Goldberg, Hailey


BIOL-UA 11-000 (9212)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lisi, Brianna


BIOL-UA 11-000 (9213)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Sookdeo, Akash


BIOL-UA 11-000 (21100)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nikulkova, Maria


BIOL-UA 11-000 (21101)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Elorza, Setiembre


BIOL-UA 11-000 (21103)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lotka, Lauren


BIOL-UA 11-000 (21105)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Savin, Avital


BIOL-UA 11-000 (21106)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Elorza, Setiembre


BIOL-UA 11-000 (7830)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


BIOL-UA 11-000 (21107)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Vikraman, Pooja

Age of Leonardo,Raphael and Michelangelo (ARTH-UA 9307)

This course is conceived as a focused study of the works of Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael Sanzio and Michelangelo Buonarroti, the men whose careers largely defined the concept of Western artistic genius. Particular consideration will also be given to their Italian and European contemporaries and followers in order to take advantage of the opportunity to the study these original works on site. High Renaissance art cannot be divorced from its times; thus, much attention will be given to contemporary history, especially Florentine politics and politics in Papal Rome. Special attention will also be given to the evolution of drawing practice in sixteenth-century Italy, an essential development for the changes that took place in the conception of works of art over the course of the century. Themes such as patronage, humanism, interpretations of antiquity, and Italian civic ideals will form a framework for understanding the works of art beyond style, iconography, technique and preservation. As the high Renaissance works are often still in their original physical settings, during field-studies to museums and churches in Florence students will have a unique opportunity to experience the works as their original viewers did and as their creators intended.

Art History (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ARTH-UA 9307-000 (3854)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at NYU Florence (Global)
Instructed by Edelstein, Bruce

Language, Culture, and Society (ANTH-UA 17)

Explores the role of language in culture and society by focusing on gender, ethnicity, social class, verbal genres, literacy, and worldview.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ANTH-UA 17-000 (7778)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Das, Sonia


ANTH-UA 17-000 (9543)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Shuting


ANTH-UA 17-000 (7779)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Li, Shuting


ANTH-UA 17-000 (24440)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Franco, Pedro

Language, Power, Identity (ANTH-UA 16)

Explores how identity is a process of “becoming” rather than a mode of “being” by examining how speakers enact their gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, nationality, religion, and socioeconomic class through everyday conversations, narratives, performances, literacy activities, and public debates. Also explores the moral and political consequences of people’s identification strategies by examining how their beliefs about language reinforce or contest normative power structures. Readings on the relationship between bilingual education and accent discrimination, multilingualism and youth counterculture, migration and code-switching, media and religious publics, linguistic nationalism and xenophobia, and literacy and neo/liberalism in different areas of the world.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ANTH-UA 16-000 (20883)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Das, Sonia · Franco, Pedro

Animal Minds (ANST-UA 410)

This course examines the philosophy of cognitive ethology and comparative psychology. We begin by discussing the nature of animal minds. Are animals conscious? Do they experience pain? Do they have beliefs? Do they use language? Are they self-conscious? How can we know? This involves applying concepts from metaphysics and epistemology to research in cognitive ethology and comparative psychology. We then discuss more general questions like: Are animals agents? Do they have free will? Do they live meaningful lives? Do they have moral rights? This involves applying concepts from ethics, existentialism, and other areas of philosophy to our conclusions about animal minds. Finally, we also ask, along the way, how research on animal minds can affect our philosophical theories. For example, should we revise our theories of consciousness, language, agency, morality, and so on if they seem to have implausible implications about animals?

Animal Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ANST-UA 410-000 (23049)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Franks, Becca

History and the Novel (AHSEM-UA 235)

What can novels based on historic events tell us? What sorts of insights can they provide that journalism and works of pure history cannot? How much imaginative leeway should the author of a historic novel be allowed – and how closely should she stick to “true” events? In this course we’ll read a wide range of novels-looking at them both as literature and as keys to history-on topics that include slavery in the U.S., post-apartheid South Africa, McCarthyism, the 9/11 terror attacks, and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Advanced Honors Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2019)


AHSEM-UA 235-000 (24462)
01/28/2019 – 05/13/2019 Wed
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Data: Code it, Make it (INTM-SHU 261)

Data Physicalization is an emerging research area. It explores new techniques to design and encode data into physical artifacts through geometry or material properties. Recent advances in Computational Design and Fabrication offer novel opportunities to complement traditional screen-based visualizations enhancing people’s ability to discover, understand, and communicate data. This course uses a data visualization approach to define new methods of computational design and digital fabrication. Students will create unique, data-driven, everyday objects and sculpt meaning into them. Through the use of platforms such as Rhinoceros: a 3D modeling software, and Grasshopper: a visual programming language, students will be introduced to fundamental computational methods for designing and fabricating, as well as the understanding of digital fabrication strategies for parametrically generated design. Prerequisite: Interaction Lab or Creative Coding Lab. Fulfillment: IMA/IMB Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 261-000 (17317)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Godoy, Marcela

Advanced Seminar: Seminar in Media Studies: Media’s Material and Environmental Relations (INTM-SHU 350)

In response to the popular conception of the “immaterial” Internet, and “datafication” of all aspects of life, how might we rethink the materiality and environmentality of media in our research? This upper-level seminar will introduce students to various theoretical frameworks in media studies including new materialism, media archaeology, studies of media infrastructures and ecologies, cultural geographies, and elemental media. Students are expected to critically assess the (geo)politics of material/environmental media and to adopt a mix of these frameworks to develop a research project and essay. Prerequisite: Junior standing OR What is New Media. Fulfillment: IMA/B Elective, Advanced IMA Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 350-000 (17319)
09/05/2022 – 12/16/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Pan, Weixian

Hello Metaverse (INTM-SHU 305)

The aim of this course is to explore the relationship between the virtual self and environment and to assess both as a space for learning and collaboration using virtual reality. This course takes place entirely in virtual, immersive environments. Students will be provided Oculus Quest 2 virtual reality headsets and specialized software. See the principles above for further details. Prerequisite: IMA Major with junior or senior standing. Fulfillment: IMA/IMB Elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


INTM-SHU 305-000 (17306)
10/31/2022 – 12/16/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Grewell, Christian

Writing the Fantastic (WRTNG-UG 1260)

Tzvetan Todorov defines the fantastic as a “subgenre of literary works characterized by the ambiguous presentation of supernatural forces.” Donald Antrim, on the other hand, regards the fantastic not as a genre, but as a condition shared between author and reader: “a potential state” in which “everything is vivid, yet nothing is clearly defined,” where “the fantastical and the real are equally questionable, equally challenged by one another.” Frankenstein’s monster comes to life. Alice goes down the rabbit hole. How can [an] author make these events seem not only uncannily plausible, but even expectable—the sudden eruption of some carefully encrypted logic operating beneath our conscious awareness? How do we ground the fantastic in enough realism to sustain the reader’s suspension of disbelief? This class will explore the fantastic as the strangest and most explicit demonstration of what literary technique can achieve in any genre. We will focus on various kinds of world-making, from magical realms to dystopias to refracted versions of “realism.” Special attention will be devoted to how writers use altered states of consciousness like trauma, intoxication, and psychosis to create a hallucinatory space between the supernatural and the deeply improbable. Readings will also span a wide spectrum of cultures and historical periods, from canonical works like Frankenstein to Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities to contemporary novels like Ben Okri’s The Famished Road, Joy Williams’ The Changeling, and Donald Antrim’s The Hundred Brothers. Assignments will include several creative writing prompts and longer pieces of original fiction for workshop.

Advanced Writing Courses (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


WRTNG-UG 1260-000 (14201)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gladstone, Bret

Cultures & Contexts: Russia Since 1917 (CORE-UA 528)

Major periods, developments, and interpretative issues in Russian politics, history, and society, from the 1917 revolution to the present. The emphasis is on the Soviet experience, though the Tsarist past and post-Soviet developments are also considered. Special attention is given to the role of historical traditions, leadership, ideology, ramifying events, and socioeconomic factors.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 528-000 (19720)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by O’Donnell, Anne


CORE-UA 528-000 (19721)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 528-000 (19722)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 528-000 (19723)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 528-000 (19724)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 528-000 (19725)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 528-000 (19726)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Sexualities of the Middle East: A Cultural History (IDSEM-UG 9550)

The course will tackle questions of sexuality in the Middle East from a historical perspective. Applying methodologies of queer theory, it will discuss the complex history of sexuality in the Middle East, and sketch the genealogy of Western attitudes towards both Arab and Jewish sexuality. Relying on theorists and historians like Michel Foucault, Robert Aldrich, Khaled El-Rouayheb, Samar Habib, and Joseph Massad, we will explore the essential role that the queer issue plays in the contemporary politics of the region.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IDSEM-UG 9550-000 (4247)
01/23/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at NYU Tel Aviv (Global)
Instructed by Ilani, Ofri

The Novel and Society: Victorian Secrets (IDSEM-UG 1726)

In the twenty-first century, the Internet arguably makes secrecy impossible, but the exposure of secrets is already an important theme in many 19th-century British novels. In part, this reflects a society in which identity seems increasingly malleable through greater social class mobility, the questioning of traditional gender roles, and imperialist opportunities. In these novels, fake identities conceal a murderer and a madwoman, among others. And the societal constraints inspiring the fictional secrets also led the authors to keep secrets of their own. Beloved author Charles Dickens, the father of 10, had a 13-year love affair with a woman who was 18 when they met. But does the novel genre, particularly the “realist” Victorian novel, with its emphasis on an omniscient narrator and intersecting plots, have a special relationship to secrets? We attempt to uncover the answer by studying Jane Eyre (1847) by Charlotte Bronte (1847), Great Expectations (1861), by Charles Dickens, George Eliot’s Middlemarch (1871-2), and Arthur Conan Doyle’s first Sherlock Holmes novel, A Study in Scarlet (1887). Theory and criticism include selections from Michel Foucault’s History of Sexuality, Edward Said’s Culture and Imperialism, Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar’s The Madwoman in the Attic, and Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak’s “Three Women’s Texts and a Critique of Imperialism.”

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


IDSEM-UG 1726-000 (12277)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Foley, June

The Modern Arabic Novel (IDSEM-UG 1478)

Colonialism left indelible marks on the cultures and societies of its colonized subjects. While nation-states have emerged, the colonial legacy and its various effects continue to haunt post-colonial societies and the modes in which they represent their history and subjectivity. The novel is a particularly privileged site to explore this problem. This course will focus on the post-colonial Arabic novel. After a brief historical introduction to the context and specific conditions of its emergence as a genre, we will read a number of representative novels. Discussions will focus on the following questions: How do writers problematize the perceived tension between tradition and modernity? Can form itself become an expression of sociopolitical resistance? How is the imaginary boundary between “West” and “East” blurred and/or solidified? How is the nation troped and can novels become sites for rewriting official history? What role do gender and sexuality play in all of the above? In addition to films, readings (all in English) may include Edward Said, Frantz Fanon, Naguib Mahfuz, al-Tayyib Salih, Abdelrahman Munif, Ghassan Kanafani, Elias Khoury, Sun`allah Ibrahim, Huda Barakat, Assia Djebbar, and Muhammad Shukri.

Interdisciplinary Seminars (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


IDSEM-UG 1478-000 (17143)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Antoon, Sinan

The Contemporary Broadway Musical: Rent to Hamilton (and Beyond) (ARTS-UG 1058)

Located at the intersection of songwriting, storytelling, creativity, and commerce, the Broadway musical is one of New York City’s most significant and singular cultural artifacts. While this art form has a long and storied history, it continues to evolve dramatically in terms of aesthetics, audiences, content, and economics. In this arts workshop (open to artists, producers, and fans), we will take a look at some of the most influential shows to play the Great White Way over the last twenty-five years, with a focus on both how they are constructed and how they have impacted the field (and society). How does a musical get made? How do librettists, composers, and lyricists synthetize their visions to speak with one creative voice? How does a show like Hamilton become a worldwide phenomenon, and what keeps a hot property like Spider-Man from reaching its potential? Shows examined will include: Rent and The Lion King (shows that serve as the unofficial gateway to this new generation); Passing Strange and In the Heights (and the ground-breaking 2008 season); The Book of Mormon (and its film precursor South Park: Bigger, Longer, Uncut); Spider-Man; Fun Home; and yes, Hamilton. Weekly responses will include original scenes (or songs), casting breakdowns, design proposals, and other creative output, as well as some traditional essays.

Arts Workshops (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ARTS-UG 1058-000 (23280)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Diaz, Kristoffer

Topics in Recorded Music: David Bowie (REMU-UT 1143)

David Bowie’s life and work offer a template for how to survive and continue to evolve as a musical artist. David Bowie has kept the music industry, his fans and the world guessing throughout a career that spans over four decades. Bowie himself put his secret best in his prophetic 1972 song, “Ch-ch-ch-ch Changes”; a multi-talented performer, writer and visual artist, Bowie has played his career like an instrument, selecting trends of every generation to process, absorb and adapt into successive phases of his ever-evolving chameleon persona. In this day of ceaseless multiple media, Bowie’s most recent, and typically perverse, coup was keeping secret the recording of his 2013 album, The Next Day, over a two-year recording period. The manipulative bravado of knowing when and how to keep a star’s inaccessibility and mystery, or to expose oneself, as Bowie did on TV in his own darkest days, has given David Bowie a singular, enduring mystique, glamour and respect. Examining the arc of his work is a window into significant scenes of every decade since the 1950s, and offers insight into: the British Blues scene that produced the Beatles and the Rolling Stones; the hippy free festival counter-culture; r’n’b; futurism; electronica;glam and gender games, improvisation; soul; funk; dance; disco; minimalism; ambient; avant-garde theater; and above all, the endlessly evolving sound of US and UK young clubland, including recent jungle and garage, to which Bowie consistently returns to recharge and find a new direction to make his own.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


REMU-UT 1143-000 (21902)
10/26/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Goldman, Vivien

Topics in Recorded Music: Taylor Swift (REMU-UT 1174)

The name “Taylor Swift” has become synonymous with a number of big ideas. To some in the music industry, the eleven-time Grammy winner (including three Album of the Year awards) defines 21st century country music’s pivot to pop radio. To others, Taylor Swift is the pop star of the 2010s (with the album sales and chart history to back it up— With sales of over 200 million records worldwide, Swift is one of the best-selling music artists of all time). When deployed pejoratively, however, the name “Taylor Swift” can signal anything from white privilege to white feminism to white taste in an era of intersectionality and Black Lives Matter conscientiousness. Taylor Swift may be a loaded phrase for some, but the career of Taylor Swift is more simply an embodiment of music’s American Dream. Raised on a Christmas tree farm in Pennsylvania, teenage Swift would move to Nashville and become one of the most lauded young songwriters in history. Her music was infatuated with love, innocence and romantic fantasias that would sour in the natural way those fairy tales do as a young woman grows up. By her early twenties, she was a full-fledged pop icon, having ditched Music Row for producers like Max Martin and Jack Antonoff, and tabloid fame. Along the way, there were feuds, squads and political discourses aplenty. Swift has encountered the type of controversies that would destroy most pop stars’ careers and acclaim. But at age 31, she has never been more awarded or acclaimed as a singer-songwriter. Meanwhile, her impact is felt in the success and style of younger singers/songwriters like Olivia Rodrigo, Conan Gray, Phoebe Bridgers and Clairo. This course proposes to deconstruct both the appeal and aversions to Taylor Swift through close readings of her music and public discourse as it relates to her own growth as an artist and a celebrity. Through readings, lectures and more, the class delves into analyses of the culture and politics of teen girlhood in pop music, fandom, media studies, whiteness and power as it relates to her image and the images of those who have both preceded and succeeded her. We’ll also consider topics like copyright and ownership, American nationalism and the ongoing impact of social media on the pop music industry.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 8 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


REMU-UT 1174-000 (14537)
01/23/2023 – 03/20/2023 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Spanos, Brittany

Creative Music Entrepreneurs in Historical Context (REMU-UT 1201)

This 14-week class introduces students to the history of innovative entrepreneurs and institutions in American recorded music. We recount the stories and make arguments about famous executives, managers, producers, performers, DJs, and journalists/publishers from the dawn of the music business until the present day. We study how and why the fields, fiefdoms, and empires built by these impressive and sometimes controversial icons have transformed the course of popular music. Along the way, students become well versed in the history of 20th and 21st century recorded music, and in various music genres and styles; and we place the art and business of creating and selling recorded music in historical, political, cultural and social context. Throughout, we look at approaches to crafting successful oral and written arguments about popular music with clear, compelling writing about sound.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


REMU-UT 1201-000 (17715)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnas, Daniel


REMU-UT 1201-000 (17716)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnas, Daniel

Topics: Led Zeppelin (REMU-UT 1115)

In name alone, Led Zeppelin carries mountains of meaning: the most successful and arguably the most influential rock band of all time. The creators of a mythic, mystical, guitar-based style that gave birth to the sounds and iconography of heavy metal. Song-crafters whose studio mastery, utilizing recording technology of the day, generated some of the most enduring rock recordings of their era, establishing standards that still define a stylistic and emotional extreme of popular music. The four British musicians who came out of the electric blues scene of the late ‘60s, recording and touring as a unit for a mere twelve years, together achieved a legendary stature that requires much study to fully appreciate more than thirty years after their demise. This course will consider the history of Led Zeppelin from a variety of perspectives: social and stylistic context; the nuts and bolts of their music—live and in the studio; the hows and whys of the band as a business. Using books, articles, videos, and a generous sampling of music, the course will follow their arrival in the final, psychedelic heyday of swingin’ London of the ‘60s; through their roots in folk and acoustic blues and later experimentations with Indian and North African music, and their rise in an era that was hungry for a heavier, more bombastic sound. The course will include special focus on the group’s technical leader and visionary, guitarist Jimmy Page, who came with prior credits as a sessionman and guitarist in the blues-rock band the Yardbirds, as well as other major players in the Zeppelin story—engineer Glyn Johns, manager Pater Grant—who helped build the sonic and popular juggernaut that the band became. In-class guest speakers will be featured, many who participated or witnessed the Led Zeppelin phenomenon, as well as a screening of the group’s concert film The Song Remains The Same.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 7 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


REMU-UT 1115-000 (21549)
09/05/2023 – 10/24/2023 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Kahn, Ashley

Human Computer Interaction (CS-UY 4543)

Designing a successful interactive experience or software system takes more than technical savvy and vision–it also requires a deep understanding of how to serve people’s needs and desires through the experience of the system, and knowledge about how to weave this understanding into the development process. This course introduces key topics and methods for creating and evaluating human-computer interfaces/digital user experiences. Students apply these practices to a system of their choosing (I encourage application to prototype systems that students are currently working on in other contexts, at any stage of development). The course builds toward a final write-up and presentation in which students detail how they tackled HCI/user experience design and evaluation of their system, and results from their investigations. Some experience creating/participating in the production of interactive experiences/software is recommended.

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4543-000 (16119)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Goyal, Nitesh


CS-UY 4543-000 (16120)
at ePoly
Instructed by Lutzky, Raymond

Performing Voice and Talking Machines (OART-UT 25)

This course will introduce students to technologies for speech synthesis and speech recognition from the point of view of performance art. Through weekly assignments and in class lectures, we will explore voice interfaces and their role in technology, design, art, and culture. We will begin with understanding human speech, and then delve into computer speech. We will learn how to program existing technologies such as p5.js to create our own talking machines. The class will research the current limitations and biases of these technologies and models, and respond by leveraging these constraints as ground for performative expression. Students will be required to develop a performative piece as their final project, this could be a live performance, an interactive installation piece, or a performative object or tool. Students are encouraged to bring their interests into the classroom and apply the course into their practice. Prior knowledge of computer programming will be helpful, however, it is not required. NYU is a global community. You are welcome to bring your own language, your accent, and your spoken identity into the class.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


OART-UT 25-000 (13600)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kananuruk, Tiriree

Introduction to Studio Art (ART-SHU 310)

This course will be an introduction to studio art for students, to traverse both cultural and temporal barriers of visual arts. Students will examine the content of artwork, and build various skills to translate ideas into reality. Class time will be devoted to individual projects and critiques, lectures, and group discussions. This course is open to all students with or without an art background. Note that attendance in the first class meeting is mandatory, otherwise you will be dropped from the course. Prerequisite: None. Fulfillment: general elective

Art (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


ART-SHU 310-000 (17746)
02/07/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Edelstein, Barbara · Zhang, Jian

Media Moguls in the 20th Century (OART-UT 562)

This course attempts to track the American entertainment industry from its plebian origins through its rise to becoming the predominant mass entertainment culture in the world. Students discover the origins of the production practices that are employed in the entertainment industry today by following the legendary characters, movie moguls, and media titans of the early 20th century and the companies they built. The emphasis is on the way the visionaries of the time impacted seemingly risk-averse systems to invigorate and sometimes completely revolutionize them. These innovative men and women include, but are not limited, to Louis B. Mayer, George Lucas, Maya Deren, Shirley Clark, Nam Jun Paik, Lucille Ball, Russell Simmons, Clive Davis, Julie Taymor, and Steve Jobs.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 562-000 (14193)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Falk, Leon


OART-UT 562-000 (14212)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Falk, Leon

The Language of Film (FMTV-UT 4)

Language of Film is an introduction to the craft, history and theory of filmmaking and film-watching. The main challenge facing all filmmakers is to show the story: in other words, to visualize the drama. Over the past century, narrative, experimental and documentary filmmakers have developed a variety of creative strategies and techniques designed to give their audiences compelling, multi-sensorial experiences. The goal of this class is to explore how filmmakers in different historical and cultural settings have contributed to the evolution of film as a powerful, complex and captivating art form.. This course allocates as History & Criticism for Film & TV majors.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


FMTV-UT 4-000 (14350)01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)at Washington SquareInstructed by Pollard, Sam


FMTV-UT 4-000 (14351)01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)at Washington SquareInstructed by Trope, Zipora


FMTV-UT 4-000 (14352)01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Thu12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Rea, Peter


FMTV-UT 4-000 (14353)01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)at Washington SquareInstructed by Kenny, Glenn


FMTV-UT 4-000 (14354)01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)at Washington SquareInstructed by Santha, Laszlo


FMTV-UT 4-000 (14355)01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)at Washington SquareInstructed by Cornell, Julian


FMTV-UT 4-000 (14704)01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)at Washington SquareInstructed by Kenny, Glenn

Creating a Good Society: Christian and Jewish Perspectives (HBRJD-UA 428)

This course explores Greek, Christian and Jewish responses to the problem: How does one create a good society? Central questions to be explored include: What is the best form of government? What economic system is ideal? Should the government actively promote a vision of the good life or leave it to individual to decide the good for themselves? Should the government prioritize the freedom, equality, or happiness of its inhabitants? What role should religion and nationhood play in society? What models of education should the government promote? How does gender inform these considerations? The course will focus on careful analysis of primary texts. Thinkers to be studied include: Plato, Maimonides, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Wollstonecraft, Mendelssohn, Marx, Hess. Having first taken the course: Living a Good Life: Greek and Jewish Perspectives is highly desirable.

Hebrew & Judaic Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


HBRJD-UA 428-000 (10015)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gottlieb, Michah

Statistics for The Behavioral Sciences (PSYCH-UA 10)

Bauer. Offered every semester. 4 points. Students gain familiarity with data description, variance and variability, significance tests, confidence bounds, and linear regression, among other topics. Students work on psychological data sets, learn approaches to statistical prediction, and learn to interpret results from randomized experiments.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8659)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bauer, Elizabeth


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8660)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zuo, Shimiao


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8661)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Wenze


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8662)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zuo, Shimiao


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8663)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Stan


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8664)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gao, Stan


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8665)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bauer, Elizabeth


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8666)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Glinton, Kristen


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8667)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Glinton, Kristen


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8668)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Parihar, Sushmeena


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8669)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Parihar, Sushmeena


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (8670)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Judy


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (26969)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhang, Wenze


PSYCH-UA 10-000 (27040)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Yang, Judy

Intro to Foods and Food Science (NUTR-UE 85)

Introduction to the foods of various world regions and the techniques used to prepare them through hand-on food preparation, demonstrations, lectures and field trips.

Nutrition & Dietetics (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


NUTR-UE 85-000 (10938)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mortillaro, Lourdes


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12408)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12409)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12410)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12411)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (11672)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12412)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12413)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Thu
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


NUTR-UE 85-000 (12414)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Tue
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Perception (PSYCH-UA 22)

Carrasco, Heeger, Landy, Pelli. Offered every semester. 4 points. How do we construct a conception of physical reality based on sensory experience? Survey of basic facts, theories, and methods of studying sensation and perception. The major emphasis is on vision and audition, although other modalities may be covered. Represen-tative topics include receptor function and physiology; color; motion; depth; psychophysics of detection, discrimination, and appearance; perceptual constancies; adaptation, pattern recognition, and the interaction of knowledge and perception.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


PSYCH-UA 22-000 (8495)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Maloney, Laurence


PSYCH-UA 22-000 (8496)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Little, Pat


PSYCH-UA 22-000 (8497)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Little, Pat


PSYCH-UA 22-000 (8498)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Tue
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Elizabeth


PSYCH-UA 22-000 (8499)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwak, Yuna


PSYCH-UA 22-000 (25982)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kwak, Yuna


PSYCH-UA 22-000 (25984)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Zhou, Elizabeth

Human Evolution (ANTH-UA 2)

Investigates the evolutionary origins of humans. The study of human evolution is a multidisciplinary endeavor involving a synthesis of concepts, techniques, and research findings from a variety of different scientific fields, including evolutionary biology, paleontology, primatology, comparative anatomy, genetics, molecular biology, geology, and archaeology. Explores the different contributions that scientists have made toward understanding human origins and provides a detailed survey of the evidence used to reconstruct the evolutionary history of our own species.

Anthropology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7767)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon,Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Higham, James


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7775)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gunson, Jessica


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7768)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gunson, Jessica


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7769)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Galway-Witham, Julia


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7770)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Galway-Witham, Julia


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7771)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Xue


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7772)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dudas, Madelynne


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7773)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Dudas, Madelynne


ANTH-UA 2-000 (7774)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wang, Xue


ANTH-UA 2-000 (26376)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Guerra, Jordan

Introduction to Digital Fabrication (IMNY-UT 252)

Do you want to MAKE THINGS with your computer? Are you an artist, engineer, designer, sculptor or architect? Are you a few of those things? How are 3D scanning and 3D modeling different? What materials should I be using? Should I be 3D printing or CNC-ing this CAD file? What is a Boolean operation and why is it my new best friend? This class will answer all of your questions. Don’t know what any of these things are? This class will answer those questions also. By the end of this course, you will be familiar with all that digital fabrication has to offer. We will cover everything from laser to 3D to CNC. You will learn how to identify which digital fabrication technique works best for your projects. But more than that, you will learn what kinds of questions you should be asking in order to complete a project from start to finish. As technology advances at rapid speeds, digital making machines and software are changing just as fast. So instead of just being taught about the machines of today, you will also be given the tools to teach yourself the machines of tomorrow. Emphasis will be put on learning how to ask the right kind of questions to successfully finish a project. What do you want to make? Let’s make it.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IMNY-UT 252-000 (22307)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Simmons, Blair

Experimental Photography (IMNY-UT 232)

This course is designed to provide hands-on experience with creative coding, physical computing, and machine learning to design alternative forms of taking, making, processing, and interacting with images for visual communication and creative expression. The forms and applications of emerging computational tools are explored weekly in technical tutorials and active workshops. These are informed by seminar discussions of readings on critical debates in photography, the history of its tools and uses, and the works of historical and contemporary photographers and artists using photography and new media. Prerequisites: IMA’s foundation course, Creative Computing, or similar coursework with coding and microcontrollers.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IMNY-UT 232-000 (22304)
01/24/2022 – 05/09/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Nickles, Ellen

Interactive Fashion (INTM-SHU 185T)

Technology is allowing us to see our clothing as an extension of our body. An extension acting as a system that reacts, collects information, and augments our modes of interactions with spaces and people. Historically, what we wear has been used to express our identity as well as complex issues related to class, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. Leila Brillson states: “”What you wear is a part of your identity, and identity is, well, pretty darn political””. Interested in fashion as a form of expression, artists, designers, and architects are now crossing disciplines to explore the realm of fashion. Utilizing computation design, digital fabrication, and electronics they are proposing new wearables to speculate on the future of human existence by exploring the limits of the body. In this course, students will research and work with soft electronics and robotics integrated into textiles to make it possible to add controlled behavior and interactivity with their immediate environment. They will study nature and design wearables, understanding them like a second skin, as well as a soft interface able to gather information and transform itself. Students will also explore the complex geometries and designs allowed by digital design and manufacturing. Furthermore, this course will engage with both theory and practice, and introduce students to a specific design sensibility and methodology in order to design wearables reflecting on religious, social, and political issues. Prerequisite: INTM-SHU 101 Interaction Lab or INTM-SHU 103 Creative Coding Lab. Fulfillment: IMA/IMB Elective

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


INTM-SHU 185T-000 (23465)
01/24/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Godoy, Marcela

Global Media Cultures (INTM-SHU 194)

This course surveys the implications of globalization for the production, circulation, and consumption of media. In this course, we will look across both analog and digital media (radio, TV, film, video, pop music, podcast, etc) in relation to a series of questions: How do media (and media industry) represents localities for a global audience? How can media practices create a feeling of belonging to the world/community? How may global media tell us about different material infrastructure, social imagination, and political desires? Students will explore media phenomena and critically examine media texts often beyond North American experiences. By the end of the class, students will be able to articulate how media connects to global flow of finance, cultural product, labor, and social aspirations.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


INTM-SHU 194-000 (23470)
01/24/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Pan, Weixian

The Berlin Music Tech Start-Up Scene (REMU-UT 9813)

After its reunification, Berlin gained a well-deserved reputation as an ‘anything-goes’ cultural playground. But just as radical cultural experimentation was leading to the city’s techno Renaissance, the same urban frontier was quietly transforming into a hotbed for new business ideas around tech. Companies like Ableton, Native Instruments, and SoundCloud started in the city and grew from headquarters there into leaders in the field of music technology. They join other world leaders in music tech around Europe, like Spotify, Deezer, Mixcloud, Focusrite/Novation, and Propellerhead. Berlin is quickly becoming known as a world-class hub for innovative tech start-ups and progressive developments in emergent media. This class, open to all students, shines a light on key Berlin-based entrepreneurial figures and innovators in music technology, with a focus on those successful individuals who have launched recognized or profitable music-focused startups. The idea is for students, many of whom are aspiring entrepreneurs, to hear directly from, and ask questions directly to, established Berlin based tech entrepreneurs, in moderated conversation. In anticipation for a guest class visit, students may be required to investigate websites, read biographical or contextual material, or attend events outside of class time. Students will be expected to ask informed questions of the guests and to develop responses throughout the course of the class. All events and speakers are subject to change.

Recorded Music (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


REMU-UT 9813-000 (13439)
08/31/2023 – 10/18/2023 Wed
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at NYU Berlin (Global)
Instructed by Strobel, Matthias

Introduction to Visual Effects for Animated and Live Action Films (FMTV-UT 1153)

Introduction to Visual Effects for Animated and Live Action Films provides an in-depth overview of VFX production from the director-producer perspective. This course will offer a basic understanding of how VFX are utilized and will prepare students for the visual effects industry, and its constantly evolving digital and in-camera solutions. It will also provide an historical overview of the evolution of VFX. Students will also learn how powerful visual effects have been, and will continue to be, in helping to tell stories, especially projects with limited budgets. They will gain a detailed understanding of the type of camera coverage necessary on-set to facilitate the VFX process and what communications, with their primary crew, are necessary during early stages of preproduction to optimize footage for VFX. Areas of study include rig removal, green/blue screen compositing, motion capture, shooting backdrops, matte paintings, background plates, miniatures – models – forced perspectives, match lighting, sky replacement, crowd replication, integration of 2D and 3D CGI elements, motion control and practical effects shot in-camera.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


FMTV-UT 1153-000 (7111)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Weinstein, Jonathan

The Science and Psychology of Marijuana (CAMS-UA 502)

Weed. Pot. Bud. Grass. Ganja. Reefer. Mary Jane. Skunk. Herb. Cannabis. It’s all marijuana – the most commonly used, in most states still illicit, drug in the United States. Calming for some, anxiety provoking for others, perhaps medicinal, always controversial, marijuana causes wonder and confusion among physicians, parents, teachers, adolescents, and lawmakers. After 50 years of debate, marijuana remains one of our most visible modern-day conundrums – is it “okay?” Is marijuana safe and therapeutic, or is it dangerous and a gateway to more harmful drugs? Through lecture, discussion, and a thorough analysis of the current research literature in neuroscience and human development, we will seek to answer these questions and identify marijuana’s role in psychology, medicine, culture, and government policy.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CAMS-UA 502-000 (9683)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Phillips, Blake A · Nayak, Komal

Environmental Systems Science (ENVST-UA 100)

A comprehensive survey of critical issues in environmental systems science, focusing on: human population; the global chemical cycles; ecosystems and biodiversity; endangered species and wildlife; nature preserves; energy flows in nature; agriculture and the environment; energy systems from fossil fuels to renewable forms; Earth?s waters; Earth?s atmosphere; carbon dioxide and global warming; urban environments; wastes; and paths to a sustainable future.

Environmental Studies (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ENVST-UA 100-000 (9509)


ENVST-UA 100-000 (8090)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ENVST-UA 100-000 (8091)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ENVST-UA 100-000 (8092)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ENVST-UA 100-000 (8093)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ENVST-UA 100-000 (8094)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


ENVST-UA 100-000 (9284)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Thu
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

The Science of Happiness (CAMS-UA 110)

Examines the state of college-student mental health and wellness on a personal and systems level. As undergraduate university students approach the end of adolescence, they often reevaluate the beliefs, values, and assumptions with which they left home. Young adulthood is a time of great promise, but the transition from child to adult is never easy. We look at how individuals can create positive change by reinterpreting their goals and identifying steps toward a successful college experience. Key findings from the fields of neuroscience and positive psychology are referenced to inform our study of the biopsychosocial underpinnings of success and happiness. Through lectures and discussions, students learn about a variety of wellness topics that include mindfulness, relationships, and self-esteem. The final project requires students to promote an area of mental wellness on campus.

Child/Adoles Mental Hlth Stds (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CAMS-UA 110-000 (7390)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan · Lerner, Daniel Louis


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9676)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9677)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
8:00 AM – 8:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9678)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
9:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9679)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9680)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
8:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9682)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 8:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9683)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9684)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9685)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9686)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9687)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9688)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9689)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9690)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9691)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 8:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan · Lerner, Daniel Louis


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9692)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
9:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan · Lerner, Daniel Louis


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9693)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan


CAMS-UA 110-000 (9694)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Schlechter, Alan · Lerner, Daniel Louis

INTRODUCTION TO HAPTICS AND TELEROBOTICS IN MEDICINE (ROB-UY 3404)

In this course, the theoretical bases and applications, of haptics technologies with a particular focus on medical applications (specifically surgical, and neurorehabilitative) are taught. Basic technological aspects, such as instrumentation, actuation, control and mechanisms, are introduced. Also, some theoretical aspects related to telerobotic systems are discussed. Students are expected to have basic knowledge of programming. As part of this course, students will participate in experimental and simulation labs to acquire hands-on expertise in haptics implementation and programming. | Prerequisite: CS-UY 1114 and MA-UY 2034 and PH-UY 1013 or equivalents (see Minor in Robotics)

Robotics (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2023)


ROB-UY 3404-000 (15568)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Atashzar, Seyed Farokh


ROB-UY 3404-000 (15569)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Tue
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Atashzar, Seyed Farokh


ROB-UY 3404-000 (15570)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Wed
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Atashzar, Seyed Farokh


ROB-UY 3404-000 (15567)
09/05/2023 – 12/15/2023 Mon,Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Atashzar, Seyed Farokh

Design Studio for Non-Majors (ART-UE 1421)

A continuing exploration of graphic design to help students refine their skills & develop more personally expressive ways to solving problems through visual communication. Assignments, readings, & research projects will allow students to consider the complex nature of graphic design. Both traditional & digital approaches to typography & layout will be incorporated with a wide range of assignment. A priority is placed on the use of concepts to dictate design techniques & on the pursuit of a genuinely creative vision.

Studio Art (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ART-UE 1421-000 (9687)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Darts, David


ART-UE 1421-000 (9689)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rader, Michael

Cultures & Contexts: New World Encounters (CORE-UA 541)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CORE-UA 541-000 (21350)


CORE-UA 541-000 (21351)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 541-000 (21352)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 541-000 (21353)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Quinton, Laura


CORE-UA 541-000 (21354)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Quinton, Laura


CORE-UA 541-000 (21355)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 541-000 (21356)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 541-000 (24148)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Quinton, Laura

Data Visualization (CUSP-GX 6006)

Visualization and visual analytics systems help people explore and explain data by allowing the creation of both static and interactive visual representations. A basic premise of visualization is that visual information can be processed at a much higher rate than raw numbers and text. Well-designed visualizations substitute perception for cognition, freeing up limited cognitive/memory resources for higher-level problems. This course aims to provide a broad understanding of the principals and designs behind data visualization. General topics include state-of-the-art techniques in both information visualization and scientific visualization, and the design of interactive/web-based visualization systems. Hands on experience will be provided through popular frameworks such as matplotlib, VTK and D3.js.

Ctr for Urban Sci and Progress (Graduate)
3 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2023)


CUSP-GX 6006-000 (7543)
01/23/2023 – 05/08/2023 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sun, Qi

Cell Phone Cinema (OART-GT 2566)

Hollywood in your palm. That is what this combination of lectures, screenings, demonstrations and practical production workshop will offer to the students in this course. There will be several professional guests making presentations and Q&A sessions from the mobile phone filmmaking industry. In addition to the historical and critical overview of the emergence and exponential growth of global cell phone cinema, students will shoot all footage on cell phones and download them for computerized editing. The final project will be under three minute shorts. Projects will include all genres of film and television: news, mini-documentaries, animation, music videos and narrative shorts. Completed student projects will be suitable to be posted on the Internet and entered into domestic and international mobile phone film festivals. For example, two minute long improvisations of Bollywood Style Music Videos shot on Cell Phones by the students have been projected at the Tribeca Cinemas as part of the New York Indian Film Festival. It is suggested but not compulsory that students bring to the class a cell phone capable of recording video.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


OART-GT 2566-000 (17833)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Bardosh, Karoly

Augmented Spaces (ITPG-GT 2356)

With recent advances in hardware and software, millions of us now carry unprecedented spatial computing and world sensing technologies in our pockets. With these technologies in hand, how do we design AR experiences that are contextual at the core – that are sensitive to the spaces we inhabit and the behaviors of people in those spaces? How do we augment this better understanding of reality? This course will be a hands-on workshop where we create spatially aware, contextually driven AR applications unique to particular situations. We will examine the opportunities and challenges when designing for site-specific experiences – museums, live events, retail, medical settings, industrial environments, schools, and others. Topics will include image and object recognition, world mapping, people tracking, location anchors, the ARKit “depth api” (LiDAR enabled features), spatial audio, scene understanding and semantics, and more. For design and development, we’ll primarily use Apple technologies – ARKit, RealityKit and RealityComposer. We’ll also tap a variety of cloud services to store, move, process, and bring intelligence to the data generated and consumed in our experiences. 3D modeling skills are helpful but not required. While we’ll cover the basics, students should expect to spend additional time outside of class learning Swift and other related programming concepts. Full-time access to an iOS device (LiDAR-enabled is ideal but not required) and a Mac laptop running the latest operating systems are required. As part of the design process, we’ll host workshops and guest critiques with designers from top studios around New York City as well as directly interfacing with various teams at Apple.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2356-000 (23992)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Creating with TinyML (ITPG-GT 2339)

A new world is emerging at the intersections of machine learning and physical computation that will offer wide-scale access to bringing intelligence to everyday devices and spaces at extremely low costs. In this course, students are offered the opportunity to become pioneers in a new field of hardware machine learning as they are introduced to the most used machine learning platform in the world (TensorFlow) that has been embedded into an incredibly small microcontroller, called TinyML. Students will learn about building with machine learning, the ethics and societal impacts of ML, and how to start realizing creative computation through ML-based physical computing.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2339-000 (23970)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Creative Learning Design (IMBX-SHU 241)

This practical, hands-on course will explore questions such as: How can we design engaging, creative learning experiences that are relevant to the cultural goals and needs of today’s youth in China, while laying the foundation for creative learning for the workforce of tomorrow? What are engaging, effective creative learning resources, and how are they best implemented in Chinese learning settings? How can we take advantage of young people’s near ubiquitous love of the arts to facilitate creative learning?’ In this course, students will work in teams to design digital learning resources and experience designs at the intersection of music, coding, arts, and technology. The course will begin with an introduction to emerging trends in learner engagement and design-based research, especially related to web- and mobile-based musical experiences and principles of making music with new media. Innovations in and applications of musical interaction, interactive technologies, user-centered design & engagement, scaffolded learning, creative learning, pedagogies of play and making, and educational entrepreneurship will also be explored. Students will work together in teams and paired with a partner audience of learners and teachers in Shanghai drawn from local and regional international schools, ed-tech startups, and cultural partners. Together they will assess the needs and opportunities of partner students and teachers, and engage in a two-stage iterative, reflective co-design process prototyping custom learning resources and experience designs with their partner end users. At the end of the course, students will present and demo their learning resources as part of a public showcase to an external audience of partners, educators, technologists, musicians, entrepreneurs, and experience designers in Shanghai. Prerequisites: None. Fulfillment: IMA Major Electives; IMB Major Business Elective/Interactive Media Elective; Business and Finance Major Non-Finance Electives; Business and Marketing Major Non-Marketing Electives.

Interactive Media and Business (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2022)


IMBX-SHU 241-000 (17770)
01/24/2022 – 05/13/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Ruthmann, Alex

Wearables for One (ITPG-GT 2343)

This course will focus on the prototyping of wearable electronics projects for a single user: you. In this class we will wear what we make, following an iterative cycle of research-design-make-wear. Lectures, readings, and discussions will serve to provide historical and contemporary framing for our work. Wearable technology prototyping strategies and techniques will be shared and tested. Special focus will be placed on circuit building and fabrication approaches that are compatible with a home studio environment. Previous experience with electronics or physical computing is strongly encouraged. Students will emerge from the course with a deeper knowledge of what it takes to develop and refine a robust, bespoke wearable electronics project.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Summer 2021)


ITPG-GT 2343-000 (6481)
05/24/2021 – 07/05/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Online
Instructed by Hartman, Kathryn

Life Science: Human Origins (CORE-UA 305)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


CORE-UA 305-000 (8176)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Mon,Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Burrell, Andrew


CORE-UA 305-000 (8177)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Avilez, Monica


CORE-UA 305-000 (8178)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Avilez, Monica


CORE-UA 305-000 (8179)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Tue
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Petersdorf, Megan


CORE-UA 305-000 (8180)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Petersdorf, Megan


CORE-UA 305-000 (8181)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Decasien, Alexandra


CORE-UA 305-000 (8182)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Fri
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Decasien, Alexandra

Theories and Practices of Transmedia Storytelling (INTM-SHU 286)

This course examines both the practices and the products of adapting narratives from one medium to another. Through case studies of specific adaptations, we will address some of the major formal, industrial, and interpretative questions that transmedia adaptation raises, as creators change characters, stories, settings, and narrative tropes to fit into new stories various, often multiple media: comics, radio, novels, movies, television, games (tabletop and electronic), and more. Theoretical readings will give students concepts and a vocabulary to discuss ways that narrative adaptations use and re-purpose their “source” texts. Students will write prompted response papers, an analytical essay, and an annotated bibliography; in collaboration with classmates, student teams will first propose and then develop transmedia narratives of their own. Prerequisite: Writing as Inquiry Fulfillment: IMA/IMB elective.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 16 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


INTM-SHU 286-000 (24343)
01/25/2021 – 05/14/2021 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Claverie, Ezra

Digital Electronics Lab (MPATE-UE 1828)

Hands-on lab accompanying Digital Electronics. Lab sessions will contain hands-on experience with logic circuits & microcontrollers. The course culminates with a student developed final project.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
1 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1828-000 (12132)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven


MPATE-UE 1828-000 (10687)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven


MPATE-UE 1828-000 (12133)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Litt, Steven


MPATE-UE 1828-000 (10689)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Kleback, Mark


MPATE-UE 1828-000 (12134)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Digital Recording Technology (MPATE-UE 1003)

Digital recording technology & production techniques are explained & demonstrated. Lecture topics engage analog to digital conversion, digital to analog conversion, digital signal theory & filter design, digital audio effects & mixing. Studio lab assignments are performed outside of class reinforcing weekly lecture topics.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1003-000 (10652)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Valenzuela, Ernesto


MPATE-UE 1003-000 (12126)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
4:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Valenzuela, Ernesto

Electronic Music Performance (MPATE-UE 1019)

Through discussions with guest performers, students study the conceptualization and production of live electronics performance pieces. Individual proposals for several pieces are created, followed by a final live performance project, in which live electronics are an integral part of the concept.

Music Technology (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


MPATE-UE 1019-000 (12980)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Rolnick, Neil


MPATE-UE 1019-000 (12981)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Naphtali, Dafna


MPATE-UE 1019-000 (12982)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Naphtali, Dafna


MPATE-UE 1019-000 (12983)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wiggins, Kacy


MPATE-UE 1019-000 (12984)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by O’Keefe, Timothy

Resisting Dystopia (MCC-UE 1041)

A deep sense of a descending dystopian future has become more pronounced with the global pandemic, economic shutdowns, and the rise of extremism and authoritarianism. Scholars, novelists, journalists, filmmakers, and activists around the world have been writing and speaking about political systems and leadership classes incapable of addressing such issues for decades. Students explore dystopia through literature, film, and scholarly works, and examine strategies for resisting dystopia. Students participate in a social action project and create video projects.

Media, Culture & Communication (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2021)


MCC-UE 1041-000 (23974)
01/28/2021 – 05/10/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gary, Brett

Application Security (CS-GY 9163)

This course addresses the design and implementation of secure applications. Concentration is on writing software programs that make it difficult for intruders to exploit security holes. The course emphasizes writing secure distributed programs in Java. The security ramifications of class, field and method visibility are emphasized. | Knowledge of Information, Security and Privacy equivalent to CS-GY 6813. Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Computer Science (Graduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-GY 9163-000 (15952)
at ePoly
Instructed by


CS-GY 9163-000 (15953)
at ePoly
Instructed by


CS-GY 9163-000 (15954)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Satt, Mo

Digital Photography (OART-UT 13)

This is a standard digital photography course designed for those with little or no experience in photography. This course will emphasize personal expression through the application of technique to the presentation of subject matter. Open Arts will have enough Sony A7r cameras for students to share. If students plan to borrow the DSLR cameras, they are first required to purchase College Student Insurance, (CSI). While it is not required that you own your own digital camera to enroll in this course, it is recommended that you borrow or acquire your own camera for the duration of this course, or if you would like to avoid having to share one of the department’s cameras with another student. If you would like to purchase your own camera, a digital single lens reflex (SLR) or mirrorless digital camera is highly recommended for this course. The camera needs to have manual aperture and shutter speed controls. The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the technical and aesthetic aspects of making photographic images. We will apply fundamental photographic techniques such as composition, framing, lighting and manual camera controls to the images we create. We will discuss the way we see, compared to how cameras and lenses see, evaluate the similarities and differences and how that impacts the creation of images and how we analyze them. Students will make photographs that are effective as individual images and photographs that work together in a series. Students will learn how to create a narrative with a series of photographs and express a feeling or mood with a series of photographs. Class discussions will introduce students to a variety of concepts related to visual literacy. Students will also be introduced to the work of historically significant photographers from a broad range of backgrounds. Students will learn how to use Adobe Creative Cloud software to adjust images for print and digital publishing. By the end of the course, students will understand how to use a digital SLR or mirrorless camera to create compelling photographs using manual controls, process their images using Adobe Creative Cloud software and best practices for publishing their images digitally as well as best practices for printing their images. Finally, students will enhance their critical thinking skills while developing a deeper understanding of visual/photographic language. Students are expected to shoot a minimum of 108 exposures (photographs) each week.

Open Arts Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


OART-UT 13-000 (14496)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ross-Smith, Bayete

Digital Photography (OART-GT 2013)

This is a standard digital photography course designed for those with little or no experience in photography. This course will emphasize personal expression through the application of technique to the presentation of subject matter. Open Arts will have enough Sony A7r cameras for students to share. If students plan to borrow the DSLR cameras, they are first required to purchase College Student Insurance, (CSI). While it is not required that you own your own digital camera to enroll in this course, it is recommended that you borrow or acquire your own camera for the duration of this course, or if you would like to avoid having to share one of the department’s cameras with another student. If you would like to purchase your own camera, a digital single lens reflex (SLR) or mirrorless digital camera is highly recommended for this course. The camera needs to have manual aperture and shutter speed controls. The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the technical and aesthetic aspects of making photographic images. We will apply fundamental photographic techniques such as composition, framing, lighting and manual camera controls to the images we create. We will discuss the way we see, compared to how cameras and lenses see, evaluate the similarities and differences and how that impacts the creation of images and how we analyze them. Students will make photographs that are effective as individual images and photographs that work together in a series. Students will learn how to create a narrative with a series of photographs and express a feeling or mood with a series of photographs. Class discussions will introduce students to a variety of concepts related to visual literacy. Students will also be introduced to the work of historically significant photographers from a broad range of backgrounds. Students will learn how to use Adobe Creative Cloud software to adjust images for print and digital publishing. By the end of the course, students will understand how to use a digital SLR or mirrorless camera to create compelling photographs using manual controls, process their images using Adobe Creative Cloud software and best practices for publishing their images digitally as well as best practices for printing their images. Finally, students will enhance their critical thinking skills while developing a deeper understanding of visual/photographic language. Students are expected to shoot a minimum of 108 exposures (photographs) each week.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


OART-GT 2013-000 (7438)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Ross-Smith, Bayete

Live Video Performance Art (OART-GT 2567)

This course will combine a history of video art and experimental film with practical training in the use of live video performance art technology. Students will explore new ways to create and edit films and videos using VJ software, projections, and multi-channel video surfaces. Workshops will demonstrate concepts and software that can be integrated into the creative process of video performance art and video art installations. COURSE OBJECTIVES At the completion of this course, the student will be able to: Draw inspiration from the recent history of incredible video and multi-media artists. Develop an understanding of audio and visual hardware used by VJ’s. Use live VJ software to manipulate digital media in real time to create Video Performance Art. Use Projection Mapping techniques to project video art onto 3D surfaces. Create original video performance art, video installations, and other performance pieces. Utilize skills to make video art in the professional market.

Open Arts Curriculum (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


OART-GT 2567-000 (7246)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Nova, Max

Locative Media (INTM-SHU 283)

With the rise of mobile computing platforms such as smart phones and tablets, location has suddenly become a key element in the production and consumption of media. In this online course, designed for NYU Shanghai Interactive Media Arts majors studying abroad, students will be encouraged to simultaneously explore their unique study away site, as well as to consume, research, critique, and create location-based media for mobile devices. Students will be introduced to GPS (Global Positioning System) technologies through activities such as geocaching and GPS drawing. We will next investigate geocoding, geotagging, and geofencing through the application of JavaScript mapping platforms CartoDB and Google Maps. Students will then explore an emerging technology known as Bluetooth Beacons, which can be used to create custom positioning systems and to facilitate location awareness in mobile devices. Students will be asked to then produce, as a final project, a game that engages participants in a location or locations, as well as in locative media in any number of forms. Note: This is an online course featuring both synchronous and asynchronous learning opportunities. Registration is limited to IMA Majors studying at NYU’s global sites other than New York or Abu Dhabi.

Interactive Media Arts (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


INTM-SHU 283-000 (22965)
09/14/2020 – 12/15/2020 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by Belanger, Matthew

Population Infinite:The Future of Identity (ITPG-GT 2041)

Course description (optional): We are currently living in a society that operates under the principle that one body equals one agent, one vantage point, one identity. But emerging technologies may create a future in which the notion of a single personal identity becomes outdated. That future includes: machine learning techniques that make emulating the style and behavior of other people fast and easy; widely available AR/VR headsets that get people to identify with however many faces and bodies they choose, instead of just those they were born with; cryptocurrencies enabling the use of pseudonymous economic identities to transact across the planet in a permissionless manner. This is a course where we will get to explore and anticipate the utopian and dystopian aspects of this weird future of identity.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 6 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


ITPG-GT 2041-000 (22623)
09/02/2020 – 10/14/2020 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Germanidis, Anastasios · Oved, Dan

Computational Approaches to Narrative (ITPG-GT 2198)

Beginning with the release of Crowther and Woods’ “Colossal Cave Adventure” in 1977, the potential and unique affordances of computation as a means of storytelling have become more and more apparent. Combining approaches from literary theory, anthropology, computational creativity and game design, this class considers how narrative structure can be represented as data and enacted through computation, and invites students to implement practical prototypes of their own interactive and procedurally-generated narratives using a variety of technologies. Topics include (but are not limited to) hypertext fiction, “choose your own adventure”-style branching narratives, text adventures, visual novels, story generation from grammars and agent-based simulations. Students will complete a series of bite-size weekly assignments to present for in-class critique. Each session will also feature lectures, class discussion, and technical tutorials.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ITPG-GT 2198-000 (14761)
01/24/2024 – 05/01/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Parrish, Allison

Designing for Digital Fabrication (ITPG-GT 2890)

The ability to digitally fabricate parts and whole pieces directly from our computers or design files used to be an exotic and expensive option not really suitable for student or designer projects, but changes in this field in the past 5 years have brought these capabilities much closer to our means, especially as ITP students. ITP and NYU now offer us access to laser cutting, CNC routing, and 3D stereolithography. In this class we will learn how to design for and operate these machines. Emphasis will be put on designing functional parts that can fit into a larger project or support other components as well as being successful on a conceptual and aesthetic level. In this class we will discover methods to design projects on CAD applications for total control of the result, and we will develop algorithmic ways to create designs from software (Processing) to take advantage of the ability to make parts and projects that are unique, customizable, dependent on external data or random. The class will include 3 assignments to create projects using the three machines (laser, router, 3D) and the opportunity to work on a final project.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2890-000 (15695)
09/04/2024 – 12/04/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rozin, Daniel

The Neural Aesthetic (ITPG-GT 2994)

Making words and images public used to be difficult, complex, and expensive. Now it’s not. That change, simple but fundamental, is transforming the media landscape. A publisher used to be required if you wanted to put material out into the public sphere; now anyone with a keyboard or a camera can circulate their material globally. This change in the economics of communication has opened the floodgates to a massive increase in the number and variety of participants creating and circulating media. This change, enormous and permanent, is driving several profound effects in the media landscape today. This course covers the transition from a world populated by professional media makers and a silent public to one where anyone who has a phone or a computer can be both producer and consumer. This change, brought about by the technological and economic characteristics of digital data and networks, is upending old industries — newspapers, music publishing, moviemaking — faster than new systems can be put in place. The result is chaos and experimentation as new ways of participating in the previously sparse media landscape are appearing everywhere. This course covers the history and economics of the previous media landscape, the design of digital networks that upend those historical systems, and new modes of participation from weblogs and wikis and Twitter to fan fiction and lolcats. The course centers on readings and field observation, with three papers due during the course of the term.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


ITPG-GT 2994-000 (23993)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Understanding Networks (ITPG-GT 2808)

“Interactive technologies seldom stand alone. They exist in networks, and they facilitate networked connections between people. Designing technologies for communications requires an understanding of networks. This course is a foundation in how networks work. Through weekly readings and class discussions and a series of short hands-on projects, students gain an understanding of network topologies, how the elements of a network are connected and addressed, what protocols hold them together, and what dynamics arise in networked environments. This class is intended to supplement the many network-centric classes at ITP. It is broad survey, both of contemporary thinking about networks, and of current technologies and methods used in creating them. Prerequisites: Students should have an understanding of basic programming. This class can be taken at the same time as, or after, Intro to Computational Media or an equivalent intro to programming. Some, though not all, production work in the class requires basic programming. There is a significant reading component to this class as well. Learning Objectives In this class, you will learn about how communications networks are structured, and you will learn how to examine those structures using software tools. By the end of this class, you should have a working knowledge of the following concepts: * The basics of network theory, some history of the internet and the organizations and stakeholders involved in its creation and maintenance * The Open Systems Interconnect (OSI) model and standard internet protocols such as Internet Protocol (IP), Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) , Universal Datagram Protocol (UDP), and Hypertext Transport Protocol (HTTP).  * Network addressing, private and public IP addresses * What hosts, servers, and clients are and a few ways in which they communicate * What a command line interface  (CLI) is and how to use the tools available in one * The basics of internet security * How telecommunications networks are similar to other infrastructural networks, like power and transportation, and how they are different.”

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2808-000 (15692)
09/04/2024 – 12/04/2024 Wed
9:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Igoe, Thomas


ITPG-GT 2808-000 (15693)
09/05/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Igoe, Thomas

Programming from A to Z (ITPG-GT 2536)

This course focuses on programming strategies and techniques behind procedural analysis and generation of text-based data. We’ll explore topics ranging from evaluating text according to its statistical properties to the automated production of text with probabilistic methods to text visualization. Students will learn server-side and client-side JavaScript programming and develop projects that can be shared and interacted with online. This fall the course will also explore topics in machine learning as related to text. There will be weekly homework assignments as well as a final project.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 13 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ITPG-GT 2536-000 (15690)
09/04/2024 – 12/04/2024 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Shiffman, Daniel

Cultures & Contexts: Germany (CORE-UA 556)

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 556-000 (9858)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Wood, Christopher


CORE-UA 556-000 (9859)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 556-000 (9860)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 556-000 (9861)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 556-000 (9862)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 556-000 (9863)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 556-000 (9864)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Context: Brazil (CORE-UA 555)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CORE-UA 555-000 (10306)


CORE-UA 555-000 (10307)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 555-000 (10308)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 555-000 (10309)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 555-000 (10310)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 555-000 (10311)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 555-000 (10312)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: Spain (CORE-UA 544)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 544-000 (19734)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Mendelson, Jordana


CORE-UA 544-000 (19735)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 544-000 (19736)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 544-000 (19737)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 544-000 (19738)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 544-000 (19739)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 544-000 (19740)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 544-000 (19741)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: Contemporary Latino Cultures (CORE-UA 529)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 529-000 (19727)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Beltran, Cristina


CORE-UA 529-000 (19728)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 529-000 (19729)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 529-000 (19730)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 529-000 (19731)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 529-000 (19732)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 529-000 (19733)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: Asian / Pacific / American Cultures (CORE-UA 539)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 539-000 (9846)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Saranillio, Dean


CORE-UA 539-000 (9847)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 539-000 (9848)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 539-000 (9849)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 539-000 (9850)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 539-000 (19710)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 539-000 (19711)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 539-000 (19712)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: The Black Atlantic (CORE-UA 534)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CORE-UA 534-000 (21333)


CORE-UA 534-000 (21334)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 534-000 (21335)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 534-000 (21336)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 534-000 (21337)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: Caribbean (CORE-UA 509)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2021)


CORE-UA 509-000 (9926)


CORE-UA 509-000 (9927)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 509-000 (9928)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 509-000 (9929)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 509-000 (9930)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 509-000 (10208)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martinez, Christine


CORE-UA 509-000 (10209)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martinez, Christine


CORE-UA 509-000 (21332)
09/02/2021 – 12/14/2021 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Martinez, Christine

Cultures & Contexts: African Diaspora (CORE-UA 532)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 532-000 (8791)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Gomez, Michael


CORE-UA 532-000 (8792)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 532-000 (8793)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 532-000 (8794)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 532-000 (8795)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 532-000 (8827)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 532-000 (8828)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: Ancient Israel (CORE-UA 514)

The history and culture of the ancient Israelite societies of biblical times and the Greco-Roman period seen from the perspective of the process of urbanization and the role of cities in the development of classical Judaism, covering the period from c. 1250 b.c.e. through the third century c.e. Surveys the history and achievements of these cities and their contribution to the development of law and social organization, prophetic movements, history of Israelite religion and early Judaism, and the background of Christianity. The Bible and ancient Jewish texts preserve much evidence for the history of ancient Israel; and archaeological excavations, as well as the discovery of ancient writings in Hebrew and related languages, have added to our knowledge. In addition, new discoveries in the Dead Sea Scrolls contribute greatly to our understanding of the history of Judaism and the emergence of Christianity. Throughout, we remain focused on the growth of cities and their role in the creation and development of ancient Israel’s culture and literature.

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 514-000 (8019)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Fleming, Daniel


CORE-UA 514-000 (8020)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 514-000 (8021)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 514-000 (8022)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 514-000 (8023)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 514-000 (19709)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Cultures & Contexts: Indigenous Australia (CORE-UA 536)

For course description, please consult the College Core Curriculum website: http://core.cas.nyu.edu

College Core Curriculum (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


CORE-UA 536-000 (8930)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Myers, Fred


CORE-UA 536-000 (8931)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 536-000 (8932)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 536-000 (8933)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 536-000 (8934)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
12:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 536-000 (8935)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by


CORE-UA 536-000 (8936)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by

Games 101 (GAMES-UT 101)

Games 101 is the foundational course for the NYU Game Center. The focus of Games 101 is game literacy – a shared understanding of games as complex cultural and aesthetic objects. The class will incorporate lectures, discussion, readings, and writing assignments, but the primary activity of the class is critical play – playing games in order to better understand and appreciate them. The class will cover games on and off the computer, including classic and contemporary board and card games, sports, and games on the PC, internet, and consoles.

Game Design (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2022)


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14339)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Mon
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Clark, Naomi


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14340)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Jones-Brewster, Jordan


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14342)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Porter, Caroline


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14341)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Boyer, Chapin


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14343)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Jones-Brewster, Jordan


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14344)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Sorensen, Samuel


GAMES-UT 101-000 (14723)
09/01/2022 – 12/14/2022 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Croasdill, D

Entrepreneurship Explored (IMBX-SHU 232)

The main aim of this course is to probe into the core rationale behind entrepreneurship: taking initiatives to make changes. Lecturing only accounts for less than one-third of the course, and students are expected to exhibit a high level of self-motivation to critically examine established and emerging ideas that have been shaping and transforming the concept and practices of entrepreneurship, as exemplified in specific cases and current practices. Students will thus be prompted to think critically and creatively about how to respond to the complexities of changes. The course lays emphasis on creativity, ethics, and future-oriented vision. Prerequisite: None

Interactive Media and Business (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


IMBX-SHU 232-000 (18584)
08/31/2020 – 12/11/2020 Wed
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Shanghai
Instructed by

Environmental Psychology (PS-UY 2324W)

This course looks at how people interact with their environments: how settings affect behavior; how people change environments to fit their needs; and how people can become an active part of the environmental-design process. The course discusses how people use space and the way environmental design meets (or fails to meet) human needs. These concerns are valid for very-small-scale design problems (as in human-factors engineering); mid-size spaces (architecture and interior design); large-scale spaces (communities, urban areas). | Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements . Co-requisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS elective.

Psychology (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2020)


PS-UY 2324W-000 (20484)
09/02/2020 – 12/13/2020 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

Fundamentals of Electronics I (ECE-UY 3114)

This course focuses on circuit models and amplifier frequency response, op-amps, difference amplifier, voltage-to-current converter, slew rate, full-power bandwidth, common-mode rejection, frequency response of closed-loop amplifier, gain-bandwidth product rule, diodes, limiters, clamps and semiconductor physics. Other topics include Bipolar Junction Transistors; small-signal models, cut-off, saturation and active regions; common emitter, common base and emitter-follower amplifier configurations; Field-Effect Transistors (MOSFET and JFET); biasing; small-signal models; common-source and common gate amplifiers; and integrated circuit MOS amplifiers. The alternate-week laboratory experiments on OP-AMP applications, BJT biasing, large signal operation and FET characteristics. The course studies design and analysis of operational amplifiers; small-signal bipolar junction transistor and field-effect transistor amplifiers; diode circuits; differential pair amplifiers and semiconductor device- physics fundamentals. | Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: EE-UY 2024 or EE-UY 2004 (C- or better) and PH-UY 2023 | Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 214 and SCIEN-AD 110. | Prerequisites for Shanghai Students: EENG-SHU 251 (C- or better) and PHYS-SHU 93 or CCSC-SHU 51. ABET competencies a, b, c, e, k.

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


ECE-UY 3114-000 (11561)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3114-000 (11562)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3114-000 (11563)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 3114-000 (11564)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon,Wed
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by

INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING (ECE-UY 1002)

This course introduces numerous subject areas in Electrical and Computer Engineering (power systems, electronics, computer networking, microprocessors, digital logic, embedded systems, communications, feedback control, and signal processing). Through a series of case studies and examples, the course demonstrates how each subject area applies to practical, real-world systems and devices and discusses how the areas interact with each other to implement a complete functioning system or device. Students make presentations in teams on case studies based on articles from the IEEE Spectrum Magazine and other sources. The IEEE Code of Ethics and ethics-related issues are discussed. | ABET criteria: i, h. | Prerequisites: First-year standing

Elect. Engineering – ECE UGRD (Undergraduate)
2 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2024)


ECE-UY 1002-000 (17982)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Mon
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


ECE-UY 1002-000 (17983)
01/22/2024 – 05/06/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Rappaport, Theodore (Ted) S.

DIGITAL LOGIC AND STATE MACHINE DESIGN (CS-UY 2204)

This course covers combinational and sequential digital circuits. Topics: Introduction to digital systems. Number systems and binary arithmetic. Switching algebra and logic design. Error detection and correction. Combinational integrated circuits, including adders. Timing hazards. Sequential circuits, flipflops, state diagrams and synchronous machine synthesis. Programmable Logic Devices, PLA, PAL and FPGA. Finite-state machine design. Memory elements. A grade of C or better is required of undergraduate computer-engineering majors. | Prerequisite for Brooklyn Students: CS-UY 1114 (C- or better) or CS-UY 1133 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-UH 1001 (C- or better) or ENGR-UH 1000 (C- or better) | Prerequisite for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 101 (C- or better)

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 2204-000 (11540)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


CS-UY 2204-000 (11541)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


CS-UY 2204-000 (11542)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


CS-UY 2204-000 (11543)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by


CS-UY 2204-000 (11544)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Tue,Thu
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Reagen, Brandon

Application Security (CS-UY 4753)

This course addresses the design and implementation of secure applications. Concentration is on writing software programs that make it difficult for intruders to exploit security holes. The course emphasizes writing secure distributed programs in Java. The security ramifications of class, field and method visibility are emphasized. | Prerequisite: CS-UY 3923

Computer Science (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CS-UY 4753-000 (16115)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Satt, Mo

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I (CM-UY 2211)

This Laboratory course teaches students how to prepare, isolate and purify typical organic compounds. Experiments illustrate basic techniques. Lab fee required. | Co/prerequisite CM-UY 2213.

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
1 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


CM-UY 2211-000 (11441)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
1:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hagver, Rena


CM-UY 2211-000 (11442)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hagver, Rena


CM-UY 2211-000 (11443)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
1:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mishiyev, Robert


CM-UY 2211-000 (11444)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mishiyev, Robert


CM-UY 2211-000 (11445)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hagver, Rena


CM-UY 2211-000 (11446)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hagver, Rena

Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory (BMS-UY 1001)

This laboratory accompanies the lecture course BMS-UY 1003 Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology. This laboratory course is required for BMS and CBE majors taking BMS-UY 1003, but is optional for other majors. | Co-requisite: BMS-UY 1003

Biomolecular Science (Undergraduate)
1 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


BMS-UY 1001-000 (11488)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Mon
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paratore, Anthony


BMS-UY 1001-000 (11489)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paratore, Anthony


BMS-UY 1001-000 (11490)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Paratore, Anthony


BMS-UY 1001-000 (11491)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Zairong


BMS-UY 1001-000 (11492)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Fri
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Li, Zairong

General Chemistry for Engineers (CM-UY 1004)

This is a one-semester introductory course in general chemistry. It covers chemical equations, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, gases, atomic and molecular structure, periodic table, chemical bonding, states of matter, chemical equilibrium, organic, inorganic and polymeric materials and electrochemistry. | Corequisite: EX-UY 1

Chemistry (Undergraduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


CM-UY 1004-000 (16847)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chigirinskaya, Lyubov


CM-UY 1004-000 (16848)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chigirinskaya, Lyubov


CM-UY 1004-000 (16849)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Roy, Debasish


CM-UY 1004-000 (16850)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Roy, Debasish


CM-UY 1004-000 (16851)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chigirinskaya, Lyubov


CM-UY 1004-000 (16852)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chigirinskaya, Lyubov


CM-UY 1004-000 (16968)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Late afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnick, Suzanne


CM-UY 1004-000 (16969)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnick, Suzanne


CM-UY 1004-000 (24919)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon
10:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mishiyev, Robert


CM-UY 1004-000 (24918)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Mon
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Mishiyev, Robert


CM-UY 1004-000 (16853)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Tue,Thu
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Hagver, Rena


CM-UY 1004-000 (16854)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Thu
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pollack, Myron


CM-UY 1004-000 (16855)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Thu
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Pollack, Myron


CM-UY 1004-000 (16856)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chigirinskaya, Lyubov


CM-UY 1004-000 (16857)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Chigirinskaya, Lyubov


CM-UY 1004-000 (20330)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnick, Suzanne


CM-UY 1004-000 (20331)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
11:00 AM – 12:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnick, Suzanne


CM-UY 1004-000 (17125)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnick, Suzanne


CM-UY 1004-000 (17124)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
6:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Evening)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Charnick, Suzanne


CM-UY 1004-000 (16858)

Drawing & Design for Animation (FMTV-UT 1313)

This course offers students an opportunity to increase their technical proficiency and, more importantly, develop stylistic and creative channels for dealing with common drawing problems. In animation, drawing is not simply seeing. It is thinking and, when successful, doing so on a deep level. The class includes one, two and three point perspective, figure drawing, character rotations, drawing exercises related to fine artists (Picasso, Matisse, Giacometti, etc.), use of tones, continuity sketches, layouts, animatics.

Undergrad Film & TV (Undergraduate)
3 credits – 14 Weeks

Sections (Fall 2024)


FMTV-UT 1313-000 (19514)
09/03/2024 – 12/12/2024 Wed
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Washington Square
Instructed by Lennert, Dean

Pro Capture (ITPG-GT 2065)

This advanced experiential production course will introduce students to the latest techniques for stereoscopic 360 video, manual 360 video stitching and depth map creation, camera-paired Depthkit volumetric video, and mixed-format photogrammetry. Techniques introduced in the class will presume some working knowledge of more basic forms of these capture methods as well as how to integrate them into Unity. Alongside an intense technical focus, the course will also deconstruct recent groundbreaking experiential works that utilize similar experimental production designs. The format of each class will combine lectures and workshops with the ultimate goal of introducing students to the expectations demanded by professional productions. All of the techniques introduced are being employed by top experiential creators and creative studios. The course will try to show viable paths for students to engage with immersive media pipelines, at an expert level, with an expanded sense of possibility and inspiration. Topics heavily examined throughout the course include: surveillance, race, socioeconomics, carceral capitalism and technoscience, algorithmic bias and oppression, and post-work societal structures.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
2 credits – 5 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2065-000 (23513)
03/25/2020 – 04/29/2020 Wed
12:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Niederhauser, Matthew

Tangible Interaction & Device Design (ITPG-GT 2061)

Tangible interfaces are interfaces that you touch. You control them with your hands, feet, and other body parts. Their shape, feel, and arrangement provide feedback. This is where interaction design meets industrial design. In this class, you’ll design, program, and build devices with tangible controls in order to better understand how humans understand and control technical systems through our sense of touch. We’ll discuss physical interaction concepts such as expressive interfaces and utilitarian ones, real-time control vs. delayed control, and implicit vs. explicit interactions. You’ll learn programming and electronic techniques to sense state change, thresholds, peaks, and other signs of user action. You’ll also learn how to design, shop for, and construct housings for the devices you build. On the electronics side, the primary tools will be the microcontroller and common tangible controls: pushbuttons, switches, rotary encoders, rotary and slide potentiometers, force sensors and touch sensors. The class will also cover on-device feedback through LEDs, speakers, and force-feedback actuators. On the fabrication side, you’ll work with the tools of the shop and XXX CAD program. You’ll design and build four projects in the course of the semester. Projects will be designed (and parts specified). Projects will build on the skills learned in Intro to Physical Computing and Intro to Fabrication. Prerequisites: Intro to Physical Computing and Intro to Computational Media, or a working knowledge of microcontroller programming in Arduino; Intro to Fabrication or basic knowledge of laser cutter.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2061-000 (23076)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (Morning)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Igoe, Thomas · Light, Benjamin

Material of Language (ITPG-GT 2051)

Language is more than just words and meanings: it’s paper and ink, pixels and screens, fingertips on keyboards, voices speaking out loud. Language is, in a word, material. In this course, students will gain an understanding of how the material of language is represented digitally, and learn computational techniques for manipulating this material in order to create speculative technologies that challenge conventional reading and writing practices. Topics include asemic writing, concrete poetry, markup languages, keyboard layouts, interactive and generative typography, printing technologies and bots (alongside other forms of radical publishing). Students will complete a series of weekly readings and production-oriented assignments leading up to a final project. In addition to critique, sessions will feature lectures, class discussions and technical tutorials. Prerequisites: Introduction to Computational Media or equivalent programming experience.

Interactive Telecommunications (Graduate)
4 credits – 15 Weeks

Sections (Spring 2020)


ITPG-GT 2051-000 (22895)
01/27/2020 – 05/11/2020 Wed
12:00 AM – 2:00 PM (Early afternoon)
at Brooklyn Campus
Instructed by Parrish, Allison

Resist! Intro to Technology Political Activism [A Product Design Perspective] (ITPG-GT 2483)

This class will apply a product and service design lens to the rapidly evolving role of technology in politics, government services, and human rights, with a dual focus on the use of technology to advance the public good, and the threats that technology can pose to various aspects of civil society. On the one hand, there has been an explosion of technology tools that aim to promote healthy and peaceful democracies, provide more efficient government services, and promote human rights. This course will survey those efforts and the product design methodologies that guide them. On the other hand, 2018 has been a reckoning year for technology all over the world. The post-mortem of the 2016 US Presidential election shined a light on technology’s role in a promulgating a deeply polarized electorate, enabling election-meddling from foreign actors, and profiligating fake news, while also raising deep concerns about data privacy and security for everyday citizens. Meanwhile, new technologies like AI and Blockchain are poised to have deeply transformative effects on multiple aspects of society – from policing to education to financial services. This course will also explore the risks various technologies can pose to privacy, safety, liberty, and well-being. The course will feature guest speakers from leading practitioners in the space. Potentially including the ACLU, Higher Ground Labs, Elucd (YC17), NYU Better Policing Initiat